Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: The artificial substitution of heart and lung action as indicated for HEART ARREST resulting from electric shock, DROWNING, respiratory arrest, or other causes. The two major components of cardiopulmonary resuscitation are artificial ventilation (RESPIRATION, ARTIFICIAL) and closed-chest CARDIAC MASSAGE.Resuscitation: The restoration to life or consciousness of one apparently dead. (Dorland, 27th ed)Heart Arrest: Cessation of heart beat or MYOCARDIAL CONTRACTION. If it is treated within a few minutes, heart arrest can be reversed in most cases to normal cardiac rhythm and effective circulation.Heart Massage: Rhythmic compression of the heart by pressure applied manually over the sternum (closed heart massage) or directly to the heart through an opening in the chest wall (open heart massage). It is done to reinstate and maintain circulation. (Dorland, 28th ed)Cardiopulmonary Bypass: Diversion of the flow of blood from the entrance of the right atrium directly to the aorta (or femoral artery) via an oxygenator thus bypassing both the heart and lungs.Resuscitation Orders: Instructions issued by a physician pertaining to the institution, continuation, or withdrawal of life support measures. The concept includes policies, laws, statutes, decisions, guidelines, and discussions that may affect the issuance of such orders.Defibrillators: Cardiac electrical stimulators that apply brief high-voltage electroshocks to the HEART. These stimulators are used to restore normal rhythm and contractile function in hearts of patients who are experiencing VENTRICULAR FIBRILLATION or ventricular tachycardia (TACHYCARDIA, VENTRICULAR) that is not accompanied by a palpable PULSE. Some defibrillators may also be used to correct certain noncritical dysrhythmias (called synchronized defibrillation or CARDIOVERSION), using relatively low-level discharges synchronized to the patient's ECG waveform. (UMDNS, 2003)Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest: Occurrence of heart arrest in an individual when there is no immediate access to medical personnel or equipment.Emergency Medical Services: Services specifically designed, staffed, and equipped for the emergency care of patients.ManikinsVentricular Fibrillation: A potentially lethal cardiac arrhythmia that is characterized by uncoordinated extremely rapid firing of electrical impulses (400-600/min) in HEART VENTRICLES. Such asynchronous ventricular quivering or fibrillation prevents any effective cardiac output and results in unconsciousness (SYNCOPE). It is one of the major electrocardiographic patterns seen with CARDIAC ARREST.Medical Futility: The absence of a useful purpose or useful result in a diagnostic procedure or therapeutic intervention. The situation of a patient whose condition will not be improved by treatment or instances in which treatment preserves permanent unconsciousness or cannot end dependence on intensive medical care. (From Ann Intern Med 1990 Jun 15;112(12):949)Electric Countershock: An electrical current applied to the HEART to terminate a disturbance of its rhythm, ARRHYTHMIAS, CARDIAC. (Stedman, 25th ed)Advanced Cardiac Life Support: The use of sophisticated methods and equipment to treat cardiopulmonary arrest. Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) includes the use of specialized equipment to maintain the airway, early defibrillation and pharmacological therapy.First Aid: Emergency care or treatment given to a person who suddenly becomes ill or injured before full medical services become available.Life Support Care: Care provided patients requiring extraordinary therapeutic measures in order to sustain and prolong life.Emergency Medical Technicians: Paramedical personnel trained to provide basic emergency care and life support under the supervision of physicians and/or nurses. These services may be carried out at the site of the emergency, in the ambulance, or in a health care institution.Visitors to Patients: Patients' guests and rules for visiting.Hypothermia, Induced: Abnormally low BODY TEMPERATURE that is intentionally induced in warm-blooded animals by artificial means. In humans, mild or moderate hypothermia has been used to reduce tissue damages, particularly after cardiac or spinal cord injuries and during subsequent surgeries.Shock, Hemorrhagic: Acute hemorrhage or excessive fluid loss resulting in HYPOVOLEMIA.Asphyxia: A pathological condition caused by lack of oxygen, manifested in impending or actual cessation of life.Compact Disks: Computer disks storing data with a maximum reduction of space and bandwidth. The compact size reduces cost of transmission and storage.Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation: Application of a life support system that circulates the blood through an oxygenating system, which may consist of a pump, a membrane oxygenator, and a heat exchanger. Examples of its use are to assist victims of smoke inhalation injury, respiratory failure, and cardiac failure.Advance Directives: Declarations by patients, made in advance of a situation in which they may be incompetent to decide about their own care, stating their treatment preferences or authorizing a third party to make decisions for them. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Blood Circulation: The movement of the BLOOD as it is pumped through the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.Withholding Treatment: Withholding or withdrawal of a particular treatment or treatments, often (but not necessarily) life-prolonging treatment, from a patient or from a research subject as part of a research protocol. The concept is differentiated from REFUSAL TO TREAT, where the emphasis is on the health professional's or health facility's refusal to treat a patient or group of patients when the patient or the patient's representative requests treatment. Withholding of life-prolonging treatment is usually indexed only with EUTHANASIA, PASSIVE, unless the distinction between withholding and withdrawing treatment, or the issue of withholding palliative rather than curative treatment, is discussed.American Heart Association: A voluntary organization concerned with the prevention and treatment of heart and vascular diseases.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Swine: Any of various animals that constitute the family Suidae and comprise stout-bodied, short-legged omnivorous mammals with thick skin, usually covered with coarse bristles, a rather long mobile snout, and small tail. Included are the genera Babyrousa, Phacochoerus (wart hogs), and Sus, the latter containing the domestic pig (see SUS SCROFA).Fluid Therapy: Therapy whose basic objective is to restore the volume and composition of the body fluids to normal with respect to WATER-ELECTROLYTE BALANCE. Fluids may be administered intravenously, orally, by intermittent gavage, or by HYPODERMOCLYSIS.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Emergency Treatment: First aid or other immediate intervention for accidents or medical conditions requiring immediate care and treatment before definitive medical and surgical management can be procured.Drama: A composition in prose or verse presenting in dialogue or pantomime a story involving various characters, usually intended to be acted on a stage and to be regarded as a form of entertainment. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Rib FracturesEmergency Medical Service Communication Systems: The use of communication systems, such as telecommunication, to transmit emergency information to appropriate providers of health services.Epinephrine: The active sympathomimetic hormone from the ADRENAL MEDULLA. It stimulates both the alpha- and beta- adrenergic systems, causes systemic VASOCONSTRICTION and gastrointestinal relaxation, stimulates the HEART, and dilates BRONCHI and cerebral vessels. It is used in ASTHMA and CARDIAC FAILURE and to delay absorption of local ANESTHETICS.Judaism: The religion of the Jews characterized by belief in one God and in the mission of the Jews to teach the Fatherhood of God as revealed in the Hebrew Scriptures. (Webster, 3d ed)Delivery Rooms: Hospital units equipped for childbirth.Survival Rate: The proportion of survivors in a group, e.g., of patients, studied and followed over a period, or the proportion of persons in a specified group alive at the beginning of a time interval who survive to the end of the interval. It is often studied using life table methods.Emergencies: Situations or conditions requiring immediate intervention to avoid serious adverse results.Allied Health Personnel: Health care workers specially trained and licensed to assist and support the work of health professionals. Often used synonymously with paramedical personnel, the term generally refers to all health care workers who perform tasks which must otherwise be performed by a physician or other health professional.Rewarming: Application of heat to correct hypothermia, accidental or induced.Hemodynamics: The movement and the forces involved in the movement of the blood through the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.Ambulances: A vehicle equipped for transporting patients in need of emergency care.Emergency Responders: Personnel trained to provide the initial services, care, and support in EMERGENCIES or DISASTERS.Adrenergic Agonists: Drugs that bind to and activate adrenergic receptors.Coma: A profound state of unconsciousness associated with depressed cerebral activity from which the individual cannot be aroused. Coma generally occurs when there is dysfunction or injury involving both cerebral hemispheres or the brain stem RETICULAR FORMATION.Terminal Care: Medical and nursing care of patients in the terminal stage of an illness.Advance Directive Adherence: Compliance by health personnel or proxies with the stipulations of ADVANCE DIRECTIVES (or similar directives such as RESUSCITATION ORDERS) when patients are unable to direct their own care.Pneumoperitoneum: A condition with trapped gas or air in the PERITONEAL CAVITY, usually secondary to perforation of the internal organs such as the LUNG and the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT, or to recent surgery. Pneumoperitoneum may be purposely introduced to aid radiological examination.Thorax: The upper part of the trunk between the NECK and the ABDOMEN. It contains the chief organs of the circulatory and respiratory systems. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Respiration, Artificial: Any method of artificial breathing that employs mechanical or non-mechanical means to force the air into and out of the lungs. Artificial respiration or ventilation is used in individuals who have stopped breathing or have RESPIRATORY INSUFFICIENCY to increase their intake of oxygen (O2) and excretion of carbon dioxide (CO2).Intubation, Intratracheal: A procedure involving placement of a tube into the trachea through the mouth or nose in order to provide a patient with oxygen and anesthesia.Practice Guidelines as Topic: Directions or principles presenting current or future rules of policy for assisting health care practitioners in patient care decisions regarding diagnosis, therapy, or related clinical circumstances. The guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by the convening of expert panels. The guidelines form a basis for the evaluation of all aspects of health care and delivery.Ethics, Medical: The principles of professional conduct concerning the rights and duties of the physician, relations with patients and fellow practitioners, as well as actions of the physician in patient care and interpersonal relations with patient families.Extracorporeal Circulation: Diversion of blood flow through a circuit located outside the body but continuous with the bodily circulation.Video Recording: The storing or preserving of video signals for television to be played back later via a transmitter or receiver. Recordings may be made on magnetic tape or discs (VIDEODISC RECORDING).Vasopressins: Antidiuretic hormones released by the NEUROHYPOPHYSIS of all vertebrates (structure varies with species) to regulate water balance and OSMOLARITY. In general, vasopressin is a nonapeptide consisting of a six-amino-acid ring with a cysteine 1 to cysteine 6 disulfide bridge or an octapeptide containing a CYSTINE. All mammals have arginine vasopressin except the pig with a lysine at position 8. Vasopressin, a vasoconstrictor, acts on the KIDNEY COLLECTING DUCTS to increase water reabsorption, increase blood volume and blood pressure.Volunteers: Persons who donate their services.Commotio Cordis: A sudden CARDIAC ARRHYTHMIA (e.g., VENTRICULAR FIBRILLATION) caused by a blunt, non-penetrating impact to the precordial region of chest wall. Commotio cordis often results in sudden death without prompt cardiopulmonary defibrillation.Isotonic Solutions: Solutions having the same osmotic pressure as blood serum, or another solution with which they are compared. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed & Dorland, 28th ed)Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Hospital Mortality: A vital statistic measuring or recording the rate of death from any cause in hospitalized populations.Blood Pressure: PRESSURE of the BLOOD on the ARTERIES and other BLOOD VESSELS.Videotape Recording: Recording of visual and sometimes sound signals on magnetic tape.Coronary Circulation: The circulation of blood through the CORONARY VESSELS of the HEART.Blood Gas Analysis: Measurement of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the blood.Life Support Systems: Systems that provide all or most of the items necessary for maintaining life and health. Provisions are made for the supplying of oxygen, food, water, temperature and pressure control, disposition of carbon dioxide and body waste. The milieu may be a spacecraft, a submarine, or the surface of the moon. In medical care, usually under hospital conditions, LIFE SUPPORT CARE is available. (From Webster's New Collegiate Dictionary)Survival Analysis: A class of statistical procedures for estimating the survival function (function of time, starting with a population 100% well at a given time and providing the percentage of the population still well at later times). The survival analysis is then used for making inferences about the effects of treatments, prognostic factors, exposures, and other covariates on the function.Clinical Competence: The capability to perform acceptably those duties directly related to patient care.Critical Care: Health care provided to a critically ill patient during a medical emergency or crisis.Hypoxia, Brain: A reduction in brain oxygen supply due to ANOXEMIA (a reduced amount of oxygen being carried in the blood by HEMOGLOBIN), or to a restriction of the blood supply to the brain, or both. Severe hypoxia is referred to as anoxia, and is a relatively common cause of injury to the central nervous system. Prolonged brain anoxia may lead to BRAIN DEATH or a PERSISTENT VEGETATIVE STATE. Histologically, this condition is characterized by neuronal loss which is most prominent in the HIPPOCAMPUS; GLOBUS PALLIDUS; CEREBELLUM; and inferior olives.Sus scrofa: A species of SWINE, in the family Suidae, comprising a number of subspecies including the domestic pig Sus scrofa domestica.Status Asthmaticus: A sudden intense and continuous aggravation of a state of asthma, marked by dyspnea to the point of exhaustion and collapse and not responding to the usual therapeutic efforts.Education, Professional, Retraining: Educational programs for individuals who have been inactive in their profession, or who wish to regain unused skills.Capnography: Continuous recording of the carbon dioxide content of expired air.Audiovisual Aids: Auditory and visual instructional materials.West VirginiaTidal Volume: The volume of air inspired or expired during each normal, quiet respiratory cycle. Common abbreviations are TV or V with subscript T.Heart Arrest, Induced: A procedure to stop the contraction of MYOCARDIUM during HEART SURGERY. It is usually achieved with the use of chemicals (CARDIOPLEGIC SOLUTIONS) or cold temperature (such as chilled perfusate).Pulmonary Embolism: Blocking of the PULMONARY ARTERY or one of its branches by an EMBOLUS.Intensive Care Units, Pediatric: Hospital units providing continuous surveillance and care to acutely ill infants and children. Neonates are excluded since INTENSIVE CARE UNITS, NEONATAL is available.Mental Competency: The ability to understand the nature and effect of the act in which the individual is engaged. (From Black's Law Dictionary, 6th ed).Decision Making: The process of making a selective intellectual judgment when presented with several complex alternatives consisting of several variables, and usually defining a course of action or an idea.