A genus of gram-positive bacteria in the family CARNOBACTERIACEAE. They are tolerant to freezing/thawing and high pressure and able to grow at low temperatures.
A gram-positive, non-spore-forming group of bacteria comprising organisms that have morphological and physiological characteristics in common.
A family of gram-positive bacteria found regularly in the mouth and intestinal tract of man and other animals, in food and dairy products, and in fermenting vegetable juices. A few species are highly pathogenic.
Substances elaborated by specific strains of bacteria that are lethal against other strains of the same or related species. They are protein or lipopolysaccharide-protein complexes used in taxonomy studies of bacteria.
Containers, packaging, and packaging materials for processed and raw foods and beverages. It includes packaging intended to be used for storage and also used for preparation of foods such as microwave food containers versus COOKING AND EATING UTENSILS. Packaging materials may be intended for food contact or designated non-contact, for example, shipping containers. FOOD LABELING is also available.
The mechanical process of cooling.
Keeping food for later consumption.
Bacteria which retain the crystal violet stain when treated by Gram's method.
A space in which the pressure is far below atmospheric pressure so that the remaining gases do not affect processes being carried on in the space.
A genus of bacteria which may be found in the feces of animals and man, on vegetation, and in silage. Its species are parasitic on cold-blooded and warm-blooded animals, including man.
Constituent of 30S subunit prokaryotic ribosomes containing 1600 nucleotides and 21 proteins. 16S rRNA is involved in initiation of polypeptide synthesis.
A genus of gram-positive, microaerophilic, rod-shaped bacteria occurring widely in nature. Its species are also part of the many normal flora of the mouth, intestinal tract, and vagina of many mammals, including humans. Pathogenicity from this genus is rare.
The intergenic DNA segments that are between the ribosomal RNA genes (internal transcribed spacers) and between the tandemly repeated units of rDNA (external transcribed spacers and nontranscribed spacers).
Various fish of the family SALMONIDAE, usually smaller than salmon. They are mostly restricted to cool clear freshwater. Some are anadromous. They are highly regarded for their handsome colors, rich well-flavored flesh, and gameness as an angling fish. The genera Salvelinus, Salmo, and ONCORHYNCHUS have been introduced virtually throughout the world.
DNA sequences encoding RIBOSOMAL RNA and the segments of DNA separating the individual ribosomal RNA genes, referred to as RIBOSOMAL SPACER DNA.
The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in food and food products. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms: the presence of various non-pathogenic bacteria and fungi in cheeses and wines, for example, is included in this concept.
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.
The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.

Carnobacterium jeotgali sp. nov., isolated from a Korean traditional fermented food. (1/8)

 (+info)

Isolation of Carnobacterium sp. from a human blood culture. (2/8)

 (+info)

Biphasic toxicodynamic features of some antimicrobial agents on microbial growth: a dynamic mathematical model and its implications on hormesis. (3/8)

 (+info)

Complete genome sequence of Carnobacterium sp. 17-4. (4/8)

 (+info)

Spoilage-related activity of Carnobacterium maltaromaticum strains in air-stored and vacuum-packed meat. (5/8)

 (+info)

Meningoencephalitis associated with Carnobacterium maltaromaticum-like bacteria in stranded juvenile salmon sharks (Lamna ditropis). (6/8)

 (+info)

Growth of Carnobacterium spp. from permafrost under low pressure, temperature, and anoxic atmosphere has implications for Earth microbes on Mars. (7/8)

 (+info)

Antimicrobial activity of a neem cake extract in a broth model meat system. (8/8)

 (+info)

Carnobacterium is a genus of Gram-positive, facultatively anaerobic bacteria that are commonly found in various environments such as water, soil, and decaying vegetation. Some species of Carnobacterium have been isolated from foods like fish, meat, and dairy products. These bacteria are non-pathogenic and generally considered to be harmless to humans. However, some species can cause spoilage of refrigerated foods due to their ability to grow at low temperatures.

The name "Carnobacterium" comes from the Latin word "carnis," which means meat, reflecting its association with meat products. The bacteria are typically rod-shaped and may form pairs or short chains. They produce lactic acid as a metabolic end product, which contributes to their ability to grow in foods with low pH levels.

