Career Choice: Selection of a type of occupation or profession.Career Mobility: The upward or downward mobility in an occupation or the change from one occupation to another.Students, Medical: Individuals enrolled in a school of medicine or a formal educational program in medicine.Specialization: An occupation limited in scope to a subsection of a broader field.Vocational Guidance: Systematic efforts to assist individuals in selecting an occupation or suitable employment on the basis of aptitude, education, etc.Fellowships and Scholarships: Stipends or grants-in-aid granted by foundations or institutions to individuals for study.Internship and Residency: Programs of training in medicine and medical specialties offered by hospitals for graduates of medicine to meet the requirements established by accrediting authorities.Mentors: Senior professionals who provide guidance, direction and support to those persons desirous of improvement in academic positions, administrative positions or other career development situations.Physicians, Women: Women licensed to practice medicine.Medicine: The art and science of studying, performing research on, preventing, diagnosing, and treating disease, as well as the maintenance of health.Education, Medical, Undergraduate: The period of medical education in a medical school. In the United States it follows the baccalaureate degree and precedes the granting of the M.D.Specialties, Dental: Various branches of dental practice limited to specialized areas.Education, Medical, Graduate: Educational programs for medical graduates entering a specialty. They include formal specialty training as well as academic work in the clinical and basic medical sciences, and may lead to board certification or an advanced medical degree.Salaries and Fringe Benefits: The remuneration paid or benefits granted to an employee.Schools, Medical: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of medicine.Professional Practice Location: Geographic area in which a professional person practices; includes primarily physicians and dentists.Job Satisfaction: Personal satisfaction relative to the work situation.Education, Medical: Use for general articles concerning medical education.Health Manpower: The availability of HEALTH PERSONNEL. It includes the demand and recruitment of both professional and allied health personnel, their present and future supply and distribution, and their assignment and utilization.Personnel Selection: The process of choosing employees for specific types of employment. The concept includes recruitment.Students, Dental: Individuals enrolled a school of dentistry or a formal educational program in leading to a degree in dentistry.Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.General Surgery: A specialty in which manual or operative procedures are used in the treatment of disease, injuries, or deformities.Motivation: Those factors which cause an organism to behave or act in either a goal-seeking or satisfying manner. They may be influenced by physiological drives or by external stimuli.Faculty, Medical: The teaching staff and members of the administrative staff having academic rank in a medical school.Physicians: Individuals licensed to practice medicine.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Curriculum: A course of study offered by an educational institution.Internal Medicine: A medical specialty concerned with the diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the internal organ systems of adults.Family Practice: A medical specialty concerned with the provision of continuing, comprehensive primary health care for the entire family.Preceptorship: Practical experience in medical and health-related services that occurs as part of an educational program wherein the professionally-trained student works outside the academic environment under the supervision of an established professional in the particular field.Clinical Clerkship: Undergraduate education programs for second- , third- , and fourth-year students in health sciences in which the students receive clinical training and experience in teaching hospitals or affiliated health centers.Alberta: A province of western Canada, lying between the provinces of British Columbia and Saskatchewan. Its capital is Edmonton. It was named in honor of Princess Louise Caroline Alberta, the fourth daughter of Queen Victoria. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p26 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p12)Professional Practice: The use of one's knowledge in a particular profession. It includes, in the case of the field of biomedicine, professional activities related to health care and the actual performance of the duties related to the provision of health care.Medical Staff, Hospital: Professional medical personnel approved to provide care to patients in a hospital.Workload: The total amount of work to be performed by an individual, a department, or other group of workers in a period of time.Pediatrics: A medical specialty concerned with maintaining health and providing medical care to children from birth to adolescence.Teaching: The educational process of instructing.Schools, Dental: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of dentistry.Canada: The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.Education, Dental: Use for articles concerning dental education in general.Rural Health Services: Health services, public or private, in rural areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.United StatesGreat BritainData Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Factor Analysis, Statistical: A set of statistical methods for analyzing the correlations among several variables in order to estimate the number of fundamental dimensions that underlie the observed data and to describe and measure those dimensions. It is used frequently in the development of scoring systems for rating scales and questionnaires.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Physicians, Family: Those physicians who have completed the education requirements specified by the American Academy of Family Physicians.Clinical Competence: The capability to perform acceptably those duties directly related to patient care.Aspirations (Psychology): Strong desires to accomplish something. This usually pertains to greater values or high ideals.Science: The study of natural phenomena by observation, measurement, and experimentation.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Research Personnel: Those individuals engaged in research.Training Support: Financial support for training including both student stipends and loans and training grants to institutions.History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.Education, Graduate: Studies beyond the bachelor's degree at an institution having graduate programs for the purpose of preparing for entrance into a specific field, and obtaining a higher degree.Awards and Prizes