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Carbon Dioxide: A colorless, odorless gas that can be formed by the body and is necessary for the respiration cycle of plants and animals.Advance Care Planning: Discussions with patients and/or their representatives about the goals and desired direction of the patient's care, particularly end-of-life care, in the event that the patient is or becomes incompetent to make decisions.Emergency Nursing: The specialty or practice of nursing in the care of patients admitted to the emergency department.Videodisc Recording: The storing of visual and usually sound signals on discs for later reproduction on a television screen or monitor.Cardiac Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the heart.Programmed Instruction as Topic: Instruction in which learners progress at their own rate using workbooks, textbooks, or electromechanical devices that provide information in discrete steps, test learning at each step, and provide immediate feedback about achievement. (ERIC, Thesaurus of ERIC Descriptors, 1996).Hospitals, Pediatric: Special hospitals which provide care for ill children.Sodium Bicarbonate: A white, crystalline powder that is commonly used as a pH buffering agent, an electrolyte replenisher, systemic alkalizer and in topical cleansing solutions.Random Allocation: A process involving chance used in therapeutic trials or other research endeavor for allocating experimental subjects, human or animal, between treatment and control groups, or among treatment groups. It may also apply to experiments on inanimate objects.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Single-Blind Method: A method in which either the observer(s) or the subject(s) is kept ignorant of the group to which the subjects are assigned.Partial Pressure: The pressure that would be exerted by one component of a mixture of gases if it were present alone in a container. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Pulmonary Gas Exchange: The exchange of OXYGEN and CARBON DIOXIDE between alveolar air and pulmonary capillary blood that occurs across the BLOOD-AIR BARRIER.Drowning: Death that occurs as a result of anoxia or heart arrest, associated with immersion in liquid.Sternum: A long, narrow, and flat bone commonly known as BREASTBONE occurring in the midsection of the anterior thoracic segment or chest region, which stabilizes the rib cage and serves as the point of origin for several muscles that move the arms, head, and neck.Survival: Continuance of life or existence especially under adverse conditions; includes methods and philosophy of survival.Cardiology: The study of the heart, its physiology, and its functions.Dogs: The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)Shock: A pathological condition manifested by failure to perfuse or oxygenate vital organs.Intubation: Introduction of a tube into a hollow organ to restore or maintain patency if obstructed. It is differentiated from CATHETERIZATION in that the insertion of a catheter is usually performed for the introducing or withdrawing of fluids from the body.Cerebrovascular Circulation: The circulation of blood through the BLOOD VESSELS of the BRAIN.Emergency Service, Hospital: Hospital department responsible for the administration and provision of immediate medical or surgical care to the emergency patient.Attitude to Death: Conceptual response of the person to the various aspects of death, which are based on individual psychosocial and cultural experience.Intensive Care Units: Hospital units providing continuous surveillance and care to acutely ill patients.Intensive Care: Advanced and highly specialized care provided to medical or surgical patients whose conditions are life-threatening and require comprehensive care and constant monitoring. It is usually administered in specially equipped units of a health care facility.Pressure: A type of stress exerted uniformly in all directions. Its measure is the force exerted per unit area. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Tachycardia, Ventricular: An abnormally rapid ventricular rhythm usually in excess of 150 beats per minute. It is generated within the ventricle below the BUNDLE OF HIS, either as autonomic impulse formation or reentrant impulse conduction. Depending on the etiology, onset of ventricular tachycardia can be paroxysmal (sudden) or nonparoxysmal, its wide QRS complexes can be uniform or polymorphic, and the ventricular beating may be independent of the atrial beating (AV dissociation).Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Acid-Base Equilibrium: The balance between acids and bases in the BODY FLUIDS. The pH (HYDROGEN-ION CONCENTRATION) of the arterial BLOOD provides an index for the total body acid-base balance.Plasma Substitutes: Any liquid used to replace blood plasma, usually a saline solution, often with serum albumins, dextrans or other preparations. These substances do not enhance the oxygen- carrying capacity of blood, but merely replace the volume. They are also used to treat dehydration.Saline Solution, Hypertonic: Hypertonic sodium chloride solution. A solution having an osmotic pressure greater than that of physiologic salt solution (0.9 g NaCl in 100 ml purified water).Medical Staff, Hospital: Professional medical personnel approved to provide care to patients in a hospital.Pediatric Nurse Practitioners: Registered nurses with graduate degrees in nursing who provide care to pediatric patients who are acutely or critically ill.Oxygen: An element