Carnivora: An order of MAMMALS, usually flesh eaters with appropriate dentition. Suborders include the terrestrial carnivores Fissipedia, and the aquatic carnivores PINNIPEDIA.Carnivory: The consumption of animal flesh.Panthera: Genus in the family FELIDAE comprised of big felines including LIONS; TIGERS; jaguars; and the leopard.Hyaenidae: A family of large terrestrial carnivores possessing long legs, coarse guard hairs and a busy tail. It is comprised of hyenas and aardwolves.Mustelidae: A family of terrestrial carnivores with long, slender bodies, long tails, and anal scent glands. They include badgers, weasels, martens, FERRETS; MINKS; wolverines, polecats, and OTTERS.Foxes: Any of several carnivores in the family CANIDAE, that possess erect ears and long bushy tails and are smaller than WOLVES. They are classified in several genera and found on all continents except Antarctica.Procyonidae: A family of long-tailed terrestrial omnivores including RACCOONS, ringtails, and coatimundis.Canidae: A family of terrestrial carnivores with long snouts and non-retractable claws. Members include COYOTES; DOGS; FOXES; JACKALS; RACCOON DOGS; and WOLVES.Ursidae: The family of carnivorous or omnivorous bears, having massive bodies, coarse heavy fur, relatively short limbs, and almost rudimentary tails.Lynx: A genus in the family FELIDAE comprising felines with long legs, ear tufts, and a short tail.Wolves: Any of several large carnivorous mammals of the family CANIDAE that usually hunt in packs.Felidae: The cat family in the order CARNIVORA comprised of muscular, deep-chested terrestrial carnivores with a highly predatory lifestyle.Acinonyx: A genus of long-legged, swift-moving felines (FELIDAE) from Africa (and formerly Asia) about the size of a small leopard.Predatory Behavior: Instinctual behavior pattern in which food is obtained by killing and consuming other species.Herpestidae: The family of agile, keen-sighted mongooses of Asia and Africa that feed on RODENTS and SNAKES.Lions: Large, chiefly nocturnal mammals of the cat family FELIDAE, species Panthera leo. They are found in Africa and southern Asia.Conservation of Natural Resources: The protection, preservation, restoration, and rational use of all resources in the total environment.Tigers: The species Panthera tigris, a large feline inhabiting Asia. Several subspecies exist including the Siberian tiger and Sumatran tiger.Mephitidae: The family of omnivorous New World skunks, showing typical warning coloration of patterned black and white and able to eject a malodorous secretion when the animal is startled or in danger.Animals, Wild: Animals considered to be wild or feral or not adapted for domestic use. It does not include wild animals in zoos for which ANIMALS, ZOO is available.Human Activities: Activities performed by humans.Namibia: A republic in southern Africa, south of ANGOLA and west of BOTSWANA. Its capital is Windhoek.Puma: A genus in the family FELIDAE comprising one species, Puma concolor. It is a large, long-tailed, feline of uniform color. The names puma, cougar, and mountain lion are used interchangeably for this species. There are more than 20 subspecies.Eupleridae: A family in the suborder Feliformia, order CARNIVORA, comprised of viverrid-like mammals.Ecosystem: A functional system which includes the organisms of a natural community together with their environment. (McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Coyotes: The species Canis latrans in the family CANIDAE, a smaller relative of WOLVES. It is found in the Western hemisphere from Costa Rica to Alaska.Raccoon Dogs: The lone species in the genus Nyctereutes, family CANIDAE. It is found in the woodland zone from southeastern Siberia to Vietnam and on the main islands of Japan.Extinction, Biological: The ceasing of existence of a species or taxonomic groups of organisms.Feline panleukopenia virus: A species of PARVOVIRUS infecting cats with a highly contagious enteric disease. Host range variants include mink enteritis virus, canine parvovirus (PARVOVIRUS, CANINE), and raccoon parvovirus. After infecting their new hosts, many of these viruses have further evolved and are now considered distinct species.Helminthiasis, Animal: Infestation of animals with parasitic worms of the helminth class. The infestation may be experimental or veterinary.Feline Panleukopenia: A highly contagious DNA virus infection of the cat family, characterized by fever, enteritis and bone marrow changes. It is also called feline ataxia, feline agranulocytosis, feline infectious enteritis, cat fever, cat plague, and show fever. It is caused by FELINE PANLEUKOPENIA VIRUS or the closely related MINK ENTERITIS VIRUS or CANINE PARVOVIRUS.Endangered Species: An animal or plant species in danger of extinction. Causes can include human activity, changing climate, or change in predator/prey ratios.Animal Distribution: A process by which animals in various forms and stages of development are physically distributed through time and space.ArtiodactylaPopulation Density: Number of individuals in a population relative to space.Fossils: Remains, impressions, or traces of animals or plants of past geological times which have been preserved in the earth's crust.Felis: Genus in the family FELIDAE comprised of small felines including the domestic cat, Felis catus (CATS) and its ancestor the wild cat, Felis silvestris.WyomingFood Chain: The sequence of transfers of matter and energy from organism to organism in the form of FOOD. Food chains intertwine locally into a food web because most organisms consume more than one type of animal or plant. PLANTS, which convert SOLAR ENERGY to food by PHOTOSYNTHESIS, are the primary food source. In a predator chain, a plant-eating animal is eaten by a larger animal. In a parasite chain, a smaller organism consumes part of a larger host and may itself be parasitized by smaller organisms. In a saprophytic chain, microorganisms live on dead organic matter.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Population Dynamics: The pattern of any process, or the interrelationship of phenomena, which affects growth or change within a population.Animal DiseasesSpecies Specificity: The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.Raccoons: Carnivores of the genus Procyon of the family PROCYONIDAE. Two subgenera and seven species are currently recognized. They range from southern Canada to Panama and are found in several of the Caribbean Islands.Cats: The domestic cat, Felis catus, of the carnivore family FELIDAE, comprising over 30 different breeds. The domestic cat is descended primarily from the wild cat of Africa and extreme southwestern Asia. Though probably present in towns in Palestine as long ago as 7000 years, actual domestication occurred in Egypt about 4000 years ago. (From Walker's Mammals of the World, 6th ed, p801)Parvovirus, Canine: A species of the genus PARVOVIRUS and a host range variant of FELINE PANLEUKOPENIA VIRUS. It causes a highly infectious fulminating ENTERITIS in dogs producing high mortality. It is distinct from CANINE MINUTE