Self Care: Performance of activities or tasks traditionally performed by professional health care providers. The concept includes care of oneself or one's family and friends.Self Concept: A person's view of himself.Germinal Center: The activated center of a lymphoid follicle in secondary lymphoid tissue where B-LYMPHOCYTES are stimulated by antigens and helper T cells (T-LYMPHOCYTES, HELPER-INDUCER) are stimulated to generate memory cells.Self Tolerance: The normal lack of the ability to produce an immunological response to autologous (self) antigens. A breakdown of self tolerance leads to autoimmune diseases. The ability to recognize the difference between self and non-self is the prime function of the immune system.Child Day Care Centers: Facilities which provide care for pre-school and school-age children.Community Health Centers: Facilities which administer the delivery of health care services to people living in a community or neighborhood.Trauma Centers: Specialized hospital facilities which provide diagnostic and therapeutic services for trauma patients.Tertiary Care Centers: A medical facility which provides a high degree of subspecialty expertise for patients from centers where they received SECONDARY CARE.Self Psychology: Psychoanalytic theory focusing on interpretation of behavior in reference to self. (From APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Terms, 1994) This elaboration of the psychoanalytic concepts of narcissism and the self, was developed by Heinz Kohut, and stresses the importance of the self-awareness of excessive needs for approval and self-gratification.Self Disclosure: A willingness to reveal information about oneself to others.Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.): An agency of the UNITED STATES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE that conducts and supports programs for the prevention and control of disease and provides consultation and assistance to health departments and other countries.Self Mutilation: The act of injuring one's own body to the extent of cutting off or permanently destroying a limb or other essential part of a body.Ego: The conscious portion of the personality structure which serves to mediate between the demands of the primitive instinctual drives, (the id), of internalized parental and social prohibitions or the conscience, (the superego), and of reality.Self Medication: The self administration of medication not prescribed by a physician or in a manner not directed by a physician.Poison Control Centers: Facilities which provide information concerning poisons and treatment of poisoning in emergencies.Photosynthetic Reaction Center Complex Proteins: Protein complexes that take part in the process of PHOTOSYNTHESIS. They are located within the THYLAKOID MEMBRANES of plant CHLOROPLASTS and a variety of structures in more primitive organisms. There are two major complexes involved in the photosynthetic process called PHOTOSYSTEM I and PHOTOSYSTEM II.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Self Efficacy: Cognitive mechanism based on expectations or beliefs about one's ability to perform actions necessary to produce a given effect. It is also a theoretical component of behavior change in various therapeutic treatments. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994)Information Centers: Facilities for collecting and organizing information. They may be specialized by subject field, type of source material, persons served, location, or type of services.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Self Report: Method for obtaining information through verbal responses, written or oral, from subjects.Self-Injurious Behavior: Behavior in which persons hurt or harm themselves without the motive of suicide or of sexual deviation.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.United StatesAutoantigens: Endogenous tissue constituents that have the ability to interact with AUTOANTIBODIES and cause an immune response.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Microtubule-Organizing Center: An amorphous region of electron dense material in the cytoplasm from which the MICROTUBULES polymerization is nucleated. The pericentriolar region of the CENTROSOME which surrounds the CENTRIOLES is an example.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Birthing Centers: Free-standing facilities that provide prenatal, childbirth, and postnatal care and usually incorporate family-centered maternity care concepts and practices.Self-Assessment: Appraisal of one's own personal qualities or traits.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (U.S.): A component of the Department of Health and Human Services to oversee and direct the Medicare and Medicaid programs and related Federal medical care quality control staffs. Name was changed effective June 14, 2001.Great BritainReferral and Consultation: The practice of sending a patient to another program or practitioner for services or advice which the referring source is not prepared to provide.Poisoning: A condition or physical state produced by the ingestion, injection, inhalation of or exposure to a deleterious agent.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Rehabilitation Centers: Facilities which provide programs for rehabilitating the mentally or physically disabled individuals.Wounds and Injuries: Damage inflicted on the body as the direct or indirect result of an external force, with or without disruption of structural continuity.Rhodobacter sphaeroides: Spherical phototrophic bacteria found in mud and stagnant water exposed to light.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Electron Spin Resonance Spectroscopy: A technique applicable to the wide variety of substances which exhibit paramagnetism because of the magnetic moments of unpaired electrons. The spectra are useful for detection and identification, for determination of electron structure, for study of interactions between molecules, and for measurement of nuclear spins and moments. (From McGraw-Hill Encyclopedia of Science and Technology, 7th edition) Electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) spectroscopy is a variant of the technique which can give enhanced resolution. Electron spin resonance analysis can now be used in vivo, including imaging applications such as MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Autoimmunity: Process whereby the immune system reacts against the body's own tissues. Autoimmunity may produce or be caused by AUTOIMMUNE DISEASES.B-Lymphocytes: Lymphoid cells concerned with humoral immunity. They are short-lived cells resembling bursa-derived lymphocytes of birds in their production of immunoglobulin upon appropriate stimulation.Attitude to Health: Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.Pilot Projects: Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.T-Lymphocytes: Lymphocytes responsible for cell-mediated immunity. Two types have been identified - cytotoxic (T-LYMPHOCYTES, CYTOTOXIC) and helper T-lymphocytes (T-LYMPHOCYTES, HELPER-INDUCER). They are formed when lymphocytes circulate through the THYMUS GLAND and differentiate to thymocytes. When exposed to an antigen, they divide rapidly and produce large numbers of new T cells sensitized to that antigen.Models, Molecular: Models used experimentally or theoretically to study molecular shape, electronic properties, or interactions; includes analogous molecules, computer-generated graphics, and mechanical structures.Ambulatory Care Facilities: Those facilities which administer health services to individuals who do not require hospitalization or institutionalization.IndiaHealth Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Immune Tolerance: The specific failure of a normally responsive individual to make an immune response to a known antigen. It results from previous contact with the antigen by an immunologically immature individual (fetus or neonate) or by an adult exposed to extreme high-dose or low-dose antigen, or by exposure to radiation, antimetabolites, antilymphocytic serum, etc.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Outcome Assessment (Health Care): Research aimed at assessing the quality and effectiveness of health care as measured by the attainment of a specified end result or outcome. Measures include parameters such as improved health, lowered morbidity or mortality, and improvement of abnormal states (such as elevated blood pressure).Breast Self-Examination: The inspection of one's breasts, usually for signs of disease, especially neoplastic disease.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Patient Education as Topic: The teaching or training of patients concerning their own health needs.Self Administration: Administration of a drug or chemical by the individual under the direction of a physician. It includes administration clinically or experimentally, by human or animal.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Patient Acceptance of Health Care: The seeking and acceptance by patients of health service.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Oxidation-Reduction: A chemical reaction in which an electron is transferred from one molecule to another. The electron-donating molecule is the reducing agent or reductant; the electron-accepting molecule is the oxidizing agent or oxidant. Reducing and oxidizing agents function as conjugate reductant-oxidant pairs or redox pairs (Lehninger, Principles of Biochemistry, 1982, p471).Community Mental Health Centers: Facilities which administer the delivery of psychologic and psychiatric services to people living in a neighborhood or community.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Patient Satisfaction: The degree to which the individual regards the health care service or product or the manner in which it is delivered by the provider as useful, effective, or beneficial.Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.Interpersonal Relations: The reciprocal interaction of two or more persons.Hospitals, Special: Hospitals which provide care for a single category of illness with facilities and staff directed toward a specific service.EuropeBinding Sites: The parts of a macromolecule that directly participate in its specific combination with another molecule.Health Services Accessibility: The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.Lymphocyte Activation: Morphologic alteration of small B LYMPHOCYTES or T LYMPHOCYTES in culture into large blast-like cells able to synthesize DNA and RNA and to divide mitotically. It is induced by INTERLEUKINS; MITOGENS such as PHYTOHEMAGGLUTININS, and by specific ANTIGENS. It may also occur in vivo as in GRAFT REJECTION.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Mice, Inbred C57BLPrognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)H-2 Antigens: The major group of transplantation antigens in the mouse.ScotlandLongitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Self-Examination: The inspection of one's own body, usually for signs of disease (e.g., BREAST SELF-EXAMINATION, testicular self-examination).Suicide, Attempted: The unsuccessful attempt to kill oneself.Program Evaluation: Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.Patient Compliance: Voluntary cooperation of the patient in following a prescribed regimen.