The artificial substitution of heart and lung action as indicated for HEART ARREST resulting from electric shock, DROWNING, respiratory arrest, or other causes. The two major components of cardiopulmonary resuscitation are artificial ventilation (RESPIRATION, ARTIFICIAL) and closed-chest CARDIAC MASSAGE.
The restoration to life or consciousness of one apparently dead. (Dorland, 27th ed)
Cessation of heart beat or MYOCARDIAL CONTRACTION. If it is treated within a few minutes, heart arrest can be reversed in most cases to normal cardiac rhythm and effective circulation.
Rhythmic compression of the heart by pressure applied manually over the sternum (closed heart massage) or directly to the heart through an opening in the chest wall (open heart massage). It is done to reinstate and maintain circulation. (Dorland, 28th ed)
Diversion of the flow of blood from the entrance of the right atrium directly to the aorta (or femoral artery) via an oxygenator thus bypassing both the heart and lungs.
Instructions issued by a physician pertaining to the institution, continuation, or withdrawal of life support measures. The concept includes policies, laws, statutes, decisions, guidelines, and discussions that may affect the issuance of such orders.
Cardiac electrical stimulators that apply brief high-voltage electroshocks to the HEART. These stimulators are used to restore normal rhythm and contractile function in hearts of patients who are experiencing VENTRICULAR FIBRILLATION or ventricular tachycardia (TACHYCARDIA, VENTRICULAR) that is not accompanied by a palpable PULSE. Some defibrillators may also be used to correct certain noncritical dysrhythmias (called synchronized defibrillation or CARDIOVERSION), using relatively low-level discharges synchronized to the patient's ECG waveform. (UMDNS, 2003)
Occurrence of heart arrest in an individual when there is no immediate access to medical personnel or equipment.
Services specifically designed, staffed, and equipped for the emergency care of patients.
In the medical field, manikins are realistic, full-size models of human bodies used for teaching and practicing medical skills, such as CPR, intubation, or surgical procedures, as they provide a realistic and safe training environment without the use of actual patients.
A potentially lethal cardiac arrhythmia that is characterized by uncoordinated extremely rapid firing of electrical impulses (400-600/min) in HEART VENTRICLES. Such asynchronous ventricular quivering or fibrillation prevents any effective cardiac output and results in unconsciousness (SYNCOPE). It is one of the major electrocardiographic patterns seen with CARDIAC ARREST.
The absence of a useful purpose or useful result in a diagnostic procedure or therapeutic intervention. The situation of a patient whose condition will not be improved by treatment or instances in which treatment preserves permanent unconsciousness or cannot end dependence on intensive medical care. (From Ann Intern Med 1990 Jun 15;112(12):949)
An electrical current applied to the HEART to terminate a disturbance of its rhythm, ARRHYTHMIAS, CARDIAC. (Stedman, 25th ed)
The use of sophisticated methods and equipment to treat cardiopulmonary arrest. Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) includes the use of specialized equipment to maintain the airway, early defibrillation and pharmacological therapy.
Emergency care or treatment given to a person who suddenly becomes ill or injured before full medical services become available.
Care provided patients requiring extraordinary therapeutic measures in order to sustain and prolong life.
Paramedical personnel trained to provide basic emergency care and life support under the supervision of physicians and/or nurses. These services may be carried out at the site of the emergency, in the ambulance, or in a health care institution.
Patients' guests and rules for visiting.
Abnormally low BODY TEMPERATURE that is intentionally induced in warm-blooded animals by artificial means. In humans, mild or moderate hypothermia has been used to reduce tissue damages, particularly after cardiac or spinal cord injuries and during subsequent surgeries.
Acute hemorrhage or excessive fluid loss resulting in HYPOVOLEMIA.
A pathological condition caused by lack of oxygen, manifested in impending or actual cessation of life.
Computer disks storing data with a maximum reduction of space and bandwidth. The compact size reduces cost of transmission and storage.
Application of a life support system that circulates the blood through an oxygenating system, which may consist of a pump, a membrane oxygenator, and a heat exchanger. Examples of its use are to assist victims of smoke inhalation injury, respiratory failure, and cardiac failure.
Declarations by patients, made in advance of a situation in which they may be incompetent to decide about their own care, stating their treatment preferences or authorizing a third party to make decisions for them. (Bioethics Thesaurus)
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
The movement of the BLOOD as it is pumped through the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.
Withholding or withdrawal of a particular treatment or treatments, often (but not necessarily) life-prolonging treatment, from a patient or from a research subject as part of a research protocol. The concept is differentiated from REFUSAL TO TREAT, where the emphasis is on the health professional's or health facility's refusal to treat a patient or group of patients when the patient or the patient's representative requests treatment. Withholding of life-prolonging treatment is usually indexed only with EUTHANASIA, PASSIVE, unless the distinction between withholding and withdrawing treatment, or the issue of withholding palliative rather than curative treatment, is discussed.
A voluntary organization concerned with the prevention and treatment of heart and vascular diseases.
Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.
Any of various animals that constitute the family Suidae and comprise stout-bodied, short-legged omnivorous mammals with thick skin, usually covered with coarse bristles, a rather long mobile snout, and small tail. Included are the genera Babyrousa, Phacochoerus (wart hogs), and Sus, the latter containing the domestic pig (see SUS SCROFA).
Therapy whose basic objective is to restore the volume and composition of the body fluids to normal with respect to WATER-ELECTROLYTE BALANCE. Fluids may be administered intravenously, orally, by intermittent gavage, or by HYPODERMOCLYSIS.
Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.
First aid or other immediate intervention for accidents or medical conditions requiring immediate care and treatment before definitive medical and surgical management can be procured.
A composition in prose or verse presenting in dialogue or pantomime a story involving various characters, usually intended to be acted on a stage and to be regarded as a form of entertainment. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)
Rib fractures are breaks or cracks in the rib bones, which can occur at any location along the rib's length, often caused by direct trauma or severe coughing, and may result in pain, difficulty breathing, and increased risk of complications such as pneumonia.
The use of communication systems, such as telecommunication, to transmit emergency information to appropriate providers of health services.
The active sympathomimetic hormone from the ADRENAL MEDULLA. It stimulates both the alpha- and beta- adrenergic systems, causes systemic VASOCONSTRICTION and gastrointestinal relaxation, stimulates the HEART, and dilates BRONCHI and cerebral vessels. It is used in ASTHMA and CARDIAC FAILURE and to delay absorption of local ANESTHETICS.
The religion of the Jews characterized by belief in one God and in the mission of the Jews to teach the Fatherhood of God as revealed in the Hebrew Scriptures. (Webster, 3d ed)
Hospital units equipped for childbirth.
The proportion of survivors in a group, e.g., of patients, studied and followed over a period, or the proportion of persons in a specified group alive at the beginning of a time interval who survive to the end of the interval. It is often studied using life table methods.
Situations or conditions requiring immediate intervention to avoid serious adverse results.
Health care workers specially trained and licensed to assist and support the work of health professionals. Often used synonymously with paramedical personnel, the term generally refers to all health care workers who perform tasks which must otherwise be performed by a physician or other health professional.
Application of heat to correct hypothermia, accidental or induced.
The movement and the forces involved in the movement of the blood through the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.
A vehicle equipped for transporting patients in need of emergency care.
Personnel trained to provide the initial services, care, and support in EMERGENCIES or DISASTERS.
Drugs that bind to and activate adrenergic receptors.
A profound state of unconsciousness associated with depressed cerebral activity from which the individual cannot be aroused. Coma generally occurs when there is dysfunction or injury involving both cerebral hemispheres or the brain stem RETICULAR FORMATION.
Medical and nursing care of patients in the terminal stage of an illness.
Compliance by health personnel or proxies with the stipulations of ADVANCE DIRECTIVES (or similar directives such as RESUSCITATION ORDERS) when patients are unable to direct their own care.
A condition with trapped gas or air in the PERITONEAL CAVITY, usually secondary to perforation of the internal organs such as the LUNG and the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT, or to recent surgery. Pneumoperitoneum may be purposely introduced to aid radiological examination.
The upper part of the trunk between the NECK and the ABDOMEN. It contains the chief organs of the circulatory and respiratory systems. (From Stedman, 25th ed)
Any method of artificial breathing that employs mechanical or non-mechanical means to force the air into and out of the lungs. Artificial respiration or ventilation is used in individuals who have stopped breathing or have RESPIRATORY INSUFFICIENCY to increase their intake of oxygen (O2) and excretion of carbon dioxide (CO2).
A procedure involving placement of a tube into the trachea through the mouth or nose in order to provide a patient with oxygen and anesthesia.
Directions or principles presenting current or future rules of policy for assisting health care practitioners in patient care decisions regarding diagnosis, therapy, or related clinical circumstances. The guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by the convening of expert panels. The guidelines form a basis for the evaluation of all aspects of health care and delivery.
The principles of professional conduct concerning the rights and duties of the physician, relations with patients and fellow practitioners, as well as actions of the physician in patient care and interpersonal relations with patient families.
Diversion of blood flow through a circuit located outside the body but continuous with the bodily circulation.
The storing or preserving of video signals for television to be played back later via a transmitter or receiver. Recordings may be made on magnetic tape or discs (VIDEODISC RECORDING).
Antidiuretic hormones released by the NEUROHYPOPHYSIS of all vertebrates (structure varies with species) to regulate water balance and OSMOLARITY. In general, vasopressin is a nonapeptide consisting of a six-amino-acid ring with a cysteine 1 to cysteine 6 disulfide bridge or an octapeptide containing a CYSTINE. All mammals have arginine vasopressin except the pig with a lysine at position 8. Vasopressin, a vasoconstrictor, acts on the KIDNEY COLLECTING DUCTS to increase water reabsorption, increase blood volume and blood pressure.
Persons who donate their services.
A sudden CARDIAC ARRHYTHMIA (e.g., VENTRICULAR FIBRILLATION) caused by a blunt, non-penetrating impact to the precordial region of chest wall. Commotio cordis often results in sudden death without prompt cardiopulmonary defibrillation.
Solutions having the same osmotic pressure as blood serum, or another solution with which they are compared. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed & Dorland, 28th ed)
Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.
A vital statistic measuring or recording the rate of death from any cause in hospitalized populations.
PRESSURE of the BLOOD on the ARTERIES and other BLOOD VESSELS.
Recording of visual and sometimes sound signals on magnetic tape.
The circulation of blood through the CORONARY VESSELS of the HEART.
Measurement of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the blood.
Systems that provide all or most of the items necessary for maintaining life and health. Provisions are made for the supplying of oxygen, food, water, temperature and pressure control, disposition of carbon dioxide and body waste. The milieu may be a spacecraft, a submarine, or the surface of the moon. In medical care, usually under hospital conditions, LIFE SUPPORT CARE is available. (From Webster's New Collegiate Dictionary)
A class of statistical procedures for estimating the survival function (function of time, starting with a population 100% well at a given time and providing the percentage of the population still well at later times). The survival analysis is then used for making inferences about the effects of treatments, prognostic factors, exposures, and other covariates on the function.
The capability to perform acceptably those duties directly related to patient care.
Health care provided to a critically ill patient during a medical emergency or crisis.
A reduction in brain oxygen supply due to ANOXEMIA (a reduced amount of oxygen being carried in the blood by HEMOGLOBIN), or to a restriction of the blood supply to the brain, or both. Severe hypoxia is referred to as anoxia, and is a relatively common cause of injury to the central nervous system. Prolonged brain anoxia may lead to BRAIN DEATH or a PERSISTENT VEGETATIVE STATE. Histologically, this condition is characterized by neuronal loss which is most prominent in the HIPPOCAMPUS; GLOBUS PALLIDUS; CEREBELLUM; and inferior olives.
A species of SWINE, in the family Suidae, comprising a number of subspecies including the domestic pig Sus scrofa domestica.
A sudden intense and continuous aggravation of a state of asthma, marked by dyspnea to the point of exhaustion and collapse and not responding to the usual therapeutic efforts.
Educational programs for individuals who have been inactive in their profession, or who wish to regain unused skills.
Continuous recording of the carbon dioxide content of expired air.
Auditory and visual instructional materials.
#### My apologies, but "West Virginia" is a geographical location and not a medical term or condition. It is a state located in the Appalachian region of the United States, known for its diverse topography, rich cultural history, and contributions to various fields including medicine.
The volume of air inspired or expired during each normal, quiet respiratory cycle. Common abbreviations are TV or V with subscript T.
A procedure to stop the contraction of MYOCARDIUM during HEART SURGERY. It is usually achieved with the use of chemicals (CARDIOPLEGIC SOLUTIONS) or cold temperature (such as chilled perfusate).
Blocking of the PULMONARY ARTERY or one of its branches by an EMBOLUS.
Hospital units providing continuous surveillance and care to acutely ill infants and children. Neonates are excluded since INTENSIVE CARE UNITS, NEONATAL is available.
The ability to understand the nature and effect of the act in which the individual is engaged. (From Black's Law Dictionary, 6th ed).
The process of making a selective intellectual judgment when presented with several complex alternatives consisting of several variables, and usually defining a course of action or an idea.
An infant during the first month after birth.
A colorless, odorless gas that can be formed by the body and is necessary for the respiration cycle of plants and animals.
Discussions with patients and/or their representatives about the goals and desired direction of the patient's care, particularly end-of-life care, in the event that the patient is or becomes incompetent to make decisions.
The specialty or practice of nursing in the care of patients admitted to the emergency department.
The storing of visual and usually sound signals on discs for later reproduction on a television screen or monitor.
Surgery performed on the heart.
Instruction in which learners progress at their own rate using workbooks, textbooks, or electromechanical devices that provide information in discrete steps, test learning at each step, and provide immediate feedback about achievement. (ERIC, Thesaurus of ERIC Descriptors, 1996).
Special hospitals which provide care for ill children.
A white, crystalline powder that is commonly used as a pH buffering agent, an electrolyte replenisher, systemic alkalizer and in topical cleansing solutions.
A process involving chance used in therapeutic trials or other research endeavor for allocating experimental subjects, human or animal, between treatment and control groups, or among treatment groups. It may also apply to experiments on inanimate objects.
Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.
A method in which either the observer(s) or the subject(s) is kept ignorant of the group to which the subjects are assigned.
The pressure that would be exerted by one component of a mixture of gases if it were present alone in a container. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
The exchange of OXYGEN and CARBON DIOXIDE between alveolar air and pulmonary capillary blood that occurs across the BLOOD-AIR BARRIER.
Death that occurs as a result of anoxia or heart arrest, associated with immersion in liquid.
A long, narrow, and flat bone commonly known as BREASTBONE occurring in the midsection of the anterior thoracic segment or chest region, which stabilizes the rib cage and serves as the point of origin for several muscles that move the arms, head, and neck.
Continuance of life or existence especially under adverse conditions; includes methods and philosophy of survival.
The study of the heart, its physiology, and its functions.
The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)
A pathological condition manifested by failure to perfuse or oxygenate vital organs.
Introduction of a tube into a hollow organ to restore or maintain patency if obstructed. It is differentiated from CATHETERIZATION in that the insertion of a catheter is usually performed for the introducing or withdrawing of fluids from the body.
The circulation of blood through the BLOOD VESSELS of the BRAIN.
Hospital department responsible for the administration and provision of immediate medical or surgical care to the emergency patient.
Conceptual response of the person to the various aspects of death, which are based on individual psychosocial and cultural experience.
Hospital units providing continuous surveillance and care to acutely ill patients.
Advanced and highly specialized care provided to medical or surgical patients whose conditions are life-threatening and require comprehensive care and constant monitoring. It is usually administered in specially equipped units of a health care facility.
A type of stress exerted uniformly in all directions. Its measure is the force exerted per unit area. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
An abnormally rapid ventricular rhythm usually in excess of 150 beats per minute. It is generated within the ventricle below the BUNDLE OF HIS, either as autonomic impulse formation or reentrant impulse conduction. Depending on the etiology, onset of ventricular tachycardia can be paroxysmal (sudden) or nonparoxysmal, its wide QRS complexes can be uniform or polymorphic, and the ventricular beating may be independent of the atrial beating (AV dissociation).
A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.
The balance between acids and bases in the BODY FLUIDS. The pH (HYDROGEN-ION CONCENTRATION) of the arterial BLOOD provides an index for the total body acid-base balance.
Any liquid used to replace blood plasma, usually a saline solution, often with serum albumins, dextrans or other preparations. These substances do not enhance the oxygen- carrying capacity of blood, but merely replace the volume. They are also used to treat dehydration.
Hypertonic sodium chloride solution. A solution having an osmotic pressure greater than that of physiologic salt solution (0.9 g NaCl in 100 ml purified water).
Professional medical personnel approved to provide care to patients in a hospital.
Registered nurses with graduate degrees in nursing who provide care to pediatric patients who are acutely or critically ill.
An element with atomic symbol O, atomic number 8, and atomic weight [15.99903; 15.99977]. It is the most abundant element on earth and essential for respiration.
A subspecialty of Pediatrics concerned with the newborn infant.
Unexpected rapid natural death due to cardiovascular collapse within one hour of initial symptoms. It is usually caused by the worsening of existing heart diseases. The sudden onset of symptoms, such as CHEST PAIN and CARDIAC ARRHYTHMIAS, particularly VENTRICULAR TACHYCARDIA, can lead to the loss of consciousness and cardiac arrest followed by biological death. (from Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine, 7th ed., 2005)
Surgical removal of an obstructing clot or foreign material which has been transported from a distant vessel by the bloodstream. Removal of a clot at its original site is called THROMBECTOMY.
A social group consisting of parents or parent substitutes and children.
A powerful vasodilator used in emergencies to lower blood pressure or to improve cardiac function. It is also an indicator for free sulfhydryl groups in proteins.
Acquisition of knowledge as a result of instruction in a formal course of study.
The continuous measurement of physiological processes, blood pressure, heart rate, renal output, reflexes, respiration, etc., in a patient or experimental animal; includes pharmacologic monitoring, the measurement of administered drugs or their metabolites in the blood, tissues, or urine.
The act of breathing with the LUNGS, consisting of INHALATION, or the taking into the lungs of the ambient air, and of EXHALATION, or the expelling of the modified air which contains more CARBON DIOXIDE than the air taken in (Blakiston's Gould Medical Dictionary, 4th ed.). This does not include tissue respiration (= OXYGEN CONSUMPTION) or cell respiration (= CELL RESPIRATION).
Respiratory failure in the newborn. (Dorland, 27th ed)
The use of persons coached to feign symptoms or conditions of real diseases in a life-like manner in order to teach or evaluate medical personnel.
Shock resulting from diminution of cardiac output in heart disease.
Self-directing freedom and especially moral independence. An ethical principle holds that the autonomy of persons ought to be respected. (Bioethics Thesaurus)
A subclass of heme a containing cytochromes that have two imidazole nitrogens as axial ligands and an alpha-band absorption of 605 nm. They are found in a variety of microorganisms and in eucaryotes as a low-spin cytochrome component of MITOCHONDRIAL ELECTRON TRANSPORT COMPLEX IV.
A 3.5 per cent colloidal solution containing urea-cross-linked polymerized peptides. It has a molecular weight of approximately 35,000 and is prepared from gelatin and electrolytes. The polymeric solution is used as a plasma expander.
The inhabitants of peripheral or adjacent areas of a city or town.
The volume of BLOOD passing through the HEART per unit of time. It is usually expressed as liters (volume) per minute so as not to be confused with STROKE VOLUME (volume per beat).
Starches that have been chemically modified so that a percentage of OH groups are substituted with 2-hydroxyethyl ether groups.
A technique to arrest the flow of blood by lowering BODY TEMPERATURE to about 20 degrees Centigrade, usually achieved by infusing chilled perfusate. The technique provides a bloodless surgical field for complex surgeries.
Drugs used to cause constriction of the blood vessels.
The individuals employed by the hospital.
The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.
Institutions with an organized medical staff which provide medical care to patients.
A pulmonary ventilation rate faster than is metabolically necessary for the exchange of gases. It is the result of an increased frequency of breathing, an increased tidal volume, or a combination of both. It causes an excess intake of oxygen and the blowing off of carbon dioxide.
Death resulting from the presence of a disease in an individual, as shown by a single case report or a limited number of patients. This should be differentiated from DEATH, the physiological cessation of life and from MORTALITY, an epidemiological or statistical concept.
The hollow, muscular organ that maintains the circulation of the blood.
A distribution in which a variable is distributed like the sum of the squares of any given independent random variable, each of which has a normal distribution with mean of zero and variance of one. The chi-square test is a statistical test based on comparison of a test statistic to a chi-square distribution. The oldest of these tests are used to detect whether two or more population distributions differ from one another.
The flow of BLOOD through or around an organ or region of the body.
The rate at which oxygen is used by a tissue; microliters of oxygen STPD used per milligram of tissue per hour; the rate at which oxygen enters the blood from alveolar gas, equal in the steady state to the consumption of oxygen by tissue metabolism throughout the body. (Stedman, 25th ed, p346)
The measure of the level of heat of a human or animal.