with atomic symbol O, atomic number 8, and atomic weight [15.99903; 15.99977]. It is the most abundant element on earth and essential for respiration.Neonatology: A subspecialty of Pediatrics concerned with the newborn infant.Death, Sudden, Cardiac: Unexpected rapid natural death due to cardiovascular collapse within one hour of initial symptoms. It is usually caused by the worsening of existing heart diseases. The sudden onset of symptoms, such as CHEST PAIN and CARDIAC ARRHYTHMIAS, particularly VENTRICULAR TACHYCARDIA, can lead to the loss of consciousness and cardiac arrest followed by biological death. (from Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine, 7th ed., 2005)Embolectomy: Surgical removal of an obstructing clot or foreign material which has been transported from a distant vessel by the bloodstream. Removal of a clot at its original site is called THROMBECTOMY.Family: A social group consisting of parents or parent substitutes and children.Nitroprusside: A powerful vasodilator used in emergencies to lower blood pressure or to improve cardiac function. It is also an indicator for free sulfhydryl groups in proteins.Education: Acquisition of knowledge as a result of instruction in a formal course of study.Monitoring, Physiologic: The continuous measurement of physiological processes, blood pressure, heart rate, renal output, reflexes, respiration, etc., in a patient or experimental animal; includes pharmacologic monitoring, the measurement of administered drugs or their metabolites in the blood, tissues, or urine.Respiration: The act of breathing with the LUNGS, consisting of INHALATION, or the taking into the lungs of the ambient air, and of EXHALATION, or the expelling of the modified air which contains more CARBON DIOXIDE than the air taken in (Blakiston's Gould Medical Dictionary, 4th ed.). This does not include tissue respiration (= OXYGEN CONSUMPTION) or cell respiration (= CELL RESPIRATION).Asphyxia Neonatorum: Respiratory failure in the newborn. (Dorland, 27th ed)Patient Simulation: The use of persons coached to feign symptoms or conditions of real diseases in a life-like manner in order to teach or evaluate medical personnel.Shock, Cardiogenic: Shock resulting from diminution of cardiac output in heart disease.Personal Autonomy: Self-directing freedom and especially moral independence. An ethical principle holds that the autonomy of persons ought to be respected. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Cytochromes a: A subclass of heme a containing cytochromes that have two imidazole nitrogens as axial ligands and an alpha-band absorption of 605 nm. They are found in a variety of microorganisms and in eucaryotes as a low-spin cytochrome component of MITOCHONDRIAL ELECTRON TRANSPORT COMPLEX IV.Polygeline: A 3.5 per cent colloidal solution containing urea-cross-linked polymerized peptides. It has a molecular weight of approximately 35,000 and is prepared from gelatin and electrolytes. The polymeric solution is used as a plasma expander.Suburban Population: The inhabitants of peripheral or adjacent areas of a city or town.Cardiac Output: The volume of BLOOD passing through the HEART per unit of time. It is usually expressed as liters (volume) per minute so as not to be confused with STROKE VOLUME (volume per beat).Hydroxyethyl Starch Derivatives: Starches that have been chemically modified so that a percentage of OH groups are substituted with 2-hydroxyethyl ether groups.Circulatory Arrest, Deep Hypothermia Induced: A technique to arrest the flow of blood by lowering BODY TEMPERATURE to about 20 degrees Centigrade, usually achieved by infusing chilled perfusate. The technique provides a bloodless surgical field for complex surgeries.Vasoconstrictor Agents: Drugs used to cause constriction of the blood vessels.Personnel, Hospital: The individuals employed by the hospital.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Hospitals: Institutions with an organized medical staff which provide medical care to patients.Hyperventilation: A pulmonary ventilation rate faster than is metabolically necessary for the exchange of gases. It is the result of an increased frequency of breathing, an increased tidal volume, or a combination of both. It causes an excess intake of oxygen and the blowing off of carbon dioxide.Fatal Outcome: Death resulting from the presence of a disease in an individual, as shown by a single case report or a limited number of patients. This should be differentiated from DEATH, the physiological cessation of life and from MORTALITY, an epidemiological or statistical concept.Heart: The hollow, muscular organ that maintains the circulation of the blood.Chi-Square Distribution: A distribution in which a variable is distributed like the sum of the squares of any given independent random variable, each of which has a normal distribution with mean of zero and variance of one. The chi-square test is a statistical test based on comparison of a test statistic to a chi-square distribution. The oldest of these tests are used to detect whether two or more population distributions differ from one another.Regional Blood Flow: The flow of BLOOD through or around an organ or region of the body.Oxygen Consumption: The rate at which oxygen is used by a tissue; microliters of oxygen STPD used per milligram of tissue per hour; the rate at which oxygen enters the blood from alveolar gas, equal in the steady state to the consumption of oxygen by tissue metabolism throughout the body. (Stedman, 25th ed, p346)Body Temperature: The measure of the level of heat of a human or animal.