While Carnobacterium species are not typically associated with human diseases, they have been studied for their potential probiotic properties. Some strains of Carnobacterium have been shown to inhibit the growth of pathogenic bacteria and may have beneficial effects on fish health. However, more research is needed to fully understand the potential benefits and risks of using these bacteria as probiotics in humans.

"Gram-positive asporegenous rods" is a term used to describe a specific shape and staining characteristic of certain types of bacteria. Here's the medical definition:

Gram-positive: These are bacteria that appear purple or violet when subjected to a Gram stain, a laboratory technique used to classify bacteria based on their cell wall structure. In this method, a primary stain (crystal violet) is applied, followed by a mordant (a substance that helps the dye bind to the bacterial cell). Then, a decolorizer (alcohol or acetone) is used to wash away the primary stain from the Gram-negative bacteria, leaving them unstained. A counterstain (safranin or fuchsin) is then applied, which stains the decolorized Gram-negative bacteria pink or red. However, Gram-positive bacteria retain the primary stain and appear purple or violet.

Asporegenous: These are bacteria that do not form spores under any conditions. Spores are a dormant, tough, and highly resistant form of bacterial cells that can survive extreme environmental conditions. Asporegenous bacteria lack this ability to form spores.

Rods: This term refers to the shape of the bacteria. Rod-shaped bacteria are also known as bacilli. They are longer than they are wide, and their size may vary from 0.5 to several micrometers in length and about 0.2 to 1.0 micrometer in width.

Examples of Gram-positive asporegenous rods include species from the genera Listeria, Corynebacterium, and Bacillus (some strains). These bacteria can cause various diseases, ranging from foodborne illnesses to severe skin and respiratory infections.

Lactobacillaceae is a family of gram-positive, facultatively anaerobic or microaerophilic, rod-shaped bacteria. They are non-spore forming and often occur in pairs or chains. Lactobacillaceae are commonly found in various environments such as the oral cavity, gastrointestinal tract, and vagina of humans and animals, as well as in fermented foods like yogurt, sauerkraut, and sourdough bread.

These bacteria are known for their ability to produce lactic acid as a major end product of carbohydrate metabolism, which gives them the name "lactic acid bacteria." They play an essential role in maintaining a healthy microbiota and have been associated with various health benefits, such as improving digestion, enhancing immune function, and preventing harmful bacterial overgrowth.

Some well-known genera within the family Lactobacillaceae include Lactobacillus, Lactococcus, Leuconostoc, and Weissella. It is important to note that recent taxonomic revisions have led to some changes in the classification of these bacteria, and some genera previously classified within Lactobacillaceae are now placed in other families within the order Lactobacillales.

Bacteriocins are ribosomally synthesized antimicrobial peptides produced by bacteria as a defense mechanism against other competing bacterial strains. They primarily target and inhibit the growth of closely related bacterial species, although some have a broader spectrum of activity. Bacteriocins can be classified into different types based on their structural features, molecular masses, and mechanisms of action.

These antimicrobial peptides often interact with the cell membrane of target bacteria, causing pore formation, depolarization, or disrupting cell wall biosynthesis, ultimately leading to bacterial cell death. Bacteriocins have gained interest in recent years as potential alternatives to conventional antibiotics due to their narrow spectrum of activity and reduced likelihood of inducing resistance. They are being explored for use in food preservation, agricultural applications, and as therapeutic agents in the medical field.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Food Packaging" is not a medical term. It is a term used to describe the process and materials used to package food products to protect them from contamination, damage, and to provide information about the product. Medical definitions are typically related to diseases, conditions, treatments, or anatomical terms. If you have any questions related to medical terminology, I'd be happy to help with those!

In the context of medical definitions, "refrigeration" typically refers to the process of storing or preserving medical supplies, specimens, or pharmaceuticals at controlled low temperatures, usually between 2°C and 8°C (35°F and 46°F). This temperature range is known as the "cold chain" and is critical for maintaining the stability, efficacy, and safety of many medical products.

Refrigeration is used to prevent the growth of bacteria, fungi, and other microorganisms that can cause spoilage or degradation of medical supplies and medications. It also helps to slow down chemical reactions that can lead to the breakdown of active ingredients in pharmaceuticals.