VIRUS, a species in the genus BOCAVIRUS. This virus can also infect cats and mink.Mammals: Warm-blooded vertebrate animals belonging to the class Mammalia, including all that possess hair and suckle their young.Biological Evolution: The process of cumulative change over successive generations through which organisms acquire their distinguishing morphological and physiological characteristics.Dogs: The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)Marsupialia: An infraclass of MAMMALS, also called Metatheria, where the young are born at an early stage of development and continue to develop in a pouch (marsupium). In contrast to Eutheria (placentals), marsupials have an incomplete PLACENTA.Distemper: A name for several highly contagious viral diseases of animals, especially canine distemper. In dogs, it is caused by the canine distemper virus (DISTEMPER VIRUS, CANINE). It is characterized by a diphasic fever, leukopenia, gastrointestinal and respiratory inflammation and sometimes, neurologic complications. In cats it is known as FELINE PANLEUKOPENIA.Herbivory: The act of feeding on plants by animals.Distemper Virus, Canine: A species of MORBILLIVIRUS causing distemper in dogs, wolves, foxes, raccoons, and ferrets. Pinnipeds have also been known to contract Canine distemper virus from contact with domestic dogs.Stapedius: A tiny muscle that arises from the posterior wall of the TYMPANIC CAVITY of MIDDLE EAR with its tendon inserted onto the neck of the STAPES. Stapedius pulls the stapes posteriorly and controls its movement.Body Size: The physical measurements of a body.Ferrets: Semidomesticated variety of European polecat much used for hunting RODENTS and/or RABBITS and as a laboratory animal. It is in the subfamily Mustelinae, family MUSTELIDAE.Dinosaurs: General name for two extinct orders of reptiles from the Mesozoic era: Saurischia and Ornithischia.Geography: The science dealing with the earth and its life, especially the description of land, sea, and air and the distribution of plant and animal life, including humanity and human industries with reference to the mutual relations of these elements. (From Webster, 3d ed)North AmericaScandinaviaAfrica, Southern: The geographical area of Africa comprising ANGOLA; BOTSWANA; LESOTHO; MALAWI; MOZAMBIQUE; NAMIBIA; SOUTH AFRICA; SWAZILAND; ZAMBIA; and ZIMBABWE.Chromosome Painting: A technique for visualizing CHROMOSOME ABERRATIONS using fluorescently labeled DNA probes which are hybridized to chromosomal DNA. Multiple fluorochromes may be attached to the probes. Upon hybridization, this produces a multicolored, or painted, effect with a unique color at each site of hybridization. This technique may also be used to identify cross-species homology by labeling probes from one species for hybridization with chromosomes from another species.PrimatesCompetitive Behavior: The direct struggle between individuals for environmental necessities or for a common goal.Mink: Carnivores of genus Mustela of the family MUSTELIDAE. The European mink, which has white upper and lower lips, was widely trapped for commercial purposes and is classified as endangered. The American mink, lacking a white upper lip, is farmed commercially.Sea Lions: A group comprised of several species of aquatic carnivores in different genera, in the family Otariidae. In comparison to FUR SEALS, they have shorter, less dense hair.Livestock: Domesticated farm animals raised for home use or profit but excluding POULTRY. Typically livestock includes CATTLE; SHEEP; HORSES; SWINE; GOATS; and others.Reptiles: Cold-blooded, air-breathing VERTEBRATES belonging to the class Reptilia, usually covered with external scales or bony plates.Lagomorpha: An order of small mammals comprising two families, Ochotonidae (pikas) and Leporidae (RABBITS and HARES). Head and body length ranges from about 125 mm to 750 mm. Hares and rabbits have a short tail, and the pikas lack a tail. Rabbits are born furless and with both eyes and ears closed. HARES are born fully haired with eyes and ears open. All are vegetarians. (From Nowak, Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p539-41)Parvoviridae Infections: Virus infections caused by the PARVOVIRIDAE.Thoracic Cavity: The region of the thorax that includes the PLEURAL CAVITY and MEDIASTINUM.South AmericaTaste Perception: The process by which the nature and meaning of gustatory stimuli are recognized and interpreted by the brain. The four basic classes of taste perception are salty, sweet, bitter, and sour.Sciuridae: A family of the order Rodentia which contains 49 genera. Some of the more common genera are MARMOTA, which includes the marmot and woodchuck; Sciurus, the gray squirrel, S. carolinensis, and the fox squirrel, S. niger; Tamias, the eastern and western chipmunk; and Tamiasciurus, the red squirrel. The flying squirrels, except the scaly-tailed Anomaluridae, also belong to this family.Biodiversity: The variety of all native living organisms and their various forms and interrelationships.Karyotype: The full set of CHROMOSOMES presented as a systematized array of METAPHASE chromosomes from a photomicrograph of a single CELL NUCLEUS arranged in pairs in descending order of size and according to the position of the CENTROMERE. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Rabies virus: The type species of LYSSAVIRUS causing rabies in humans and other animals. Transmission is mostly by animal bites through saliva. The virus is neurotropic multiplying in neurons and myotubes of vertebrates.Plague: An acute infectious disease caused by YERSINIA PESTIS that affects humans, wild rodents, and their ectoparasites. This condition persists due to its firm entrenchment in sylvatic rodent-flea ecosystems throughout the world. Bubonic plague is the most common form.Paleontology: The study of early forms of life through fossil remains.Disease Reservoirs: Animate or inanimate sources which normally harbor disease-causing organisms and thus serve as potential sources of disease outbreaks. Reservoirs are distinguished from vectors (DISEASE VECTORS) and carriers, which are agents of disease transmission rather than continuing sources of potential disease outbreaks.Body Constitution: The physical characteristics of the body, including the mode of performance of functions, the activity of metabolic processes, the manner and degree of reactions to stimuli, and power of resistance to the attack of pathogenic organisms.Rabies: Acute VIRAL CNS INFECTION affecting mammals, including humans. It is caused by RABIES VIRUS and usually spread by contamination with virus-laden saliva of bites inflicted by rabid animals. Important animal vectors include the dog, cat, bat, fox, raccoon, skunk, and wolf.Echinococcosis: An infection caused by the infestation of the larval form of tapeworms of the genus Echinococcus. The liver, lungs, and kidney are the most common areas of infestation.Territoriality: Behavior in defense of an area against another individual or individuals primarily of the same species.Evolution, Molecular: The process of cumulative change at the level