Repeated administration of vasopressin but not epinephrine maintains coronary perfusion pressure after early and late administration during prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation in pigs. (1/1128)

BACKGROUND: It is unknown whether repeated dosages of vasopressin or epinephrine given early or late during basic life support cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) may be able to increase coronary perfusion pressure above a threshold between 20 and 30 mm Hg that renders defibrillation successful. METHODS AND RESULTS: After 4 minutes of cardiac arrest, followed by 3 minutes of basic life support CPR, 12 animals were randomly assigned to receive, every 5 minutes, either vasopressin (early vasopressin: 0.4, 0.4, and 0.8 U/kg, respectively; n=6) or epinephrine (early epinephrine: 45, 45, and 200 microg/kg, respectively; n=6). Another 12 animals were randomly allocated after 4 minutes of cardiac arrest, followed by 8 minutes of basic life support CPR, to receive, every 5 minutes, either vasopressin (late vasopressin: 0.4 and 0.8 U/kg, respectively; n=6), or epinephrine (late epinephrine: 45 and 200 microg/kg, respectively; n=6). Defibrillation was attempted after 22 minutes of cardiac arrest. Mean+/-SEM coronary perfusion pressure was significantly higher 90 seconds after early vasopressin compared with early epinephrine (50+/-4 versus 34+/-3 mm Hg, P<0.02; 42+/-5 versus 15+/-3 mm Hg, P<0.0008; and 37+/-5 versus 11+/-3 mm Hg, P<0. 002, respectively). Mean+/-SEM coronary perfusion pressure was significantly higher 90 seconds after late vasopressin compared with late epinephrine (40+/-3 versus 22+/-4 mm Hg, P<0.004, and 32+/-4 versus 15+/-4 mm Hg, P<0.01, respectively). All vasopressin animals survived 60 minutes, whereas no epinephrine pig had return of spontaneous circulation (P<0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Repeated administration of vasopressin but only the first epinephrine dose given early and late during basic life support CPR maintained coronary perfusion pressure above the threshold that is needed for successful defibrillation.  (+info)