Repeated administration of vasopressin but not epinephrine maintains coronary perfusion pressure after early and late administration during prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation in pigs. (1/1128)

BACKGROUND: It is unknown whether repeated dosages of vasopressin or epinephrine given early or late during basic life support cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) may be able to increase coronary perfusion pressure above a threshold between 20 and 30 mm Hg that renders defibrillation successful. METHODS AND RESULTS: After 4 minutes of cardiac arrest, followed by 3 minutes of basic life support CPR, 12 animals were randomly assigned to receive, every 5 minutes, either vasopressin (early vasopressin: 0.4, 0.4, and 0.8 U/kg, respectively; n=6) or epinephrine (early epinephrine: 45, 45, and 200 microg/kg, respectively; n=6). Another 12 animals were randomly allocated after 4 minutes of cardiac arrest, followed by 8 minutes of basic life support CPR, to receive, every 5 minutes, either vasopressin (late vasopressin: 0.4 and 0.8 U/kg, respectively; n=6), or epinephrine (late epinephrine: 45 and 200 microg/kg, respectively; n=6). Defibrillation was attempted after 22 minutes of cardiac arrest. Mean+/-SEM coronary perfusion pressure was significantly higher 90 seconds after early vasopressin compared with early epinephrine (50+/-4 versus 34+/-3 mm Hg, P<0.02; 42+/-5 versus 15+/-3 mm Hg, P<0.0008; and 37+/-5 versus 11+/-3 mm Hg, P<0. 002, respectively). Mean+/-SEM coronary perfusion pressure was significantly higher 90 seconds after late vasopressin compared with late epinephrine (40+/-3 versus 22+/-4 mm Hg, P<0.004, and 32+/-4 versus 15+/-4 mm Hg, P<0.01, respectively). All vasopressin animals survived 60 minutes, whereas no epinephrine pig had return of spontaneous circulation (P<0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Repeated administration of vasopressin but only the first epinephrine dose given early and late during basic life support CPR maintained coronary perfusion pressure above the threshold that is needed for successful defibrillation.  (+info)

Is peer tutoring beneficial in the context of school resuscitation training? (2/1128)

First year pupils at a Cardiff comprehensive school were trained in cardiopulmonary resuscitation, 106 by the teacher only and 137 by the teacher assisted by older pupils (peer tutoring). Scores in a multiple choice theory test and in practical skill assessment showed no significant difference between instruction methods, but boys taught by the teacher assisted by older pupils expressed less willingness to resuscitate in an emergency than girls instructed by either method (P < 0.01). Girls had higher scores in the multiple choice paper (P < 0.025) and in the skills assessment (P < 0.01). Those pupils who reported some prior knowledge of resuscitation techniques performed better during skill assessment than novice trainees (P < 0.025).  (+info)

Cardiopulmonary resuscitation: effect of CPAP on gas exchange during chest compressions. (3/1128)

BACKGROUND: Conventional cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) includes 80-100/min precordial compressions with intermittent positive pressure ventilation (IPPV) after every fifth compression. To prevent gastric insufflation, chest compressions are held during IPPV if the patient is not intubated. Elimination of IPPV would simplify CPR and might offer physiologic advantages, but compression-induced ventilation without IPPV has been shown to result in hypercapnia. The authors hypothesized that application of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) might increase CO2 elimination during chest compressions. METHODS: After appropriate instrumentation and measurement of baseline data, ventricular fibrillation was induced in 18 pigs. Conventional CPR was performed as a control (CPR(C)) for 5 min. Pauses were then discontinued, and animals were assigned randomly to receive alternate trials of uninterrupted chest compressions at a rate of 80/min without IPPV, either at atmospheric airway pressure (CPR(ATM)) or with CPAP (CPR(CPAP)). CPAP was adjusted to produce a minute ventilation of 75% of the animal's baseline ventilation. Data were summarized as mean +/- SD and compared with Student t test for paired observations. RESULTS: During CPR without IPPV, CPAP decreased PaCO2 (55+/-28 vs. 100+/-16 mmHg) and increased SaO2 (0.86+/-0.19 vs. 0.50+/-0.18%; P < 0.001). CPAP also increased arteriovenous oxygen content difference (10.7+/-3.1 vs. 5.5+/-2.3 ml/dl blood) and CO2 elimination (120+/-20 vs. 12+/-20 ml/min; P < 0.01). Differences between CPR(CPAP) and CPR(ATM) in aortic blood pressure, cardiac output, and stroke volume were not significant. CONCLUSIONS: Mechanical ventilation may not be necessary during CPR as long as CPAP is applied. Discontinuation of IPPV will simplify CPR and may offer physiologic advantage.  (+info)

Resuscitation from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: is survival dependent on who is available at the scene? (4/1128)

OBJECTIVE: To determine whether survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is influenced by the on-scene availability of different grades of ambulance personnel and other health professionals. DESIGN: Population based, retrospective, observational study. SETTING: County of Nottinghamshire with a population of one million. SUBJECTS: All 2094 patients who had resuscitation attempted by Nottinghamshire Ambulance Service crew from 1991 to 1994; study of 1547 patients whose arrest were of cardiac aetiology. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Survival to hospital admission and survival to hospital discharge. RESULTS: Overall survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest remains poor: 221 patients (14.3%) survived to reach hospital alive and only 94 (6.1%) survived to be discharged from hospital. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that the chances of those resuscitated by technician crew reaching hospital alive were poor but were greater when paramedic crew were either called to assist technicians or dealt with the arrest themselves (odds ratio 6.9 (95% confidence interval 3.92 to 26.61)). Compared to technician crew, survival to hospital discharge was only significantly improved with paramedic crew (3.55 (1.62 to 7.79)) and further improved when paramedics were assisted by either a health professional (9.91 (3.12 to 26.61)) or a medical practitioner (20.88 (6.72 to 64.94)). CONCLUSIONS: Survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest remains poor despite attendance at the scene of the arrest by ambulance crew and other health professionals. Patients resuscitated by a paramedic from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest caused by cardiac disease were more likely to survive to hospital discharge than when resuscitation was provided by an ambulance technician. Resuscitation by a paramedic assisted by a medical practitioner offers a patient the best chances of surviving the event.  (+info)

Influence of ambulance crew's length of experience on the outcome of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. (5/1128)

AIMS: To investigate whether an ambulance crew's length of experience affected the outcome of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. METHODS AND RESULTS: This was a population-based, retrospective observational study of attempted resuscitations in 1547 consecutive arrests of cardiac aetiology by Nottinghamshire Emergency Ambulance Service crew. One thousand and seventy-one patients were managed by either a paramedic or a technician crew without assistance from other trained individuals at the scene of arrest. Overall, the chances of a patient surviving to be discharged from hospital alive did not appear to be affected by the paramedic's length of experience (among survivors, 18 months experience vs non-survivors 16 months experience, P = 0.347) but there appears to be a trend in the effect of a technician's length of experience on survival (among survivors, 60 months experience vs non-survivors 28 months experience, P = 0.075). However, when a technician had 4 years of experience or more and a paramedic 1 year's experience, survival rates did improve. Logistic regression analysis, adjusted for factors known to influence outcome, revealed that chances of survival increased once technicians had over 4 years of experience after qualification (odds ratio 2.71, 95% CI 1.17 to 6.32, P = 0.02) and paramedics after just 1 year of experience (odds ratio 2.68, 95% CI 1.05 to 6.82, P = 0.04). CONCLUSIONS: Survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest varies with the type of ambulance crew and length of experience after qualification. Experience in the field seems important as paramedics achieve better survival rates after just 1 year's experience, while technicians need to have more than 4 years' experience to improve survival.  (+info)

Preparing for medical emergencies in the dental office. (6/1128)

If you discover an unconscious patient in your office, attend to the ABCs while you evaluate the patient's medical history and piece together the events leading up to the emergency. These actions will help you arrive at a diagnosis. Then as the emergency cart and team arrive, you will be able to provide good, safe care to stabilize the patient and get him or her to a medical facility.  (+info)

A comparison of standard cardiopulmonary resuscitation and active compression-decompression resuscitation for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. French Active Compression-Decompression Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Study Group. (7/1128)

BACKGROUND: We previously observed that short-term survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest was greater with active compression-decompression cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) than with standard CPR. In the current study, we assessed the effects of the active compression-decompression method on one-year survival. METHODS: Patients who had cardiac arrest in the Paris metropolitan area or in Thionville, France, more than 80 percent of whom had asystole, were assigned to receive either standard CPR (377 patients) or active compression-decompression CPR (373 patients) according to whether their arrest occurred on an even or odd day of the month, respectively. The primary end point was survival at one year. The rate of survival to hospital discharge without neurologic impairment and the neurologic outcome were secondary end points. RESULTS: Both the rate of hospital discharge without neurologic impairment (6 percent vs. 2 percent, P=0.01) and the one-year survival rate (5 percent vs. 2 percent, P=0.03) were significantly higher among patients who received active compression-decompression CPR than among those who received standard CPR. All patients who survived to one year had cardiac arrests that were witnessed. Nine of 17 one-year survivors in the active compression-decompression group and 2 of 7 in the standard group, respectively, initially had asystole or pulseless electrical activity. In 12 of the 17 survivors who had received active compression-decompression CPR, neurologic status returned to base line, as compared with 3 of 7 survivors who had received standard CPR (P=0.34). CONCLUSIONS: Active compression-decompression CPR performed during advanced life support significantly improved long-term survival rates among patients who had cardiac arrest outside the hospital.  (+info)

Effects of the AMPA receptor antagonist NBQX on outcome of newborn pigs after asphyxic cardiac arrest. (8/1128)

In neonates, asphyxia is a common cause of neuronal injury and often results in seizures. The authors evaluated whether blockade of alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA) receptors during asphyxia and early recovery with 2,3-dihydroxy-6-nitro-7-sulfamoylbenzo-(F)-quinoxaline (NBQX) ameliorates neurologic deficit and histopathology in 1-week-old piglets. Anesthetized piglets were exposed to a sequence of 30 minutes of hypoxia, 5 minutes of room air ventilation, 7 minutes of airway occlusion, and cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Vehicle or NBQX was administered intravenously before asphyxia (30 mg/kg) and during the first 4 hours of recovery (15 mg/kg/h). Neuropathologic findings were evaluated at 96 hours of recovery by light microscopic and cytochrome oxidase histochemical study. Cardiac arrest occurred at 5 to 6 minutes of airway occlusion, and cardiopulmonary resuscitation restored spontaneous circulation independent of treatment modalities in about 2 to 3 minutes. Neurologic deficit over the 96-hour recovery period was not ameliorated by NBQX. Seizure activity began after 24 to 48 hours in 7 of 10 animals with vehicle and in 9 of 10 of animals with NBQX. In each group, four animals died in status epilepticus. Neuropathologic outcomes were not improved by NBQX. The density of remaining viable neurons was decreased in parietal cortex and putamen by NBQX treatment. Metabolic defects in cytochrome oxidase activity were worsened by NBQX treatment. Seizure activity during recovery was associated with reduced neuronal viability in neocortex and striatum in piglets from both groups that survived for 96 hours. This neonatal model of asphyxic cardiac arrest and resuscitation generates neurologic deficits, clinical seizure activity, and selective damage in regions of basal ganglia and sensorimotor cortex. In contrast to other studies in mature brain, AMPA receptor blockade with NBQX failed to protect against neurologic damage in the immature piglet and worsened postasphyxic histopathologic outcome in neocortex and putamen.  (+info)

Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a lifesaving procedure that is performed when someone's breathing or heartbeat has stopped. It involves a series of steps that are designed to manually pump blood through the body and maintain the flow of oxygen to the brain until advanced medical treatment can be provided.

CPR typically involves a combination of chest compressions and rescue breaths, which are delivered in a specific rhythm and frequency. The goal is to maintain circulation and oxygenation of vital organs, particularly the brain, until advanced life support measures such as defibrillation or medication can be administered.

Chest compressions are used to manually pump blood through the heart and into the rest of the body. This is typically done by placing both hands on the lower half of the chest and pressing down with enough force to compress the chest by about 2 inches. The compressions should be delivered at a rate of at least 100-120 compressions per minute.

Rescue breaths are used to provide oxygen to the lungs and maintain oxygenation of the body's tissues. This is typically done by pinching the nose shut, creating a seal around the person's mouth with your own, and blowing in enough air to make the chest rise. The breath should be delivered over about one second, and this process should be repeated until the person begins to breathe on their own or advanced medical help arrives.

CPR can be performed by trained laypeople as well as healthcare professionals. It is an important skill that can help save lives in emergency situations where a person's breathing or heartbeat has stopped.

Resuscitation is a medical term that refers to the process of reversing cardiopulmonary arrest or preventing further deterioration of someone in cardiac or respiratory arrest. It involves a series of interventions aimed at restoring spontaneous blood circulation and breathing, thereby preventing or minimizing tissue damage due to lack of oxygen.

The most common form of resuscitation is cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), which combines chest compressions to manually pump blood through the body with rescue breaths to provide oxygen to the lungs. In a hospital setting, more advanced techniques such as defibrillation, medication administration, and intubation may also be used as part of the resuscitation process.

The goal of resuscitation is to stabilize the patient's condition and prevent further harm while treating the underlying cause of the arrest. Successful resuscitation can lead to a full recovery or, in some cases, result in varying degrees of neurological impairment depending on the severity and duration of the cardiac or respiratory arrest.

Cardiac arrest, also known as heart arrest, is a medical condition where the heart suddenly stops beating or functioning properly. This results in the cessation of blood flow to the rest of the body, including the brain, leading to loss of consciousness and pulse. Cardiac arrest is often caused by electrical disturbances in the heart that disrupt its normal rhythm, known as arrhythmias. If not treated immediately with cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and defibrillation, it can lead to death or permanent brain damage due to lack of oxygen supply. It's important to note that a heart attack is different from cardiac arrest; a heart attack occurs when blood flow to a part of the heart is blocked, often by a clot, causing damage to the heart muscle, but the heart continues to beat. However, a heart attack can sometimes trigger a cardiac arrest.

Heart massage, also known as cardiac massage or chest compression, is a medical procedure that involves applying pressure to the chest in order to manually pump blood through the heart and maintain circulation when the heart has stopped or is not functioning effectively. This is a critical component of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and is typically performed during a cardiac arrest to help restore proper blood flow to vital organs and tissues.

During heart massage, the rescuer places their hands on the lower half of the victim's chest, typically at the center, and presses down with the heel of one or both hands. The recommended compression depth for adults is at least 2 inches (5 cm) and should be performed at a rate of 100-120 compressions per minute. It is essential to minimize interruptions in chest compressions and ensure that they are deep and fast enough to maintain adequate blood flow.

Heart massage can also be performed surgically during specific medical procedures, such as open-heart surgery or extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). In these cases, the surgeon directly compresses the heart using their hands or specialized instruments. This technique is called a "surgical heart massage" or "direct cardiac compression."

It's important to note that heart massage should only be performed by trained individuals, as improper techniques can cause harm and potentially worsen the patient's condition.

Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) is a medical procedure that temporarily takes over the functions of the heart and lungs during major heart surgery. It allows the surgeon to operate on a still, bloodless heart.

During CPB, the patient's blood is circulated outside the body with the help of a heart-lung machine. The machine pumps the blood through a oxygenator, where it is oxygenated and then returned to the body. This bypasses the heart and lungs, hence the name "cardiopulmonary bypass."

CPB involves several components, including a pump, oxygenator, heat exchanger, and tubing. The patient's blood is drained from the heart through cannulas (tubes) and passed through the oxygenator, where it is oxygenated and carbon dioxide is removed. The oxygenated blood is then warmed to body temperature in a heat exchanger before being pumped back into the body.

While on CPB, the patient's heart is stopped with the help of cardioplegia solution, which is infused directly into the coronary arteries. This helps to protect the heart muscle during surgery. The surgeon can then operate on a still and bloodless heart, allowing for more precise surgical repair.

After the surgery is complete, the patient is gradually weaned off CPB, and the heart is restarted with the help of electrical stimulation or medication. The patient's condition is closely monitored during this time to ensure that their heart and lungs are functioning properly.

While CPB has revolutionized heart surgery and allowed for more complex procedures to be performed, it is not without risks. These include bleeding, infection, stroke, kidney damage, and inflammation. However, with advances in technology and technique, the risks associated with CPB have been significantly reduced over time.

Resuscitation orders, also known as do-not-resuscitate (DNR) orders or no-code orders, are medical instructions written by a physician in the chart of a patient who has a serious illness or chronic health condition and for whom cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) would be medically inappropriate.

The order specifies that if the patient's heart stops or they stop breathing, healthcare providers should not attempt to restart it using CPR or other advanced life support measures. Instead, comfort care measures are provided to keep the patient as comfortable and pain-free as possible.

Resuscitation orders are typically discussed with the patient, their family members, and their healthcare team, taking into account the patient's values, goals, and treatment preferences. The decision to implement a resuscitation order is based on an assessment of the patient's overall prognosis, likelihood of survival, and quality of life.

A defibrillator is a medical device that delivers a therapeutic dose of electrical energy to the heart. The aim of the treatment is to restore the normal rhythm of the heart in cases where it has started to beat irregularly, or in a chaotic and unsynchronized manner, which can be life-threatening.

There are two main types of defibrillators: external and implantable. External defibrillators are typically used in emergency situations and are often found in public places such as airports, casinos, and sports arenas. These devices have pads that are placed on the chest of the patient, and they deliver an electrical shock to the heart through the chest wall.

Implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) are small devices that are implanted in the chest of patients who are at risk of sudden cardiac death due to life-threatening arrhythmias. ICDs constantly monitor the heart's rhythm and deliver an electrical shock if they detect a dangerous arrhythmia, such as ventricular fibrillation or ventricular tachycardia.

Defibrillators are important medical devices that can save lives in emergency situations. They are often used in conjunction with other treatments, such as medications and cardiac procedures, to manage heart conditions and prevent sudden cardiac death.

Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is a medical condition where the heart suddenly and unexpectedly stops functioning outside of a hospital setting, leading to the cessation of blood circulation and breathing. This results in immediate unconsciousness and can be caused by various factors such as electrical disturbances in the heart, severe trauma, or suffocation. It is a serious emergency that requires immediate cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and advanced life support measures to restore spontaneous circulation and improve survival outcomes.

Emergency Medical Services (EMS) is a system that provides immediate and urgent medical care, transportation, and treatment to patients who are experiencing an acute illness or injury that poses an immediate threat to their health, safety, or life. EMS is typically composed of trained professionals, such as emergency medical technicians (EMTs), paramedics, and first responders, who work together to assess a patient's condition, administer appropriate medical interventions, and transport the patient to a hospital or other medical facility for further treatment.

The goal of EMS is to quickly and effectively stabilize patients in emergency situations, prevent further injury or illness, and ensure that they receive timely and appropriate medical care. This may involve providing basic life support (BLS) measures such as cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), controlling bleeding, and managing airway obstructions, as well as more advanced interventions such as administering medications, establishing intravenous lines, and performing emergency procedures like intubation or defibrillation.

EMS systems are typically organized and managed at the local or regional level, with coordination and oversight provided by public health agencies, hospitals, and other healthcare organizations. EMS providers may work for private companies, non-profit organizations, or government agencies, and they may be dispatched to emergencies via 911 or other emergency response systems.

In summary, Emergency Medical Services (EMS) is a critical component of the healthcare system that provides urgent medical care and transportation to patients who are experiencing acute illnesses or injuries. EMS professionals work together to quickly assess, stabilize, and transport patients to appropriate medical facilities for further treatment.

A manikin is commonly referred to as a full-size model of the human body used for training in various medical and healthcare fields. Medical manikins are often made from materials that simulate human skin and tissues, allowing for realistic practice in procedures such as physical examinations, resuscitation, and surgical techniques.

These manikins can be highly advanced, with built-in mechanisms to simulate physiological responses, such as breathing, heartbeats, and pupil dilation. They may also have interchangeable parts, allowing for the simulation of various medical conditions and scenarios. Medical manikins are essential tools in healthcare education, enabling learners to develop their skills and confidence in a controlled, safe environment before working with real patients.

Ventricular Fibrillation (VF) is a type of cardiac arrhythmia, which is an abnormal heart rhythm. In VF, the ventricles, which are the lower chambers of the heart, beat in a rapid and unorganized manner. This results in the heart being unable to pump blood effectively to the rest of the body, leading to immediate circulatory collapse and cardiac arrest if not treated promptly. It is often caused by underlying heart conditions such as coronary artery disease, structural heart problems, or electrolyte imbalances. VF is a medical emergency that requires immediate defibrillation to restore a normal heart rhythm.

Medical futility is a controversial and complex concept that refers to medical treatments or interventions that are highly unlikely to result in achieving a meaningful clinical benefit for the patient. The determination of medical futility often involves a consideration of various factors, including the patient's current medical condition, prognosis, values, and goals of care.

There is no universally accepted definition of medical futility, and its interpretation can vary widely among healthcare providers, patients, and families. In general, medical treatments are considered futile when they have a very low probability of success or when they only prolong the process of dying without improving the patient's quality of life.

The concept of medical futility is important in end-of-life care discussions and decision-making, as it can help healthcare providers and patients make informed decisions about whether to pursue certain treatments or interventions. However, determining medical futility can be challenging, and it requires careful consideration of the patient's individual circumstances and values. Ultimately, the goal of medical futility is to ensure that patients receive care that is both medically appropriate and aligned with their goals and values.

Electric countershock, also known as defibrillation, is a medical procedure that uses an electric current to restore normal heart rhythm in certain types of cardiac arrhythmias, such as ventricular fibrillation or pulseless ventricular tachycardia. The procedure involves delivering a therapeutic dose of electrical energy to the heart through electrodes placed on the chest wall or directly on the heart. This electric current helps to depolarize a large number of cardiac cells simultaneously, which can help to interrupt the abnormal electrical activity in the heart and allow the normal conduction system to regain control and restore a normal rhythm. Electric countershock is typically delivered using an automated external defibrillator (AED) or a manual defibrillator, and it is a critical component of advanced cardiac life support (ACLS).

Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) is a set of clinical guidelines and protocols used by healthcare providers to manage and treat cardiopulmonary emergencies, such as cardiac arrest, stroke, and other life-threatening conditions. It is an advanced level of care that builds upon Basic Life Support (BLS) skills and includes the use of medications, electrical therapies, and specialized monitoring techniques.

ACLS certification courses typically cover topics such as airway management, electrocardiogram (ECG) interpretation, pharmacology, rhythm recognition, and team dynamics. The goal of ACLS is to provide a systematic approach to assessing, diagnosing, and treating patients in critical situations, with the ultimate aim of improving outcomes and increasing survival rates.

ACLS protocols are regularly updated by professional organizations such as the American Heart Association (AHA) and the European Resuscitation Council (ERC), based on the latest scientific research and evidence-based practices. Healthcare providers who work in critical care settings, such as emergency departments, intensive care units, and cardiac catheterization labs, are often required to maintain ACLS certification through regular training and recertification.

First Aid is the immediate and temporary treatment or care given to a sick, injured, or wounded person until full medical services become available. It can include simple procedures like cleaning and dressing wounds, administering CPR (Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation), preventing shock, or placing a splint on a broken bone. The goal of first aid is to preserve life, prevent further harm, and promote recovery.

Life support care, also known as artificial life support or mechanical ventilation, refers to medical interventions that are used to maintain and sustain the essential body functions of a patient who is unable to do so independently. These interventions can include mechanical ventilation to assist with breathing, hemodialysis to filter waste from the blood, intravenous (IV) fluids and medications to maintain circulation, and various other treatments to support organ function.

The goal of life support care is to keep a patient alive while treating their underlying medical condition, allowing time for the body to heal or providing comfort at the end of life. The use of life support can be temporary or long-term, depending on the patient's prognosis and the severity of their illness or injury.

It is important to note that decisions regarding the initiation, continuation, or withdrawal of life support care are complex and multifaceted, often requiring input from medical professionals, patients, and their families. Ethical considerations and advance directives, such as living wills and healthcare proxies, may also play a role in these decisions.

Emergency Medical Technicians (EMTs) are healthcare professionals who provide emergency medical services to critically ill or injured individuals. They are trained to assess a patient's condition, manage respiratory, cardiac, and trauma emergencies, and administer basic life support care. EMTs may also perform emergency procedures such as spinal immobilization, automated external defibrillation, and administer medications under certain circumstances.

EMTs typically work in ambulances, fire departments, hospitals, and other emergency medical settings. They must be able to work in high-stress situations, make quick decisions, and communicate effectively with other healthcare providers. EMTs are required to obtain certification and maintain continuing education to ensure they are up-to-date on the latest practices and protocols in emergency medicine.

I'm happy to help, but it seems there might be a misunderstanding. "Visitors to patients" is not a medical term or concept in and of itself. However, the practice of visiting patients in a healthcare setting is an important aspect of patient-centered care that can contribute to positive health outcomes.

In this context, we could define "visitors to patients" as individuals who come to see or accompany a patient during their hospitalization or visit to a medical facility. Visitors may include family members, friends, or other support persons who provide emotional and social support to the patient, which can contribute to improved mental health, reduced anxiety, and better coping mechanisms during treatment and recovery.

It's important to note that healthcare facilities often have specific policies regarding visitation hours and guidelines to ensure the safety and well-being of both patients and visitors. These policies may include restrictions on visiting hours, the number of visitors allowed at a time, and requirements for personal protective equipment (PPE) during infectious disease outbreaks.

Induced hypothermia is a medically controlled lowering of the core body temperature to around 89.6-93.2°F (32-34°C) for therapeutic purposes. It is intentionally induced to reduce the metabolic rate and oxygen demand of organs, thereby offering protection during periods of low blood flow or inadequate oxygenation, such as during cardiac bypass surgery, severe trauma, or after a cardiac arrest. The deliberate induction and maintenance of hypothermia can help minimize tissue damage and improve outcomes in specific clinical scenarios. Once the risk has passed, the body temperature is gradually rewarmed to normal levels under controlled conditions.

Hemorrhagic shock is a type of shock that occurs when there is significant blood loss leading to inadequate perfusion of tissues and organs. It is characterized by hypovolemia (low blood volume), hypotension (low blood pressure), tachycardia (rapid heart rate), and decreased urine output. Hemorrhagic shock can be classified into four stages based on the amount of blood loss and hemodynamic changes. In severe cases, it can lead to multi-organ dysfunction and death if not treated promptly and effectively.

Asphyxia is a medical condition that occurs when there is insufficient oxygen supply or excessive carbon dioxide buildup in the body, leading to impaired respiration and oxygenation of organs. This can result in unconsciousness, damage to internal organs, and potentially death if not treated promptly.

Asphyxia can be caused by various factors such as strangulation, choking, smoke inhalation, chemical exposure, or drowning. Symptoms of asphyxia may include shortness of breath, coughing, wheezing, cyanosis (bluish discoloration of the skin and mucous membranes), rapid heartbeat, confusion, and eventually loss of consciousness.

Immediate medical attention is required for individuals experiencing symptoms of asphyxia. Treatment may involve providing supplemental oxygen, removing the source of obstruction or exposure to harmful substances, and supporting respiratory function with mechanical ventilation if necessary. Prevention measures include avoiding hazardous environments, using proper safety equipment, and seeking prompt medical attention in case of suspected asphyxiation.

A Compact Disc (CD) is not a medical term, but rather a term used in technology and electronics. It is a small, flat, circular piece of optical storage media that can hold digital data such as music, video, or computer files. The medical field does not use compact discs for storing patient records or other medical information, as there are more secure and efficient methods available for electronic health records (EHRs).

Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO) is a medical procedure that uses a machine to take over the function of the lungs and sometimes also the heart, by pumping and oxygenating the patient's blood outside of their body. This technique is used when a patient's lungs or heart are unable to provide adequate gas exchange or circulation, despite other forms of treatment.

During ECMO, blood is removed from the body through a large catheter or cannula, passed through a membrane oxygenator that adds oxygen and removes carbon dioxide, and then returned to the body through another catheter. This process helps to rest and heal the lungs and/or heart while maintaining adequate oxygenation and circulation to the rest of the body.

ECMO is typically used as a last resort in patients with severe respiratory or cardiac failure who have not responded to other treatments, such as mechanical ventilation or medication. It can be a life-saving procedure, but it also carries risks, including bleeding, infection, and damage to blood vessels or organs.

Advance directives are legal documents that allow individuals to express their wishes and preferences regarding medical treatment in the event that they become unable to make decisions for themselves due to serious illness or injury. These documents typically include a living will, which outlines the types of treatments an individual wants or doesn't want to receive in specific circumstances, and a healthcare power of attorney, which designates a trusted person to make medical decisions on their behalf.

Advance directives are an important tool for ensuring that individuals receive the medical care they desire, even when they cannot communicate their wishes themselves. They can also help to prevent family members from having to make difficult decisions about medical treatment without knowing what their loved one would have wanted. It is important for individuals to discuss their advance directives with their healthcare providers and loved ones to ensure that everyone understands their wishes and can carry them out if necessary.

In the field of medicine, "time factors" refer to the duration of symptoms or time elapsed since the onset of a medical condition, which can have significant implications for diagnosis and treatment. Understanding time factors is crucial in determining the progression of a disease, evaluating the effectiveness of treatments, and making critical decisions regarding patient care.

For example, in stroke management, "time is brain," meaning that rapid intervention within a specific time frame (usually within 4.5 hours) is essential to administering tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a clot-busting drug that can minimize brain damage and improve patient outcomes. Similarly, in trauma care, the "golden hour" concept emphasizes the importance of providing definitive care within the first 60 minutes after injury to increase survival rates and reduce morbidity.

Time factors also play a role in monitoring the progression of chronic conditions like diabetes or heart disease, where regular follow-ups and assessments help determine appropriate treatment adjustments and prevent complications. In infectious diseases, time factors are crucial for initiating antibiotic therapy and identifying potential outbreaks to control their spread.

Overall, "time factors" encompass the significance of recognizing and acting promptly in various medical scenarios to optimize patient outcomes and provide effective care.

Blood circulation, also known as cardiovascular circulation, refers to the process by which blood is pumped by the heart and circulated throughout the body through a network of blood vessels, including arteries, veins, and capillaries. This process ensures that oxygen and nutrients are delivered to cells and tissues, while waste products and carbon dioxide are removed.

The circulation of blood can be divided into two main parts: the pulmonary circulation and the systemic circulation. The pulmonary circulation involves the movement of blood between the heart and the lungs, where it picks up oxygen and releases carbon dioxide. The systemic circulation refers to the movement of blood between the heart and the rest of the body, delivering oxygen and nutrients to cells and tissues while picking up waste products for removal.

The heart plays a central role in blood circulation, acting as a pump that contracts and relaxes to move blood through the body. The contraction of the heart's left ventricle pushes oxygenated blood into the aorta, which then branches off into smaller arteries that carry blood throughout the body. The blood then flows through capillaries, where it exchanges oxygen and nutrients for waste products and carbon dioxide with surrounding cells and tissues. The deoxygenated blood is then collected in veins, which merge together to form larger vessels that eventually return the blood back to the heart's right atrium. From there, the blood is pumped into the lungs to pick up oxygen and release carbon dioxide, completing the cycle of blood circulation.

"Withholding treatment" in a medical context refers to the deliberate decision not to provide or initiate certain medical treatments, interventions, or procedures for a patient. This decision is typically made after considering various factors such as the patient's wishes, their overall prognosis, the potential benefits and burdens of the treatment, and the patient's quality of life.

The reasons for withholding treatment can vary widely, but some common reasons include:

* The treatment is unlikely to be effective in improving the patient's condition or extending their life.
* The treatment may cause unnecessary discomfort, pain, or suffering for the patient.
* The patient has expressed a desire not to receive certain treatments, particularly if they are deemed to be burdensome or of little benefit.
* The cost of the treatment is prohibitive and not covered by insurance, and the patient cannot afford to pay out-of-pocket.

It's important to note that withholding treatment does not mean abandoning the patient or providing substandard care. Rather, it involves making thoughtful and informed decisions about the most appropriate course of action for a given situation, taking into account the patient's individual needs and preferences.

The American Heart Association (AHA) is a non-profit organization in the United States that aims to reduce disability and death from cardiovascular diseases and stroke, including heart disease and stroke. The AHA was founded in 1924 and is one of the oldest and largest voluntary organizations dedicated to fighting cardiovascular disease.

The AHA provides a range of services, including:

* Funding research into the causes, prevention, and treatment of heart disease and stroke
* Providing educational resources for healthcare professionals, patients, and the general public
* Advocating for policies that promote heart health and prevent heart disease and stroke
* Developing guidelines and standards for the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of cardiovascular diseases

The AHA is funded through donations from individuals, corporations, and foundations. It operates with a volunteer board of directors and a professional staff. The organization has more than 3,400 volunteers and 70 local offices across the United States.

Treatment outcome is a term used to describe the result or effect of medical treatment on a patient's health status. It can be measured in various ways, such as through symptoms improvement, disease remission, reduced disability, improved quality of life, or survival rates. The treatment outcome helps healthcare providers evaluate the effectiveness of a particular treatment plan and make informed decisions about future care. It is also used in clinical research to compare the efficacy of different treatments and improve patient care.

"Swine" is a common term used to refer to even-toed ungulates of the family Suidae, including domestic pigs and wild boars. However, in a medical context, "swine" often appears in the phrase "swine flu," which is a strain of influenza virus that typically infects pigs but can also cause illness in humans. The 2009 H1N1 pandemic was caused by a new strain of swine-origin influenza A virus, which was commonly referred to as "swine flu." It's important to note that this virus is not transmitted through eating cooked pork products; it spreads from person to person, mainly through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs or sneezes.

Fluid therapy, in a medical context, refers to the administration of fluids into a patient's circulatory system for various therapeutic purposes. This can be done intravenously (through a vein), intraosseously (through a bone), or subcutaneously (under the skin). The goal of fluid therapy is to correct or prevent imbalances in the body's fluids and electrolytes, maintain or restore blood volume, and support organ function.

The types of fluids used in fluid therapy can include crystalloids (which contain electrolytes and water) and colloids (which contain larger molecules like proteins). The choice of fluid depends on the patient's specific needs and condition. Fluid therapy is commonly used in the treatment of dehydration, shock, sepsis, trauma, surgery, and other medical conditions that can affect the body's fluid balance.

Proper administration of fluid therapy requires careful monitoring of the patient's vital signs, urine output, electrolyte levels, and overall clinical status to ensure that the therapy is effective and safe.

Prospective studies, also known as longitudinal studies, are a type of cohort study in which data is collected forward in time, following a group of individuals who share a common characteristic or exposure over a period of time. The researchers clearly define the study population and exposure of interest at the beginning of the study and follow up with the participants to determine the outcomes that develop over time. This type of study design allows for the investigation of causal relationships between exposures and outcomes, as well as the identification of risk factors and the estimation of disease incidence rates. Prospective studies are particularly useful in epidemiology and medical research when studying diseases with long latency periods or rare outcomes.

Emergency treatment refers to the urgent medical interventions and care provided to individuals who are experiencing a severe injury, illness, or life-threatening condition. The primary aim of emergency treatment is to stabilize the patient's condition, prevent further harm, and provide immediate medical attention to save the patient's life or limb.

Emergency treatment may include various medical procedures, such as cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), airway management, administering medications, controlling bleeding, treating burns, immobilizing fractures, and providing pain relief. The specific emergency treatment provided will depend on the nature and severity of the patient's condition.

Emergency treatment is typically delivered in an emergency department (ED) or a similar setting, such as an urgent care center, ambulance, or helicopter transport. Healthcare professionals who provide emergency treatment include emergency physicians, nurses, paramedics, and other specialists trained in emergency medicine.

It's important to note that emergency treatment is different from routine medical care, which is usually provided on a scheduled basis and focuses on preventing, diagnosing, and managing chronic or ongoing health conditions. Emergency treatment, on the other hand, is provided in response to an acute event or crisis that requires immediate attention and action.

'Drama' is a term that is more commonly associated with the humanities, particularly literature, theater, and film, rather than medicine. It refers to a type of narrative that explores human emotions, conflicts, and experiences through characters and plot. Drama can be presented in various forms such as plays, movies, or television shows.

There is no medical definition for 'drama' as it is not a term used in the field of medicine. However, in some contexts, drama may refer to emotional distress or turmoil that a person experiences, which could be relevant to mental health and psychology. In such cases, healthcare professionals might use related terms like "psychological distress," "emotional disturbance," or "crisis intervention" to describe the situation more accurately.

Rib fractures are breaks or cracks in the bones that make up the rib cage, which is the protective structure around the lungs and heart. Rib fractures can result from direct trauma to the chest, such as from a fall, motor vehicle accident, or physical assault. They can also occur from indirect forces, such as during coughing fits in people with weakened bones (osteoporosis).

Rib fractures are painful and can make breathing difficult, particularly when taking deep breaths or coughing. In some cases, rib fractures may lead to complications like punctured lungs (pneumothorax) or collapsed lungs (atelectasis), especially if multiple ribs are broken in several places.

It is essential to seek medical attention for suspected rib fractures, as proper diagnosis and management can help prevent further complications and promote healing. Treatment typically involves pain management, breathing exercises, and, in some cases, immobilization or surgery.

Emergency Medical Service (EMS) communication systems are networks and technologies used to facilitate the communication and coordination of emergency medical services. These systems typically include dispatch centers, radio and telephone communications, computer-aided dispatch (CAD) systems, and other technologies that enable EMS personnel to quickly and effectively respond to medical emergencies.

The primary goal of an EMS communication system is to ensure that the right resources are dispatched to the right location in a timely manner, and that EMS providers have the information they need to provide appropriate care. This may include transmitting patient information, such as medical history and symptoms, from the dispatch center to the responding EMS personnel, as well as coordinating the response of multiple agencies, such as fire departments and law enforcement, to a single incident.

EMS communication systems are an essential component of emergency medical services, as they help ensure that patients receive the care they need as quickly and efficiently as possible.

Epinephrine, also known as adrenaline, is a hormone and a neurotransmitter that is produced in the body. It is released by the adrenal glands in response to stress or excitement, and it prepares the body for the "fight or flight" response. Epinephrine works by binding to specific receptors in the body, which causes a variety of physiological effects, including increased heart rate and blood pressure, improved muscle strength and alertness, and narrowing of the blood vessels in the skin and intestines. It is also used as a medication to treat various medical conditions, such as anaphylaxis (a severe allergic reaction), cardiac arrest, and low blood pressure.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Judaism" is not a medical term. It is a religion, ethnicity, and culture originating in the Judaea region of the Middle East. Judaism is based on the teachings of the Torah and the Talmud, and it includes various practices, beliefs, and traditions. If you have any questions about medical terminology or health-related topics, I would be happy to try to help answer those for you.

A delivery room is a specialized unit in a hospital where childbirth takes place. It is staffed with healthcare professionals, such as obstetricians, nurses, and midwives, who are trained to assist women during labor, delivery, and the immediate postpartum period. Delivery rooms are equipped with medical equipment and supplies to monitor the mother's and baby's vital signs, administer medications, and perform emergency procedures if necessary.

Delivery rooms may also be referred to as labor and delivery units or wards. In some hospitals, there may be different types of delivery rooms, such as birthing suites that provide a more home-like atmosphere for women who prefer a natural childbirth experience. Overall, the goal of a delivery room is to ensure a safe and healthy outcome for both the mother and the baby during childbirth.

Medical survival rate is a statistical measure used to determine the percentage of patients who are still alive for a specific period of time after their diagnosis or treatment for a certain condition or disease. It is often expressed as a five-year survival rate, which refers to the proportion of people who are alive five years after their diagnosis. Survival rates can be affected by many factors, including the stage of the disease at diagnosis, the patient's age and overall health, the effectiveness of treatment, and other health conditions that the patient may have. It is important to note that survival rates are statistical estimates and do not necessarily predict an individual patient's prognosis.

An emergency is a sudden, unexpected situation that requires immediate medical attention to prevent serious harm, permanent disability, or death. Emergencies can include severe injuries, trauma, cardiac arrest, stroke, difficulty breathing, severe allergic reactions, and other life-threatening conditions. In such situations, prompt medical intervention is necessary to stabilize the patient's condition, diagnose the underlying problem, and provide appropriate treatment.

Emergency medical services (EMS) are responsible for providing emergency care to patients outside of a hospital setting, such as in the home, workplace, or public place. EMS personnel include emergency medical technicians (EMTs), paramedics, and other first responders who are trained to assess a patient's condition, provide basic life support, and transport the patient to a hospital for further treatment.

In a hospital setting, an emergency department (ED) is a specialized unit that provides immediate care to patients with acute illnesses or injuries. ED staff includes physicians, nurses, and other healthcare professionals who are trained to handle a wide range of medical emergencies. The ED is equipped with advanced medical technology and resources to provide prompt diagnosis and treatment for critically ill or injured patients.

Overall, the goal of emergency medical care is to stabilize the patient's condition, prevent further harm, and provide timely and effective treatment to improve outcomes and save lives.

Allied health personnel refers to a group of healthcare professionals who are licensed or regulated to provide specific services within the healthcare system. They work in collaboration with physicians and other healthcare providers to deliver comprehensive medical care. Allied health personnel include various disciplines such as:

1. Occupational therapists
2. Physical therapists
3. Speech-language pathologists
4. Audiologists
5. Respiratory therapists
6. Dietitians and nutritionists
7. Social workers
8. Diagnostic medical sonographers
9. Radiologic technologists
10. Clinical laboratory scientists
11. Genetic counselors
12. Rehabilitation counselors
13. Therapeutic recreation specialists

These professionals play a crucial role in the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of various medical conditions and are essential members of the healthcare team.

Rewarming, in a medical context, refers to the process of gradually increasing the body temperature of a person who is experiencing hypothermia. Hypothermia is a condition in which the core body temperature drops below 95°F (35°C), which can be caused by exposure to cold environments or certain medical conditions.

Rewarming can be accomplished through various methods, including:

1. Passive rewarming: This involves removing wet clothing and covering the person with warm blankets to allow their body to naturally increase its temperature.
2. Active external rewarming: This involves using warming devices such as heating pads or warm water bottles to apply heat to the skin surface.
3. Active core rewarming: This involves using more invasive methods, such as warmed intravenous fluids, warm air insufflation, or extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) with a heat exchanger, to directly warm the internal organs and blood.

The choice of rewarming method depends on the severity of hypothermia, the presence of other medical conditions, and the resources available. It is important to monitor the person's vital signs and core temperature during rewarming to avoid complications such as rewarming shock or arrhythmias.

Hemodynamics is the study of how blood flows through the cardiovascular system, including the heart and the vascular network. It examines various factors that affect blood flow, such as blood volume, viscosity, vessel length and diameter, and pressure differences between different parts of the circulatory system. Hemodynamics also considers the impact of various physiological and pathological conditions on these variables, and how they in turn influence the function of vital organs and systems in the body. It is a critical area of study in fields such as cardiology, anesthesiology, and critical care medicine.

An ambulance is a vehicle specifically equipped to provide emergency medical care and transportation to sick or injured individuals. The term "ambulance" generally refers to the vehicle itself, as well as the medical services provided within it.

The primary function of an ambulance is to quickly transport patients to a hospital or other medical facility where they can receive further treatment. However, many ambulances are also staffed with trained medical professionals, such as paramedics and emergency medical technicians (EMTs), who can provide basic life support and advanced life support during transportation.

Ambulances may be equipped with a variety of medical equipment, including stretchers, oxygen tanks, heart monitors, defibrillators, and medication to treat various medical emergencies. Some ambulances may also have specialized equipment for transporting patients with specific needs, such as bariatric patients or those requiring critical care.

There are several types of ambulances, including:

1. Ground Ambulance: These are the most common type of ambulance and are designed to travel on roads and highways. They can range from basic transport vans to advanced mobile intensive care units (MICUs).
2. Air Ambulance: These are helicopters or fixed-wing aircraft that are used to transport patients over long distances or in remote areas where ground transportation is not feasible.
3. Water Ambulance: These are specialized boats or ships that are used to transport patients in coastal or aquatic environments, such as offshore oil rigs or cruise ships.
4. Bariatric Ambulance: These are specially designed ambulances that can accommodate patients who weigh over 300 pounds (136 kg). They typically have reinforced floors and walls, wider doors, and specialized lifting equipment to safely move the patient.
5. Critical Care Ambulance: These are advanced mobile intensive care units that are staffed with critical care nurses and paramedics. They are equipped with sophisticated medical equipment, such as ventilators and monitoring devices, to provide critical care during transportation.

Emergency responders are individuals who are trained and authorized to provide immediate assistance in the event of an emergency. This can include medical emergencies, fires, natural disasters, or other situations that require urgent attention. Some common types of emergency responders include:

1. Emergency Medical Services (EMS) personnel: These are healthcare professionals who provide pre-hospital care to patients in emergency situations. They may be trained as emergency medical technicians (EMTs), paramedics, or nurses, and they often work for ambulance services, fire departments, or hospitals.
2. Firefighters: These are individuals who are trained to respond to fires, rescue people from dangerous situations, and provide other emergency services. They may also be trained in medical response and can provide basic life support care until EMS personnel arrive.
3. Police officers: Law enforcement officers who respond to emergencies such as crimes in progress, traffic accidents, or natural disasters. They are responsible for maintaining public safety and order, and may provide first aid or other emergency medical services if necessary.
4. Search and Rescue (SAR) teams: These are specialized teams that are trained to locate and rescue people who are lost, missing, or injured in remote or difficult-to-reach areas. They may work for government agencies, volunteer organizations, or private companies.
5. Public Health officials: These are individuals who work for local, state, or federal health departments and are responsible for responding to public health emergencies such as disease outbreaks or bioterrorism attacks. They may provide education, vaccination, or other services to protect the public's health.
6. Emergency Management professionals: These are individuals who are trained to coordinate emergency response efforts during large-scale disasters or emergencies. They may work for government agencies, nonprofit organizations, or private companies.

Overall, emergency responders play a critical role in protecting public safety and ensuring that people receive the medical care they need during emergencies.

Adrenergic agonists are medications or substances that bind to and activate adrenergic receptors, which are a type of receptor in the body that respond to neurotransmitters such as norepinephrine and epinephrine (also known as adrenaline).

There are two main types of adrenergic receptors: alpha and beta receptors. Alpha-adrenergic agonists activate alpha receptors, while beta-adrenergic agonists activate beta receptors. These medications can have a variety of effects on the body, depending on which type of receptor they act on.

Alpha-adrenergic agonists are often used to treat conditions such as nasal congestion, glaucoma, and low blood pressure. Examples include phenylephrine, oxymetazoline, and clonidine.

Beta-adrenergic agonists are commonly used to treat respiratory conditions such as asthma and COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease). They work by relaxing the smooth muscle in the airways, which makes it easier to breathe. Examples include albuterol, salmeterol, and formoterol.

It's important to note that adrenergic agonists can have both desired and undesired effects on the body. They should be used under the guidance of a healthcare professional, who can monitor their effectiveness and potential side effects.

A coma is a deep state of unconsciousness in which an individual cannot be awakened, cannot respond to stimuli, and does not exhibit any sleep-wake cycles. It is typically caused by severe brain injury, illness, or toxic exposure that impairs the function of the brainstem and cerebral cortex.

In a coma, the person may appear to be asleep, but they are not aware of their surroundings or able to communicate or respond to stimuli. Comas can last for varying lengths of time, from days to weeks or even months, and some people may emerge from a coma with varying degrees of brain function and disability.

Medical professionals use various diagnostic tools and assessments to evaluate the level of consciousness and brain function in individuals who are in a coma, including the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), which measures eye opening, verbal response, and motor response. Treatment for coma typically involves supportive care to maintain vital functions, manage any underlying medical conditions, and prevent further complications.

Terminal care, also known as end-of-life care or palliative care, is a type of medical care provided to patients who are in the final stages of a terminal illness or condition. The primary goal of terminal care is to provide comfort, dignity, and quality of life for the patient, rather than attempting to cure the disease or prolong life.

Terminal care may involve managing pain and other symptoms, providing emotional and psychological support to both the patient and their family, and helping the patient plan for the end of their life. This can include discussing advance directives, hospice care options, and other important decisions related to end-of-life care.

The focus of terminal care is on ensuring that the patient's physical, emotional, and spiritual needs are met in a compassionate and supportive manner. It is an essential component of high-quality medical care for patients who are facing the end of their lives.

An advance directive is a legal document that outlines an individual's preferences for medical treatment and care in the event that they become unable to make decisions for themselves due to illness or injury. Advance directive adherence refers to the process of ensuring that healthcare providers follow the instructions and wishes outlined in a patient's advance directive.

Advance directive adherence involves several steps, including:

1. Communication: Healthcare providers should have open and honest discussions with their patients about advance care planning, including end-of-life care preferences. This can help ensure that the patient's wishes are understood and documented in an advance directive.
2. Documentation: Healthcare providers should document the patient's advance directive in their medical record, along with any relevant discussions or decisions made about treatment options.
3. Sharing: Healthcare providers should share the patient's advance directive with other members of the healthcare team, as well as with family members or other designated decision-makers.
4. Respecting: Healthcare providers should respect and follow the instructions outlined in the patient's advance directive, unless there are medical reasons why they cannot be followed. If there is a conflict between the advance directive and the patient's current wishes or values, healthcare providers should engage in ongoing communication with the patient and their decision-makers to determine the best course of action.
5. Reviewing: Healthcare providers should regularly review the patient's advance directive to ensure that it remains up-to-date and reflects their current wishes and values. This is especially important if the patient's medical condition changes or if they experience a significant life event.

Pneumoperitoneum is a medical condition characterized by the presence of free air or gas within the peritoneal cavity, which is the space between the lining of the abdominal wall and the internal organs. This accumulation of air can occur due to various reasons such as perforation of an organ (e.g., stomach, intestine, or esophagus), recent surgery, or medical procedures involving the introduction of air into the abdomen.

The presence of pneumoperitoneum is often diagnosed through imaging techniques like X-rays or computed tomography (CT) scans, which can reveal the presence of free gas in the peritoneal cavity. The condition may require prompt medical attention, depending on the underlying cause and the patient's symptoms. Treatment typically involves addressing the underlying cause, such as repairing a perforation or managing an infection.

The thorax is the central part of the human body, located between the neck and the abdomen. In medical terms, it refers to the portion of the body that contains the heart, lungs, and associated structures within a protective cage made up of the sternum (breastbone), ribs, and thoracic vertebrae. The thorax is enclosed by muscles and protected by the ribcage, which helps to maintain its structural integrity and protect the vital organs contained within it.

The thorax plays a crucial role in respiration, as it allows for the expansion and contraction of the lungs during breathing. This movement is facilitated by the flexible nature of the ribcage, which expands and contracts with each breath, allowing air to enter and exit the lungs. Additionally, the thorax serves as a conduit for major blood vessels, such as the aorta and vena cava, which carry blood to and from the heart and the rest of the body.

Understanding the anatomy and function of the thorax is essential for medical professionals, as many conditions and diseases can affect this region of the body. These may include respiratory disorders such as pneumonia or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), cardiovascular conditions like heart attacks or aortic aneurysms, and musculoskeletal issues involving the ribs, spine, or surrounding muscles.

Artificial respiration is an emergency procedure that can be used to provide oxygen to a person who is not breathing or is breathing inadequately. It involves manually forcing air into the lungs, either by compressing the chest or using a device to deliver breaths. The goal of artificial respiration is to maintain adequate oxygenation of the body's tissues and organs until the person can breathe on their own or until advanced medical care arrives. Artificial respiration may be used in conjunction with cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in cases of cardiac arrest.

Intubation, intratracheal is a medical procedure in which a flexible plastic or rubber tube called an endotracheal tube (ETT) is inserted through the mouth or nose, passing through the vocal cords and into the trachea (windpipe). This procedure is performed to establish and maintain a patent airway, allowing for the delivery of oxygen and the removal of carbon dioxide during mechanical ventilation in various clinical scenarios, such as:

1. Respiratory failure or arrest
2. Procedural sedation
3. Surgery under general anesthesia
4. Neuromuscular disorders
5. Ingestion of toxic substances
6. Head and neck trauma
7. Critical illness or injury affecting the airway

The process of intubation is typically performed by trained medical professionals, such as anesthesiologists, emergency medicine physicians, or critical care specialists, using direct laryngoscopy or video laryngoscopy to visualize the vocal cords and guide the ETT into the correct position. Once placed, the ETT is secured to prevent dislodgement, and the patient's respiratory status is continuously monitored to ensure proper ventilation and oxygenation.

Practice guidelines, also known as clinical practice guidelines, are systematically developed statements that aim to assist healthcare professionals and patients in making informed decisions about appropriate health care for specific clinical circumstances. They are based on a thorough evaluation of the available scientific evidence, consensus of expert opinion, and consideration of patient preferences. Practice guidelines can cover a wide range of topics, including diagnosis, management, prevention, and treatment options for various medical conditions. They are intended to improve the quality and consistency of care, reduce unnecessary variations in practice, and promote evidence-based medicine. However, they should not replace clinical judgment or individualized patient care.

Medical ethics is a branch of ethics that deals with moral issues in medical care, research, and practice. It provides a framework for addressing questions related to patient autonomy, informed consent, confidentiality, distributive justice, beneficentia (doing good), and non-maleficence (not doing harm). Medical ethics also involves the application of ethical principles such as respect for persons, beneficence, non-maleficence, and justice to specific medical cases and situations. It is a crucial component of medical education and practice, helping healthcare professionals make informed decisions that promote patient well-being while respecting their rights and dignity.

Extracorporeal circulation (ECC) is a term used in medicine to describe the process of temporarily taking over the functions of the heart and lungs by using a machine. This allows the surgeon to perform certain types of surgery, such as open-heart surgery, on a still and bloodless operating field.

During ECC, the patient's blood is circulated outside the body through a pump and oxygenator. The pump helps to maintain blood flow and pressure, while the oxygenator adds oxygen to the blood and removes carbon dioxide. This allows the surgeon to stop the heart and arrest its motion, making it easier to perform delicate procedures on the heart and surrounding structures.

Extracorporeal circulation is a complex and high-risk procedure that requires careful monitoring and management by a team of healthcare professionals. It carries risks such as bleeding, infection, and injury to blood vessels or organs. However, when performed correctly, it can be a life-saving measure for patients undergoing certain types of surgery.

I apologize, but "video recording" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. It generally refers to the process of capturing and storing moving visual images on electronic media, which is used in various medical fields for different purposes such as surgical training, telemedicine consultations, or monitoring patient conditions. However, there is no unique medical meaning associated with this term.

Vasopressin, also known as antidiuretic hormone (ADH), is a hormone that helps regulate water balance in the body. It is produced by the hypothalamus and stored in the posterior pituitary gland. When the body is dehydrated or experiencing low blood pressure, vasopressin is released into the bloodstream, where it causes the kidneys to decrease the amount of urine they produce and helps to constrict blood vessels, thereby increasing blood pressure. This helps to maintain adequate fluid volume in the body and ensure that vital organs receive an adequate supply of oxygen-rich blood. In addition to its role in water balance and blood pressure regulation, vasopressin also plays a role in social behaviors such as pair bonding and trust.

I believe there may be some confusion in your question. "Volunteers" generally refers to individuals who willingly offer their time, effort, and services to help others without expecting compensation. In the context of medicine or clinical research, volunteers are participants who willingly take part in medical studies or trials, playing a crucial role in the development and testing of new treatments, medications, or medical devices.

However, if you're looking for a medical term related to volunteers, you may be thinking of "voluntary muscle action." Voluntary muscles, also known as skeletal muscles, are striated muscles that we control voluntarily to perform activities like walking, talking, and lifting objects.

Commotio cordis is a medical condition that results from a sudden, violent blow to the chest, which can cause the heart to stop beating (cardiac arrest). It usually occurs in young, healthy individuals during sports activities. The impact disrupts the electrical activity of the heart without causing any structural damage to the organ. This disruption can lead to ventricular fibrillation, an abnormal heart rhythm that prevents the heart from pumping blood effectively. If not treated promptly with defibrillation, commotio cordis can result in death within minutes.

Isotonic solutions are defined in the context of medical and physiological sciences as solutions that contain the same concentration of solutes (dissolved particles) as another solution, usually the bodily fluids like blood. This means that if you compare the concentration of solute particles in two isotonic solutions, they will be equal.

A common example is a 0.9% sodium chloride (NaCl) solution, also known as normal saline. The concentration of NaCl in this solution is approximately equal to the concentration found in the fluid portion of human blood, making it isotonic with blood.

Isotonic solutions are crucial in medical settings for various purposes, such as intravenous (IV) fluids replacement, wound care, and irrigation solutions. They help maintain fluid balance, prevent excessive water movement across cell membranes, and reduce the risk of damaging cells due to osmotic pressure differences between the solution and bodily fluids.

Retrospective studies, also known as retrospective research or looking back studies, are a type of observational study that examines data from the past to draw conclusions about possible causal relationships between risk factors and outcomes. In these studies, researchers analyze existing records, medical charts, or previously collected data to test a hypothesis or answer a specific research question.

Retrospective studies can be useful for generating hypotheses and identifying trends, but they have limitations compared to prospective studies, which follow participants forward in time from exposure to outcome. Retrospective studies are subject to biases such as recall bias, selection bias, and information bias, which can affect the validity of the results. Therefore, retrospective studies should be interpreted with caution and used primarily to generate hypotheses for further testing in prospective studies.

Hospital mortality is a term used to describe the number or rate of deaths that occur in a hospital setting during a specific period. It is often used as a measure of the quality of healthcare provided by a hospital, as a higher hospital mortality rate may indicate poorer care or more complex cases being treated. However, it's important to note that hospital mortality rates can be influenced by many factors, including the severity of illness of the patients being treated, patient demographics, and the availability of resources and specialized care. Therefore, hospital mortality rates should be interpreted with caution and in the context of other quality metrics.

Blood pressure is the force exerted by circulating blood on the walls of the blood vessels. It is measured in millimeters of mercury (mmHg) and is given as two figures:

1. Systolic pressure: This is the pressure when the heart pushes blood out into the arteries.
2. Diastolic pressure: This is the pressure when the heart rests between beats, allowing it to fill with blood.

Normal blood pressure for adults is typically around 120/80 mmHg, although this can vary slightly depending on age, sex, and other factors. High blood pressure (hypertension) is generally considered to be a reading of 130/80 mmHg or higher, while low blood pressure (hypotension) is usually defined as a reading below 90/60 mmHg. It's important to note that blood pressure can fluctuate throughout the day and may be affected by factors such as stress, physical activity, and medication use.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "videotape recording" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. Videotape recording is a general technology term that refers to the process of capturing and storing visual and/or audio content on magnetic tape in the form of a videocassette.

In a medical context, videotape recordings might be used for various purposes, such as documenting medical procedures or patient consultations, creating educational materials, or conducting research. However, the use of videotape recording in these situations would not change the fundamental meaning of the term.

Coronary circulation refers to the circulation of blood in the coronary vessels, which supply oxygenated blood to the heart muscle (myocardium) and drain deoxygenated blood from it. The coronary circulation system includes two main coronary arteries - the left main coronary artery and the right coronary artery - that branch off from the aorta just above the aortic valve. These arteries further divide into smaller branches, which supply blood to different regions of the heart muscle.

The left main coronary artery divides into two branches: the left anterior descending (LAD) artery and the left circumflex (LCx) artery. The LAD supplies blood to the front and sides of the heart, while the LCx supplies blood to the back and sides of the heart. The right coronary artery supplies blood to the lower part of the heart, including the right ventricle and the bottom portion of the left ventricle.

The veins that drain the heart muscle include the great cardiac vein, the middle cardiac vein, and the small cardiac vein, which merge to form the coronary sinus. The coronary sinus empties into the right atrium, allowing deoxygenated blood to enter the right side of the heart and be pumped to the lungs for oxygenation.

Coronary circulation is essential for maintaining the health and function of the heart muscle, as it provides the necessary oxygen and nutrients required for proper contraction and relaxation of the myocardium. Any disruption or blockage in the coronary circulation system can lead to serious consequences, such as angina, heart attack, or even death.

Blood gas analysis is a medical test that measures the levels of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the blood, as well as the pH level, which indicates the acidity or alkalinity of the blood. This test is often used to evaluate lung function, respiratory disorders, and acid-base balance in the body. It can also be used to monitor the effectiveness of treatments for conditions such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, and other respiratory illnesses. The analysis is typically performed on a sample of arterial blood, although venous blood may also be used in some cases.

Life support systems are medical devices or equipment that provide necessary functions for patients who cannot breathe or maintain other vital functions on their own. These systems can include ventilators to assist with breathing, dialysis machines to perform kidney functions, and feeding tubes to provide nutrition. The goal of life support systems is to keep a patient alive while they receive treatment for an illness or injury, or until their body can function independently again.

Survival analysis is a branch of statistics that deals with the analysis of time to event data. It is used to estimate the time it takes for a certain event of interest to occur, such as death, disease recurrence, or treatment failure. The event of interest is called the "failure" event, and survival analysis estimates the probability of not experiencing the failure event until a certain point in time, also known as the "survival" probability.

Survival analysis can provide important information about the effectiveness of treatments, the prognosis of patients, and the identification of risk factors associated with the event of interest. It can handle censored data, which is common in medical research where some participants may drop out or be lost to follow-up before the event of interest occurs.

Survival analysis typically involves estimating the survival function, which describes the probability of surviving beyond a certain time point, as well as hazard functions, which describe the instantaneous rate of failure at a given time point. Other important concepts in survival analysis include median survival times, restricted mean survival times, and various statistical tests to compare survival curves between groups.

Clinical competence is the ability of a healthcare professional to provide safe and effective patient care, demonstrating the knowledge, skills, and attitudes required for the job. It involves the integration of theoretical knowledge with practical skills, judgment, and decision-making abilities in real-world clinical situations. Clinical competence is typically evaluated through various methods such as direct observation, case studies, simulations, and feedback from peers and supervisors.

A clinically competent healthcare professional should be able to:

1. Demonstrate a solid understanding of the relevant medical knowledge and its application in clinical practice.
2. Perform essential clinical skills proficiently and safely.
3. Communicate effectively with patients, families, and other healthcare professionals.
4. Make informed decisions based on critical thinking and problem-solving abilities.
5. Exhibit professionalism, ethical behavior, and cultural sensitivity in patient care.
6. Continuously evaluate and improve their performance through self-reflection and ongoing learning.

Maintaining clinical competence is essential for healthcare professionals to ensure the best possible outcomes for their patients and stay current with advances in medical science and technology.

Critical care, also known as intensive care, is a medical specialty that deals with the diagnosis and management of life-threatening conditions that require close monitoring and organ support. Critical care medicine is practiced in critical care units (ICUs) or intensive care units of hospitals. The goal of critical care is to prevent further deterioration of the patient's condition, to support failing organs, and to treat any underlying conditions that may have caused the patient to become critically ill.

Critical care involves a multidisciplinary team approach, including intensivists (specialist doctors trained in critical care), nurses, respiratory therapists, pharmacists, and other healthcare professionals. The care provided in the ICU is highly specialized and often involves advanced medical technology such as mechanical ventilation, dialysis, and continuous renal replacement therapy.

Patients who require critical care may have a wide range of conditions, including severe infections, respiratory failure, cardiovascular instability, neurological emergencies, and multi-organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS). Critical care is an essential component of modern healthcare and has significantly improved the outcomes of critically ill patients.

Brain hypoxia is a medical condition characterized by a reduced supply of oxygen to the brain. The brain requires a continuous supply of oxygen to function properly, and even a brief period of hypoxia can cause significant damage to brain cells.

Hypoxia can result from various conditions, such as cardiac arrest, respiratory failure, carbon monoxide poisoning, or high altitude exposure. When the brain is deprived of oxygen, it can lead to a range of symptoms, including confusion, disorientation, seizures, loss of consciousness, and ultimately, brain death.

Brain hypoxia is a medical emergency that requires immediate treatment to prevent long-term neurological damage or death. Treatment typically involves addressing the underlying cause of hypoxia, such as administering oxygen therapy, resuscitating the heart, or treating respiratory failure. In some cases, more invasive treatments, such as therapeutic hypothermia or mechanical ventilation, may be necessary to prevent further brain damage.

'Sus scrofa' is the scientific name for the wild boar, a species of suid that is native to much of Eurasia and North Africa. It is not a medical term or concept. If you have any questions related to medical terminology or health-related topics, I would be happy to help with those instead!

Status asthmaticus is a severe, potentially life-threatening exacerbation of asthma that does not respond to standard treatments with bronchodilators and corticosteroids. It is characterized by persistent bronchospasm, air trapping, and hypoxemia, despite the administration of beta-agonists and systemic steroids. Prolonged respiratory acidosis and muscular fatigue may also occur due to the increased work of breathing. Status asthmaticus can lead to respiratory failure and may require mechanical ventilation in severe cases. It is a medical emergency that requires immediate evaluation and treatment in a hospital setting.

Professional education and retraining refers to the process of acquiring or updating knowledge, skills, and competencies necessary for a specific profession or occupation. This may involve formal education in an academic institution, on-the-job training, or continuing education programs. The goal of professional education and retraining is to ensure that individuals are equipped with the necessary expertise to perform their duties safely, effectively, and ethically, and to stay current with advances and changes in their field. Retraining may be necessary when an individual is transitioning to a new profession, or when there are significant changes in technology, regulations, or best practices in their existing field.

Capnography is the non-invasive measurement and monitoring of carbon dioxide (CO2) in exhaled breath, also known as end-tidal CO2 (EtCO2). It is typically displayed as a waveform graph that shows the concentration of CO2 over time. Capnography provides important information about respiratory function, metabolic rate, and the effectiveness of ventilation during medical procedures such as anesthesia, mechanical ventilation, and resuscitation. Changes in capnograph patterns can help detect conditions such as hypoventilation, hyperventilation, esophageal intubation, and pulmonary embolism.

Audiovisual aids are educational tools that utilize both visual and auditory senses to facilitate learning and communication. These aids can include various forms of technology such as projectors, televisions, computers, and mobile devices, as well as traditional materials like posters, charts, and models. In a medical context, audiovisual aids may be used in lectures, presentations, or patient education to help illustrate complex concepts, demonstrate procedures, or provide information in a clear and engaging way. They can be particularly useful for individuals who learn best through visual or auditory means, and can help to improve comprehension and retention of information.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "West Virginia" is a state located in the Eastern United States, and it is not a medical term or condition. If you have any questions about medical definitions or topics, I would be happy to try to help answer them!

Tidal volume (Vt) is the amount of air that moves into or out of the lungs during normal, resting breathing. It is the difference between the volume of air in the lungs at the end of a normal expiration and the volume at the end of a normal inspiration. In other words, it's the volume of each breath you take when you are not making any effort to breathe more deeply.

The average tidal volume for an adult human is around 500 milliliters (ml) per breath, but this can vary depending on factors such as age, sex, size, and fitness level. During exercise or other activities that require increased oxygen intake, tidal volume may increase to meet the body's demands for more oxygen.

Tidal volume is an important concept in respiratory physiology and clinical medicine, as it can be used to assess lung function and diagnose respiratory disorders such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or asthma.

Induced heart arrest, also known as controlled cardiac arrest or planned cardiac arrest, is a deliberate medical intervention where cardiac activity is temporarily stopped through the use of medications or electrical disruption. This procedure is typically carried out during a surgical procedure, such as open-heart surgery, where the heart needs to be stilled to allow surgeons to work on it safely.

The most common method used to induce heart arrest is by administering a medication called potassium chloride, which stops the heart's electrical activity. Alternatively, an electrical shock may be delivered to the heart to achieve the same effect. Once the procedure is complete, the heart can be restarted using various resuscitation techniques, such as defibrillation or medication administration.

It's important to note that induced heart arrest is a carefully monitored and controlled medical procedure carried out by trained healthcare professionals in a hospital setting. It should not be confused with sudden cardiac arrest, which is an unexpected and often unpredictable event that occurs outside of a medical setting.

A pulmonary embolism (PE) is a medical condition that occurs when a blood clot, often formed in the deep veins of the legs (deep vein thrombosis), breaks off and travels to the lungs, blocking one or more pulmonary arteries. This blockage can lead to various symptoms such as shortness of breath, chest pain, rapid heart rate, and coughing up blood. In severe cases, it can cause life-threatening complications like low oxygen levels, hypotension, and even death if not promptly diagnosed and treated with anticoagulant medications or thrombolytic therapy to dissolve the clot.

A Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) is a specialized hospital unit that provides intensive care to critically ill or injured infants, children, and adolescents. The PICU is equipped with advanced medical technology and staffed by healthcare professionals trained in pediatrics, including pediatric intensivists, pediatric nurses, respiratory therapists, and other specialists as needed.

The primary goal of the PICU is to closely monitor and manage the most critical patients, providing around-the-clock care and interventions to support organ function, treat life-threatening conditions, and prevent complications. The PICU team works together to provide family-centered care, keeping parents informed about their child's condition and involving them in decision-making processes.

Common reasons for admission to the PICU include respiratory failure, shock, sepsis, severe trauma, congenital heart disease, neurological emergencies, and post-operative monitoring after complex surgeries. The length of stay in the PICU can vary widely depending on the severity of the child's illness or injury and their response to treatment.

Mental competency, also known as mental capacity, is a legal term that refers to a person's ability to make informed decisions and understand the nature and consequences of their actions. In a medical context, mental competency is often assessed in patients who are making decisions about their own medical care, such as whether to consent to a particular treatment or procedure.

A determination of mental competency typically involves an evaluation of a person's ability to:

* Understand and retain information about their medical condition and the proposed treatment
* Evaluate the risks and benefits of different treatment options
* Make and communicate a clear and consistent decision based on this information
* Understand the potential consequences of their decision

Mental competency can be affected by various factors, including mental illness, cognitive impairment, substance abuse, or developmental disabilities. A healthcare provider may seek a formal evaluation of a patient's mental competency if there are concerns about their ability to make informed decisions about their care. This evaluation may involve input from psychiatrists, psychologists, or other mental health professionals.

It is important to note that mental competency is not the same as legal competency, which refers to a person's ability to understand and participate in legal proceedings. A person may be deemed mentally competent for medical purposes but not for legal purposes, or vice versa.

Decision-making is the cognitive process of selecting a course of action from among multiple alternatives. In a medical context, decision-making refers to the process by which healthcare professionals and patients make choices about medical tests, treatments, or management options based on a thorough evaluation of available information, including the patient's preferences, values, and circumstances.

The decision-making process in medicine typically involves several steps:

1. Identifying the problem or issue that requires a decision.
2. Gathering relevant information about the patient's medical history, current condition, diagnostic test results, treatment options, and potential outcomes.
3. Considering the benefits, risks, and uncertainties associated with each option.
4. Evaluating the patient's preferences, values, and goals.
5. Selecting the most appropriate course of action based on a careful weighing of the available evidence and the patient's individual needs and circumstances.
6. Communicating the decision to the patient and ensuring that they understand the rationale behind it, as well as any potential risks or benefits.
7. Monitoring the outcomes of the decision and adjusting the course of action as needed based on ongoing evaluation and feedback.

Effective decision-making in medicine requires a thorough understanding of medical evidence, clinical expertise, and patient preferences. It also involves careful consideration of ethical principles, such as respect for autonomy, non-maleficence, beneficence, and justice. Ultimately, the goal of decision-making in healthcare is to promote the best possible outcomes for patients while minimizing harm and respecting their individual needs and values.

A newborn infant is a baby who is within the first 28 days of life. This period is also referred to as the neonatal period. Newborns require specialized care and attention due to their immature bodily systems and increased vulnerability to various health issues. They are closely monitored for signs of well-being, growth, and development during this critical time.

Carbon dioxide (CO2) is a colorless, odorless gas that is naturally present in the Earth's atmosphere. It is a normal byproduct of cellular respiration in humans, animals, and plants, and is also produced through the combustion of fossil fuels such as coal, oil, and natural gas.

In medical terms, carbon dioxide is often used as a respiratory stimulant and to maintain the pH balance of blood. It is also used during certain medical procedures, such as laparoscopic surgery, to insufflate (inflate) the abdominal cavity and create a working space for the surgeon.

Elevated levels of carbon dioxide in the body can lead to respiratory acidosis, a condition characterized by an increased concentration of carbon dioxide in the blood and a decrease in pH. This can occur in conditions such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, or other lung diseases that impair breathing and gas exchange. Symptoms of respiratory acidosis may include shortness of breath, confusion, headache, and in severe cases, coma or death.

Advance care planning (ACP) is a process that involves discussing and documenting an individual's preferences and goals for future medical care, particularly in the event that they become unable to make decisions for themselves due to serious illness or injury. The purpose of ACP is to ensure that a person's values, beliefs, and wishes are respected and honored when it comes to their healthcare decisions.

ACP typically involves discussions between the individual, their loved ones, and healthcare providers about various topics such as:

* The individual's understanding of their current health status and prognosis
* Their goals for medical treatment, including any treatments they would or would not want to receive
* Their values and beliefs that should guide their medical care
* The appointment of a healthcare proxy or surrogate decision-maker who can make decisions on their behalf if they become unable to make them for themselves.

The outcome of ACP is often the creation of an advance directive, which is a legal document that outlines the individual's wishes for medical treatment and appoints a healthcare proxy. Advance care planning is an ongoing process that should be revisited and updated regularly as an individual's health status and preferences change over time.

Emergency nursing is a specialized field of nursing that involves providing care to patients who are experiencing acute illnesses or injuries that require immediate attention. Emergency nurses work in emergency departments, trauma centers, and urgent care settings, where they quickly assess a patient's condition, provide life-saving interventions, and coordinate care with other members of the healthcare team.

Emergency nurses must be highly skilled in a wide range of procedures, including cardiac monitoring, airway management, IV insertion, and medication administration. They must also be able to communicate effectively with patients and their families, as well as other healthcare providers, to ensure that each patient receives the best possible care.

In addition to their technical skills, emergency nurses must be able to work in a fast-paced, high-stress environment and make quick decisions under pressure. They must also be compassionate and empathetic, as they often provide care to patients who are experiencing some of the most difficult moments of their lives. Overall, emergency nursing is a rewarding and challenging field that requires a unique combination of technical expertise, critical thinking skills, and interpersonal abilities.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "videodisc recording" is not a medical term. It is a general technology term that refers to the process of recording video images and sound onto a videodisc, such as a Laserdisc or Video CD. If you have any questions about medical terminology or concepts, I'd be happy to help with those!

Cardiac surgical procedures are operations that are performed on the heart or great vessels (the aorta and vena cava) by cardiothoracic surgeons. These surgeries are often complex and require a high level of skill and expertise. Some common reasons for cardiac surgical procedures include:

1. Coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG): This is a surgery to improve blood flow to the heart in patients with coronary artery disease. During the procedure, a healthy blood vessel from another part of the body is used to create a detour around the blocked or narrowed portion of the coronary artery.
2. Valve repair or replacement: The heart has four valves that control blood flow through and out of the heart. If one or more of these valves become damaged or diseased, they may need to be repaired or replaced. This can be done using artificial valves or valves from animal or human donors.
3. Aneurysm repair: An aneurysm is a weakened area in the wall of an artery that can bulge out and potentially rupture. If an aneurysm occurs in the aorta, it may require surgical repair to prevent rupture.
4. Heart transplantation: In some cases, heart failure may be so severe that a heart transplant is necessary. This involves removing the diseased heart and replacing it with a healthy donor heart.
5. Arrhythmia surgery: Certain types of abnormal heart rhythms (arrhythmias) may require surgical treatment. One such procedure is called the Maze procedure, which involves creating a pattern of scar tissue in the heart to disrupt the abnormal electrical signals that cause the arrhythmia.
6. Congenital heart defect repair: Some people are born with structural problems in their hearts that require surgical correction. These may include holes between the chambers of the heart or abnormal blood vessels.

Cardiac surgical procedures carry risks, including bleeding, infection, stroke, and death. However, for many patients, these surgeries can significantly improve their quality of life and longevity.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Programmed Instruction" is not a medical term or concept. It is a educational theory and teaching strategy that was developed in the mid-20th century. Programmed instruction involves presenting information to learners in small, manageable chunks or "frames," with each frame building upon the previous one. Learners are often asked to respond to questions or prompts after each frame, which allows them to immediately apply what they have learned and receive feedback. This approach is designed to help learners progress at their own pace and take an active role in their learning process. It has been used in various settings, including medical education, to teach a wide range of topics.

A pediatric hospital is a specialized medical facility that provides comprehensive healthcare services for infants, children, adolescents, and young adults up to the age of 21. These hospitals employ medical professionals with expertise in treating various childhood illnesses, injuries, and developmental disorders. The facilities are designed to cater to the unique needs of children, including child-friendly environments, specialized equipment, and age-appropriate care.

Pediatric hospitals offer a wide range of services such as inpatient and outpatient care, emergency services, surgical procedures, diagnostic testing, rehabilitation, and mental health services. They also focus on preventive healthcare, family-centered care, and education to support the overall well-being of their young patients. Some pediatric hospitals may specialize further, focusing on specific areas such as cancer treatment, cardiology, neurology, or orthopedics.

Sodium bicarbonate, also known as baking soda, is a chemical compound with the formula NaHCO3. It is a white solid that is crystalline but often appears as a fine powder. It has a slightly salty, alkaline taste and is commonly used in cooking as a leavening agent.

In a medical context, sodium bicarbonate is used as a medication to treat conditions caused by high levels of acid in the body, such as metabolic acidosis. It works by neutralizing the acid and turning it into a harmless salt and water. Sodium bicarbonate can be given intravenously or orally, depending on the severity of the condition being treated.

It is important to note that sodium bicarbonate should only be used under the supervision of a healthcare professional, as it can have serious side effects if not used properly. These may include fluid buildup in the body, electrolyte imbalances, and an increased risk of infection.

"Random allocation," also known as "random assignment" or "randomization," is a process used in clinical trials and other research studies to distribute participants into different intervention groups (such as experimental group vs. control group) in a way that minimizes selection bias and ensures the groups are comparable at the start of the study.

In random allocation, each participant has an equal chance of being assigned to any group, and the assignment is typically made using a computer-generated randomization schedule or other objective methods. This process helps to ensure that any differences between the groups are due to the intervention being tested rather than pre-existing differences in the participants' characteristics.

Animal disease models are specialized animals, typically rodents such as mice or rats, that have been genetically engineered or exposed to certain conditions to develop symptoms and physiological changes similar to those seen in human diseases. These models are used in medical research to study the pathophysiology of diseases, identify potential therapeutic targets, test drug efficacy and safety, and understand disease mechanisms.

The genetic modifications can include knockout or knock-in mutations, transgenic expression of specific genes, or RNA interference techniques. The animals may also be exposed to environmental factors such as chemicals, radiation, or infectious agents to induce the disease state.

Examples of animal disease models include:

1. Mouse models of cancer: Genetically engineered mice that develop various types of tumors, allowing researchers to study cancer initiation, progression, and metastasis.
2. Alzheimer's disease models: Transgenic mice expressing mutant human genes associated with Alzheimer's disease, which exhibit amyloid plaque formation and cognitive decline.
3. Diabetes models: Obese and diabetic mouse strains like the NOD (non-obese diabetic) or db/db mice, used to study the development of type 1 and type 2 diabetes, respectively.
4. Cardiovascular disease models: Atherosclerosis-prone mice, such as ApoE-deficient or LDLR-deficient mice, that develop plaque buildup in their arteries when fed a high-fat diet.
5. Inflammatory bowel disease models: Mice with genetic mutations affecting intestinal barrier function and immune response, such as IL-10 knockout or SAMP1/YitFc mice, which develop colitis.

Animal disease models are essential tools in preclinical research, but it is important to recognize their limitations. Differences between species can affect the translatability of results from animal studies to human patients. Therefore, researchers must carefully consider the choice of model and interpret findings cautiously when applying them to human diseases.

A single-blind method in medical research is a study design where the participants are unaware of the group or intervention they have been assigned to, but the researchers conducting the study know which participant belongs to which group. This is done to prevent bias from the participants' expectations or knowledge of their assignment, while still allowing the researchers to control the study conditions and collect data.

In a single-blind trial, the participants do not know whether they are receiving the active treatment or a placebo (a sham treatment that looks like the real thing but has no therapeutic effect), whereas the researcher knows which participant is receiving which intervention. This design helps to ensure that the participants' responses and outcomes are not influenced by their knowledge of the treatment assignment, while still allowing the researchers to assess the effectiveness or safety of the intervention being studied.

Single-blind methods are commonly used in clinical trials and other medical research studies where it is important to minimize bias and control for confounding variables that could affect the study results.

In the context of medicine, and specifically in physiology and respiratory therapy, partial pressure (P or p) is a measure of the pressure exerted by an individual gas in a mixture of gases. It's commonly used to describe the concentrations of gases in the body, such as oxygen (PO2), carbon dioxide (PCO2), and nitrogen (PN2).

The partial pressure of a specific gas is calculated as the fraction of that gas in the total mixture multiplied by the total pressure of the mixture. This concept is based on Dalton's law, which states that the total pressure exerted by a mixture of gases is equal to the sum of the pressures exerted by each individual gas.

For example, in room air at sea level, the partial pressure of oxygen (PO2) is approximately 160 mmHg (mm of mercury), which represents about 21% of the total barometric pressure (760 mmHg). This concept is crucial for understanding gas exchange in the lungs and how gases move across membranes, such as from alveoli to blood and vice versa.

Pulmonary gas exchange is the process by which oxygen (O2) from inhaled air is transferred to the blood, and carbon dioxide (CO2), a waste product of metabolism, is removed from the blood and exhaled. This process occurs in the lungs, primarily in the alveoli, where the thin walls of the alveoli and capillaries allow for the rapid diffusion of gases between them. The partial pressure gradient between the alveolar air and the blood in the pulmonary capillaries drives this diffusion process. Oxygen-rich blood is then transported to the body's tissues, while CO2-rich blood returns to the lungs to be exhaled.

Drowning is a process resulting in primary respiratory impairment from the direct or indirect immersion/submersion in a liquid medium. It can be classified as:

1. Death due to drowning, which is the wet form where water enters the lungs (drowning with respirations) and
2. Death due to asphyxia from lack of breathing while submerged in water (drowning without respirations).

The terms "wet," "dry," "active," "passive," "silent," or "smothering" drowning have been used historically but are no longer recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) or other experts because they can be misleading and do not contribute to the understanding or prevention of drowning.

The process of drowning can lead to various clinical presentations, ranging from mild respiratory symptoms to severe hypoxic injury and ultimately death. Factors such as the duration of submersion, the volume and temperature of the fluid, and the presence of other injuries or medical conditions can all influence the outcome.

It is important to note that drowning is a significant public health issue and a leading cause of accidental deaths worldwide, particularly among children and adolescents. Prevention efforts, such as water safety education, supervision, and barriers around bodies of water, are crucial in reducing the incidence of drowning.

The sternum, also known as the breastbone, is a long, flat bone located in the central part of the chest. It serves as the attachment point for several muscles and tendons, including those involved in breathing. The sternum has three main parts: the manubrium at the top, the body in the middle, and the xiphoid process at the bottom. The upper seven pairs of ribs connect to the sternum via costal cartilages.

In a medical context, "survival" generally refers to the continuation of life following a serious illness, injury, or dangerous event. It is often used in research and clinical settings to describe the length and quality of life after a specific treatment or diagnosis. For example, survival rate might refer to the percentage of patients who are still alive after a certain period of time following a cancer diagnosis or surgery. Survival can also be used more broadly to describe an individual's ability to adapt and persist in the face of adversity or challenge, whether that's due to medical conditions or other life circumstances.

Cardiology is a branch of medicine that deals with the diagnosis and treatment of diseases and disorders of the heart and blood vessels. It encompasses the study of the normal functioning of the heart, the investigation and diagnosis of heart disease, and the treatment of various cardiovascular conditions through both surgical and non-surgical interventions. Cardiologists are medical professionals who specialize in this field, providing comprehensive care for patients with conditions such as coronary artery disease, congenital heart defects, valvular heart disease, electrophysiology disorders, and hypertension, among others. They work closely with other healthcare providers to manage cardiovascular risk factors, optimize overall cardiovascular health, and improve patients' quality of life.

I believe there might be a misunderstanding in your question. "Dogs" is not a medical term or condition. It is the common name for a domesticated carnivore of the family Canidae, specifically the genus Canis, which includes wolves, foxes, and other extant and extinct species of mammals. Dogs are often kept as pets and companions, and they have been bred in a wide variety of forms and sizes for different purposes, such as hunting, herding, guarding, assisting police and military forces, and providing companionship and emotional support.

If you meant to ask about a specific medical condition or term related to dogs, please provide more context so I can give you an accurate answer.

In medical terms, shock is a life-threatening condition that occurs when the body is not getting enough blood flow or when the circulatory system is not functioning properly to distribute oxygen and nutrients to the tissues and organs. This results in a state of hypoxia (lack of oxygen) and cellular dysfunction, which can lead to multiple organ failure and death if left untreated.

Shock can be caused by various factors such as severe blood loss, infection, trauma, heart failure, allergic reactions, and severe burns. The symptoms of shock include low blood pressure, rapid pulse, cool and clammy skin, rapid and shallow breathing, confusion, weakness, and a bluish color to the lips and nails. Immediate medical attention is required for proper diagnosis and treatment of shock.

Intubation is a medical procedure in which a flexible plastic tube called an endotracheal tube (ETT) is inserted into the patient's windpipe (trachea) through the mouth or nose. This procedure is performed to maintain an open airway and ensure adequate ventilation and oxygenation of the lungs during surgery, critical illness, or trauma.

The ETT is connected to a breathing circuit and a ventilator, which delivers breaths and removes carbon dioxide from the lungs. Intubation allows healthcare professionals to manage the patient's airway, control their breathing, and administer anesthesia during surgical procedures. It is typically performed by trained medical personnel such as anesthesiologists, emergency medicine physicians, or critical care specialists.

There are two main types of intubation: oral and nasal. Oral intubation involves inserting the ETT through the patient's mouth, while nasal intubation involves passing the tube through the nostril and into the trachea. The choice of technique depends on various factors, including the patient's medical condition, anatomy, and the reason for intubation.

Cerebrovascular circulation refers to the network of blood vessels that supply oxygenated blood and nutrients to the brain tissue, and remove waste products. It includes the internal carotid arteries, vertebral arteries, circle of Willis, and the intracranial arteries that branch off from them.

The internal carotid arteries and vertebral arteries merge to form the circle of Willis, a polygonal network of vessels located at the base of the brain. The anterior cerebral artery, middle cerebral artery, posterior cerebral artery, and communicating arteries are the major vessels that branch off from the circle of Willis and supply blood to different regions of the brain.

Interruptions or abnormalities in the cerebrovascular circulation can lead to various neurological conditions such as stroke, transient ischemic attack (TIA), and vascular dementia.

An emergency service in a hospital is a department that provides immediate medical or surgical care for individuals who are experiencing an acute illness, injury, or severe symptoms that require immediate attention. The goal of an emergency service is to quickly assess, stabilize, and treat patients who require urgent medical intervention, with the aim of preventing further harm or death.

Emergency services in hospitals typically operate 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, and are staffed by teams of healthcare professionals including physicians, nurses, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, and other allied health professionals. These teams are trained to provide rapid evaluation and treatment for a wide range of medical conditions, from minor injuries to life-threatening emergencies such as heart attacks, strokes, and severe infections.

In addition to providing emergency care, hospital emergency services also serve as a key point of entry for patients who require further hospitalization or specialized care. They work closely with other departments within the hospital, such as radiology, laboratory, and critical care units, to ensure that patients receive timely and appropriate treatment. Overall, the emergency service in a hospital plays a crucial role in ensuring that patients receive prompt and effective medical care during times of crisis.

"Attitude to Death" is not a medical term per se, but it does refer to an individual's perspective, feelings, and beliefs about death and dying. It can encompass various aspects such as fear, acceptance, curiosity, denial, or preparation. While not a medical definition, understanding a person's attitude to death can be relevant in healthcare settings, particularly in palliative and end-of-life care, as it can influence their decisions and experiences around their own mortality.

An Intensive Care Unit (ICU) is a specialized hospital department that provides continuous monitoring and advanced life support for critically ill patients. The ICU is equipped with sophisticated technology and staffed by highly trained healthcare professionals, including intensivists, nurses, respiratory therapists, and other specialists.

Patients in the ICU may require mechanical ventilation, invasive monitoring, vasoactive medications, and other advanced interventions due to conditions such as severe infections, trauma, cardiac arrest, respiratory failure, or post-surgical complications. The goal of the ICU is to stabilize patients' condition, prevent further complications, and support organ function while the underlying illness is treated.

ICUs may be organized into different units based on the type of care provided, such as medical, surgical, cardiac, neurological, or pediatric ICUs. The length of stay in the ICU can vary widely depending on the patient's condition and response to treatment.

Intensive care is a specialized level of medical care that is provided to critically ill patients. It's usually given in a dedicated unit of a hospital called the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) or Critical Care Unit (CCU). The goal of intensive care is to closely monitor and manage life-threatening conditions, stabilize vital functions, and support organs until they recover or the patient can be moved to a less acute level of care.

Intensive care involves advanced medical equipment and technologies, such as ventilators to assist with breathing, dialysis machines for kidney support, intravenous lines for medication administration, and continuous monitoring devices for heart rate, blood pressure, oxygen levels, and other vital signs.

The ICU team typically includes intensive care specialists (intensivists), critical care nurses, respiratory therapists, and other healthcare professionals who work together to provide comprehensive, round-the-clock care for critically ill patients.

In medical terms, pressure is defined as the force applied per unit area on an object or body surface. It is often measured in millimeters of mercury (mmHg) in clinical settings. For example, blood pressure is the force exerted by circulating blood on the walls of the arteries and is recorded as two numbers: systolic pressure (when the heart beats and pushes blood out) and diastolic pressure (when the heart rests between beats).

Pressure can also refer to the pressure exerted on a wound or incision to help control bleeding, or the pressure inside the skull or spinal canal. High or low pressure in different body systems can indicate various medical conditions and require appropriate treatment.

Ventricular Tachycardia (VT) is a rapid heart rhythm that originates from the ventricles, the lower chambers of the heart. It is defined as three or more consecutive ventricular beats at a rate of 120 beats per minute or greater in a resting adult. This abnormal heart rhythm can cause the heart to pump less effectively, leading to inadequate blood flow to the body and potentially life-threatening conditions such as hypotension, shock, or cardiac arrest.

VT can be classified into three types based on its duration, hemodynamic stability, and response to treatment:

1. Non-sustained VT (NSVT): It lasts for less than 30 seconds and is usually well tolerated without causing significant symptoms or hemodynamic instability.
2. Sustained VT (SVT): It lasts for more than 30 seconds, causes symptoms such as palpitations, dizziness, shortness of breath, or chest pain, and may lead to hemodynamic instability.
3. Pulseless VT: It is a type of sustained VT that does not produce a pulse, blood pressure, or adequate cardiac output, requiring immediate electrical cardioversion or defibrillation to restore a normal heart rhythm.

VT can occur in people with various underlying heart conditions such as coronary artery disease, cardiomyopathy, valvular heart disease, congenital heart defects, and electrolyte imbalances. It can also be triggered by certain medications, substance abuse, or electrical abnormalities in the heart. Prompt diagnosis and treatment of VT are crucial to prevent complications and improve outcomes.

Prognosis is a medical term that refers to the prediction of the likely outcome or course of a disease, including the chances of recovery or recurrence, based on the patient's symptoms, medical history, physical examination, and diagnostic tests. It is an important aspect of clinical decision-making and patient communication, as it helps doctors and patients make informed decisions about treatment options, set realistic expectations, and plan for future care.

Prognosis can be expressed in various ways, such as percentages, categories (e.g., good, fair, poor), or survival rates, depending on the nature of the disease and the available evidence. However, it is important to note that prognosis is not an exact science and may vary depending on individual factors, such as age, overall health status, and response to treatment. Therefore, it should be used as a guide rather than a definitive forecast.

Acid-base equilibrium refers to the balance between the concentration of acids and bases in a solution, which determines its pH level. In a healthy human body, maintaining acid-base equilibrium is crucial for proper cellular function and homeostasis.

The balance is maintained by several buffering systems in the body, including the bicarbonate buffer system, which helps to regulate the pH of blood. This system involves the reaction between carbonic acid (a weak acid) and bicarbonate ions (a base) to form water and carbon dioxide.

The balance between acids and bases is carefully regulated by the body's respiratory and renal systems. The lungs control the elimination of carbon dioxide, a weak acid, through exhalation, while the kidneys regulate the excretion of hydrogen ions and the reabsorption of bicarbonate ions.

When the balance between acids and bases is disrupted, it can lead to acid-base disorders such as acidosis (excessive acidity) or alkalosis (excessive basicity). These conditions can have serious consequences on various organ systems if left untreated.

Plasma substitutes are fluids that are used to replace the plasma volume in conditions such as hypovolemia (low blood volume) or plasma loss, for example due to severe burns, trauma, or major surgery. They do not contain cells or clotting factors, but they help to maintain intravascular volume and tissue perfusion. Plasma substitutes can be divided into two main categories: crystalloids and colloids.

Crystalloid solutions contain small molecules that can easily move between intracellular and extracellular spaces. Examples include normal saline (0.9% sodium chloride) and lactated Ringer's solution. They are less expensive and have a lower risk of allergic reactions compared to colloids, but they may require larger volumes to achieve the same effect due to their rapid distribution in the body.

Colloid solutions contain larger molecules that tend to stay within the intravascular space for longer periods, thus increasing the oncotic pressure and helping to maintain fluid balance. Examples include albumin, fresh frozen plasma, and synthetic colloids such as hydroxyethyl starch (HES) and gelatin. Colloids may be more effective in restoring intravascular volume, but they carry a higher risk of allergic reactions and anaphylaxis, and some types have been associated with adverse effects such as kidney injury and coagulopathy.

The choice of plasma substitute depends on various factors, including the patient's clinical condition, the underlying cause of plasma loss, and any contraindications or potential side effects of the available products. It is important to monitor the patient's hemodynamic status, electrolyte balance, and coagulation profile during and after the administration of plasma substitutes to ensure appropriate resuscitation and avoid complications.

A hypertonic saline solution is a type of medical fluid that contains a higher concentration of salt (sodium chloride) than is found in the average person's blood. This solution is used to treat various medical conditions, such as dehydration, brain swelling, and increased intracranial pressure.

The osmolarity of a hypertonic saline solution typically ranges from 1500 to 23,400 mOsm/L, with the most commonly used solutions having an osmolarity of around 3000 mOsm/L. The high sodium concentration in these solutions creates an osmotic gradient that draws water out of cells and into the bloodstream, helping to reduce swelling and increase fluid volume in the body.

It is important to note that hypertonic saline solutions should be administered with caution, as they can cause serious side effects such as electrolyte imbalances, heart rhythm abnormalities, and kidney damage if not used properly. Healthcare professionals must carefully monitor patients receiving these solutions to ensure safe and effective treatment.

'Medical Staff, Hospital' is a general term that refers to the group of licensed physicians and other healthcare professionals who are responsible for providing medical care to patients in a hospital setting. The medical staff may include attending physicians, residents, interns, fellows, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, and other advanced practice providers.

The medical staff is typically governed by a set of bylaws that outline the structure, authority, and responsibilities of the group. They are responsible for establishing policies and procedures related to patient care, quality improvement, and safety. The medical staff also plays a key role in the hospital's credentialing and privileging process, which ensures that healthcare professionals meet certain standards and qualifications before they are allowed to practice in the hospital.

The medical staff may work in various departments or divisions within the hospital, such as internal medicine, surgery, pediatrics, obstetrics and gynecology, psychiatry, and radiology. They may also participate in teaching and research activities, as well as hospital committees and leadership roles.

A Pediatric Nurse Practitioner (PNP) is an advanced practice registered nurse who has completed additional education and training in the specialty area of pediatrics. PNPs provide primary health care to children from birth through young adulthood, including well-child care, acute and chronic illness management, and anticipatory guidance for families. They work collaboratively with physicians and other healthcare professionals to provide comprehensive care to children in a variety of settings, such as hospitals, clinics, private practices, and community health centers. PNPs may also specialize in specific areas within pediatrics, such as neonatology or adolescent medicine.

Oxygen is a colorless, odorless, tasteless gas that constitutes about 21% of the earth's atmosphere. It is a crucial element for human and most living organisms as it is vital for respiration. Inhaled oxygen enters the lungs and binds to hemoglobin in red blood cells, which carries it to tissues throughout the body where it is used to convert nutrients into energy and carbon dioxide, a waste product that is exhaled.

Medically, supplemental oxygen therapy may be provided to patients with conditions such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), pneumonia, heart failure, or other medical conditions that impair the body's ability to extract sufficient oxygen from the air. Oxygen can be administered through various devices, including nasal cannulas, face masks, and ventilators.

Neonatology is a subspecialty of pediatrics that focuses on the medical care of newborn infants, particularly those who are born prematurely or with critical illnesses. Neonatologists are physicians who have additional training and expertise in managing complex neonatal conditions such as respiratory distress syndrome, birth defects, infection, and other issues that can affect newborns. They typically work in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) and collaborate with a multidisciplinary team of healthcare professionals to provide comprehensive care for these vulnerable patients.

Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is a sudden, unexpected natural death caused by the cessation of cardiac activity. It is often caused by cardiac arrhythmias, particularly ventricular fibrillation, and is often associated with underlying heart disease, although it can occur in people with no known heart condition. SCD is typically defined as a natural death due to cardiac causes that occurs within one hour of the onset of symptoms, or if the individual was last seen alive in a normal state of health, it can be defined as occurring within 24 hours.

It's important to note that sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) is different from SCD, although they are related. SCA refers to the sudden cessation of cardiac activity, which if not treated immediately can lead to SCD.

An embolectomy is a surgical procedure to remove an embolus, which is a blockage in a blood vessel caused by a clot or air bubble that has traveled from another part of the body. During an embolectomy, the surgeon makes an incision in the affected blood vessel and removes the embolus using specialized surgical instruments. This procedure is often performed as an emergency treatment to restore blood flow and prevent tissue damage in the affected area of the body.

The term "family" in a medical context often refers to a group of individuals who are related by blood, marriage, or adoption and who consider themselves to be a single household. This can include spouses, parents, children, siblings, grandparents, and other extended family members. In some cases, the term may also be used more broadly to refer to any close-knit group of people who provide emotional and social support for one another, regardless of their biological or legal relationship.

In healthcare settings, understanding a patient's family dynamics can be important for providing effective care. Family members may be involved in decision-making about medical treatments, providing care and support at home, and communicating with healthcare providers. Additionally, cultural beliefs and values within families can influence health behaviors and attitudes towards medical care, making it essential for healthcare professionals to take a culturally sensitive approach when working with patients and their families.

nitroprusside (ni-troe-rus-ide)

A rapid-acting vasodilator used in the management of severe hypertension, acute heart failure, and to reduce afterload in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. It is a potent arterial and venous dilator that decreases preload and afterload, thereby reducing myocardial oxygen demand. Nitroprusside is metabolized to cyanide, which must be monitored closely during therapy to prevent toxicity.

Pharmacologic class: Peripheral vasodilators

Therapeutic class: Antihypertensives, Vasodilators

Medical Categories: Cardiovascular Drugs, Hypertension Agents

I am not a medical professional, but I can provide you with some general information about the concept of "education" in the context of health and medicine.

In this context, education generally refers to the process of acquiring knowledge, skills, values, and attitudes related to maintaining and improving one's health and well-being, as well as preventing and managing diseases and injuries. Health education can take place in various settings, such as schools, healthcare facilities, workplaces, and communities.