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Mass Screening: Organized periodic procedures performed on large groups of people for the purpose of detecting disease.Age Distribution: The frequency of different ages or age groups in a given population. The distribution may refer to either how many or what proportion of the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Electron Transport: The process by which ELECTRONS are transported from a reduced substrate to molecular OXYGEN. (From Bennington, Saunders Dictionary and Encyclopedia of Laboratory Medicine and Technology, 1984, p270)September 11 Terrorist Attacks: Terrorism on September 11, 2001 against targets in New York, the Pentagon in Virginia, and an aborted attack that ended in Pennsylvania.EnglandRegistries: The systems and processes involved in the establishment, support, management, and operation of registers, e.g., disease registers.Photosystem II Protein Complex: A large multisubunit protein complex found in the THYLAKOID MEMBRANE. It uses light energy derived from LIGHT-HARVESTING PROTEIN COMPLEXES to catalyze the splitting of WATER into DIOXYGEN and of reducing equivalents of HYDROGEN.Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Depression: Depressive states usually of moderate intensity in contrast with major depression present in neurotic and psychotic disorders.Neoplasms: New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.Odds Ratio: The ratio of two odds. The exposure-odds ratio for case control data is the ratio of the odds in favor of exposure among cases to the odds in favor of exposure among noncases. The disease-odds ratio for a cohort or cross section is the ratio of the odds in favor of disease among the exposed to the odds in favor of disease among the unexposed. The prevalence-odds ratio refers to an odds ratio derived cross-sectionally from studies of prevalent cases.Mice, Transgenic: Laboratory mice that have been produced from a genetically manipulated EGG or EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN.Light-Harvesting Protein Complexes: Complexes containing CHLOROPHYLL and other photosensitive molecules. They serve to capture energy in the form of PHOTONS and are generally found as components of the PHOTOSYSTEM I PROTEIN COMPLEX or the PHOTOSYSTEM II PROTEIN COMPLEX.Kinetics: The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.Survival Rate: The proportion of survivors in a group, e.g., of patients, studied and followed over a period, or the proportion of persons in a specified group alive at the beginning of a time interval who survive to the end of the interval. It is often studied using life table methods.Emergency Service, Hospital: Hospital department responsible for the administration and provision of immediate medical or surgical care to the emergency patient.Ambulatory Care: Health care services provided to patients on an ambulatory basis, rather than by admission to a hospital or other health care facility. The services may be a part of a hospital, augmenting its inpatient services, or may be provided at a free-standing facility.Chi-Square Distribution: A distribution in which a variable is distributed like the sum of the squares of any given independent random variable, each of which has a normal distribution with mean of zero and variance of one. The chi-square test is a statistical test based on comparison of a test statistic to a chi-square distribution. The oldest of these tests are used to detect whether two or more population distributions differ from one another.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Protein Conformation: The characteristic 3-dimensional shape of a protein, including the secondary, supersecondary (motifs), tertiary (domains) and quaternary structure of the peptide chain. PROTEIN STRUCTURE, QUATERNARY describes the conformation assumed by multimeric proteins (aggregates of more than one polypeptide chain).Awareness: The act of "taking account" of an object or state of affairs. It does not imply assessment of, nor attention to the qualities or nature of the object.Feasibility Studies: Studies to determine the advantages or disadvantages, practicability, or capability of accomplishing a projected plan, study, or project.France: A country in western Europe bordered by the Atlantic Ocean, the English Channel, the Mediterranean Sea, and the countries of Belgium, Germany, Italy, Spain, Switzerland, the principalities of Andorra and Monaco, and by the duchy of Luxembourg. Its capital is Paris.Sex Distribution: The number of males and females in a given population. The distribution may refer to how many men or women or what proportion of either in the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Iron-Sulfur Proteins: A group of proteins possessing only the iron-sulfur complex as the prosthetic group. These proteins participate in all major pathways of electron transport: photosynthesis, respiration, hydroxylation and bacterial hydrogen and nitrogen fixation.LondonIsraelInterviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Health Care Surveys: Statistical measures of utilization and other aspects of the provision of health care services including hospitalization and ambulatory care.Autoimmune Diseases: Disorders that are characterized by the production of antibodies that react with host tissues or immune effector cells that are autoreactive to endogenous peptides.Health Status Indicators: The measurement of the health status for a given population using a variety of indices, including morbidity, mortality, and available health resources.Psychoanalytic Theory: Conceptual system developed by Freud and his followers in which unconscious motivations are considered to shape normal and abnormal personality development and behavior.Major Histocompatibility Complex: The genetic region which contains the loci of genes which determine the structure of the serologically defined (SD) and lymphocyte-defined (LD) TRANSPLANTATION ANTIGENS, genes which control the structure of the IMMUNE RESPONSE-ASSOCIATED ANTIGENS, HUMAN; the IMMUNE RESPONSE GENES which control the ability of an animal to respond immunologically to antigenic stimuli, and genes which determine the structure and/or level of the first four components of complement.ItalyCase-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Activities of Daily Living: The performance of the basic activities of self care, such as dressing, ambulation, or eating.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Existentialism: Philosophy based on the analysis of the individual's existence in the world which holds that human existence cannot be completely described in scientific terms. Existentialism also stresses the freedom and responsibility of the individual as well as the uniqueness of religious and ethical experiences and the analysis of subjective phenomena such as anxiety, guilt, and suffering. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed.)New York CityModels, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Body Image: Individuals' concept of their own bodies.Spleen: An encapsulated lymphatic organ through which venous blood filters.Receptors, Antigen, T-Cell: Molecules on the surface of T-lymphocytes that recognize and combine with antigens. The receptors are non-covalently associated with a complex of several polypeptides collectively called CD3 antigens (ANTIGENS, CD3). Recognition of foreign antigen and the major histocompatibility complex is accomplished by a single heterodimeric antigen-receptor structure, composed of either alpha-beta (RECEPTORS, ANTIGEN, T-CELL, ALPHA-BETA) or gamma-delta (RECEPTORS, ANTIGEN, T-CELL, GAMMA-DELTA) chains.Research Design: A plan for collecting and utilizing data so that desired information can be obtained with sufficient precision or so that an hypothesis can be tested properly.Empathy: An individual's objective and insightful awareness of the feelings and behavior of another person. It should be distinguished from sympathy, which is usually nonobjective and noncritical. It includes caring, which is the demonstration of an awareness of and a concern for the good of others. (From Bioethics Thesaurus, 1992)TurkeyPheophytins: Chlorophylls from which the magnesium has been removed by treatment with weak acid.BrazilSmoking: Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.Patient Selection: Criteria and standards used for the determination of the appropriateness of the inclusion of patients with specific conditions in proposed treatment plans and the criteria used for the inclusion of subjects in various clinical trials and other research protocols.National Center for Health Statistics (U.S.): A center in the PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE which is primarily concerned with the collection, analysis, and dissemination of health statistics on vital events and health activities to reflect the health status of people, health needs, and health resources.Length of Stay: The period of confinement of a patient to a hospital or other health facility.Educational Status: Educational attainment or level of education of individuals.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Quality Assurance, Health Care: Activities and programs intended to assure or improve the quality of care in either a defined medical setting or a program. The concept includes the assessment or evaluation of the quality of care; identification of problems or shortcomings in the delivery of care; designing activities to overcome these deficiencies; and follow-up monitoring to ensure effectiveness of corrective steps.Clinical Competence: The capability to perform acceptably those duties directly related to patient care.Databases, Factual: Extensive collections, reputedly complete, of facts and data garnered from material of a specialized subject area and made available for analysis and application. The collection can be automated by various contemporary methods for retrieval. The concept should be differentiated from DATABASES, BIBLIOGRAPHIC which is restricted to collections of bibliographic references.Hospitalization: The confinement of a patient in a hospital.Protein Binding: The process in which substances, either endogenous or exogenous, bind to proteins, peptides, enzymes, protein precursors, or allied compounds. Specific protein-binding measures are often used as assays in diagnostic assessments.TexasSocial Class: A stratum of people with similar position and prestige; includes social stratification. Social class is measured by criteria such as education, occupation, and income.Academies and Institutes: Organizations representing specialized fields which are accepted as authoritative; may be non-governmental, university or an independent research organization, e.g., National Academy of Sciences, Brookings Institution, etc.Patient Care Team: Care of patients by a multidisciplinary team usually organized under the leadership of a physician; each member of the team has specific responsibilities and the whole team contributes to the care of the patient.Recurrence: The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.IraqPsychometrics: Assessment of psychological variables by the application of mathematical procedures.Health Education: Education that increases the awareness and favorably influences the attitudes and knowledge relating to the improvement of health on a personal or community basis.Community Health Services: Diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive health services provided for individuals in the community.Autoantibodies: Antibodies that react with self-antigens (AUTOANTIGENS) of the organism that produced them.SwedenHospitals, University: Hospitals maintained by a university for the teaching of medical students, postgraduate training programs, and clinical research.Quality of Health Care: The levels of excellence which characterize the health service or health care provided based on accepted standards of quality.Malaysia: A parliamentary democracy with a constitutional monarch in southeast Asia, consisting of 11 states (West Malaysia) on the Malay Peninsula and two states (East Malaysia) on the island of BORNEO. It is also called the Federation of Malaysia. Its capital is Kuala Lumpur. Before 1963 it was the Union of Malaya. It reorganized in 1948 as the Federation of Malaya, becoming independent from British Malaya in 1957 and becoming Malaysia in 1963 as a federation of Malaya, Sabah, Sarawak, and Singapore (which seceded in 1965). The form Malay- probably derives from the Tamil malay, mountain, with reference to its geography. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p715 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p329)Practice Guidelines as Topic: Directions or principles presenting current or future rules of policy for assisting health care practitioners in patient care decisions regarding diagnosis, therapy, or related clinical circumstances. The guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by the convening of expert panels. The guidelines form a basis for the evaluation of all aspects of health care and delivery.Bacterial Proteins: Proteins found in any species of bacterium.Rural Health: The status of health in rural populations.Antigen Presentation: The process by which antigen is presented to lymphocytes in a form they can recognize. This is performed by antigen presenting cells (APCs). Some antigens require processing before they can be recognized. Antigen processing consists of ingestion and partial digestion of the antigen by the APC, followed by presentation of fragments on the cell surface. (From Rosen et al., Dictionary of Immunology, 1989)Outpatient Clinics, Hospital: Organized services in a hospital which provide medical care on an outpatient basis.Crystallography, X-Ray: The study of crystal structure using X-RAY DIFFRACTION techniques. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Anxiety: Feeling or emotion of dread, apprehension, and impending disaster but not disabling as with ANXIETY DISORDERS.Urban Population: The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.Thymus Gland: A single, unpaired primary lymphoid organ situated in the MEDIASTINUM, extending superiorly into the neck to the lower edge of the THYROID GLAND and inferiorly to the fourth costal cartilage. It is necessary for normal development of immunologic function early in life. By puberty, it begins to involute and much of the tissue is replaced by fat.Hospitals: Institutions with an organized medical staff which provide medical care to patients.Medical Records: Recording of pertinent information concerning patient's illness or illnesses.Survival Analysis: A class of statistical procedures for estimating the survival function (function of time, starting with a population 100% well at a given time and providing the percentage of the population still well at later times). The survival analysis is then used for making inferences about the effects of treatments, prognostic factors, exposures, and other covariates on the function.Occupational Diseases: Diseases caused by factors involved in one's employment.Single-Blind Method: A method in which either the observer(s) or the subject(s) is kept ignorant of the group to which the subjects are assigned.Clinical Protocols: Precise and detailed plans for the study of a medical or biomedical problem and/or plans for a regimen of therapy.IranSpain: Parliamentary democracy located between France on the northeast and Portugual on the west and bordered by the Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea.HIV Infections: Includes the spectrum of human immunodeficiency virus infections that range from asymptomatic seropositivity, thru AIDS-related complex (ARC), to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).Social Perception: The perceiving of attributes, characteristics, and behaviors of one's associates or social groups.Cost-Benefit Analysis: A method of comparing the cost of a program with its expected benefits in dollars (or other currency). The benefit-to-cost ratio is a measure of total return expected per unit of money spent. This analysis generally excludes consideration of factors that are not measured ultimately in economic terms. Cost effectiveness compares alternative ways to achieve a specific set of results.Mental Disorders: Psychiatric illness or diseases manifested by breakdowns in the adaptational process expressed primarily as abnormalities of thought, feeling, and behavior producing either distress or impairment of function.Diagnostic Self Evaluation: A self-evaluation of health status.Guideline Adherence: Conformity in fulfilling or following official, recognized, or institutional requirements, guidelines, recommendations, protocols, pathways, or other standards.Population Surveillance: Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.Cooperative Behavior: The interaction of two or more persons or organizations directed toward a common goal which is mutually beneficial. An act or instance of working or acting together for a common purpose or benefit, i.e., joint action. (From Random House Dictionary Unabridged, 2d ed)Palatine Tonsil: A round-to-oval mass of lymphoid tissue embedded in the lateral wall of the PHARYNX. There is one on each side of the oropharynx in the fauces between the anterior and posterior pillars of the SOFT PALATE.Delivery of Health Care: The concept concerned with all aspects of providing and distributing health services to a patient population.Adaptation, Psychological: A state of harmony between internal needs and external demands and the processes used in achieving this condition. (From APA Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)Peptides: Members of the class of compounds composed of AMINO ACIDS joined together by peptide bonds between adjacent amino acids into linear, branched or cyclical structures. OLIGOPEPTIDES are composed of approximately 2-12 amino acids. Polypeptides are composed of approximately 13 or more amino acids. PROTEINS are linear polypeptides that are normally synthesized on RIBOSOMES.Emergency Medical Services: Services specifically designed, staffed, and equipped for the emergency care of patients.Peptide Fragments: Partial proteins formed by partial hydrolysis of complete proteins or generated through PROTEIN ENGINEERING techniques.Literature, ModernCanada: The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.
  • AAPCC maintains the National Poison Data System (NPDS) , the national database of information logged by the country's regional poison control centers serving all 50 United States, Puerto Rico, the District of Columbia, and territories. (aapcc.org)
  • AAPCC is not able to completely verify the accuracy of every report made to member centers. (aapcc.org)
  • Full accreditation from the National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers, a program administered by the American College of Surgeons to improve quality of care and monitoring of outcomes for patients with diseases of the breast. (princetonhcs.org)
  • The Primary Care Clinic is staffed by physicians (MDs), Advanced Registered Nurse Practitioners (ARNPs or nurses with graduate level training), registered nurses (RNs), and medical assistants (MAs). (washington.edu)
  • During our inspection, we spoke with nine people who lived at the service, two relatives, four members of the care staff, two registered nurses, a housekeeper, an activities organiser, two members of the kitchen staff, the administrator and the registered manager. (cqc.org.uk)
  • As part of the NCI-Designated Dan L Duncan Comprehensive Cancer Center at Baylor St. Luke's Medical Center our physicians are among the best in their field and are committed to patient care, applying the latest clinical research to improve treatment options. (bcm.edu)
  • The physicians and nursing staff of the Oregon Poison Center provides professional toxicology education through lectures, conferences, medical journal articles and didactic learning experiences. (ohsu.edu)
  • This integrated approach to care enables physicians and researchers to closely monitor how children with kidney problems are responding to treatment, make rapid adjustments where needed and ultimately standardize care for the best possible results. (cincinnatichildrens.org)
  • The physicians are not only well-informed but they are caring and sensitive to your individual needs. (umich.edu)
  • One reason we felt we could make it work economically now is that Blue Cross said it would no longer require referrals from primary care physicians to be seen in urgent care centers," Hughes said. (bizjournals.com)
  • The CED offers 24-hour care and is staffed by an international team with the highest qualifications in paediatric emergency care, including physicians, nurses, emergency medical technicians and imaging and lab professionals. (gulf-times.com)
  • Residents, or physicians in training after medical school, are also responsible for all aspects of your child's care while in the hospital. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • Dr. Michael Hughes and his partner Dr. Chris Whelan , two emergency medicine doctors at Cape Cod Hospital, next week will open a new urgent care center in a strip mall in Weymouth. (bizjournals.com)
  • But armed with state data showing almost half of ER visits, to the tune of $514 million in 2008, were unnecessary, insurers like Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts are eager to see urgent care centers grow. (bizjournals.com)
  • Urgent care centers differ from retail clinics such as CVS MinuteClinic because they are staffed by doctors rather than nurses or physician assistants. (bizjournals.com)
  • The typical wait time in a walk-in urgent care center is 15 minutes, a study by the Urgent Care Association of America found. (bizjournals.com)
  • The Urgent Care Association found that nationally, the average reimbursement for an urgent care visit increased almost 15 percent between 2008 and 2010, to $118. (bizjournals.com)
  • Blue Cross issued a letter to providers in January 2011, asking for applications to join a new Urgent Care Center Network, which now has 13 members. (bizjournals.com)
  • Urgent care facilities in the network are included in Blue Cross marketing materials and members pay co-pays comparable to a specialist doctor visit, which is much lower than ER co-pays. (bizjournals.com)
  • Tufts says it is receiving increasing requests from urgent care centers in both Massachusetts and Rhode Island who wish to contract with the plan. (bizjournals.com)
  • With the opening of the CED, Sidra Medicine is adding capacity to existing emergency and urgent care centres in the country. (gulf-times.com)
  • In addition to the CED, Sidra Medicine also operates a Children's Urgent Care Clinic in the same location. (gulf-times.com)
  • Should parents with children requiring non-emergency care choose to come to Sidra Medicine for treatment, the Children's Urgent Care Clinic will treat them in order of medical urgency and require a charge of QR 550 to be paid for consultation (supplementary charges may apply). (gulf-times.com)
  • If you need urgent care for a non life-threatening issue when the Wellness Center is open, please call Dial-A-Nurse at 773.508.8883. (luc.edu)
  • If you need urgent care for a non life-threatening issue at a time when the Wellness Center is closed, consider utilizing one of the phone or clinic resources below. (luc.edu)
  • If you don't have access to a nurse line, please visit our urgent care referral sites below. (luc.edu)
  • Ghaly said it makes sense to have a primary care clinic at the urgent care center. (medpagetoday.com)
  • Ever since I've been in college I've heard multiple times how it's important to practice self care but actually I find it hard for myself to actually do that on a regular basis because I feel like there is always something to be done. (uwm.edu)
  • Master Care Medical Center is a medical group practice located in Jasper, GA that specializes in Internal Medicine and Nursing (Nurse Practitioner). (healthgrades.com)
  • One-year funding of $20,000 was awarded for their submission, "Developing a Call to Care: Understanding How Family Medicine Residents' Values Shape their Practice of Patient-centred Care. (queensu.ca)
  • And, by advocating for best practice care professionally and in the public policy arena, we are striving to address the critical issues of a population that historically are the highest medical resource utilizers but also statistically have the worst outcomes for their chronic respiratory illnesses. (volunteermatch.org)
  • The palliative care faculty and their colleagues are active participants in an array of research efforts that will contribute to advances in the theory and practice of palliative care. (rochester.edu)
  • Before you schedule an appointment, please contact your insurance company to make sure that the Comprehensive Care Practice and our providers are covered by your plan. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • Having a conversation about the cost of the complex drugs and biologics and payment assistance before therapy starts can help put families at ease, said Evans, who will present tips during a session on the best and worst practices for running an infusion center here at the National Infusion Center Association 2019 Meeting. (medscape.com)
  • Cite this: Infusion Centers Help Navigate Cost of Care - Medscape - Jun 11, 2019. (medscape.com)
  • Their multidisciplinary team cares for a wide scope of spinal diseases, injuries, and deformities through physical rehabilitation, injection therapy, medication management, and minimally invasive surgery. (spine-health.com)
  • Our team built on their extensive international experience with many thousands of simulation hours and training so that we're prepared for a really wide range of scenarios and ready to offer the best care possible as one multidisciplinary team," he added. (gulf-times.com)
  • CoC accreditation recognizes programs that provide comprehensive, high-quality and multidisciplinary patient-centered care. (princetonhcs.org)
  • We also observed how care and support was provided to people. (cqc.org.uk)
  • SOFI is a way of observing care to help us understand the experience of people who could not talk with us. (cqc.org.uk)
  • Palliative (pronounced pal-lee-uh-tiv) care is specialized medical care for people with serious illnesses. (washington.edu)
  • Today, there is approximately one palliative care medical professional for every 1,200 people facing serious illness. (washington.edu)
  • People in care homes receive accommodation and nursing or personal care as single package under one contractual agreement. (cqc.org.uk)
  • We spoke with nine people who used the service and eight relatives about their experience of the care provided. (cqc.org.uk)
  • When people leave the centers in the evening, there is comfort in knowing that the parking lots are active and other businesses are still open, he said. (medscape.com)
  • They have no brand if they aren't affiliated with a hospital, and in Massachusetts, unlike some other places, most people have primary care doctors," Dr. David Himmelstein , associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School, said. (bizjournals.com)
  • to provide independent information on all aspects of care for older people. (which.co.uk)
  • Locally, our care is recognised for its quality, substance and reliability in meeting the needs of older people by way of a dedicated staff and care workforce. (ageuk.org.uk)
  • Located near the city center at 8532 W Capitol Dr, the Pulmedix Asthma Care Center a Not for Profit organization dedicated to improving the lives of medically under served people suffering the debilitating effects of asthma. (volunteermatch.org)
  • Evidence has shown that a series of failings in immigration removal centres (IRCs) has compromised the continuity of care for people with HIV. (aidsmap.com)
  • it is generally accepted in law that this should be of the same standard of care as that provided to people living in the community. (aidsmap.com)
  • This approach could permit rapid expansion of human resources for HIV care while providing the skills and clinic capacity for effective management of other chronic illnesses. (who.int)
  • A recent report " Imprisoned Justice: Inside Two Georgia Immigration Detention Centers ," by Project South and the Penn State Law Center for Immigrants' Right Clinic, details a long list of abuses at the Stewart and Irwin detention centers. (huffingtonpost.com)
  • The Sebring clinic opened in May 2007 and has always been at the Herring Avenue location, just across the street from the Sebring Comcast customer service center. (wikipedia.org)
  • Learn about the latest in contact center technology from the Customer Care team. (cisco.com)
  • The OHSU Spine Center team combines experts in all aspects of spine care, including pain management, orthopaedics, rehabilitation, physical therapy and the latest in minimally invasive surgical techniques. (ohsu.edu)