Is peer tutoring beneficial in the context of school resuscitation training? (2/1128)

First year pupils at a Cardiff comprehensive school were trained in cardiopulmonary resuscitation, 106 by the teacher only and 137 by the teacher assisted by older pupils (peer tutoring). Scores in a multiple choice theory test and in practical skill assessment showed no significant difference between instruction methods, but boys taught by the teacher assisted by older pupils expressed less willingness to resuscitate in an emergency than girls instructed by either method (P < 0.01). Girls had higher scores in the multiple choice paper (P < 0.025) and in the skills assessment (P < 0.01). Those pupils who reported some prior knowledge of resuscitation techniques performed better during skill assessment than novice trainees (P < 0.025).  (+info)

Cardiopulmonary resuscitation: effect of CPAP on gas exchange during chest compressions. (3/1128)

BACKGROUND: Conventional cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) includes 80-100/min precordial compressions with intermittent positive pressure ventilation (IPPV) after every fifth compression. To prevent gastric insufflation, chest compressions are held during IPPV if the patient is not intubated. Elimination of IPPV would simplify CPR and might offer physiologic advantages, but compression-induced ventilation without IPPV has been shown to result in hypercapnia. The authors hypothesized that application of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) might increase CO2 elimination during chest compressions. METHODS: After appropriate instrumentation and measurement of baseline data, ventricular fibrillation was induced in 18 pigs. Conventional CPR was performed as a control (CPR(C)) for 5 min. Pauses were then discontinued, and animals were assigned randomly to receive alternate trials of uninterrupted chest compressions at a rate of 80/min without IPPV, either at atmospheric airway pressure (CPR(ATM)) or with CPAP (CPR(CPAP)). CPAP was adjusted to produce a minute ventilation of 75% of the animal's baseline ventilation. Data were summarized as mean +/- SD and compared with Student t test for paired observations. RESULTS: During CPR without IPPV, CPAP decreased PaCO2 (55+/-28 vs. 100+/-16 mmHg) and increased SaO2 (0.86+/-0.19 vs. 0.50+/-0.18%; P < 0.001). CPAP also increased arteriovenous oxygen content difference (10.7+/-3.1 vs. 5.5+/-2.3 ml/dl blood) and CO2 elimination (120+/-20 vs. 12+/-20 ml/min; P < 0.01). Differences between CPR(CPAP) and CPR(ATM) in aortic blood pressure, cardiac output, and stroke volume were not significant. CONCLUSIONS: Mechanical ventilation may not be necessary during CPR as long as CPAP is applied. Discontinuation of IPPV will simplify CPR and may offer physiologic advantage.  (+info)

Resuscitation from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: is survival dependent on who is available at the scene? (4/1128)

OBJECTIVE: To determine whether survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is influenced by the on-scene availability of different grades of ambulance personnel and other health professionals. DESIGN: Population based, retrospective, observational study. SETTING: County of Nottinghamshire with a population of one million. SUBJECTS: All 2094 patients who had resuscitation attempted by Nottinghamshire Ambulance Service crew from 1991 to 1994; study of 1547 patients whose arrest were of cardiac aetiology. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Survival to hospital admission and survival to hospital discharge. RESULTS: Overall survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest remains poor: 221 patients (14.3%) survived to reach hospital alive and only 94 (6.1%) survived to be discharged from hospital. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that the chances of those resuscitated by technician crew reaching hospital alive were poor but were greater when paramedic crew were either called to assist technicians or dealt with the arrest themselves (odds ratio 6.9 (95% confidence interval 3.92 to 26.61)). Compared to technician crew, survival to hospital discharge was only significantly improved with paramedic crew (3.55 (1.62 to 7.79)) and further improved when paramedics were assisted by either a health professional (9.91 (3.12 to 26.61)) or a medical practitioner (20.88 (6.72 to 64.94)). CONCLUSIONS: Survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest remains poor despite attendance at the scene of the arrest by ambulance crew and other health professionals. Patients resuscitated by a paramedic from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest caused by cardiac disease were more likely to survive to hospital discharge than when resuscitation was provided by an ambulance technician. Resuscitation by a paramedic assisted by a medical practitioner offers a patient the best chances of surviving the event.  (+info)

Influence of ambulance crew's length of experience on the outcome of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. (5/1128)

AIMS: To investigate whether an ambulance crew's length of experience affected the outcome of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. METHODS AND RESULTS: This was a population-based, retrospective observational study of attempted resuscitations in 1547 consecutive arrests of cardiac aetiology by Nottinghamshire Emergency Ambulance Service crew. One thousand and seventy-one patients were managed by either a paramedic or a technician crew without assistance from other trained individuals at the scene of arrest. Overall, the chances of a patient surviving to be discharged from hospital alive did not appear to be affected by the paramedic's length of experience (among survivors, 18 months experience vs non-survivors 16 months experience, P = 0.347) but there appears to be a trend in the effect of a technician's length of experience on survival (among survivors, 60 months experience vs non-survivors 28 months experience, P = 0.075). However, when a technician had 4 years of experience or more and a paramedic 1 year's experience, survival rates did improve. Logistic regression analysis, adjusted for factors known to influence outcome, revealed that chances of survival increased once technicians had over 4 years of experience after qualification (odds ratio 2.71, 95% CI 1.17 to 6.32, P = 0.02) and paramedics after just 1 year of experience (odds ratio 2.68, 95% CI 1.05 to 6.82, P = 0.04). CONCLUSIONS: Survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest varies with the type of ambulance crew and length of experience after qualification. Experience in the field seems important as paramedics achieve better survival rates after just 1 year's experience, while technicians need to have more than 4 years' experience to improve survival.  (+info)

Preparing for medical emergencies in the dental office. (6/1128)

If you discover an unconscious patient in your office, attend to the ABCs while you evaluate the patient's medical history and piece together the events leading up to the emergency. These actions will help you arrive at a diagnosis. Then as the emergency cart and team arrive, you will be able to provide good, safe care to stabilize the patient and get him or her to a medical facility.  (+info)

A comparison of standard cardiopulmonary resuscitation and active compression-decompression resuscitation for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. French Active Compression-Decompression Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Study Group. (7/1128)

BACKGROUND: We previously observed that short-term survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest was greater with active compression-decompression cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) than with standard CPR. In the current study, we assessed the effects of the active compression-decompression method on one-year survival. METHODS: Patients who had cardiac arrest in the Paris metropolitan area or in Thionville, France, more than 80 percent of whom had asystole, were assigned to receive either standard CPR (377 patients) or active compression-decompression CPR (373 patients) according to whether their arrest occurred on an even or odd day of the month, respectively. The primary end point was survival at one year. The rate of survival to hospital discharge without neurologic impairment and the neurologic outcome were secondary end points. RESULTS: Both the rate of hospital discharge without neurologic impairment (6 percent vs. 2 percent, P=0.01) and the one-year survival rate (5 percent vs. 2 percent, P=0.03) were significantly higher among patients who received active compression-decompression CPR than among those who received standard CPR. All patients who survived to one year had cardiac arrests that were witnessed. Nine of 17 one-year survivors in the active compression-decompression group and 2 of 7 in the standard group, respectively, initially had asystole or pulseless electrical activity. In 12 of the 17 survivors who had received active compression-decompression CPR, neurologic status returned to base line, as compared with 3 of 7 survivors who had received standard CPR (P=0.34). CONCLUSIONS: Active compression-decompression CPR performed during advanced life support significantly improved long-term survival rates among patients who had cardiac arrest outside the hospital.  (+info)

Effects of the AMPA receptor antagonist NBQX on outcome of newborn pigs after asphyxic cardiac arrest. (8/1128)

In neonates, asphyxia is a common cause of neuronal injury and often results in seizures. The authors evaluated whether blockade of alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA) receptors during asphyxia and early recovery with 2,3-dihydroxy-6-nitro-7-sulfamoylbenzo-(F)-quinoxaline (NBQX) ameliorates neurologic deficit and histopathology in 1-week-old piglets. Anesthetized piglets were exposed to a sequence of 30 minutes of hypoxia, 5 minutes of room air ventilation, 7 minutes of airway occlusion, and cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Vehicle or NBQX was administered intravenously before asphyxia (30 mg/kg) and during the first 4 hours of recovery (15 mg/kg/h). Neuropathologic findings were evaluated at 96 hours of recovery by light microscopic and cytochrome oxidase histochemical study. Cardiac arrest occurred at 5 to 6 minutes of airway occlusion, and cardiopulmonary resuscitation restored spontaneous circulation independent of treatment modalities in about 2 to 3 minutes. Neurologic deficit over the 96-hour recovery period was not ameliorated by NBQX. Seizure activity began after 24 to 48 hours in 7 of 10 animals with vehicle and in 9 of 10 of animals with NBQX. In each group, four animals died in status epilepticus. