Medical Futility: The absence of a useful purpose or useful result in a diagnostic procedure or therapeutic intervention. The situation of a patient whose condition will not be improved by treatment or instances in which treatment preserves permanent unconsciousness or cannot end dependence on intensive medical care. (From Ann Intern Med 1990 Jun 15;112(12):949)Withholding Treatment: Withholding or withdrawal of a particular treatment or treatments, often (but not necessarily) life-prolonging treatment, from a patient or from a research subject as part of a research protocol. The concept is differentiated from REFUSAL TO TREAT, where the emphasis is on the health professional's or health facility's refusal to treat a patient or group of patients when the patient or the patient's representative requests treatment. Withholding of life-prolonging treatment is usually indexed only with EUTHANASIA, PASSIVE, unless the distinction between withholding and withdrawing treatment, or the issue of withholding palliative rather than curative treatment, is discussed.Early Termination of Clinical Trials: Earlier than planned termination of clinical trials.Euthanasia, Passive: Failing to prevent death from natural causes, for reasons of mercy by the withdrawal or withholding of life-prolonging treatment.Dissent and Disputes: Differences of opinion or disagreements that may arise, for example, between health professionals and patients or their families, or against a political regime.Life Support Care: Care provided patients requiring extraordinary therapeutic measures in order to sustain and prolong life.Refusal to Treat: Refusal of the health professional to initiate or continue treatment of a patient or group of patients. The refusal can be based on any reason. The concept is differentiated from PATIENT REFUSAL OF TREATMENT see TREATMENT REFUSAL which originates with the patient and not the health professional.Persistent Vegetative State: Vegetative state refers to the neurocognitive status of individuals with severe brain damage, in whom physiologic functions (sleep-wake cycles, autonomic control, and breathing) persist, but awareness (including all cognitive function and emotion) is abolished.Ethicists: Persons trained in philosophical or theological ethics who work in clinical, research, public policy, or other settings where they bring their expertise to bear on the analysis of ethical dilemmas in policies or cases. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Ethics, Medical: The principles of professional conduct concerning the rights and duties of the physician, relations with patients and fellow practitioners, as well as actions of the physician in patient care and interpersonal relations with patient families.Ethics, Nursing: The principles of proper professional conduct concerning the rights and duties of nurses themselves, their patients, and their fellow practitioners, as well as their actions in the care of patients and in relations with their families.Secularism: Indifference to, or rejection of, RELIGION or religious considerations. (From Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, 10th ed)Ethics Committees, Clinical: Hospital or other institutional ethics committees established to consider the ethical dimensions of patient care. Distinguish from ETHICS COMMITTEES, RESEARCH, which are established to monitor the welfare of patients or healthy volunteers participating in research studies.Paternalism: Interference with the FREEDOM or PERSONAL AUTONOMY of another person, with justifications referring to the promotion of the person's good or the prevention of harm to the person. (from Cambridge Dictionary of Philosophy, 1995); more generally, not allowing a person to make decisions on his or her own behalf.Resuscitation Orders: Instructions issued by a physician pertaining to the institution, continuation, or withdrawal of life support measures. The concept includes policies, laws, statutes, decisions, guidelines, and discussions that may affect the issuance of such orders.Empirical Research: The study, based on direct observation, use of statistical records, interviews, or experimental methods, of actual practices or the actual impact of practices or policies.Social Values: Abstract standards or empirical variables in social life which are believed to be important and/or desirable.Personal Autonomy: Self-directing freedom and especially moral independence. An ethical principle holds that the autonomy of persons ought to be respected. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Moral Obligations: Duties that are based in ETHICS, rather than in law.Clinical Trials, Phase II as Topic: Works about studies that are usually controlled to assess the effectiveness and dosage (if appropriate) of diagnostic, therapeutic, or prophylactic drugs, devices, or techniques. These studies are performed on several hundred volunteers, including a limited number of patients with the target disease or disorder, and last about two years. This concept includes phase II studies conducted in both the U.S. and in other countries.Physician's Role: The expected function of a member of the medical profession.Decision Making: The process of making a selective intellectual judgment when presented with several complex alternatives consisting of several variables, and usually defining a course of action or an idea.Cost Control: The containment, regulation, or restraint of costs. Costs are said to be contained when the value of resources committed to an activity is not considered excessive. This determination is frequently subjective and dependent upon the specific geographic area of the activity being measured. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Critical Illness: A disease or state in which death is possible or imminent.Intensive Care: Advanced and highly specialized care provided to medical or surgical patients whose conditions are life-threatening and require comprehensive care and constant monitoring. It is usually administered in specially equipped units of a health care facility.Patients: Individuals participating in the health care system for the purpose of receiving therapeutic, diagnostic, or preventive procedures.Clinical Trials, Phase III as Topic: Works about comparative studies to verify the effectiveness of diagnostic, therapeutic, or prophylactic drugs, devices, or techniques determined in phase II studies. During these trials, patients are monitored closely by physicians to identify any adverse reactions from long-term use. These studies are performed on groups of patients large enough to identify clinically significant responses and usually last about three years. This concept includes phase III studies conducted in both the U.S. and in other countries.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Clinical Trials Data Monitoring Committees: Committees established to review interim data and efficacy outcomes in clinical trials. The findings of these committees are used in deciding whether a trial should be continued as designed, changed, or terminated. Government regulations regarding federally-funded research involving human subjects (the "Common Rule") require (45 CFR 46.111) that research ethics committees reviewing large-scale clinical trials monitor the data collected using a mechanism such as a data monitoring committee. FDA regulations (21 CFR 50.24) require that such committees be established to monitor studies conducted in emergency settings.Labor Pain: Pain associated with OBSTETRIC LABOR in CHILDBIRTH. It is caused primarily by UTERINE CONTRACTION as well as pressure on the CERVIX; BLADDER; and the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT. Labor pain mostly occurs in the ABDOMEN; the GROIN; and the BACK.Labor Unions: Organizations comprising wage and salary workers in health-related fields for the purpose of improving their status and conditions. The concept includes labor union activities toward providing health services to members.Labor, Obstetric: The repetitive uterine contraction during childbirth which is associated with the progressive dilation of the uterine cervix (CERVIX UTERI). Successful labor results in the expulsion of the FETUS and PLACENTA. Obstetric labor can be spontaneous or induced (LABOR, INDUCED).Analgesia, Obstetrical: The elimination of PAIN, without the loss of CONSCIOUSNESS, during OBSTETRIC LABOR; OBSTETRIC DELIVERY; or the POSTPARTUM PERIOD, usually through the administration of ANALGESICS.Obstetric Nursing: A nursing specialty involving nursing care given to the pregnant patient before, after, or during childbirth.Analgesia, Epidural: The relief of pain without loss of consciousness through the introduction of an analgesic agent into the epidural space of the vertebral canal. It is differentiated from ANESTHESIA, EPIDURAL which refers to the state of insensitivity to sensation.PrintingMinnesotaBeak: In some animals, the jaws together with their horny covering. The beak usually refers to the bill of birds in which the whole varies greatly in form according of the food and habits of the bird. While the beak refers most commonly to birds, the anatomical counterpart is found also in the turtle, squid, and octopus. (From Webster, 3d ed & Storer, et al., General Zoology, 6th ed, p491, 755)Health Policy: Decisions, usually developed by government policymakers, for determining present and future objectives pertaining to the health care system.Cost-Benefit Analysis: A method of comparing the cost of a program with its expected benefits in dollars (or other currency). The benefit-to-cost ratio is a measure of total return expected per unit of money spent. This analysis generally excludes consideration of factors that are not measured ultimately in economic terms. Cost effectiveness compares alternative ways to achieve a specific set of results.Policy Making: The decision process by which individuals, groups or institutions establish policies pertaining to plans, programs or procedures.American Hospital Association: A professional society in the United States whose membership is composed of hospitals.Burial: The act or ceremony of putting a corpse into the ground or a vault, or into the sea; or the inurnment of CREMAINS.Th2 Cells: Subset of helper-inducer T-lymphocytes which synthesize and secrete the interleukins IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, and IL-10. These cytokines influence B-cell development and antibody production as well as augmenting humoral responses.Th1 Cells: Subset