of DNA; RNA; and PROTEINS, over successive generations.Rodentia: A mammalian order which consists of 29 families and many genera.Agriculture: The science, art or practice of cultivating soil, producing crops, and raising livestock.Chromosomes, Mammalian: Complex nucleoprotein structures which contain the genomic DNA and are part of the CELL NUCLEUS of MAMMALS.Body Weights and Measures: Measurements of the height, weight, length, area, etc., of the human and animal body or its parts.Behavior, Animal: The observable response an animal makes to any situation.Dog Diseases: Diseases of the domestic dog (Canis familiaris). This term does not include diseases of wild dogs, WOLVES; FOXES; and other Canidae for which the heading CARNIVORA is used.Deer: The family Cervidae of 17 genera and 45 species occurring nearly throughout North America, South America, and Eurasia, on most associated continental islands, and in northern Africa. Wild populations of deer have been established through introduction by people in Cuba, New Guinea, Australia, New Zealand, and other places where the family does not naturally occur. They are slim, long-legged and best characterized by the presence of antlers. Their habitat is forests, swamps, brush country, deserts, and arctic tundra. They are usually good swimmers; some migrate seasonally. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1362)Selection, Genetic: Differential and non-random reproduction of different genotypes, operating to alter the gene frequencies within a population.Animals, Domestic: Animals which have become adapted through breeding in captivity to a life intimately associated with humans. They include animals domesticated by humans to live and breed in a tame condition on farms or ranches for economic reasons, including LIVESTOCK (specifically CATTLE; SHEEP; HORSES; etc.), POULTRY; and those raised or kept for pleasure and companionship, e.g., PETS; or specifically DOGS; CATS; etc.Ecology: The branch of science concerned with the interrelationship of organisms and their ENVIRONMENT, especially as manifested by natural cycles and rhythms, community development and structure, interactions between different kinds of organisms, geographic distributions, and population alterations. (Webster's, 3d ed)Cat Diseases: Diseases of the domestic cat (Felis catus or F. domesticus). This term does not include diseases of the so-called big cats such as CHEETAHS; LIONS; tigers, cougars, panthers, leopards, and other Felidae for which the heading CARNIVORA is used.DNA, Kinetoplast: DNA of kinetoplasts which are specialized MITOCHONDRIA of trypanosomes and related parasitic protozoa within the order KINETOPLASTIDA. Kinetoplast DNA consists of a complex network of numerous catenated rings of two classes; the first being a large number of small DNA duplex rings, called minicircles, approximately 2000 base pairs in length, and the second being several dozen much larger rings, called maxicircles, approximately 37 kb in length.Tropical Climate: A climate which is typical of equatorial and tropical regions, i.e., one with continually high temperatures with considerable precipitation, at least during part of the year. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Feeding Behavior: Behavioral responses or sequences associated with eating including modes of feeding, rhythmic patterns of eating, and time intervals.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Adaptation, Biological: Changes in biological features that help an organism cope with its ENVIRONMENT. These changes include physiological (ADAPTATION, PHYSIOLOGICAL), phenotypic and genetic changes.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Birds: Warm-blooded VERTEBRATES possessing FEATHERS and belonging to the class Aves.Seasons: Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Chromosome Banding: Staining of bands, or chromosome segments, allowing the precise identification of individual chromosomes or parts of chromosomes. Applications include the determination of chromosome rearrangements in malformation syndromes and cancer, the chemistry of chromosome segments, chromosome changes during evolution, and, in conjunction with cell hybridization studies, chromosome mapping.Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.Feces: Excrement from the INTESTINES, containing unabsorbed solids, waste products, secretions, and BACTERIA of the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.Trees: Woody, usually tall, perennial higher plants (Angiosperms, Gymnosperms, and some Pterophyta) having usually a main stem and numerous branches.Bayes Theorem: A theorem in probability theory named for Thomas Bayes (1702-1761). In epidemiology, it is used to obtain the probability of disease in a group of people with some characteristic on the basis of the overall rate of that disease and of the likelihood of that characteristic in healthy and diseased individuals. The most familiar application is in clinical decision analysis where it is used for estimating the probability of a particular diagnosis given the appearance of some symptoms or test result.Genetic Variation: Genotypic differences observed among individuals in a population.Principal Component Analysis: Mathematical procedure that transforms a number of possibly correlated variables into a smaller number of uncorrelated variables called principal components.DNA, Mitochondrial: Double-stranded DNA of MITOCHONDRIA. In eukaryotes, the mitochondrial GENOME is circular and codes for ribosomal RNAs, transfer RNAs, and about 10 proteins.Diet: Regular course of eating and drinking adopted by a person or animal.AfricaMicrosatellite Repeats: A variety of simple repeat sequences that are distributed throughout the GENOME. They are characterized by a short repeat unit of 2-8 basepairs that is repeated up to 100 times. They are also known as short tandem repeats (STRs).Asia: The largest of the continents. It was known to the Romans more specifically as what we know today as Asia Minor. The name comes from at least two possible sources: from the Assyrian asu (to rise) or from the Sanskrit usa (dawn), both with reference to its being the land of the rising sun, i.e., eastern as opposed to Europe, to the west. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p82 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p34)EuropeGenome: The genetic complement of an organism, including all of its GENES, as represented in its DNA, or in some cases, its RNA.Reproduction: The total process by which organisms produce offspring. (Stedman, 25th ed)Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Adaptation, Physiological: The non-genetic biological changes of an organism in response to challenges in its ENVIRONMENT.Cluster Analysis: A set of statistical methods used to group variables or observations into strongly inter-related subgroups. In epidemiology, it may be used to analyze a closely grouped series of events or cases of disease or other health-related phenomenon with well-defined distribution patterns in relation to time or place or both.