The role of curriculum in influencing students to select generalist training: a 21-year longitudinal study. (1/1094)

To determine if specific curricula or backgrounds influence selection of generalist careers, the curricular choices of graduates of Mount Sinai School of Medicine between 1970 and 1990 were reviewed based on admission category. Students were divided into three groups: Group 1, those who started their first year of training at the School of Medicine; Group 2, those accepted with advanced standing into their third year of training from the Sophie Davis School of Biomedical Education, a five-year program developed to select and produce students likely to enter primary care fields; and Group 3, those accepted with advanced standing into the third year who spent the first two years at a foreign medical school. All three groups took the identical last two years of clinical training at the School of Medicine. These were no significant differences with respect to initial choice of generalist training programs among all three groups, with 46% of the total cohort selecting generalist training. Of those students who chose generalist programs, 58% in Group 1, 51% in Group 2, and 41% in Group 3 remained in these fields rather than progressing to fellowship training. This difference was significant only with respect to Group 3. However, when an analysis was performed among those students providing only primary care as compared to only specialty care, there were no significant differences. Analysis by gender revealed women to be more likely to select generalist fields and remain in these fields without taking specialty training (P < .0001). Differentiating characteristics with respect to choosing generalist fields were not related to either Part I or Part II scores on National Board Examinations or selection to AOA. However, with respect to those specific specialties considered quite competitive (general surgery, obstetrics and gynecology, and ophthalmology), total test scores on Part I and Part II were significantly higher than those of all other students. The analysis indicated that, despite the diverse characteristics of students entering the third year at the School of Medicine, no one group produced a statistically greater proportion of generalists positions than any other, and academic performance while in medical school did not have a significant influence on whether a student entered a generalist field.  (+info)

Introducing managed care to the medical school curriculum: effect on student attitudes. (2/1094)

In order to assess the effect of clinical training and didactic instruction on medical student attitudes toward managed care, we conducted a survey of all medical students at the midpoint of their third year clerkships at the University of Massachusetts Medical School. The students were exposed to clinical training in managed care settings and a 2-day required course on the principles underlying managed care. The main outcome measures were student attitudes toward the concepts of managed care, managed care organizations, and future careers in managed care. Students also assessed the attitudes of medical faculty toward managed care. Attitudes of students with previous clinical training in managed care settings did not differ from those of students without such exposure toward the concepts underlying managed care or managed care organizations and were less positive about careers in managed care. Student responses before and after the 2-day course on managed care demonstrated that attitudes moved in a significantly positive direction. Seventy-one percent of students reported that the opinions they had heard from medical faculty about managed care were negative. Preparing medical students to practice medicine effectively in managed care settings will require focused attention on managed care issues in the medical school curriculum and the combined efforts of academic health centers and managed care organizations.  (+info)

The career outcomes for doctors completing general practice vocational training 1990-1995. (3/1094)

BACKGROUND: While much has been published about the career outcomes of doctors who completed general practice vocational training prior to 1990, no evidence is currently available about those who have qualified since that time. AIM: To obtain information about the career paths of doctors who had completed general practice vocational training since 1990, and to compare the results with previously published data. METHOD: Postal questionnaire survey of all doctors completing vocational training during the period 1990-1995 in three regions of the United Kingdom. The study examined current work status, career path since completion of training, desire for and experience of part-time training, degree of difficulty in choosing and following a career, and the degree to which certain factors impeded career choice. RESULTS: The overall response rate was 64.8%, although there was a significant difference between the response rates for men and women. While virtually all responders were employed, with the majority working in general practice, women were significantly less likely than men to be working as principals in general practice, for all cohorts. These results were very similar to those cohorts described in earlier studies. The career paths of doctors only became stable after about four years. Of those working in general practice, about 20% found it difficult to choose their career, and about 10% found it difficult to follow their career. Out-of-hours work was the major factor impeding career choice. CONCLUSION: Although they are taking longer to reach, the final career destinations of doctors completing vocational training since 1990 are no different from those of earlier cohorts.  (+info)

Rural background and clinical rural rotations during medical training: effect on practice location. (4/1094)