of helper-inducer T-lymphocytes which synthesize and secrete interleukin-2, gamma-interferon, and interleukin-12. Due to their ability to kill antigen-presenting cells and their lymphokine-mediated effector activity, Th1 cells are associated with vigorous delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions.Consensus: General agreement or collective opinion; the judgment arrived at by most of those concerned.Seizures, Febrile: Seizures that occur during a febrile episode. It is a common condition, affecting 2-5% of children aged 3 months to five years. An autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance has been identified in some families. The majority are simple febrile seizures (generally defined as generalized onset, single seizures with a duration of less than 30 minutes). Complex febrile seizures are characterized by focal onset, duration greater than 30 minutes, and/or more than one seizure in a 24 hour period. The likelihood of developing epilepsy (i.e., a nonfebrile seizure disorder) following simple febrile seizures is low. Complex febrile seizures are associated with a moderately increased incidence of epilepsy. (From Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, p784)Th17 Cells: Subset of helper-effector T-lymphocytes which synthesize and secrete IL-17, IL-17F, and IL-22. These cytokines are involved in host defenses and tissue inflammation in autoimmune diseases.Consensus Sequence: A theoretical representative nucleotide or amino acid sequence in which each nucleotide or amino acid is the one which occurs most frequently at that site in the different sequences which occur in nature. The phrase also refers to an actual sequence which approximates the theoretical consensus. A known CONSERVED SEQUENCE set is represented by a consensus sequence. Commonly observed supersecondary protein structures (AMINO ACID MOTIFS) are often formed by conserved sequences.
  • The health care team wants to write a Do Not Attempt Resuscitation (DNAR) order because, in their judgment, attempted CPR in the event of cardiac arrest-even if it did temporarily restore cardiac function-would be futile, since it would not fulfill a fundamental goal of their efforts: namely to restore her to a level of health that would permit her to survive outside the acute hospital setting. (springer.com)
  • Andrew Courtwright and colleagues at the Massachusetts General Hospital have published "Experience with a hospital policy on not offering cardiopulmonary resuscitation when believed more harmful than beneficial" in the Journal of Critical Care . (georgetown.edu)
  • Many EPs' decisions regarding resuscitation are based on concerns of litigation and criticism, rather than their professional judgment of medical benefit or futility. (nih.gov)
  • Futility has no utility in resuscitation medicine. (springer.com)
  • Paramedics intubate Mr. A. and perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation while en route to a nearby community hospital. (asnjournals.org)
  • Duration of Resuscitation that results in futility of care is unknown. (ispub.com)
  • If the patient has arrested, resuscitation has already exceeded 30 minutes, and the nearest facility is more than 30 minutes away, involvement of parents and family of these children in the decision-making process with assistance and guidance from medical professionals should be considered as part of an emphasis on family-centered care because the evidence suggests that either death or a poor outcome is inevitable. (aappublications.org)
  • Given the emotional demands of withholding resuscitation from a child in the field, it was believed by both the leadership in pediatric trauma care and emergency medical services (EMS) that additional studies were warranted before including children in any termination-of-resuscitation protocol. (aappublications.org)
  • Re-examining outcomes after unsuccessful out-of-hospital resuscitation in the era of field termination of resuscitation guidelines and regionalized post-resuscitation care. (semanticscholar.org)
  • Sadly, in the futility debate wherein some critics have failed or refused to define medical futility an important area of medicine has in large part been neglected, not only in treatment decisions at the bedside, but in public discussions-comfort care-the physician's obligation to alleviate suffering, enhance well being and support the dignity of the patient in the last few days of life. (springer.com)
  • But to define therapeutic utility/ futility is certainly not an easy task. (hospicecare.com)
  • The goals of the authors were to elucidate how clinicians define futility, when they perceive life-sustaining treatment (LST) to be futile, how they communicate this situation and why LST is sometimes continued despite being recognised as futile. (uni-muenchen.de)
  • To investigate how doctors define and use the terms "futility" and "futile treatment" in end-of-life care. (mja.com.au)
  • Here is a scenario familiar to just about everyone engaged in critical care. (springer.com)
  • The Journal of Trauma: Injury, Infection, and Critical Care. (lww.com)
  • 2013. The frequency and cost of treatment perceived to be futile in critical care. (springer.com)