Proper refrigeration practices are essential for healthcare facilities, laboratories, and research institutions to ensure the quality and safety of their medical products and specimens. Regular monitoring and maintenance of refrigeration equipment are necessary to maintain the appropriate temperature range and prevent any deviations that could compromise the integrity of the stored items.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Food Storage" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. It generally refers to the practice of storing food supplies, often in large quantities and for extended periods of time. While it may have relevance to nutrition and food safety, it's not a term used within medical terminology. If you have any questions related to nutrition, food safety, or any other medical topic, I'd be happy to try to help answer those!

Gram-positive bacteria are a type of bacteria that stain dark purple or blue when subjected to the Gram staining method, which is a common technique used in microbiology to classify and identify different types of bacteria based on their structural differences. This staining method was developed by Hans Christian Gram in 1884.

The key characteristic that distinguishes Gram-positive bacteria from other types, such as Gram-negative bacteria, is the presence of a thick layer of peptidoglycan in their cell walls, which retains the crystal violet stain used in the Gram staining process. Additionally, Gram-positive bacteria lack an outer membrane found in Gram-negative bacteria.

Examples of Gram-positive bacteria include Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes, and Bacillus subtilis. Some Gram-positive bacteria can cause various human diseases, while others are beneficial or harmless.

In the context of medical terminology, "vacuum" is not typically used as a standalone term with a specific medical definition. However, it can be used in certain medical procedures or conditions in relation to creating a partial vacuum or absence of pressure. For example:

1. In surgical procedures, such as a vacuum-assisted closure, a vacuum is applied to help promote wound healing by removing fluids and infectious materials from the wound site.
2. In some cases, a therapeutic vacuum may be used to treat soft tissue injuries or conditions like lymphedema, where controlled negative pressure is applied to improve circulation, reduce swelling, and promote healing.
3. A rare medical condition called "spontaneous intracranial hypotension" can occur when there is a leak in the dura mater (the protective membrane surrounding the brain and spinal cord), causing cerebrospinal fluid to escape and creating a negative pressure or vacuum-like effect within the skull, which may result in headaches, neck pain, or other neurological symptoms.

In general, "vacuum" is not a commonly used medical term with a specific definition but can be found in relation to certain procedures or conditions where a partial vacuum or absence of pressure is involved.

"Listeria" is actually the name of a genus of bacteria, but when people use the term in a medical context, they're usually referring to a foodborne illness called listeriosis, which is caused by ingesting certain species of this bacterium, most commonly Listeria monocytogenes. This infection can cause serious complications, particularly for pregnant women, newborns, older adults, and people with weakened immune systems. It's often associated with unpasteurized dairy products, raw fruits and vegetables, and prepared foods that have been contaminated after cooking.

Ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is a type of RNA that combines with proteins to form ribosomes, which are complex structures inside cells where protein synthesis occurs. The "16S" refers to the sedimentation coefficient of the rRNA molecule, which is a measure of its size and shape. In particular, 16S rRNA is a component of the smaller subunit of the prokaryotic ribosome (found in bacteria and archaea), and is often used as a molecular marker for identifying and classifying these organisms due to its relative stability and conservation among species. The sequence of 16S rRNA can be compared across different species to determine their evolutionary relationships and taxonomic positions.

Lactobacillus is a genus of gram-positive, rod-shaped, facultatively anaerobic or microaerophilic, non-spore-forming bacteria. They are part of the normal flora found in the intestinal, urinary, and genital tracts of humans and other animals. Lactobacilli are also commonly found in some fermented foods, such as yogurt, sauerkraut, and sourdough bread.

Lactobacilli are known for their ability to produce lactic acid through the fermentation of sugars, which contributes to their role in maintaining a healthy microbiota and lowering the pH in various environments. Some species of Lactobacillus have been shown to provide health benefits, such as improving digestion, enhancing immune function, and preventing infections, particularly in the urogenital and intestinal tracts. They are often used as probiotics, either in food or supplement form, to promote a balanced microbiome and support overall health.

The ribosomal spacer in DNA refers to the non-coding sequences of DNA that are located between the genes for ribosomal RNA (rRNA). These spacer regions are present in the DNA of organisms that have a nuclear genome, including humans and other animals, plants, and fungi.

In prokaryotic cells, such as bacteria, there are two ribosomal RNA genes, 16S and 23S, separated by a spacer region known as the intergenic spacer (IGS). In eukaryotic cells, there are multiple copies of ribosomal RNA genes arranged in clusters called nucleolar organizer regions (NORs), which are located on the short arms of several acrocentric chromosomes. Each cluster contains hundreds to thousands of copies of the 18S, 5.8S, and 28S rRNA genes, separated by non-transcribed spacer regions known as internal transcribed spacers (ITS) and external transcribed spacers (ETS).