  • The Spine Center team is also committed to trying nonsurgical options first. (ohsu.edu)
  • By implementing Martti right where care is administered, Sanford Bemidji is able to quickly access a highly-qualified team of language professionals," explains James Edwards, LAN's CEO. (cnbc.com)
  • Your care center team may refer you to a specialty or treatment center. (mdanderson.org)
  • In addition to traditional research, many members of our team consult and participate in quality of care initiatives that cross cut all of our clinical endeavors. (rochester.edu)
  • But if a person's behaviour becomes a problem, centre staff can find themselves relatively isolated. (communitycare.co.uk)
  • However, day centre staff can be quite isolated, and often have to deal with very difficult types of behaviour without always being able to obtain support from other agencies. (communitycare.co.uk)
  • In addition, the day centre staff and the centre's other clients would offer her a wider range of social interaction, as otherwise she was fairly socially isolated. (communitycare.co.uk)
  • She returned to the centre the next day, again in a distraught state, and hit a member of staff," she adds. (communitycare.co.uk)
  • While the day centre staff have developed a good relationship with Thomas, the centre cannot operate a 24-hour service, so when she is not there her anxieties, self-destructive behaviour and depression often re-emerge. (communitycare.co.uk)
  • I will always be honest and accurate in all my dealings with the Honolulu Wellness Center and it's staff. (google.com)
  • They participate in the staff hiring process, attend Center events and family programs. (wcsu.edu)
  • Sidra Medicine's highly qualified and experienced triage staff will determine the urgency of treatment and the appropriate level of care required on site. (gulf-times.com)
  • All of the Geriatrics Center staff have special training and an interest in working with older adults. (umich.edu)
  • Downstairs houses residents who are losing or have lost much of their mental faculties, and are taken care of by a different set of staff members. (caring.com)
  • What initial and ongoing state training and registry system (STARS) training is required for child care center staff? (wa.gov)
  • What are the required staff to child ratios and maximum group sizes for my center? (wa.gov)
  • When is a child or staff member too ill to be at child care? (wa.gov)
  • The staff seem nice and caring, but they don't follow with with the simplest of request and do not know where to get what they need to make a resident comfortable. (caring.com)
  • The largest dementia care residential complex in southern Alberta opened Tuesday in the southeast Calgary community of Southview. (cbc.ca)
  • Of the 210 new beds, 120 will be dedicated to complex dementia care. (cbc.ca)
  • Bethany Riverview is a newly built, 200,000-square-foot dementia care centre in southeast Calgary. (cbc.ca)
  • At Smilow Care Centers, you have convenient access to today's most advanced screening and diagnostic methods, including 3D mammography (tomosynthesis), ultrasound, MRI and image-guided biopsy. (ynhh.org)
  • Curriculum is focused towards preparing nurses to sit for the Certified Breast Care Nurse  Examination. (mskcc.org)
  • As American society gets grayer, families are taking the lead role in providing care for aging adults. (pewresearch.org)
  • Overview The record generation gap that played out at the voting booth in the last two presidential elections is echoed by large differences by age in attitudes about the tradeoff between reducing the federal deficit and preserving entitlements for older adults, according to a new nationwide Pew Research Center survey. (pewresearch.org)
  • This module covers palliative care in both children and adults. (who.int)
  • Also included in the neonate critical care codes are immediate preoperative evaluation and stabilization of neonates with life threatening surgical or cardiac conditions. (aapc.com)
  • This collaboration in care will focus on reducing delays in proceeding to the operating room, encouraging early weight bearing, and reducing preventable complications. (rochester.edu)
  • To diagnose Arthritis, the Hand Center must conduct a physical exam and depending on your findings perform imaging tests. (mcw.edu)
  • Life Care Centers of America is the largest privately held long-term elderly care company in the U.S., with facilities across 28 states, and the third largest in the U.S. It is headquartered in Cleveland, Tennessee . (wikipedia.org)
  • I agree not to bring any weapons or anything that can be used as a weapon into Honolulu Wellness Center facilities. (google.com)
  • Only five percent of breast imaging facilities nationwide have achieved this designation, a status granted to centers that have achieved high standards in image quality, personnel qualifications, equipment, quality control and quality assurance programs. (princetonhcs.org)
  • We looked at eight people's care plan records and other records related to the running of and the quality of the service. (cqc.org.uk)
  • This included 19 people's care records and 13 medication records. (cqc.org.uk)
  • The Honolulu Star-Advertiser (https://ow.ly/BkSa30583bn ) reports the lawsuit says baby Zoe died July 2015 hours after her father dropped her off at Aloha Made Child Care. (washingtontimes.com)