Carnivores[edit]. European wildcat (Felis silvestris). The representation of the weasel family (Mustelidae) in Scotland is ...
Dasyuromorphia (marsupial carnivores)[edit]. Thylacinidae[edit]. *Thylacine, Thylacinus cynocephalus EX - extinct. Dasyuridae[ ...
"Carnivores". Outdoor Alabama. Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources. Retrieved October 14, 2012.. ... thirteen carnivore species, six insectivore species, one opossum species, four rabbit species, twenty-two rodent species, and ...
Unleash the Carnivore (2009-2010)[edit]. Devourment's third full-length studio album, Unleash the Carnivore, was released in ... Unleash the Carnivore was followed in 2010 with the "Unleash the Carnivore tour". On July 14, 2010, Devourment announced that ... Unleash the Carnivore, and Conceived in Sewage. ... 1.4 Unleash the Carnivore (2009-2010). *1.5 Conceived in Sewage ...
1. Carnivores. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona Sanderson, J.; Khan, J.; Grassman, L. & Mallon, D.P. (2008). "Neofelis nebulosa". IUCN ...
ISBN 0-14-014481-1. "Carnivores". U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management. 2009-12-14. Retrieved 2011-03-28 ...
1. Carnivores. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona. ISBN 978-84-96553-49-1 Reid, F. & Helgen, K. (2008). "Nasuella olivacea". IUCN Red ... Small Carnivore Conservation. 41: 65-74. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2014-01-16. Retrieved 2013-08-20. Pacheco, V., R. ... Small Carnivore Conservation 23: 1-6. ISIS (2011). Mountain coati. Version 12 January 2011. WildlifeExtra (September 2010). ...
doi:10.1111/j.1469-7998.1998.tb00172.x. "Pteronura brasiliensis (giant otter)". Carnivores. Food and agricultural organization ...
"Carnivores". U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management. 2009-12-14. Retrieved 2011-03-28. Boroditsky, Lera ( ...
Volume 1. Carnivores. Barcelona: Lynx Edicions. Kinnear, N. B. (1913). "The Brown Palm-Civet in North Kanara". Journal of the ... Mudappa, D.; Noon, B.R.; Kumar, A. & Chellam, R. (2007). "Responses of small carnivores to rainforest fragmentation in the ... Small Carnivore Conservation. 27: 6-11. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2011-07-28. Blanford, W.T. (1888-91). Fauna of ... southern Western Ghats, India" (PDF). Small Carnivore Conservation. 36: 18-26. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2011-07-28. ...
Carnivores. Carnivore Ecology & Conservation. p. 52. Retrieved 10 April 2009. "Wild dogs getting bigger, more mixed". ABC News ...
Meatal stenosis; 22 September 2016 [Retrieved 2 October 2017]. R. F. Ewer (1973). The Carnivores. Cornell University Press. pp ...
V. Carnivores, Pangolins, Equids and Rhinoceroses, pp. 223-229. Bloomsbury, London, UK. Roeder, J. J. (1979). La reproduction ... Stuart, C. T. (1981). "Notes on the Mammalian Carnivores of the Cape Province, South Africa" (PDF). Bontebok. Cape Town: Cape ... Ewer, R. (1973). The Carnivores. Ithaca: Cornell University Press. Linnaeus, C. (1758). Viverra genetta. Systema naturæ per ... Cuzin, F. (1996). "Répartition actuelle et statut des grands mammifères sauvages du Maroc (Primates, Carnivores, Artiodactyles ...
CS1 maint: Multiple names: authors list (link) Ewer, R.F. (1973). The Carnivores. Ithaca: Cornell University Press. ...
Some animals' (example: carnivores') urine possesses a strong odour, especially when it is used to mark territory or ... R. F. Ewer (1973). The Carnivores. Cornell University Press. pp. 116-. ISBN 978-0-8014-8493-3. Retrieved 8 February 2013. John ... Richard Estes (1991). The Behavior Guide to African Mammals: Including Hoofed Mammals, Carnivores, Primates. University of ...
The oosik is a polished and sometimes carved baculum of these large northern carnivores. Oosiks are also sold as tourist ... Dixson, A. F. "Baculum length and copulatory behaviour in carnivores and pinnipeds (Grand Order Ferae)." Journal of Zoology ... R. F. Ewer (1973). The Carnivores. Cornell University Press. ISBN 978-0-8014-8493-3. Retrieved 16 December 2012. Dyck, Markus G ... "Postcopulatory sexual selection influences baculum evolution in primates and carnivores." Proc. R. Soc. B. Vol. 283. No. 1844. ...
Sandell, M. (1989). "The mating tactics and spacing patterns of solitary carnivores". Carnivore behavior, ecology, and ... Carnivores of the World by Dr. Luke Hunter. Princeton University Press (2011), ISBN 9780691152288 Wood, Gerald (1983). The ... Increased brain size in large carnivores has been positively linked to whether a given species is solitary, as is the brown ... Odden, J., Smith, M. E., Aanes, R., & Swenson, J. E. (1999). "Large carnivores that kill livestock: do" problem individuals" ...
R. F. Ewer (1973). The Carnivores. Cornell University Press. ISBN 0-8014-8493-6. Beauchamp, Gary K. "The perineal scent gland ...
ISBN 0-87196-871-1. Ewer, R. F. (1998). The Carnivores. Cornell University Press. ISBN 0-8014-8493-6. Groves, C. P., Rajapaksha ... Veron, G.; Catzeflis, F. M. (1993). "Phylogenetic relationships of the endemic Malagasy carnivore Cryptoprocta ferox ( ...
Cats are obligate carnivores, requiring a diet of meat and organs to survive. Aside from the lion, wild felids are generally ... Cats are obligate carnivores, meaning they are dependent on nutrients in animal flesh for survival, and because of the large ... Carnivores compete against each other. There is fossil evidence that felids have been more successful than canids in North ... Of the 13 terrestrial families in the order Carnivora, they are the strictest carnivores. Living cats belong to two subfamilies ...
In carnivores, the upper premolar P4 and the lower molar m1 form the carnassials that are used together in a scissor-like ... Because of its low variability, the length of the lower carnassial is used to provide an estimate of a carnivore's body size. A ... Carnivore Behavior, Ecology, and Evolution, Vol. 1. Comstock Publishing Associates: Ithaca. Perini, F. A.; Russo, C. A. M.; ... The ratio between the trigonid and the talonid indicates a carnivore's dietary habits, with a larger trigonid indicating a ...
ISBN 0-300-10398-0. Shekhar, K. S. (October 2003). "The status of mongooses in central India". Small Carnivore Conservation. 29 ... ISBN 978-93-5009-761-8. Ewer, R. F. (1973). The carnivores. London: Weidenfeld and Nicolson. pp. 124-125. ISBN 0297995642. ... Ewer, R. F. (1973). The carnivores. London: Weidenfeld and Nicolson. pp. 198-200. ISBN 0297995642. Lal, Ranjit (20 September ...
R. F. Ewer (1998). The Carnivores. Cornell University Press. p. 116. ISBN 978-0-8014-8493-3. Retrieved 23 July 2013. Köhncke, M ...
R. F. Ewer (1973). The Carnivores. Cornell University Press. ISBN 0-8014-8493-6. Turner, Alan (1997). The Big Cats and their ...
Cascade Carnivores. 2011. Retrieved December 14, 2011. Hughes, Stanley John. On conidia of fungi, and gemmae of algae, ...
Non-invasive methods of studying this elusive carnivore were also investigated, and the genotyping of remotely plucked hair ...
Serengeti Tanzania Africa wildlife cheetah animal carnivore cat fauna game mammal predator environment nature wilderness cub ...
There are fewer than three hundred species of terrestrial carnivore in the whole world, and that is fittable in a single book… ... Carnivores of the World (Princeton Field Guides), and the truth is, this is ONE OF THE COOLEST BOOKS IVE EVER SEEN! All the ... carnivores (almost) in one book. Interestingly, it turns out to be possible. ...
Nutrient Requirements: Carnivores. Duane E. Ullrey. Encyclopedia of Animal Science. *^ a b Mammals: Carnivores. Duane E. Ullrey ... Characteristics of carnivores[edit]. Characteristics commonly associated with carnivores include strength, speed, and keen ... Obligate or "true" carnivores are those whose diet requires nutrients found only in animal flesh. While obligate carnivores ... A carnivore /ˈkɑːrnɪvɔːr/, meaning "meat eater" (Latin, caro, genitive carnis, meaning "meat" or "flesh" and vorare meaning "to ...
California Carnivores is a plant nursery in Sebastopol, California in the United States. Specializing in the cultivation of ... California Carnivores is owned by horticulturalist Peter DAmato, carnivorous plant expert and author of The Savage Garden: ... California Carnivores. Archived from the original on 18 March 2016. Retrieved 18 March 2016. Lehmann, Tracy Hobson (28 June ... California Carnivores also provides consultation and plants for both temporary and permanent public exhibitions of carnivorous ...
"Carnivores :: Pillow Talk Featuring Bradford Cox". Aquarium Drunkard. 2013-03-04. Retrieved 2013-11-13. "Carnivores ... "Carnivores "A Crime"". Pitchfork. Pitchfork Media. Retrieved 2013-11-13. Vashi, Sonam (10 October 2013). "Carnivores third ... Carnivores is an indie rock band formed in Atlanta, Georgia in 2009 by Philip Frobos, Nathaniel Higgins, and Caitlin Lang. ... Reidy, Julia (2009-12-09). "Best of Whats Next: Carnivores". Paste Magazine. Paste Media Group. Retrieved 2013-11-13. Martins ...
Large carnivores in Europe. Historically, large carnivores had seen their numbers and distribution decline dramatically, mainly ... This has resulted in large carnivores return to many areas from which they had been absent for decades and to reinforce their ... In June 2014, the European Commission launched the EU Platform on Coexistence between People and Large Carnivores. The Platform ... Because of their predatory habits large carnivores need very large areas and their conservation needs to be planned on very ...
The results of this survey help us to learn about how people in different parts of Europe live with large carnivores wolf, lynx ... We ask how you see the current situation of large carnivores in Europe, your level of engagement in the topic and your ...
Bekoff M. (1989) Behavioral Development of Terrestrial Carnivores. In: Gittleman J.L. (eds) Carnivore Behavior, Ecology, and ... Life history patterns and the comparative social ecology of carnivores. Ann. Rev. Ecol. Syst. 15:191-232.CrossRefGoogle Scholar ... Carnivore brain size, behavioral ecology, and phylogeny. J. Mamm. 67:23-36.CrossRefGoogle Scholar ... Carnivore life history patterns: Allometric, phylogenetic, and ecological associations. Amer. Nat. 127:744-771.CrossRefGoogle ...
Learn about the different types of carnivores in this article. ... A carnivore is an organism that feeds mainly or exclusively on ... Hypo-carnivores are those carnivores whose diets are less than 30% meat and the rest consisting of non-animal food. Carnivores ... Characteristics Of Carnivores. Obligate carnivores, as highlighted above, are carnivores whose diet mainly consists of other ... Types Of Carnivores. Hypercarnivores. Hypercarnivores are carnivores whose diet is at least 70% meat. Examples of such animals ...
Im a meat eater; Im an enthusiastic cook; Im a lover of great farming; I dont have an unlimited budget for food shopping; and I always seem to be really (really) busy, largely because of starting up our meat company, Muddy Boots.. Indeed, the average cooking time for an evening meal in the UK has reduced from 55 minutes in the 1970s to just 18 minutes today. So here are recipes that work within the demands of a modern lifestyle.. ...
How Plants Evolved into Carnivores. Distantly-related plants acquired their ability to eat meat through similar genetic changes ...
Carnivore, animal whose diet consists of other animals. Adaptations for a carnivorous diet include a variety of hunting ... nutrition: Carnivores. …to escape their carnivore predators. Carnivores necessarily form only a small portion of the animal ... Most carnivores are larger than their prey species, although some of the largest carnivores prey on even larger species-for ... More About Carnivore. 9 references found in Britannica articles. Assorted References. *major reference* In nutrition: ...
The name is somewhat misleading, however, for while many carnivores live mainly on fresh killed prey, others are omnivorous ... Carnivores. Carnivores vary greatly in size and appearance. The name is somewhat misleading, however, for while many carnivores ... Carnivores generally live on land, but some spend part of nearly all of their time in water. ... Carnivores vary greatly in size and appearance. ...
New research suggests reconciliation between two competing theories about the prehistoric origins of carnivores ... Without oxygen, there would be no carnivores. Without carnivores, there would be no Cambrian explosion, the stunning ... But small carnivores ply the transition zones, where oxygen levels start to rise. A similar oxygen boost during the Cambrian ... Oxygen Brought Earliest Carnivores to Life. New research suggests reconciliation between two competing theories about the ...
The word carnivore, as we were taught in school, usually refers to a small group of animals, both present-day and prehistoric ... Think of carnivores, and animals like Tyrannosaurus rex, African lions, and sharks will come to mind; but now another animal ... He switched from a diet that included salads, spinach, dairy and nuts to pure carnivore 18 months ago, and told the Guardian ... But even if fears of pending illness are not sufficient to deter the new carnivores, the environmental argument should. It begs ...
"This study offers a rare look at problem-solving in carnivores, and the results provide important support for the claim that ... zoos and presented 140 animals from 39 mammalian carnivore species with a novel problem-solving task. ... and rigorous experimental test of the relationship between brain size and problem-solving ability using mammalian carnivores as ...
Carnivores paradise South Bombay is famous for its night life or food to be precise. Collin Rodrigues explores one of Mumbais ...
Many policies regulating carnivore hunting do not adequately acknowledge and address the negative effects of hunting on ... Carnivore hunting policies must account for different methods of sampling effort and detection, they say. The authors also ... IMAGE: Lions are among the large carnivores that have been reduced world-wide by over-hunting. Here, a female lion rests in ... Many policies regulating carnivore hunting do not adequately acknowledge and address the negative effects of hunting on ...
As an enthusiastic carnivore, I surprisingly go meat-free for many meals. The reason? Theres three:1. Meat is usually the most ... As a fellow carnivore, sometimes you just crave some meat. I get it! So if its too tough to go completely meatless, try ... As an enthusiastic carnivore, I surprisingly go meat-free for many meals. ...
"Carnivores aren´t a problem for this group of Maasai," Wagner said. "They´ve made a conscious decision to not hunt carnivores. ... If one of their livestock is killed by a carnivore, people don´t go out and kill a carnivore in retaliation. It´s a little bit ... "Other research has shown that people and carnivores can coexist, but there is a large body of thought that believes carnivores ... While most of the results were expected - the majority of carnivore photos were taken after dark, most of the larger predators ...
... Morten Tryland, Tore Sandvik, Jon M. Arnemo, Gudbrand ... "ANTIBODIES AGAINST ORTHOPOXVIRUSES IN WILD CARNIVORES FROM FENNOSCANDIA," Journal of Wildlife Diseases 34(3), 443-450, (1 July ... "ANTIBODIES AGAINST ORTHOPOXVIRUSES IN WILD CARNIVORES FROM FENNOSCANDIA," Journal of Wildlife Diseases, 34(3), 443-450, (1 July ...
Relevant range States of African carnivores are urged to work through the Joint CITES- CMS African Carnivores Initiative to ... a) include the African Carnivores Initiative in its proposals for the new CMS-CITES joint work programme for the period 2021- ... ii) support range States of African carnivores in implementing relevant CITES Resolutions and Decisions through the ACI;. c) ... i) develop a dedicated Programme of Work for the Joint CITES-CMS African Carnivores Initiative (ACI), taking into consideration ...
Human-carnivore conflict and perspectives on carnivore management worldwide. Conservation Biology 17:1491-1499CrossRefGoogle ... The three villages reported losses of 295 animals to these carnivores during a period of 2.5 years ending in early 2003, which ... Livestock depredation by large carnivores in the Indian Trans-Himalaya: conflict perceptions and conservation prospects. ...
Red-Green government in Germany wants to increase e-mail spying German Carnivore regulation should completely monitor ... There is already talk of a German "Carnivore" regulation. Carnivore was, untilrecently, the name of a similar bugging device ... Carnivore Use for Telcos Debated in Germany. By germany.internet.com Staff , February 26, 2001 Page 1 of 2 ... GERMANY -- Red-Green government in Germany wants to increase e-mail spying German Carnivore regulation should completely ...