  • Our study showed no major improvement in survival following cardiac arrest with pulseless electrical activity or asystole as the presenting rhythm in the ICU despite many advances in critical care over the previous two decades. (cmaj.ca)
  • Collectively, the hospitals have about 130 adult critical care beds (defined by capacity for continuous monitoring, one-on-one nursing and mechanical ventilation): 40 beds in coronary care units, 70 beds in multidisciplinary general ICUs and, at the University of Alberta Hospital, 20 beds in a cardiovascular surgical ICU. (cmaj.ca)
  • At the new hospital, the pulmonary and critical care team consults the neurology, renal, and palliative care teams to discuss the patient's care plan. (asnjournals.org)
  • To receive news and publication updates for Critical Care Research and Practice, enter your email address in the box below. (hindawi.com)
  • Due to their relatively large impact, outcomes and costs in critical care are of significant interest to policymakers and health care administrators. (hindawi.com)
  • Measurement of potentially ineffective care has been proposed as an outcome measure to evaluate critical care delivery, and the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act affords the opportunity to reshape the care of the critically ill. (hindawi.com)
  • While this spending growth spares few areas of the health care system, critical care medicine provides an abundant area for analysis, as its costs continue to increase both overall and as a percentage of US gross domestic product [ 2 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • Accordingly, establishing a standard means for examining the cost effectiveness and value of critical care delivery should be a priority for public policy. (hindawi.com)
  • OBJECTIVE: To illustrate neonatal outcomes, including morbidity, birth weight and gestational age-specific mortality, and care practices for very-low-birth-weight infants admitted to our tertiary neonatal intensive care unit in Turkey and compare these with the corresponding data from recent reports from developed countries. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Among full-term newborns with moderate or severe hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (damage to cells in the central nervous system from inadequate oxygen), receiving deeper or longer duration cooling did not reduce risk of neonatal intensive care unit death, compared to usual care, according to a study in the December 24/31 issue of JAMA . (eurekalert.org)
  • Infants admitted to the neonatal intensive care until within 6 hours of birth were candidates for the study when seizures or moderate or severe encephalopathy was present. (eurekalert.org)
  • Mortality in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) was 7 percent for the 33.5°C for 72 hours group, 14 percent for the 32.0°C for 72 hours group, 16 percent for the 33.5°C for 120 hours group, and 17 percent for the 32.0°C for 120 hours group. (eurekalert.org)
  • Should the physicians follow the family's wishes to continue aggressive life-sustaining treatment including attempted CPR, or should the physicians refuse by invoking medical futility and seek to engage the family in emphasizing comfort care? (springer.com)
  • The physicians treating Tinslee at Cook Children's Medical Center in Fort Worth describe her condition as fatal without life-sustaining treatment and say that even routine care, like bathing and feeding, " can cause her little body to experience a medical crisis, which causes even more intervention and pain for her," according to a hospital statement. (californiahealthline.org)
  • Because of this silence, some physicians write DNAR orders without the consent of the patient/surrogate, without notifying him, and without a medical futility decision. (all.org)
  • He said that until this joint project there had been smaller initiatives but that the partnership would allow a more systematic look at what training in hospice and palliative care can be and how to make it more generally available to physicians and produce specific outcomes. (lww.com)
  • The pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) physicians felt that further transfusions would be medically futile and wished to stop the intervention to avoid prolonging the patient's suffering. (oncologynurseadvisor.com)
  • Furthermore, the concept of therapeutic utility does not exclusively refer to the goal of restoring health, as to preserve or enhance a patient's comfort and general well-being, and to prevent other diseases or complications of an incurable condition are also desirable goals of medicine, specially in the case of palliative care. (hospicecare.com)
  • It also does not entail withdrawal or passivity on the part of the health care professional. (who.int)
  • Through our prescription medicines, vaccines, biologic therapies, and consumer care and animal health products, we work with customers and operate in more than 140 countries to deliver innovative health solutions. (tmcnet.com)
  • The crisis in our current health care crisis has finally reached the crisis point. (huffingtonpost.com)
  • The only impact it will have on health care is if thousands of copies are sent to municipal governments, soaked in bleach, and used to wipe down dirty syringes collected from needle exchanges. (huffingtonpost.com)