The ribosomal spacer regions in DNA are often used as molecular markers for studying evolutionary relationships among organisms because they evolve more rapidly than the rRNA genes themselves. The sequences of these spacer regions can be compared among different species to infer their phylogenetic relationships and to estimate the time since they diverged from a common ancestor. Additionally, the length and composition of ribosomal spacers can vary between individuals within a species, making them useful for studying genetic diversity and population structure.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "trout" is not a term typically used in medical definitions. Trout is a common name that refers to several species of freshwater fish belonging to the salmonid family. If you have any questions related to medical terminology or health concerns, I would be happy to try and help answer those for you.

Ribosomal DNA (rDNA) refers to the specific regions of DNA in a cell that contain the genes for ribosomal RNA (rRNA). Ribosomes are complex structures composed of proteins and rRNA, which play a crucial role in protein synthesis by translating messenger RNA (mRNA) into proteins.

In humans, there are four types of rRNA molecules: 18S, 5.8S, 28S, and 5S. These rRNAs are encoded by multiple copies of rDNA genes that are organized in clusters on specific chromosomes. In humans, the majority of rDNA genes are located on the short arms of acrocentric chromosomes 13, 14, 15, 21, and 22.

Each cluster of rDNA genes contains both transcribed and non-transcribed spacer regions. The transcribed regions contain the genes for the four types of rRNA, while the non-transcribed spacers contain regulatory elements that control the transcription of the rRNA genes.

The number of rDNA copies varies between species and even within individuals of the same species. The copy number can also change during development and in response to environmental factors. Variations in rDNA copy number have been associated with various diseases, including cancer and neurological disorders.

Food microbiology is the study of the microorganisms that are present in food, including bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites. This field examines how these microbes interact with food, how they affect its safety and quality, and how they can be controlled during food production, processing, storage, and preparation. Food microbiology also involves the development of methods for detecting and identifying pathogenic microorganisms in food, as well as studying the mechanisms of foodborne illnesses and developing strategies to prevent them. Additionally, it includes research on the beneficial microbes found in certain fermented foods and their potential applications in improving food quality and safety.

Molecular sequence data refers to the specific arrangement of molecules, most commonly nucleotides in DNA or RNA, or amino acids in proteins, that make up a biological macromolecule. This data is generated through laboratory techniques such as sequencing, and provides information about the exact order of the constituent molecules. This data is crucial in various fields of biology, including genetics, evolution, and molecular biology, allowing for comparisons between different organisms, identification of genetic variations, and studies of gene function and regulation.

Bacterial DNA refers to the genetic material found in bacteria. It is composed of a double-stranded helix containing four nucleotide bases - adenine (A), thymine (T), guanine (G), and cytosine (C) - that are linked together by phosphodiester bonds. The sequence of these bases in the DNA molecule carries the genetic information necessary for the growth, development, and reproduction of bacteria.

Bacterial DNA is circular in most bacterial species, although some have linear chromosomes. In addition to the main chromosome, many bacteria also contain small circular pieces of DNA called plasmids that can carry additional genes and provide resistance to antibiotics or other environmental stressors.

Unlike eukaryotic cells, which have their DNA enclosed within a nucleus, bacterial DNA is present in the cytoplasm of the cell, where it is in direct contact with the cell's metabolic machinery. This allows for rapid gene expression and regulation in response to changing environmental conditions.

Phylogeny is the evolutionary history and relationship among biological entities, such as species or genes, based on their shared characteristics. In other words, it refers to the branching pattern of evolution that shows how various organisms have descended from a common ancestor over time. Phylogenetic analysis involves constructing a tree-like diagram called a phylogenetic tree, which depicts the inferred evolutionary relationships among organisms or genes based on molecular sequence data or other types of characters. This information is crucial for understanding the diversity and distribution of life on Earth, as well as for studying the emergence and spread of diseases.

... sp. has also been found in the gut of stingless carrion-eating vulture bees, besides other acidophilic (acid- ... Carnobacterium is a genus of Gram-positive bacteria within the family Carnobacteriaceae. C. divergens and C. maltaromaticum are ... A species of Carnobacterium, C. maltaromaticum strain CB1, has been evaluated under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, ... "Genus: Carnobacterium". LPSN.DSMZ.de. Leisner, JJ; Laursen, BG; Prévost, H; Drider, D; Dalgaard, P (September 2007). " ...
"Species: Carnobacterium pleistocenium". LPSN.DSMZ.de. Pikuta, E. V. (1 January 2005). "Carnobacterium pleistocenium sp. nov., a ... Carnobacterium pleistocenium is a recently discovered bacterium from the arctic part of Alaska. It was found in permafrost, ... Type strain of Carnobacterium pleistocenium at BacDive - the Bacterial Diversity Metadatabase v t e (Articles with short ...
None of the bacteria in carnobacterium genus are known to be pathogenic in humans, although some are known for spoiling chilled ... By 2005, scientists revisiting that tunnel have discovered frozen cells of carnobacterium pleistocenium, with an estimated age ... Leisner, JJ; Laursen, BG; Prévost, H; Drider, D; Dalgaard, P (September 2007). "Carnobacterium: positive and negative effects ... Pikuta, E. V. (1 January 2005). "Carnobacterium pleistocenium sp. nov., a novel psychrotolerant, facultative anaerobe isolated ...
Pikuta, E. V.; Marsic, D; Bej, A; Tang, J; Krader, P; Hoover, RB (2005). "Carnobacterium pleistocenium sp. nov., a novel ... and Carnobacterium pleistocenium that survived for 32,000 years in a frozen Alaskan pond. Hoover co-directed the NATO Advanced ... and the living pleistocene bacterium Carnobacterium pleistocenium isolated from the 32,000-year-old permafrost from Fox Tunnel ...
Carnobacterium piscicola carnobacteriocin B2. Lactobacillus sakei sakacin P. Enterococcus faecium enterocin A. Enterococcus ...
Nicholson, Wayne L.; Krivushin, Kirill; Gilichinsky, u; Schuerger, Andrew C. (24 December 2012). "Growth of Carnobacterium spp ...
Leisner, J.J.; B.G. Laursen; H. Prévost; D. Drider; P. Dalgaard (2007). "Carnobacterium: positive and negative effects in the ...
nov., a Carnobacterium-like organism isolated from the intestine of a badger". International Journal of Systematic and ...
Carnobacterium pleistocenium Chryseobacterium greenlandensis Coglan A. "'Resurrection bug' revived after 120,000 years - life ...
"16S rRNA Sequence Determination for Members of the Genus Carnobacterium and Related Lactic Acid Bacteria and Description of ...
Three species of bacteria, Carnobacterium pleistocenium, as well as Chryseobacterium greenlandensis and Herminiimonas glaciei, ...
Carnobacterium, Brochothrix, Listeria and Yersinia. Halotolerant bacteria can survive high salt concentrations greater than 10 ...
Carnobacterium, Weissella, Oenococcus, and Leuconostoc. The Pediococcus species P. dextrinicus has been reclassified as a ...
And some of the Carnobacterium species isolated from permafrosts have the ability to survive under the conditions of the low ...
Most plants, in particular, can safely reach temperatures of −4 °C to −12 °C. Three species of bacteria, Carnobacterium ...
Abiotrophia Aerococcus Carnobacterium Enterococcus Lactobacillus Lactococcus Leuconostoc Oenococcus Pediococcus Streptococcus ... Carnobacterium, Enterococcus, Oenococcus, Sporolactobacillus, Tetragenococcus, Vagococcus, and Weissella. All but ...
Carnobacterium sp. has also been found in the gut of stingless carrion-eating vulture bees, besides other acidophilic (acid- ... Carnobacterium is a genus of Gram-positive bacteria within the family Carnobacteriaceae. C. divergens and C. maltaromaticum are ... A species of Carnobacterium, C. maltaromaticum strain CB1, has been evaluated under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, ... "Genus: Carnobacterium". LPSN.DSMZ.de. Leisner, JJ; Laursen, BG; Prévost, H; Drider, D; Dalgaard, P (September 2007). " ...
Hoenigl M, Grisold AJ, Valentin T, Leitner E, Zarfel G, Renner H, Isolation of Carnobacterium sp. from a human blood culture. J ... Afzal MI, Jacquet T, Delaunay S, Borges F, Millière JB, Revol-Junelles AM, Carnobacterium maltaromaticum: identification, ... Carnobacterium: positive and negative effects in the environment and in foods. FEMS Microbiol Rev. 2007;31:592-613. DOIPubMed ... Isolation of Carnobacterium piscicola from human pus-case report. Folia Microbiol (Praha). 2002;47:455-7. DOIPubMedGoogle ...
Carnobacterium maltaromaticum. CB1; 8. Log. 10. CFU/kg of feed). Overall, meat quality was not affected substantially by the ... Application of Carnobacterium maltaromaticum as a feed additive for weaned rabbits to improve meat microbial quality and safety ...
We report the complete genome sequence of Carnobacterium gilichinskyi strain WN1359, previously isolated from Siberian ... Complete genome sequence of Carnobacterium gilichinskyi strain WN1359T (DSM 27470T). Authors: Leonard, Michael T and Panayotova ... We report the complete genome sequence of Carnobacterium gilichinskyi strain WN1359, previously isolated from Siberian ...
Characterization of Carnobacterium divergens strain 6251 isolated from intestine of arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus l.). ... Characterization of Carnobacterium divergens strain 6251 isolated from intestine of arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus l.). ... Characterization of Carnobacterium divergens strain 6251 isolated from intestine of arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus l.) ... An atypical strain of Carnobacterium divergens, strain 6251, was isolated from the small intestine of Arctic charr (Salvelinus ...
A selection process based on the robustness of anti-Listeria monocytogenes activity reveals two strains of Carnobacterium ... A selection process based on the robustness of anti-Listeria monocytogenes activity reveals two strains of Carnobacterium ... A selection process based on the robustness of anti-Listeria monocytogenes activity reveals two strains of Carnobacterium ...
c) in the case of vacuum-packed sliced cooked turkey, Carnobacterium maltaromaticum CB1. ... f) in the case of vacuum-packed sliced cooked turkey, Carnobacterium maltaromaticum CB1. ...
Carnobacterium maltaromaticum boosts intestinal vitamin D production to suppress colorectal cancer in female mice. Li Q, Chan H ...
Identification of Carnobacterium, Lactobacillus, Leuconostoc and Pediococcus by rDNA-based techniques 2003 Departamento de ... Profiles obtained by ISR amplification allowed identification at genus level of Carnobacterium and Leuconostoc, and even at ... They have been applied for the molecular characterization of 91 strains with the following identities: eight Carnobacterium ... ISR restriction and ARDRA have been evaluated as molecular tools for identifying Carnobacterium, Lactobacillus, Leuconostoc and ...
Displaying similar symptoms, the previous sharks were determined to have died from the meningitis-causing Carnobacterium. But ...
Carnobacterium divergens 9P. Carnobacterium maltaromaticum. Chondromyces crocatus Cm c2. Citrobacter freundii ATCC 33128. ...
Functional characterization of the alanine-serine-cysteine exchanger of Carnobacterium sp AT7 ...
Carnobacterium divergens 9P. Cellulomonas uda. Chromobacterium violaceum CV0. Clostridium difficile. Collimonas pratensis Ter91 ...
and Carnobacterium sp. These two bacteria plus two Listeria monocytogenes isolated for sliced ham were subjected to testing of ... e Carnobacterium sp. Além delas, mais 2 Listeria monocytogenes isoladas nesse trabalho foram submetidas ao teste de produção de ...
Carnobacterium, Streptococcus, and Geobacillus. ...
d) in the case of vacuum-packed sliced roast beef and vacuum-packed sliced cooked ham, Carnobacterium maltaromaticum CB1. ...
LALCULT Protect LC1 is composed of an exclusive strain of Carnobacterium maltaromaticum patented by the university. The strain ... of Lorraine in France in 2021 highlights the particularly effective protective role of two new strains of Carnobacterium ...
When the scientists thawed the ice under a microscope the newly-identified organisms, bacteria christened Carnobacterium ... When the scientists thawed the ice under a microscope the newly-identified organisms, bacteria christened Carnobacterium ...
... and Carnobacterium. The results of this study demonstrate that the luminal and mucosal bacterial communities may be different ...
Carnobacterium divergens - B5, Propionibacterium thoenii - B6, Clostridium butyricum - B7) and 12 prebiotics, differing in ...