Health education aims to empower individuals and populations to make informed decisions about their health and promote healthy behaviors and lifestyle choices. It covers a wide range of topics, including:

1. Anatomy and physiology
2. Nutrition and diet
3. Exercise and physical activity
4. Mental health and well-being
5. Substance use and abuse
6. Sexual and reproductive health
7. Personal hygiene and infection control
8. Chronic disease management
9. Injury prevention and safety
10. Environmental health

Health education is often delivered by healthcare professionals, educators, and community leaders, using various methods such as lectures, workshops, demonstrations, simulations, and digital media. The ultimate goal of health education is to improve overall health outcomes and reduce health disparities in populations.

Physiological monitoring is the continuous or intermittent observation and measurement of various body functions or parameters in a patient, with the aim of evaluating their health status, identifying any abnormalities or changes, and guiding clinical decision-making and treatment. This may involve the use of specialized medical equipment, such as cardiac monitors, pulse oximeters, blood pressure monitors, and capnographs, among others. The data collected through physiological monitoring can help healthcare professionals assess the effectiveness of treatments, detect complications early, and make timely adjustments to patient care plans.

Medical Definition of Respiration:

Respiration, in physiology, is the process by which an organism takes in oxygen and gives out carbon dioxide. It's also known as breathing. This process is essential for most forms of life because it provides the necessary oxygen for cellular respiration, where the cells convert biochemical energy from nutrients into adenosine triphosphate (ATP), and releases waste products, primarily carbon dioxide.

In humans and other mammals, respiration is a two-stage process:

1. Breathing (or external respiration): This involves the exchange of gases with the environment. Air enters the lungs through the mouth or nose, then passes through the pharynx, larynx, trachea, and bronchi, finally reaching the alveoli where the actual gas exchange occurs. Oxygen from the inhaled air diffuses into the blood, while carbon dioxide, a waste product of metabolism, diffuses from the blood into the alveoli to be exhaled.

2. Cellular respiration (or internal respiration): This is the process by which cells convert glucose and other nutrients into ATP, water, and carbon dioxide in the presence of oxygen. The carbon dioxide produced during this process then diffuses out of the cells and into the bloodstream to be exhaled during breathing.

In summary, respiration is a vital physiological function that enables organisms to obtain the necessary oxygen for cellular metabolism while eliminating waste products like carbon dioxide.

Asphyxia neonatorum is a medical condition that refers to a newborn baby's lack of oxygen or difficulty breathing, which can lead to suffocation and serious complications. It is often caused by problems during the birthing process, such as umbilical cord compression or prolapse, placental abruption, or prolonged labor.

Symptoms of asphyxia neonatorum may include bluish skin color (cyanosis), weak or absent breathing, poor muscle tone, meconium-stained amniotic fluid, and a slow heart rate. In severe cases, it can lead to organ damage, developmental delays, or even death.

Prompt medical attention is necessary to diagnose and treat asphyxia neonatorum. Treatment may include oxygen therapy, mechanical ventilation, and medications to support the baby's heart function and blood pressure. In some cases, therapeutic hypothermia (cooling the body) may be used to reduce the risk of brain damage. Preventive measures such as proper prenatal care, timely delivery, and careful monitoring during labor and delivery can also help reduce the risk of asphyxia neonatorum.

Patient simulation is the creation of a situation or scenario that represents a patient's medical condition or illness, using a mannequin or computer-based program. It allows healthcare professionals and students to practice their skills and decision-making abilities in a controlled and safe environment. The simulated patient can respond to treatments and interventions, providing a realistic representation of the patient's condition. This type of simulation is used for training, assessment, and research purposes in medical education and healthcare fields.

Cardiogenic shock is a serious condition characterized by the inability of the heart to pump enough blood to meet the body's needs. It is a type of shock that originates from a primary cardiac dysfunction, such as severe heart muscle damage (myocardial infarction or heart attack), abnormal heart rhythms (arrhythmias), or acute valvular insufficiency.

In cardiogenic shock, the low cardiac output leads to inadequate tissue perfusion and oxygenation, resulting in multiple organ dysfunction and failure. Symptoms of cardiogenic shock include severe hypotension (low blood pressure), cool extremities, decreased urine output, altered mental status, and signs of congestive heart failure such as shortness of breath, cough, and peripheral edema.

Cardiogenic shock is a medical emergency that requires prompt diagnosis and immediate treatment, which may include medications to support blood pressure and heart function, mechanical assist devices, or even emergency heart transplantation in some cases.

"Personal Autonomy" is not a medical term per se, but it is often used in medical ethics and patient care. It refers to the ability of an individual to make informed decisions about their own health and healthcare, based on their own values, beliefs, and preferences, without undue influence or coercion from others. This includes the right to accept or refuse medical treatment, to maintain confidentiality, and to participate in shared decision-making with healthcare providers. Personal autonomy is recognized as a fundamental principle in medical ethics and patient rights, and is protected by laws and regulations in many countries.

Cytochrome a is a type of cytochrome that contains a heme group with an attached ferrous iron (FeII) as its prosthetic group. It is a component of the cytochrome c oxidase complex, which is the final electron acceptor in the electron transport chain located in the inner mitochondrial membrane.

Cytochrome a plays a crucial role in the process of cellular respiration by accepting electrons from cytochrome c and transferring them to oxygen, thereby reducing it to water. This reaction is accompanied by the generation of a proton gradient across the inner mitochondrial membrane, which drives the synthesis of ATP, the main energy currency of the cell.

It's worth noting that cytochrome a is often referred to in the context of its partner cytochrome a3, as they form a functional unit within the cytochrome c oxidase complex. Together, they facilitate the reduction of oxygen to water and contribute to the overall efficiency of the electron transport chain.

Polygeline is a colloidal plasma expander, which is a type of intravenous fluid used to increase blood volume in hypovolemia or shock. It is made up of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) molecules that are cross-linked with divinyl sulfone and then suspended in an electrolyte solution. Polygeline works by drawing water into the circulation, thereby increasing the volume of the plasma.

It is important to note that polygeline has been associated with anaphylactic reactions and therefore should be used with caution. It is also not recommended for use in patients with renal impairment or those who are allergic to PVP. As with any medical treatment, it should only be administered under the direction of a qualified healthcare professional.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Suburban Population" is not a medical term. It refers to the people living in suburban areas, which are typically residential districts or communities that lie outside a city center. They are often characterized by single-family homes and less population density than in urban areas. If you have any questions related to medical terminology, I would be happy to help with those!

Cardiac output is a measure of the amount of blood that is pumped by the heart in one minute. It is defined as the product of stroke volume (the amount of blood pumped by the left ventricle during each contraction) and heart rate (the number of contractions per minute). Normal cardiac output at rest for an average-sized adult is about 5 to 6 liters per minute. Cardiac output can be increased during exercise or other conditions that require more blood flow, such as during illness or injury. It can be measured noninvasively using techniques such as echocardiography or invasively through a catheter placed in the heart.

Hydroxyethyl starch derivatives are modified starches that are used as plasma expanders in medicine. They are created by chemically treating corn, potato, or wheat starch with hydroxylethyl groups, which makes the starch more soluble and less likely to be broken down by enzymes in the body. This results in a large molecule that can remain in the bloodstream for an extended period, increasing intravascular volume and improving circulation.

These derivatives are available in different molecular weights and substitution patterns, which affect their pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. They are used to treat or prevent hypovolemia (low blood volume) due to various causes such as bleeding, burns, or dehydration. Common brand names include Hetastarch, Pentastarch, and Voluven.

It's important to note that the use of hydroxyethyl starch derivatives has been associated with adverse effects, including kidney injury, coagulopathy, and pruritus (severe itching). Therefore, their use should be carefully monitored and restricted to specific clinical situations.

Deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA) is a medical procedure in which the body temperature is lowered to around 15-20°C (59-68°F), and the circulation of blood is temporarily stopped. This technique is often used during complex cardiac surgeries, such as aortic arch reconstruction or repair of congenital heart defects, to reduce the body's metabolic demand for oxygen and allow surgeons to operate in a still and bloodless field.

During DHCA, the patient is connected to a heart-lung machine that takes over the function of pumping blood and oxygenating it. The blood is then cooled down using a cooling device before being returned to the body. Once the body temperature reaches the desired level, the circulation is stopped for a short period, usually no more than 30 minutes, during which time the surgeon can work on the heart or great vessels.

After the surgical procedure is complete, the patient is gradually rewarmed, and the circulation is restarted. DHCA carries some risks, including neurological complications such as stroke, cognitive impairment, or delirium, but it remains an important tool in complex cardiac surgery.

Vasoconstrictor agents are substances that cause the narrowing of blood vessels by constricting the smooth muscle in their walls. This leads to an increase in blood pressure and a decrease in blood flow. They work by activating the sympathetic nervous system, which triggers the release of neurotransmitters such as norepinephrine and epinephrine that bind to alpha-adrenergic receptors on the smooth muscle cells of the blood vessel walls, causing them to contract.

Vasoconstrictor agents are used medically for a variety of purposes, including:

* Treating hypotension (low blood pressure)
* Controlling bleeding during surgery or childbirth
* Relieving symptoms of nasal congestion in conditions such as the common cold or allergies

Examples of vasoconstrictor agents include phenylephrine, oxymetazoline, and epinephrine. It's important to note that prolonged use or excessive doses of vasoconstrictor agents can lead to rebound congestion and other adverse effects, so they should be used with caution and under the guidance of a healthcare professional.

'Hospital Personnel' is a general term that refers to all individuals who are employed by or provide services on behalf of a hospital. This can include, but is not limited to:

1. Healthcare professionals such as doctors, nurses, pharmacists, therapists, and technicians.
2. Administrative staff who manage the hospital's operations, including human resources, finance, and management.
3. Support services personnel such as maintenance workers, food service workers, housekeeping staff, and volunteers.
4. Medical students, interns, and trainees who are gaining clinical experience in the hospital setting.

All of these individuals play a critical role in ensuring that the hospital runs smoothly and provides high-quality care to its patients.

The brain is the central organ of the nervous system, responsible for receiving and processing sensory information, regulating vital functions, and controlling behavior, movement, and cognition. It is divided into several distinct regions, each with specific functions:

1. Cerebrum: The largest part of the brain, responsible for higher cognitive functions such as thinking, learning, memory, language, and perception. It is divided into two hemispheres, each controlling the opposite side of the body.
2. Cerebellum: Located at the back of the brain, it is responsible for coordinating muscle movements, maintaining balance, and fine-tuning motor skills.
3. Brainstem: Connects the cerebrum and cerebellum to the spinal cord, controlling vital functions such as breathing, heart rate, and blood pressure. It also serves as a relay center for sensory information and motor commands between the brain and the rest of the body.
4. Diencephalon: A region that includes the thalamus (a major sensory relay station) and hypothalamus (regulates hormones, temperature, hunger, thirst, and sleep).
5. Limbic system: A group of structures involved in emotional processing, memory formation, and motivation, including the hippocampus, amygdala, and cingulate gyrus.

The brain is composed of billions of interconnected neurons that communicate through electrical and chemical signals. It is protected by the skull and surrounded by three layers of membranes called meninges, as well as cerebrospinal fluid that provides cushioning and nutrients.

A hospital is a healthcare facility where patients receive medical treatment, diagnosis, and care for various health conditions, injuries, or diseases. It is typically staffed with medical professionals such as doctors, nurses, and other healthcare workers who provide round-the-clock medical services. Hospitals may offer inpatient (overnight) stays or outpatient (same-day) services, depending on the nature of the treatment required. They are equipped with various medical facilities like operating rooms, diagnostic equipment, intensive care units (ICUs), and emergency departments to handle a wide range of medical situations. Hospitals may specialize in specific areas of medicine, such as pediatrics, geriatrics, oncology, or trauma care.

Hyperventilation is a medical condition characterized by an increased respiratory rate and depth, resulting in excessive elimination of carbon dioxide (CO2) from the body. This leads to hypocapnia (low CO2 levels in the blood), which can cause symptoms such as lightheadedness, dizziness, confusion, tingling sensations in the extremities, and muscle spasms. Hyperventilation may occur due to various underlying causes, including anxiety disorders, lung diseases, neurological conditions, or certain medications. It is essential to identify and address the underlying cause of hyperventilation for proper treatment.

A fatal outcome is a term used in medical context to describe a situation where a disease, injury, or illness results in the death of an individual. It is the most severe and unfortunate possible outcome of any medical condition, and is often used as a measure of the severity and prognosis of various diseases and injuries. In clinical trials and research, fatal outcome may be used as an endpoint to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of different treatments or interventions.

In medical terms, the heart is a muscular organ located in the thoracic cavity that functions as a pump to circulate blood throughout the body. It's responsible for delivering oxygen and nutrients to the tissues and removing carbon dioxide and other wastes. The human heart is divided into four chambers: two atria on the top and two ventricles on the bottom. The right side of the heart receives deoxygenated blood from the body and pumps it to the lungs, while the left side receives oxygenated blood from the lungs and pumps it out to the rest of the body. The heart's rhythmic contractions and relaxations are regulated by a complex electrical conduction system.

The Chi-square distribution is a continuous probability distribution that is often used in statistical hypothesis testing. It is the distribution of a sum of squares of k independent standard normal random variables. The resulting quantity follows a chi-square distribution with k degrees of freedom, denoted as χ²(k).

The probability density function (pdf) of the Chi-square distribution with k degrees of freedom is given by:

f(x; k) = (1/ (2^(k/2) * Γ(k/2))) \* x^((k/2)-1) \* e^(-x/2), for x > 0 and 0, otherwise.

Where Γ(k/2) is the gamma function evaluated at k/2. The mean and variance of a Chi-square distribution with k degrees of freedom are k and 2k, respectively.

The Chi-square distribution has various applications in statistical inference, including testing goodness-of-fit, homogeneity of variances, and independence in contingency tables.

Regional blood flow (RBF) refers to the rate at which blood flows through a specific region or organ in the body, typically expressed in milliliters per minute per 100 grams of tissue (ml/min/100g). It is an essential physiological parameter that reflects the delivery of oxygen and nutrients to tissues while removing waste products. RBF can be affected by various factors such as metabolic demands, neural regulation, hormonal influences, and changes in blood pressure or vascular resistance. Measuring RBF is crucial for understanding organ function, diagnosing diseases, and evaluating the effectiveness of treatments.

Oxygen consumption, also known as oxygen uptake, is the amount of oxygen that is consumed or utilized by the body during a specific period of time, usually measured in liters per minute (L/min). It is a common measurement used in exercise physiology and critical care medicine to assess an individual's aerobic metabolism and overall health status.

In clinical settings, oxygen consumption is often measured during cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) to evaluate cardiovascular function, pulmonary function, and exercise capacity in patients with various medical conditions such as heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and other respiratory or cardiac disorders.

During exercise, oxygen is consumed by the muscles to generate energy through a process called oxidative phosphorylation. The amount of oxygen consumed during exercise can provide important information about an individual's fitness level, exercise capacity, and overall health status. Additionally, measuring oxygen consumption can help healthcare providers assess the effectiveness of treatments and rehabilitation programs in patients with various medical conditions.

Body temperature is the measure of heat produced by the body. In humans, the normal body temperature range is typically between 97.8°F (36.5°C) and 99°F (37.2°C), with an average oral temperature of 98.6°F (37°C). Body temperature can be measured in various ways, including orally, rectally, axillary (under the arm), and temporally (on the forehead).

Maintaining a stable body temperature is crucial for proper bodily functions, as enzymes and other biological processes depend on specific temperature ranges. The hypothalamus region of the brain regulates body temperature through feedback mechanisms that involve shivering to produce heat and sweating to release heat. Fever is a common medical sign characterized by an elevated body temperature above the normal range, often as a response to infection or inflammation.