BACKGROUND: Providing health care services in rural communities in Canada remains a challenge. What affects a family medicine resident's decision concerning practice location? Does the resident's background or exposure to rural practice during clinical rotations affect that decision? METHODS: Cross-sectional mail survey of 159 physicians who graduated from the Family Medicine Program at Queen's University, Kingston, Ont., between 1977 and 1991. The outcome variables of interest were the size of community in which the graduate chose to practise on completion of training (rural [population less than 10,000] v. nonrural [population 10,000 or more]) and the size of community of practice when the survey was conducted (1993). The predictor or independent variables were age, sex, number of years in practice, exposure to rural practice during undergraduate and residency training, and size of hometown. RESULTS: Physicians who were raised in rural communities were 2.3 times more likely than those from nonrural communities to choose to practise in a rural community immediately after graduation (95% confidence interval 1.43-3.69, p = 0.001). They were also 2.5 times more likely to still be in rural practice at the time of the survey (95% confidence interval 1.53-4.01, p = 0.001). There was no association between exposure to rural practice during undergraduate or residency training and choosing to practise in a rural community. INTERPRETATION: Physicians who have roots in rural Canada are more likely to practise in rural Canada than those without such a background.  (+info)

What do general practice receptionists think and feel about their work? (5/1094)

BACKGROUND: Although there is some published work acknowledging that the general practice receptionist's role is both important and difficult, receptionists' own views have rarely been sought. AIM: To explore general practice receptionists' ideas and feelings about their work. METHOD: A questionnaire was distributed to all 150 receptionists in a representative sample of 26 practices in the area covered by Leeds family health services authority. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with a representative group of 20 receptionists selected from the questionnaire sample. RESULTS: All responders were women, 60% were over 40 years old, and about half had been in the post for more than five years; four-fifths worked part-time. They had chosen the job because it dovetailed with the rest of their lives. Responders derived satisfaction from helping patients, meeting people, having good relationships with colleagues, and doing varied work. Sources of stress included difficult patients, work pressure, problems finding appointments for patients, and feeling caught between doctors' and patients' demands. Responders' experiences and views of training were diverse. Practice managers were important in making them feel consulted and supported. All had a sense of teamwork with colleagues, but many did not perceive the whole practice as a team. Many felt doctors failed to appreciate the pressure and complexity of their work. CONCLUSIONS: Receptionists' work is complex, demanding and intense, involving a high level of commitment to patients, colleagues, and the practice. Recommendations include improved appointment systems, a positive role for practice managers in relation to reception staff, and individual planning of receptionists' training. Effective teamwork among receptionists should be recognized and developed. General practitioners (GPs) are recommended to develop a greater understanding of receptionists' work.  (+info)

Educational and career outcomes of an internal medicine preceptorship for first-year medical students. (6/1094)

OBJECTIVE: Medical educators have attempted in recent years to provide quality clinical experiences for medical students early in their medical training. We questioned whether participating in a preceptorship in internal medicine (PIM) resulted in better performances on subsequent clinical rotations and increased interest in internal medicine. PARTICIPANTS: Fifty-four students have participated in the PIM to date, with control groups consisting of students who applied for it but were not selected (n = 36), students participating in a preceptorship in family medicine (n = 168), and the remaining students (n = 330). DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. SETTING: University medical center and community practices. INTERVENTION: A 2-month, clinical preceptorship following the first year of medical school. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: The following outcomes were assessed: scores in the introduction to clinical medicine course; grades in the medical ethics course; scores from the internal medicine clerkship; and choosing a career in internal medicine. In their second year, PIM students scored higher in both semesters of the introduction to clinical medicine course (87% and 86% vs 84% and 84%, p's <.01) and were more likely to receive honors in ethics (50% vs 29%, p <.01) than non-PIM students. During the internal medicine clerkship, PIM students' scores were significantly higher on an objective structured clinical examination (79% vs 76%, p =.05), ambulatory clinical evaluations (80% vs 76%, p <.01), and overall clerkship scores (78% vs 75%, p =.03) but not on inpatient clinical evaluations or on the National Board of Medical Examiners Subject Examination. Preceptorship students were more likely to receive honors grades in the medicine clerkship (33% vs 10%, p <.01), and they were more likely to match into internal medicine residencies than control students (54% vs 27%, p <.01). CONCLUSIONS: The PIM course is an intervention, early in students' careers, which appears to benefit them academically and increase their interest in internal medicine as a career.  (+info)

Transplant surgeons in training: is anybody out there? (7/1094)

There is a long-standing recognition that there is an organ donor shortage in the United Kingdom and Ireland (UK&E) that limits transplant activity. However, the fact that, at present, there are several unfilled consultant vacancies would suggest that a shortage of trained surgeons may soon be an equally important limiting factor. The aim of this current study was to identify all transplant trainees in the UK&E and to determine their career aspirations. A list of all trainees intending to practice as transplant surgeons was compiled. A combination of postal questionnaire and telephone interview was used to construct a database on past and present training in transplantation, and preferred type of consultancy was assessed both by direct questioning and by using a visual analogue scale to grade desirability of various posts. Of 110 potential trainees identified, 50 (45%) replied and indicated a desire to pursue a career in transplant surgery. Thirty-one intended practising in the UK&E (19 UK&E graduates and 12 overseas). The preferred consultancy (27/31) was transplantation (Tx) together with a second specialty while only four wanted a multivisceral practice. The mean score (0-10) for desirability of a multivisceral transplant post was 4.7, for renal transplant and vascular access it was 3.6 and for transplantation and a second specialty it was 8.4. We conclude that the majority of trainees do not wish to apply for pure transplant posts, either single organ or multivisceral, and that the majority wish to practice transplantation with a second specialty. In addition, there is still a major shortage of trainees and further studies are required to identify reasons why trainees fail to pursue a career in transplantation.  (+info)