  • Other countries address national health issues in ways that imply they care whether their populations live or die. (huffingtonpost.com)
  • The American tradition of public health care is one of not interfering with nature, fortified with Dr. Franklin's rhyming advice about fructiphobic doctors and the deadly perils of sleeping in. (huffingtonpost.com)
  • In crafting our new health care policy, congress seems bent on embracing these home-grown approaches, with a respectful nod to the Inuit practice of empowering the ill and elderly to fend for themselves equipped with a ration of water and a blanket. (huffingtonpost.com)
  • Covers the False Claims Act, Qui Tams, whistleblowers, and other related collateral proceedings, with special emphasis on health care fraud. (justia.com)
  • Addresses issues faced by license professionals and regulated businesses in civil, business, administrative and criminal matters with an emphasis on health care. (justia.com)
  • When it comes to health care prices, the burden piled on payers can seem almost cartoonishly heavy. (calhospital.org)
  • I now, finally, see a clear role for artificial intelligence in health care. (calhospital.org)
  • Former President George H.W. Bush may have been every inch the caring individual portrayed in the eulogies of those who knew him, but when it came to health care reform, two words characterized his attitude: Don't care. (calhospital.org)
  • To amend title I of the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974, title XXVII of the Public Health Service Act, and the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to protect consumers in managed care plans and other health coverage. (govtrack.us)
  • Choice of health care professional. (govtrack.us)
  • Ch. 8 Paying for Health Care -- pt. (worldcat.org)
  • The University of Virginia - through the Miller Center - offers online discussion and debate series, and their series on end of life care focused on the idea of rationing health care in the US for those needing end of life care. (nursingassistantguides.com)
  • Insight provides an in-depth look at health care issues in and affecting California. (californiahealthline.org)
  • This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged syndicated . (bioethics.net)
  • This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged medical futility blog , syndicated . (bioethics.net)
  • The current medical futility section of the Texas advance directive law (Chapter 166.046 of the Health & Safety Code) is silent on DNAR orders. (all.org)
  • Support Network Factors Associated With Naming a Health Care Decision-Maker and Talking About Advance Care Planning Among People Living With HIV. (nih.gov)
  • Everything you always wanted to know about the Health Care system. (thehealthcareblog.com)
  • To what would you rather attribute the dent in growth rate of health care spending? (thehealthcareblog.com)
  • In 1972, after a month of deliberation, Congress launched the nation's most ambitious experiment in universal health care: a change to the Social Security Act that granted comprehensive coverage under Medicare to virtually anyone diagnosed with kidney failure, regardless of age or income. (minnpost.com)
  • Now, almost four decades later, a program once envisioned as a model for a national health care system has evolved into a hulking monster. (minnpost.com)
  • Even during a fervid national debate over health care, the state of dialysis garnered little public attention. (minnpost.com)
  • One reason the system's problems have evolved out of the health care spotlight is that kidney failure disproportionately afflicts minorities and the dispossessed. (minnpost.com)
  • As the United States moves to expand access to health care, dialysis offers potent lessons. (minnpost.com)
  • Nurses may be the most in-demand health care position in the country. (nursingschools.net)
  • On the same day that the three-year initiative funded by the Agency for Health Care Research Quality (AHCRQ) was announced (March 6), a Perspective article by the AAHPM's Immediate Past President and 2013 President was published in the New England Journal of Medicine ( 2013;368:1173-1175 ). (lww.com)
  • TOPEKA, Kan. (AP) - The future is murky for a House-passed bill that would allow Kansas to join a compact of states seeking an exemption from the federal health care overhaul. (washingtontimes.com)
  • The compact would allow member states to set their own health care policies while retaining federal health care dollars, but only if Congress approves. (washingtontimes.com)
  • Senate Minority Leader Anthony Hensley said the measure would largely be symbolic since the compact is unlikely to win approval in the U.S. Senate, which is controlled by Democrats who have staunchly defended the health care overhaul. (washingtontimes.com)
  • Becoming old is considered a privilege and results from the socioeconomic progress and improvements in health care systems worldwide. (uib.no)
  • Health care providers will encounter bereaved individuals throughout their personal and professional lives. (uwhealth.org)