"Increasing Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Provision in Communities with Low Bystander Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Rates: A ... "Skeletal chest injuries secondary to cardiopulmonary resuscitation". Resuscitation. 63 (3): 327-38. doi:10.1016/j.resuscitation ... "Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR)". www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au. Retrieved 2022-10-20. "Resuscitation Council UK Paediatric ... July 2013). "Cardiopulmonary resuscitation quality: [corrected] improving cardiac resuscitation outcomes both inside and ...
... (commonly known as ECPR) is a method of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) that ... Similar to the concept of elective cardiopulmonary bypass, used in open heart surgery, oxygenation and perfusion can be ...
The history of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) can be traced as far back as the literary works of ancient Egypt (c. 2686 - ... Hurt, R (2005). "Modern cardiopulmonary resuscitation-not so new after all". Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 98 (7): ... Ad Hoc Committee on Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation of the Division of Medical Sciences, National Academy of Sciences-National ... Cooper, J. A.; Cooper, J. D.; Cooper, J. M. (2006). "Cardiopulmonary resuscitation: history, current practice, and future ...
Cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Central IV lines. TEG Sampling. Point of Care Analysis. American Society of Anesthesia ... Anesthetic Technicians' also provide a key role in the emergency resuscitation of patients.[citation needed] Anesthetic ...
"Paediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation". Oh's Intensive Care Manual. Oxford: Elsevier. pp. 1365-1374. ISBN 978-0-7020-7221-5 ... a common and life-threatening problem during cardiopulmonary resuscitation". Critical Care Medicine. 32(9 Suppl) (9 Suppl): ... Ward, Kevin R.; Kurz, Michael C.; Neumar, Robert W. (2014). "Chapter 9: Adult Resuscitation". In Marx, John A.; Hockberger, ... or femoral artery to ensure this is purely respiratory arrest and not cardiopulmonary arrest. Checking a pulse after ...
"Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) , betterhealth.vic.gov.au". www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au. Retrieved 2021-05-19. "AEDs- High- ... "Guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation and emergency cardiac care. Emergency Cardiac Care Committee and Subcommittees, ... Basic life support Cardiac arrest Cardiac Arrest Registry to Enhance Survival (CARES) Cardiopulmonary resuscitation ... Over the years, the American Heart Association has added two new links to the chain: post-resuscitation care in 2010, and ...
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR)" (PDF). The ARC Guidelines. Section 8 - Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation. Australian ... "Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR)". Department of Health. Better Health Channel. Victoria State Government. Retrieved 19 ... Australian Resuscitation Council. p. 5. Retrieved 19 August 2021. Australian and New Zealand Committee on Resuscitation (April ... should begin cardiopulmonary resuscitation at a rate of 100 to 120 compressions per minute. Interruptions to chest compressions ...
"Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR)". The Lecturio Medical Concept Library. Retrieved 5 August 2021. Bloat in Dogs: Causes, ... a parasitic infection Cardiopulmonary resuscitation procedures, due to the artificial mouth-to-mouth insufflation of air. In ...
International Consensus on Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) and Emergency Cardiovascular Care (ECC) Science With Treatment ... Sayre, Michael (2005). Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (PDF). Humana Press, Springer. pp. 111-121. ISBN 978-1-58829-283-4. ... Resuscitation. 44 (2): 105-8. doi:10.1016/S0300-9572(00)00161-1. PMID 10767497. "The American Red Cross 2005 Guidelines for ...
BLS cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Automated external defibrillation using the AED. Application of up to 100% oxygen therapy ...
"Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation" (PDF). Centre for Excellence in Teaching and Learning. Morley, J and Sprenger C (2012), First ... The protocol was originally developed as a memory aid for rescuers performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and the most ... For this reason, lay rescuers proceed directly to cardiopulmonary resuscitation, starting with chest compressions, which is ... October 2010). Highlights of the 2010 American Heart Association Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency ...
ISBN 978-0-912912-11-0. Dubin, Dale (1972). Understanding Cardio-pulmonary Resuscitation. C.P.R. Inc. Nossiter, Adam (1986). " ... Exploring the Heart's Ionic-Molecular Microcosm and Understanding Cardio-pulmonary Resuscitation. In 1986, Dubin, age 46, was ...
"Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) Statistics". American Red Cross. Archived from the original on 19 November 2008. Retrieved ... Electronics portal Medicine portal Cardiopulmonary resuscitation Defibrillation Advanced cardiac life support Cardioversion ... level cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) classes. The portable version of the defibrillator was invented in the mid-1960s by ... "Legal and Ethical Issues Related to Resuscitation - Section 10: Guideline 10.5" (PDF). Australian Resuscitation Council. 2015. ...
Dubin, Dale (1972). Understanding Cardio-pulmonary Resuscitation. C.P.R. Inc. Massad, Caroline (December 5, 2001). "Read the ... Exploring the Heart's Ionic-Molecular Microcosm and Understanding Cardio-pulmonary Resuscitation. The large yellow book was ...
Steinman, AM (1986). "Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Hypothermia". Circulation. 74 (6 pt. 2): 32-35. PMID 3536162. Steinman ...
Cardiopulmonary resuscitation, Experimental medical treatments). ... and fail to respond to ordinary resuscitation efforts. ... Emergency Preservation and Resuscitation (EPR) is an experimental medical procedure where an emergency department patient is ... Kutcher, M. E., Forsythe, R. M., & Tisherman, S. A. (2016). "Emergency preservation and resuscitation for cardiac arrest from ... "Induction of Profound Hypothermia for Emergency Preservation and Resuscitation Allows Intact Survival After Cardiac Arrest ...
"Outcomes following neonatal cardiopulmonary resuscitation". Tidsskrift for den Norske Legeforening. 138 (9). doi:10.4045/ ... Neonatal resuscitation, also known as newborn resuscitation, is an emergency procedure focused on supporting approximately 10% ... If a newborns score is 0-3, then resuscitation efforts are initiated. Neonatal resuscitation guidelines closely resemble those ... 2020 International Consensus on Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care Science With Treatment ...
See main article: cardiopulmonary resuscitation. If the casualty has injuries the rescuers will need to provide first aid and ... If immediate assisted removal from the water is possible, this should be done, and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) started ... If the casualty is not breathing, an urgent ascent directly to the surface is needed so that resuscitation can take place there ... List of diving hazards and precautions - Hazards associated with underwater diving Resuscitation - Emergency correction of ...
Fractured ribs and sternum may be a complication of cardiopulmonary resuscitation attempts. Sepsis (infection of the blood) may ... Kottachchi, Dan T.; Dong, Jihao; Reid, Susan (February 2009). "A rare complication of cardiopulmonary resuscitation". Canadian ...
... start cardiopulmonary resuscitation. if you are alone, call for help after a minute of any CPR; if help has already been called ... the European Resuscitation Council publishes updated guidelines about all stages of resuscitation, both for medical staff and ... if there are not, feel the pulse and if there are no signs of circulation begins resuscitation. If air doesn't pass, consider a ... If, after 15 ventilations (thirty seconds) the heart rate remains below 60 per minute is necessary to begin resuscitation, ...
Raehl CL (July 1986). "Endotracheal drug therapy in cardiopulmonary resuscitation". Clinical Pharmacy. 5 (7): 572-9. PMID ... A Birmingham gauge of 14 is a very large cannula (used in resuscitation settings) and 24-26 is the smallest. The most common ...
... is often an important step in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). CPR is an algorithm-based intervention aimed ... Werman, Howard A.; Karren, K; Mistovich, Joseph (2014). "Automated External Defibrillation and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation". ... Borke, Jesse (2016-11-03). "Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR): Practice Essentials, Preparation, Technique". Archived from ... it would be treated only by cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and medication, and then by cardioversion or defibrillation if ...
"Vasopressin during cardiopulmonary resuscitation: a progress report". Critical Care Medicine. 32 (9 Suppl): S432-5. doi:10.1097 ... "Stress hormone response during and after cardiopulmonary resuscitation". Anesthesiology. 77 (4): 662-8. doi:10.1097/00000542- ...
His achievements were wide ranging from the development of cardio-pulmonary resuscitation and as a founder of the nation's ... He is credited with pioneering cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Safar was born in Vienna, Austria, in 1924 into a medical ... Acierno, L. J.; L. T. Worrell (January 2007). "Peter Safar: father of modern cardiopulmonary resuscitation". Clinical ... Acierno, Louis J.; Worrell, L. Timothy (29 January 2007). "Peter Safar: Father of modern cardiopulmonary resuscitation". ...
Acierno, L. J.; Worrell, LT (January 2007). "Peter Safar: father of modern cardiopulmonary resuscitation". Clinical Cardiology ... 2003) "The resuscitation greats. Andreas Vesalius, the concept of an artificial airway." Resuscitation" 56:3-7 Mostafa Shehata ...
Cardiopulmonary-cerebral Resuscitation: State of the Art. 13 (9, Part 2): 791-794. doi:10.1016/S0196-0644(84)80439-4. ISSN 0196 ... It should not delay cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and defibrillation, nor should it be used in those with unwitnessed out ... Australian Resuscitation Council and New Zealand Resuscitation Council. July 2011. Archived from the original on October 6, ... Resuscitation. 84 (12): 1691-6. doi:10.1016/j.resuscitation.2013.08.011. PMID 23994203. Cave, DM; Gazmuri, RJ; Otto, CW; ...
Mouth-to-mouth resuscitation is also part of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) making it an essential skill for first aid. In ... "Decisions about cardiopulmonary resuscitation model information leafler". British Medical Association. July 2002. Archived from ... 2019-20 coronavirus pandemic related shortages#Mechanical ventilation Cardiopulmonary resuscitation Medical emergency Medical ... ISBN 978-0-07-144767-6. Chamberlain D (2003). "Never quite there: a tale of resuscitation medicine". Clin Med. 3 (6): 573-7. ...
Hoke RS, Chamberlain D (December 2004). "Skeletal chest injuries secondary to cardiopulmonary resuscitation". Resuscitation. 63 ... Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), has also been known to cause thoracic injury, including sternum and rib fractures. Sternal ... doi:10.1016/j.resuscitation.2004.05.019. PMID 15582769. Monkhouse SJ, Kelly MD (2008). "Airbag-related chest wall burn as a ...
August 2014). "Hemodynamic-directed cardiopulmonary resuscitation during in-hospital cardiac arrest". Resuscitation. 85 (8): ... Gough, Christopher J. R.; Nolan, Jerry P. (2018). "The role of adrenaline in cardiopulmonary resuscitation". Critical Care. 22 ... "Coronary perfusion pressure and the return of spontaneous circulation in human cardiopulmonary resuscitation". JAMA. 263 (8): ... During cardiac surgery, when a patient is placed on cardiopulmonary bypass, and blood is passed through the coronary vessels in ...
Treatment is with cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and defibrillation. Biphasic defibrillation may be better than monophasic ... as well as cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) between defibrillation attempts. Though ALS/ACLS algorithms encourage the use of ... and patients in V-fib should be treated with cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and prompt defibrillation. Left untreated, ... 2015 American Heart Association Guidelines Update for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care". ...
"Increasing Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Provision in Communities with Low Bystander Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Rates: A ... "Skeletal chest injuries secondary to cardiopulmonary resuscitation". Resuscitation. 63 (3): 327-38. doi:10.1016/j.resuscitation ... "Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR)". www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au. Retrieved 2022-10-20. "Resuscitation Council UK Paediatric ... July 2013). "Cardiopulmonary resuscitation quality: [corrected] improving cardiac resuscitation outcomes both inside and ...
PropDel}},br>,br>{{subpages}} Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation or CPR is performed when a persons heart has stopped due to ... although this is disputed by new reports which indicate that CPR compressions alone provide the best chance of resuscitation. ...
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Luce JM, Ross BK, OQuin RJ, Culver BH, Sivarajan M, Amory DW, Regional blood flow during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in dogs ... Survival after cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the hospital. N Engl J Med. 1983;309:569-76. DOIPubMedGoogle Scholar ... Possible SARS Coronavirus Transmission during Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation On This Page Methods Discussion Conclusion Cite ... Possible SARS Coronavirus Transmission during Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2004;10(2):287-293. ...
Advances in resuscitation science, new insights into important predictors of outcome from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, and ... Cardiac Arrest and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Outcome Reports: Update of the Utstein Resuscitation Registry Templates for ... Perioperative and Resuscitation Resuscitation. 2015 Nov:96:328-40. doi: 10.1016/j.resuscitation.2014.11.002. Epub 2014 Nov 11. ... Cardiopulmonary resuscitation; Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest; Registry; Resuscitation; Utstein. ...
Assess the casualty and recognise the need for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). 1.4. Seek assistance from emergency ... This unit describes the skills and knowledge required to perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in line with the ... performing at least 2 minutes of uninterrupted single rescuer cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) (5 cycles of both ... adult and infant resuscitation manikins following ARC guidelines for the purpose of assessment of CPR procedures ...
Cardiopulmonary resuscitation, Critical care, Europe, Family presence, Family-witnessed, Relatives Persistent URL doi.org/ ... The presence of family members during cardiopulmonary resuscitation: European federation of Critical Care Nursing associations ... The presence of family members during cardiopulmonary resuscitation: European federation of Critical Care Nursing associations ... Nursing and Allied Professions Joint Position Statement on The Presence of Family Members During Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation ...
Considerations Before Enrolling to a Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Class. October 21, 2019October 21, 2019, 0 Comments, admin ... Choosing Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Classes There are CPR courses are offered across many hospitals, community health ... Cardiopulmonary resuscitation is an effective first aid procedure administered on unresponsive people whove stopped breathing. ... Normally CPR rescue would involve mouth-to-mouth resuscitation but when the mouth has sustained major injuries or cant open, ...
Training in cardiopulmonary resuscitation Cite CITE. Title : Training in cardiopulmonary resuscitation Personal Author(s) : ... Schrogie, J. J. "Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation In Practice" 81, no. 2 (1966). Schrogie, J. J. "Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation In ... Training in cardiopulmonary resuscitation. 80(1). Schrogie, John J. "Training in cardiopulmonary resuscitation" 80, no. 1 (1965 ... Title : Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation In Practice Personal Author(s) : Schrogie, J. J. Published Date : 02/01/1966 Source : ...
This unit of competency provides participants with the skills and knowledge required to perform Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation ( ... The Provide Advanced Resuscitation Techniques course trains participants in the provision of advanced First Aid resuscitation ... The cost of Advanced Resuscitation is $100 (including CPR).. Students must be over 14 years of age to obtain a CPR ... Accredited Training Company also offers Provide Advanced Resuscitation Techniques courses (HLTAID007).. ...
Cardiopulmonary resuscitation. In an arrest situation, place pregnant patients in a left lateral tilt position to avoid supine ... Acute volume resuscitation following obstetric hemorrhage. J Perinat Neonatal Nurs. 2011 Jul-Sep. 25(3):253-60. [QxMD MEDLINE ... Normal cardiopulmonary physiology during pregnancy. Clin Obstet Gynecol. 1996 Mar. 39(1):3-16. [QxMD MEDLINE Link]. ... The first priority is resuscitation of the mother and administration of oxygen (100% concentration). The patient may need to be ...
First Aid and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation. HLT 100 Credit Hours: 3 CRN: 42566 ... Focuses on the principles and techniques of safety, first aid, and cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Read Full Course Description ...
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What is Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR)? Open Close Cardio means heart. Pulmonary means lungs. Resuscitation means ... Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) decisions Our goal is to respect your wishes and provide the proper care at all times, ... Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) can work for reasonably healthy adults, and only if others are there when it happens, and ... Do Not Attempt Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation or Do Not Resuscitate are orders the doctor can write after discussing with the ...
Chest-compression-only versus standard cardiopulmonary resuscitation: a meta-analysis. by EMOttawa , Apr 4, 2013 , 0 comments ...
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) in Adults - Etiology, pathophysiology, symptoms, signs, diagnosis & prognosis from the MSD ... read more and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in Infants and Children Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) in Infants and Children ... 1 Termination of resuscitation references Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is an organized, sequential response to cardiac ... 2 Termination of resuscitation references Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is an organized, sequential response to cardiac ...
cardiopulmonary resuscitation. *endotracheal intubation and extubation. *non-invasive ventilation (e.g., BiPAP, CPAP) ...
Provide cardiopulmonary resuscitation. This course describes the skills and knowledge required to perform cardiopulmonary ... resuscitation (CPR) in line with the Australian Resuscitation Council (ARC) Guidelines. This unit applies to all workers who ...
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in the Prone Position and the Role of the Nurse. Berna Cafer Karalar1, Serap zer2. 1Ege ... Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in the Prone Position and the Role of the Nurse. Turk J Card Nur. 2023; 14(34): 62-67. ... Standard cardiopulmonary resuscitation is performed in the supine position. However, if the patient cannot be placed in the ... Nurses start cardiopulmonary resuscitation practices by taking all precautions for patients and implement interventions to ...
Cardiopulmonary resuscitation. An emergency procedure whose heart has stopper or is no longer breathing. ...
CPR: cardiopulmonary resuscitation; ICU: intensive care unit; DNR: do-not-resuscitation; POLST: physician orders of life ... DNR: do-not-resuscitation; POLST: physician orders of life sustaining treatment; CPR: cardiopulmonary resuscitation; ICU: ... Will implementation of the Life-sustaining Treatment Decisions Act reduce the incidence of cardiopulmonary resuscitation?. In- ... Effect of life-sustaining treatment decision law on pediatric in-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation rate: A Korean ...
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The mean heparin dose per kilogram body weight, mean initial ACT, and mean duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) did ... and incidence of bleeding and thrombotic complications in post-cardiopulmonary arrest patients who received a fixed, body ... Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR) is being used increasingly in the emergency and critical care field in ... Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation versus conventional cardiopulmonary resuscitation in adults with out-of-hospital ...
Family Presence during Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation. N Engl J Med. 2013;368(11):1008-1018. doi:10.1056/NEJMoa1203366 ... Resuscitation. 2006;68(2):203-207. doi:10.1016/j.resuscitation.2005.06.019 5. Lott C, Truhlář A, Alfonzo A, et al. European ... Resuscitation. 2005;66(1):99-104. doi:10.1016/j.resuscitation.2004.12.024 Summarized by Jorge Chalit, OMSII , Edited by Meg ... Resuscitation. 2021;161:152-219. doi:10.1016/j.resuscitation.2021.02.011 6. Plaisier BR. Thoracic lavage in accidental ...
This course teaches you the skills and knowledge required to perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in line with the ... children and adults in line with the Australian Resuscitation Council (ARC) Guidelines. ... Australian Resuscitation Council (ARC) Guidelines. This course is developed for existing workers in the industry who may ...
Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). *Lesson planning. *Curriculum development. Making a difference with your degree: The ...
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P. A. Meaney, V. M. Nadkarni, E. F. Cook et al., "American Heart Association National Registry of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation ... V. M. Nadkarni, G. L. Larkin, M. A. Peberdy et al., "National Registry of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Investigators. First ... M. C. Morris, G. Wernovsky, and V. M. Nadkarni, "Survival outcomes after extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation ... "Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation to support cardiopulmonary resuscitation in adults," Annals of Thoracic Surgery, vol. 87, ...
  • The rescuer may also provide artificial ventilation by either exhaling air into the subject's mouth or nose (mouth-to-mouth resuscitation) or using a device that pushes air into the subject's lungs (mechanical ventilation). (wikipedia.org)
  • The internet provides plenty of resources for people who want to learn how to save lives with their bare hands and mouth-to-mouth resuscitation techniques. (cprcertificationnow.com)
  • In 2010, the American Heart Association and International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation updated their CPR guidelines. (wikipedia.org)
  • It instructs the rescue worker to reach a depth of 1.5 to 2 inches as per AHA and ILCOR (International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation) Standards, and if it is lesser than 1.5 inches to push harder. (azosensors.com)
  • Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is an emergency procedure consisting of chest compressions often combined with artificial ventilation, or mouth to mouth in an effort to manually preserve intact brain function until further measures are taken to restore spontaneous blood circulation and breathing in a person who is in cardiac arrest. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) in Infants and Children Despite the use of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), mortality rates for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest are about 90% for infants and children. (msdmanuals.com)
  • The incidence of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) in the UK is approximately 60,000 per year and UK ambulance services attempt resuscitation in an estimated 30,000 people per year. (hqip.org.uk)
  • Unexpected cardiac arrest in ICU corresponds to cardiovascular arrest leading to at least one cardiopulmonary resuscitation technique (external cardiac massage and / or electric shock). (veeva.com)
  • A prospective description of risk factors, circumstances and consequences in the medium term would identify (and prevent) risky situations and identify, among those at risk for unexpected cardiac arrest, those for whom a cardiopulmonary resuscitation is justified. (veeva.com)
  • The objective is to delay tissue death and to extend the brief window of opportunity for a successful resuscitation without permanent brain damage. (wikipedia.org)
  • the rare exception is profound hypothermia caused by cold water immersion, when successful resuscitation may be accomplished even after prolonged arrest (up to 60 minutes). (msdmanuals.com)
  • The purpose of ECMO is to provide adequate oxygenated blood to the tissues by bypassing either the pulmonary or cardiopulmonary system in severe respiratory failure and/or cardiac failure, respectively. (hindawi.com)
  • These same techniques may also reduce the effectiveness of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (cardiorespiratory interactions of respiratory assistance, pro-arrhythmogenic effect of vasopressor drugs, haemodynamic repercussion of extracorporeal circulation). (veeva.com)
  • It also said it is concerned that Do Not Attempt Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (DNACPR) notices and Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DoLS) are often not applied correctly, meaning someone's treatment can be wrongfully withheld or their liberty infringed. (independent.co.uk)
  • Cardiac monitoring in the bay revealed ventricular tachycardia (a heart rhythm incompatible with life), and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and advanced life support (ALS) were begun. (cdc.gov)
  • Perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation if necessary. (cdc.gov)
  • Learn how to save a life by knowing how to perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). (cprcertificationnow.com)
  • Anyone answering is directed to activate the emergency response system (or appropriate in-hospital resuscitation personnel) and, if possible, obtain a defibrillator. (msdmanuals.com)
  • ZOLL Medical Corporation helps in both the development and marketing of hi-tech medical equipments, in the emergency care segment, with products such as fluid resuscitation, data management, circulation and CPR feedback etc. (azosensors.com)
  • Updated guidance on cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) policy reflecting feedback and changes to national good practice. (gov.scot)
  • This was the most important part of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, which required opening the patient's airway and using the forehead lift jaw method to make the jaw vertical to the ground. (goldenageusa.com)
  • cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was begun. (cdc.gov)
  • The key to cardiopulmonary resuscitation was to be ruthless, if the force of chest compressions wasn't enough, the patient's bl-ood circulation couldn't be maintained, the rescue was bound to face failure. (goldenageusa.com)
  • The death certificate, completed by the deputy county coroner, and the autopsy, completed by the forensic pathologist, listed "cardiopulmonary arrest due to dilated cardiomyopathy" as the cause of death. (cdc.gov)
  • Neonatal Resuscitation Extensive physiologic changes accompany the birth process, sometimes unmasking conditions that posed no problem during intrauterine life. (msdmanuals.com)
  • The Captain was never able to sustain a viable heart rhythm, pulse, or blood pressure despite the placement of a pacemaker and an intra-aortic balloon pump and extensive use of cardiac resuscitation medications. (cdc.gov)
  • Many people are surprised to learn that they can become certified in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and other basic lifesaving skills (BLS) online. (nhcps.com)
  • Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a lifesaving technique that can help you save a life if you are ever in the position to do so. (cprcertificationnow.com)
  • These procedures included defibrillation, delivery of cardiac resuscitation medications via the intraosseous route, and oxygen administration via bag-valve-mask. (cdc.gov)
  • After participants gave informed consent, convalescent-phase serum was collected from all consenting healthcare workers exposed to the attempted resuscitation event as part of a larger seroprevalence study of hospital staff. (cdc.gov)
  • METHODS: A nationwide cohort study based on the Swedish Registry of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation, between January 1st, 2014, and December 31st, 2021. (lu.se)
  • Analog Devices Inc (ADI) has revealed that its iMEMS technology is to be used by ZOLL Medical Corporation, to facilitate a new device called PocketCPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation) device. (azosensors.com)
  • All staff also completed privacy protection and confidentiality training, and cardiopulmonary resuscitation training. (cdc.gov)
  • After approximately 2.5 hours of intermittent ALS and CPR, the Captain was pronounced dead (1445 hours), and resuscitation efforts were discontinued. (cdc.gov)
  • The human rights of people in care are at risk of being breached by slow progress on enabling visits and the inappropriate use of resuscitation notices, a report has warned. (independent.co.uk)
  • Hospital and provincial policies in place at the time of the resuscitation were reviewed. (cdc.gov)
  • MCPS should make cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and First Aid training a requisite for all teachers at all levels of education in the county. (mbhs.edu)