Square pegs in round holes: has psychometric testing a place in choosing a surgical career? A preliminary report of work in progress. (8/1094)

Methods of selection of candidates for training in surgery has long been regarded as lacking explicit criteria and objectivity. Our purpose was to discover the aptitudes and personality types of applicants for surgical posts at the outset, in order to discover which were most likely to result in a satisfactory progression through training and which were associated with career difficulties. This longitudinal predictive validation study has been undertaken in a London Teaching Hospital since 1994. After short-listing, but immediately before interview, all candidates for senior house officer posts in basic surgical training and in geriatric medicine were asked to undertake psychometric tests of numerical (GMA) and spatial (SIT7) reasoning, personality type (MBTI), and self-rating of competency. There were no differences in ability scores between surgeons or geriatricians. Personality differences were revealed between the surgeons and the geriatricians, and between male and female surgeons. This study suggests that while there are no differences in ability between surgeons and geriatricians at the start of training, there are differences in personality. Long-term follow-up of the career development of this cohort of surgical SHOs is required to determine whether the psychometric measures described correlate with achievements of milestones in their surgical careers.  (+info)

  • For these and other job titles, Dr. Seaborne says that that DBA can enhance or extend a career - even among those who already hold a master's of business administration (MBA). (franklin.edu)
  • This is the first multi-centre study exploring students' career preferences and preference influences upon entry into and exit from undergraduate medical degree programmes. (beds.ac.uk)
  • What this study adds is that, while acknowledging student intake differs by medical school, medical school itself seems to influence career preference. (beds.ac.uk)
  • A robust, longitudinal study is required to explore how medical students' career preferences change as they progress through medical school and training to understand the influence of the learning environment on training choice and outcomes. (beds.ac.uk)
  • It examines the value of the School's Careers Education Programme in helping pupils to make considered choices with regard to courses, careers decisions and Further and Higher Education, by asking pupils about their job ideas and knowledge, sources of information, reasons for subject choices, ambitions, expectations for the future, expected examination results, first experiences of work and opinions regarding the School's careers guidance provision. (lboro.ac.uk)
  • Year 1 and Year 5 students' specialty preferences also differed within each school and, while there were some common patterns, each medical school had a different profile of students' career preferences on exit. (beds.ac.uk)
  • In fact, according to a 2013 report of the AACSB (Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business) International Doctoral Education Task Force , more than 2,300 doctoral students completed their programs and pursued a variety of careers at educational institutions, industry, public and not-for-profit organizations. (franklin.edu)
  • College involves getting education, considering careers and choosing a Major. (studentshare.org)
  • The final part deals with the changes that have occurred in the labour market since the years of the survey and the response to those changes to be found in the Careers Education curriculum of the School. (lboro.ac.uk)
  • This course not only enables me to be practical and independent in my studies, but it also enables me to apply flexibility and team work in my career. (studentshare.org)
  • Much work has been examined the career intentions, career preferences and career destinations of UK medical graduates but there is little published about medical students career intentions. (beds.ac.uk)
  • Where other resources can get bogged down in convincing the reader that it s okay to leave academia, or abandon structure to jam in personal testimonials and anecdotes, this book succinctly sums up the need to consider alternative careers and provides a plethora of information in an easily digestible manner. (cshlpress.com)
  • The results suggest that a sense of calling early in life (intrinsic motivation) is a particularly important factor in helping resolve career decisions later on, and in determining the trajectory of one's career pursuits. (ioatwork.com)
  • Recently, two researchers sought to understand what influences career decisions when these approaches clash. (ioatwork.com)
  • This book plugs the gap by providing information about a wide variety of different careers that individuals with a PhD in the life sciences can pursue. (cshlpress.com)
  • They provide advice and instruction on taking care of the teeth and gums and on diet choices that affect oral health. (stockton.edu)
  • This simple career theory helps people think about the type of person they are and the environment they would most enjoy working within. (aut.ac.nz)
  • It was possible to trace the progression/stability of their career ideas and, by comparing a school-banding analysis with a socioeconomic analysis on the basis of four housing zones, to draw some conclusions regarding the School's influence compared with socio-economic factors. (lboro.ac.uk)