  • The CCCC along with the California Health Care Foundation and California community leaders have made great strides in getting the word out about advance care planning and disseminating POLST forms. (geripal.org)
  • there is no point in completing advance care planning if people across the health system can't find or see it when it is needed. (geripal.org)
  • Of course, there are many health professionals that still embody this caring ethic. (geripal.org)
  • The regularity of black hat wins, including this month's disastrous Anthem health care hack , which may have compromised another 80 million customer profiles, makes the best case for change. (cbsnews.com)
  • Providing a time and space for conversation on how to reduce health care costs gives the public an opportunity to help solve the broken and complex health care system. (publicagenda.org)
  • How much do average Americans care about public issues like health care? (publicagenda.org)
  • These numbers alone don't reveal why so many of us seem disinterested in following health care policy, though in many ways the disinterest is understandable. (publicagenda.org)
  • At the same time, we believe there is immense potential to ignite meaningful public conversation about solutions on out-of-control health care spending. (publicagenda.org)
  • One reason for the public's lack of interest may be our lack of agency when it comes to health care policy. (publicagenda.org)
  • Health care is also complex, and these complexities may contribute to public ambivalence and exhaustion. (publicagenda.org)
  • We ve all struggled with problems pertaining to our own personal health care costs, so it s easy to understand how thinking about the big policy picture doesn t come to mind when trying to read an insurance bill or figure out which prescriptions are covered under our plans. (publicagenda.org)
  • Yet one of our most recent projects suggests that, with the right support, the public can quickly develop a deeper understanding of and interest in big-picture health care policy issues. (publicagenda.org)
  • There is a great opportunity for average Americans to contribute to solutions to rising health care costs, but what the public needs is the time and space to deliberate in. (publicagenda.org)
  • The rising costs and suboptimal quality throughout the American health care system continue to invite critical inquiry, and practice in the intensive care unit setting is no exception. (hindawi.com)
  • Health care rationing, which is blatant and invidious medical discrimination, is a growing threat. (blogspot.com)
  • Protecting medical conscience rights for health care professionals who wish to adhere to Hippocratic values is going to be huge internationally. (blogspot.com)
  • The supportive team of depression treatment professionals at Ascension Seton Behavioral Health Care in Austin, Texas is committed to ensuring that you or your loved one receives the help and guidance needed through every step of the healing process. (seton.net)
  • Looking for some current suggestions regarding health care issues in relation to health services administration. (brainmass.com)
  • The expression disproportionate futility qualifies a value-laden decision to abstain from a certain medical intervention - in spite of an eventual statistical probability of achieving an immediate beneficial therapeutic effect - because its application would represent an excessive burden and will actually not substantially modify the patient's prognosis. (hospicecare.com)
  • There is not point in advance care panning discussions if the system is unable to honor the patient's goals- for example to be able to get their care needs met at home, and to avoid the hospital and ED. If you are not hospice eligible, the system cannot honor your goal to get your care needs met at home. (geripal.org)
  • It is difficult to determine when a particular course of action may fall under the definition of futile medical care, because of the difficulty in defining the point at which there is no further benefit to intervention in each case. (wikipedia.org)
  • Just 15 to 20 years ago, disputes between doctors and families over the futility of further medical care flared once or twice each year, said Dr. Robert Truog , a pediatric intensive care physician at Boston Children's Hospital. (californiahealthline.org)
  • this ethic sometimes translates into denying the weak and vulnerable medical care that others would receive readily. (lifenews.com)
  • once we learn the skill and practice it over and over again we dont need to look at a care plan to spell out what needs to be done. (allnurses.com)
  • Nurses continually practice infection control, primary prevention (such as vaccines), and supportive care for those who cannot care for themselves. (snipperoo.com)
  • To facilitate introduction of the precepts and techniques of palliative care to surgical practice and education in the United States and Canada by bringing together surgeons with demonstrated interest in palliative care to share resources, strategies, and expertise, and in so doing, act as a catalyst for change. (promotingexcellence.org)
  • According to the American Academy of Neurology Practice Parameter paper, the definition of poor outcome in AIE includes death, persistent vegetative state (PVS), or severe disability requiring full nursing care 6 months after event. (asnjournals.org)
  • Carol Taylor (2011), author of Fundamentals of Nursing: The Art and Science of Nursing Care, writes, "Nursing care involves any number of activities, from carrying out complicated technical procedures to something as seemingly as holding a hand" (p. 5). (snipperoo.com)
  • Yet the United States continues to have one of the industrialized world's highest mortality rates for dialysis care. (minnpost.com)
  • CONCLUSION: Despite marked differences in socioeconomic conditions and tertiary care facilities, the mortality (except in the smallest babies) and morbidity rates were comparable with those of recent studies from developed countries. (biomedsearch.com)
  • FORT WORTH, Texas ― Critically ill Tinslee Lewis ― a Fort Worth baby embroiled in a dispute between her family and a hospital over whether to continue life-sustaining treatment ― is the most recent public face of the heartbreaking and intractable dilemmas often confronted quietly in intensive care units. (californiahealthline.org)
  • 2011. End of life care in Italian intensive care units: Where are we now? (springer.com)
  • Survival outcomes after cardiac or respiratory arrest occurring outside of intensive care units (ICUs) has been well described. (cmaj.ca)
  • 2 - 4 How these data apply to approximately one-third of in-hospital cardiac arrests that occur in intensive care units (ICUs) is less clear. (cmaj.ca)
  • The study was conducted from March 2008 to April 2013 in 19 cardiovascular intensive care units in Italy. (eurekalert.org)
  • Statistical futility expresses the low probability of a specific measure to achieve a given goal. (hospicecare.com)
  • Its story expresses the fears of both ends of the ideological spectrum about what can happen when the doors to care are thrown wide open: Neither government controls nor market forces have kept costs from ballooning or ensured the highest-quality care. (minnpost.com)
  • We suggest the use of HumMod, a computer-based human physiology simulator, to demonstrate beneficial physiological responses to pre-oxygenation and the futility of excessive minute ventilation after intubation. (medsci.org)
  • The acute (hospital) care plans I have seen cared for a problem not the person. (allnurses.com)
  • Thought you might appreciate this item(s) I saw at Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery. (lww.com)
  • This became apparent to me when I was rounding with pediatric Hematology/Oncology at Mott Children's Hospital in my last semester in the Pediatric Nurse Practitioner-Acute Care program at Wayne State University. (oncologynurseadvisor.com)
  • I've targeted Exercises In Futility in particular because it is demonstratively and quintessentially Mgła , and all preceding and subsequent efforts are defined by it. (metalstorm.net)
  • New efforts such as The Conversation Project, advance care planning videos, and emerging advance directive websites have begun to focus on the individual person, and not only on the healthcare environment. (geripal.org)
  • A Phase 3, multicenter, randomized, double-blind, controlled study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of peramivir administered intravenously in addition to standard of care compared to standard of care alone in adults and adolescents who are hospitalized due to serious influenza. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • After participating in carefully designed, moderated conversations that helped those in the study engage with realistic policy options, participants' thinking moved away from resigned futility and toward constructive action. (publicagenda.org)
  • The study is being posted early online to coincide with its presentation at the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine annual congress. (eurekalert.org)
  • The following note was made by the Massachusetts General Hospital Optimum Care Committee in the medical record of Barbara Howe . (georgetown.edu)
  • Later, Thomas Petty, MD, an eminent pulmonologist who headed a respiratory team at the University of Colorado Medical Center and became chairman of the National Lung Educational Program, introduced the young physician to a team-based approach to hospital care. (the-hospitalist.org)
  • Palliative care input and continued dialogue with her family about goals of care ultimately culminated in a "do not resuscitate" order, and she died on the seventy-second hospital day. (hindawi.com)
  • Statewide regionalization of postarrest care for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: association with survival and neurologic outcome. (semanticscholar.org)
  • Futility analysis determined that the probability of detecting a statistically significant benefit for longer cooling, deeper cooling, or both for NICU death was less than 2 percent. (eurekalert.org)
  • I suggested that she has a feeding tube inserted through her nose into her stomach and to return home to Vietnam for supportive care. (straitstimes.com)
  • However, cancer has served as the paradigm for terminal care, the many other conditions have recognizable terminal phases, a systematic approach to end of life care should be part of all medical specialties. (ispub.com)