  • This revival is mainly due to favourable national and international legislation such as the EU Habitats Directive, adopted some 20 years ago, which protects the European large carnivore species to varying degrees and provides a basis for harmonisation of national legislation. (iucn.org)
  • Carnivores are important in the ecosystem as they regulate the population of other species by preventing them from being overpopulated. (worldatlas.com)
  • Most carnivores are larger than their prey species, although some of the largest carnivores prey on even larger species-for example, tigers on water buffalo and orcas on baleen whales . (britannica.com)
  • Without carnivores, there would be no Cambrian explosion, the stunning evolutionary burst of diversity in species and body forms that began 540 million years ago. (scientificamerican.com)
  • To tackle this lack of scientific data, Sarah Benson-Amram, a scientist at the University of Wyoming and the paper's first author, and collaborators traveled to nine U.S. zoos and presented 140 animals from 39 mammalian carnivore species with a novel problem-solving task. (nsf.gov)
  • This study offers a rare look at problem-solving in carnivores, and the results provide important support for the claim that brain size reflects an animal's problem-solving abilities as well as enhance our understanding of why larger brains evolved in some species," Benson-Amram said. (nsf.gov)
  • The authors emphasize that, although they chose wolves in the western U.S. to highlight, too often inadequate hunting policies for large carnivores extend beyond the iconic gray beasts of Rocky Mountains to other species. (eurekalert.org)
  • Relevant range States of African carnivores are urged to work through the Joint CITES- CMS African Carnivores Initiative to implement CITES Resolutions and Decisions relating to the species covered by this Initiative. (cites.org)
  • Parties are invited to recognize the importance of the Joint CITES-CMS African Carnivores Initiative in implementing CITES Resolutions and Decisions relating to the species covered by the Initiative, and in seeking synergies as appropriate to implement complementary CMS resolutions and decisions. (cites.org)
  • Parties, intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations are encouraged to support relevant African range States, through the Joint CITES-CMS African Carnivores Initiative, in their implementation of CITES Resolutions and Decisions relating to the species covered by this Initiative. (cites.org)
  • Resources allow players to make the most of answering Research Questions, which, if answered correctly, will let players draw tiles and reveal the Vegetation, Herbivores, Competitor Carnivores, and their intended Study Species of their study site. (kickstarter.com)
  • It will also contribute to ensuring the long-term survival of smaller carnivores and prey species such as various antelope species by empowering civil society organisations which will work with relevant authorities and involve local communities in finding solutions to prevent their extinction. (iucn.org)
  • Claudio Sillero-Zubiri, Chair of the IUCN SSC Canid Specialist Group , says: "On the roof of Africa a few hundred Ethiopian wolves - Africa's rarest and most threatened carnivore species - survive against the odds in tiny mountain enclaves. (iucn.org)
  • Wolves ( Canis lupus ), wolverines ( Gulo gulo ), cougars ( Puma concolor ), jaguars ( Panthera onca ), lynx, and grizzy bears ( Ursus arctos ) have natural histories that often include long dispersals (although grizzly bears don't disperse as far as some of these other carnivore species). (utne.com)
  • In fact more than 75% of the 31 largest carnivore species are declining, and 17 species now occupy less than half their former ranges. (theconversation.com)
  • Southeast Asia, southern and East Africa, and the Amazon are among areas in which multiple large carnivore species are declining. (theconversation.com)
  • Many of these large carnivore species are endangered and some are at risk of extinction, either in specific regions or entirely. (theconversation.com)
  • This project uses new species-level phylogenetic trees along with extensive databases on species traits and distributions within mammals, to perform global analyses of species overlap and divergence across multiple carnivore and primate communities. (ucsb.edu)
  • Species co-existence and character divergence across carnivores. (ucsb.edu)
  • Each of the Carnivore families below has been identified by the common name of major species included in the family. (whozoo.org)
  • The least weasel ( Mustela nivalis ) is the smallest species of true carnivore, coming from the order Carnivora. (iowadnr.gov)
  • The National Park Service is conducting research on multiple carnivore species in the Santa Monica Mountains, including bobcats, mountain lions, coyotes and gray foxes. (nps.gov)
  • The stereotype that people have about these species is really completely far from the truth, the scientific data and experience," said Gay Bradshaw, a psychologist and ecologist and author of the book " Carnivore Minds: Who These Fearsome Animals Really Are . (wpr.org)
  • If convenience and economy are important considerations for you, then these scientifically- advanced, species- appropriate rations for carnivores should be considered. (dogfoodchat.com)
  • Carnivore species aren't described very often," Robert Voss, a curator in the division of mammalogy at the American Museum of Natural History in New York, said in a telephone interview. (telegram.com)
  • The discovery process started from a 10-year-long study of existing olingo species, which are carnivores that live in trees and are closely related to the new animal. (telegram.com)
  • One faster alternative would be to plant crops alongside other species that both attract carnivores and repel pests. (innovations-report.com)
  • We are just now learning about the ecological effects of large carnivores around the globe and at the same time we're finding these species are declining and threatened with endangerment. (ijpr.org)
  • So one of the things in I saw in the paper was this measure of how strong of an effect carnivores have, on the other species in their ecosystem. (ijpr.org)
  • a) include the African Carnivores Initiative in its proposals for the new CMS-CITES joint work programme for the period 2021-2025, to be developed in the context of the implementation of Resolution Conf. (cites.org)
  • Apart from consuming diets with different nutritional compositions, obligate herbivores and carnivores differ in other aspects, such as the time spent feeding, regularity of pancreatic juice secretion, exposure to toxic plant-derived compounds, and gut microbiome diversity. (pnas.org)
  • Many carnivores also eat herbivore dung, presumably to obtain essential nutrients that they could not otherwise obtain, since their dentition and digestive system do not permit efficient processing of vegetable matter. (newworldencyclopedia.org)
  • What Are the Differences Between the Teeth of a Carnivore and an Herbivore? (reference.com)
  • Because of their predatory habits large carnivores need very large areas and their conservation needs to be planned on very wide spatial scales which span many intra- and international administrative and jurisdictional borders. (iucn.org)
  • The paper " Occupancy patterns and niche partitioning within a diverse carnivore community exposed to anthropogenic pressures " was recently published in Biological Conservation . (redorbit.com)
  • Wagner and her colleagues spent just over two years documenting the carnivores of the southern Rift Valley, using motion-detecting camera traps to captures images of the creatures and people using four different areas of land: a conservation area with no human settlements, a grazing area that also had no human settlements, a permanent settlement area, and a buffer zone between the grazing and conservation areas that included seasonal human settlements. (redorbit.com)
  • Thus, the Framework Convention on the Protection and Sustainable Development of the Carpathians (The Carpathian Convention), namely its Protocol on Conservation and Sustainable Use of Biological and Landscape Diversity, together with the Carpathian Convention Working Group on Conservation and Sustainable Use of Biological and Landscape Diversity (The Biodiversity Working Group) pay special attention to effective large carnivores` conservation. (ochranaprirody.cz)
  • A carnivore at the top of the food chain , not preyed upon by other animals, is termed an apex predator . (wikipedia.org)
  • A carnivore is an organism that feeds mainly or exclusively on other animals. (worldatlas.com)
  • However, carnivores that lack physical characteristics and cannot bring down prey often scavenge on dead animals. (worldatlas.com)
  • The three villages reported losses of 295 animals to these carnivores during a period of 2.5 years ending in early 2003, which represents an annual loss rate of 2.9% of their livestock holdings. (springer.com)
  • A comprehensive introduction places carnivores in the context of other living things, and an extensive catalog showcases the incredible variety of these animals. (dk.com)
  • While the term carnivores often is thought of in terms of vertebrates , in a more general sense any animal, including invertebrates , can loosely be considered carnivores if their feeding behavior consists of preying on other animals rather than grazing on plants. (newworldencyclopedia.org)
  • As with other dietary categories, carnivore (in the general, non-taxonomic sense) delineates a heterogeneous group of animals from many phyla and classes. (newworldencyclopedia.org)
  • Many animals that are considered carnivores, such as foxes, actually eat plants as well. (reference.com)
  • If the protists were photosynthetic then these early animals were herbivores, not carnivores. (uncommondescent.com)
  • If they were not photosynthetic then they fed on cells that were, and they were the early animals (and herbivores, not carnivores). (uncommondescent.com)
  • The author of a new book on how carnivore minds work says these misconceptions hide the true nature of these animals. (wpr.org)
  • Unlike other plant-eating animals that have successfully evolved, anatomically specialized digestive systems to efficiently deconstruct fibrous plant matter, the giant panda still retains a gastrointestinal tract typical of carnivores. (rt.com)
  • My goal in these components is to examine how carnivores and other animals interact with their ecosystems, and particularly with human impacts on those ecosystems. (marlboro.edu)
  • Carnivore was, untilrecently, the name of a similar bugging device used by the American FBI to search through all e-mails for certain key words. (internetnews.com)
  • Since all three genera have superficially similar, vascularized digestive glands that also function to absorb nutrients, it is likely the last common ancestor of the group was already a carnivore. (carnivorousplants.org)
  • Although the carnivore connection of domestic cats is well recognised, little is known about the precise nutrient profile to which the digestive physiology and metabolism of the cat have adapted throughout evolution. (mdpi.com)
  • For example, sometimes the fact that cats are strict carnivores is interpreted as meaning that cats can only obtain their nutritional requirements through consuming animal tissue. (mdpi.com)
  • Regardless of Industry's motives for characterizing the dog in a manner other than what it truly is, (whether as a result of ignorance, or to justify its extensive use of profit-generating materials for which a carnivore has no nutritional requirement, and would be better off without it) is immaterial. (dogfoodchat.com)
  • Unfortunately, it is not always easy for the public to discover how best to feed their carnivore, who has very precise, nutritional needs. (dogfoodchat.com)
  • Commercial rations, on the whole, do not conform to the nutritional patterns established by Nature as essential for the well-being of the carnivore. (dogfoodchat.com)
  • This is, however , the most costly and technically demanding approach of all, because it involves the use of meat and a working knowledge of the nutritional requirements of carnivores. (dogfoodchat.com)
  • One of the more popular apostles of going carnivore is Shawn Baker , a former orthopaedic surgeon and power lifter who, in 2017, voluntarily surrendered his licence, at the insistence of his New Mexico licensing board, over "incompetence to practise as a licensee. (nationalpost.com)
  • Facultative carnivores feed mostly on animal flesh but also require nutrients from non-animal foods and have the physiological ability to digest them. (worldatlas.com)
  • SOS African Wildlife offers a great opportunity to empower and support dedicated organisations and individuals across Africa to protect these threatened carnivores and the habitats they represent. (iucn.org)
  • In "The Carnivore Way," author Cristina Eisenberg follows the footsteps of six large carnivores on a 7,500-mile wildlife corridor from Alaska to Mexico along the Rocky Mountains. (utne.com)
  • Many scientists and wildlife managers now recognise the growing evidence of carnivores' complex role in ecosystems, and their social and economic benefits. (theconversation.com)
  • Other research has shown that people and carnivores can coexist, but there is a large body of thought that believes carnivores need their own protected space to survive. (redorbit.com)
  • Carnivore or Omnivore? (dogfoodchat.com)
  • The public is left to rely upon it's own instincts, intellect and common sense, and to exercise its own judgement as to whether it believes that the dog is a carnivore, omnivore, or whatever, because that is how it must be fed. (dogfoodchat.com)
  • The researchers found that 61 percent of the largest land carnivores are threatened with extinction. (ijpr.org)
  • According to a recent study in the journal Science, over 75 percent of Earth's big carnivores are suffering major declines in their numbers that could result in their extinction unless efforts are taken to preserve them. (guardianlv.com)
  • All carnivores, whether they be sharks, raptors, polar bears, foxes or wolves, are made to eat and digest the raw meat, bones and organs that make up the whole carcasses of their prey. (rawfedcats.org)
  • Carnivores also are known as meat eaters , with meat used in its broadest sense as "animal tissues used for food," including invertebrate tissue, fish , amphibians , reptiles , birds , and so forth. (newworldencyclopedia.org)
  • Chinese researchers have discovered that giant panda bears have gut bacteria similar to that found in carnivores and are ill suited to digesting their main source of food, Bamboo. (rt.com)