Carnobacterium iners sp nov., a psychrophilic, lactic acid-producing bacterium from the littoral zone of an Antarctic pond. ...
They found enrichments of several bacterial taxa (e.g., Arthrobacter sp., Paenibacillus sp., and Carnobacterium sp.) in samples ...
Bacterial diseases such as Yersinia, Carnobacterium, Aeromonas are a serious problem for many fisheries, killing tens of ...
... regulatory system involved in quorum sensing-based regulation of peptide antibiotic production in Carnobacterium maltaromaticum ...
Carnobacterium spp., Tetragenococcus halophilus, Clostridiisalibacter spp. and Porphyromonadaceae. Psychrobacter celer, ...
Carnobacterium jeotgali Kim et al. 2009, sp. nov. (Part 12) Castellaniella ginsengisoli Kim et al. 2009, sp. nov. (Part 9) ...
Carnobacterium divergensV41, Pediococcus acidilactici ASG16, and Lactiplantibacillus plantarum ISCAR-07436, for future research ...
Carnobacterium divergensV41, Pediococcus acidilactici ASG16, anti Lactiplantibacillus plantarum ISCAR-07436, for future ...
Arthrobacter sp., Carnobacterium sp., Staphylococcus sp. and Brevibacterium linens, as bacteria, and Debaryomyces hansenii, as ...
  • A species of Carnobacterium, C. maltaromaticum strain CB1, has been evaluated under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, as a food additive for vacuum- or modified atmosphere-packaged ready-to-eat meat and fresh comminuted, processed meat. (wikipedia.org)
  • c) in the case of vacuum-packed sliced cooked turkey, Carnobacterium maltaromaticum CB1. (gc.ca)
  • Carnobacterium maltaromaticum boosts intestinal vitamin D production to suppress colorectal cancer in female mice. (nih.gov)
  • d) in the case of vacuum-packed sliced roast beef and vacuum-packed sliced cooked ham, Carnobacterium maltaromaticum CB1. (gc.ca)
  • A patent filed by the University of Lorraine in France in 2021 highlights the particularly effective protective role of two new strains of Carnobacterium maltaromaticum isolated from raw milk in dairy technologies. (cheesemarketnews.com)
  • LALCULT Protect LC1 is composed of an exclusive strain of Carnobacterium maltaromaticum patented by the university. (cheesemarketnews.com)
  • Characterization of Carnobacterium divergens strain 6251 isolated from intestine of arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus l. (nofima.com)
  • An atypical strain of Carnobacterium divergens, strain 6251, was isolated from the small intestine of Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus L.), fed high dietary carbohydrate. (nofima.com)
  • Sequencing of a 16S rDNA region of 578 nucleotides and AFLPTM microbial fingerprinting suggested that strain 6251 is not closely related to any carnobacteria known, however, DNA-DNA similarity determinations showed high similarity (96.2%) with the type strain of Carnobacterium divergens. (nofima.com)
  • This study offers insights into the effect of bacterial strains on a salmonid host and highlights three strains, Carnobacterium divergens V41, Pediococcus acidilactici ASG16, anti Lactiplantibacillus plantarum ISCAR-07436, for future research into growth promotion of salmonid fish through probiotic supplementation. (matis.is)
  • Between the two groups, the researchers also measured differences in the proportions of certain species, including Enterobacter , Lactococcus , Carnobacterium , Streptococcus , and Geobacillus . (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • The principal bacterial genera recorded in the mucosa wereCetobacterium, Yersinia, Ralstonia, Hafnia and Carnobacterium. (stir.ac.uk)
  • Bacterial diseases such as Yersinia, Carnobacterium, Aeromonas are a serious problem for many fisheries, killing tens of thousands of fish every year. (polygiene.de)
  • Carnobacterium is a genus of Gram-positive bacteria within the family Carnobacteriaceae. (wikipedia.org)
  • Because Carnobacterium and Listeria bacteria are psychrotrophic and share the same ecologic niche, many studies have highlighted the potential use of carnobacteria as a biopreservative ( 1 ). (cdc.gov)
  • When the scientists thawed the ice under a microscope the newly-identified organisms, bacteria christened Carnobacterium pleistocenium , showed signs of life and began swimming around. (thenakedscientists.com)
  • Complete genome sequence of Carnobacterium gilichinskyi strain WN1359T (DSM 27470T). (pacb.com)
  • We report the complete genome sequence of Carnobacterium gilichinskyi strain WN1359, previously isolated from Siberian permafrost and capable of growth under cold (0°C), anoxic, CO2-dominated, low-pressure (0.7-kPa) conditions in a simulation of the Mars atmosphere. (pacb.com)
  • Three reports of isolation of Carnobacterium sp. (cdc.gov)
  • The first report described isolation of Carnobacterium sp. (cdc.gov)
  • Carnobacterium piscicola was first described in 1984. (nih.gov)
  • Isolation and properties of a bacteriocin-producing Carnobacterium piscicola isolated from fish. (nih.gov)
  • Carnobacterium piscicola (Hiu et al. (irmng.org)
  • Bhugaloo-Vial P., Dousset X., Metivier A., Sorokine O., Anglade P., Boyaval P., Marion D., Purification and amino acid sequences of piscicocins V1a and V1b, two class IIa bacteriocins secreted by Carnobacterium piscicola V1 that display significantly different levels of specific inhibitory activity, Appl. (dairy-journal.org)
  • A species of Carnobacterium, C. maltaromaticum strain CB1, has been evaluated under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, as a food additive for vacuum- or modified atmosphere-packaged ready-to-eat meat and fresh comminuted, processed meat. (wikipedia.org)
  • Carnobacterium maltaromaticum is a species of lactic acid bacteria found in dairy, meat, and fish, with technological properties useful in food biopreservation and flavor development. (hal.science)
  • Rachman C, Kabadjova P, Valcheva R, Prevost H, Dousset X. (2004) Identification of Carnobacterium species by restriction fragment length polymorphism of the 16S-23S rRNA gene intergenic spacer region and species-specific PCR. (seafoodplus.org)
  • Carnobacterium is a genus of Gram-positive bacteria within the family Carnobacteriaceae. (wikipedia.org)
  • Carnobacterium are rod-shaped lactic acid bacteria. (kenyon.edu)
  • Carnobacterium are gram-positive rod-shaped lactic acid bacteria. (kenyon.edu)
  • Because Carnobacterium and Listeria bacteria are psychrotrophic and share the same ecologic niche, many studies have highlighted the potential use of carnobacteria as a biopreservative ( 1 ). (cdc.gov)
  • Common bacteria to avoid includes Brochothrix thermosphacta, Lactococcus spp, and Carnobacterium spp. (lemonblossomcleaning.com)
  • 2004). Biodiversity of Listeria monocytogenes sensitivity to bacteriocin-producing Carnobacterium strains and application in sterile cold-smoked salmon. (seafoodplus.org)
  • Duffes F., Corre C., Leroi F., Dousset X., Boyaval P., Inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes by in situ produced and semipurified bacteriocins of Carnobacterium spp. (dairy-journal.org)
  • 12. Structure function relationship of inducer peptide pheromones involved in bacteriocin production in Carnobacterium maltaromaticum and Enterococcus faecium. (nih.gov)
  • 16S rRNA gene sequence showed that A1 was relativey closed to Carnobacterium gallinarum strain DSM4847 and A3was relatively closed to Carnobacterium maltaromaticum strain JCM 1154 with similarity of 84 and 78%, respectively. (microbiologyjournal.org)
  • An improved high-quality draft genome sequence of Carnobacterium inhibens subsp. (escholarship.org)
  • Despite their ubiquity and their involvement in food spoilage, the genus Carnobacterium remains rather sparsely characterized at the genome level. (escholarship.org)
  • The present study determined the genome sequence and annotation of Carnobacterium inhibens K1(T). The genome comprised 2,748,608 bp with a G + C content of 34.85 %, which included 2621 protein-coding genes and 116 RNA genes. (escholarship.org)
  • Carnobacterium inhibens K1(T) is a member of the Carnobacteriaceae family within the class Bacilli. (escholarship.org)
  • The presence of Carnobacterium can be found in seawater as well as dairy, fish, & meat products. (kenyon.edu)
  • On July 20th, the team led by Professor Yu at the Chinese University of Hong Kong published a research paper in "Cancer Cell" titled "Carnobacterium maltaromaticum boosts intestinal vitamin D production to suppress colorectal cancer in female mice. (medicaltrend.org)
  • Oxyl-Pro has been tested to BS EN 1276 as required by the Food Standards Agency for use in food preparation areas. (oxylpro.com)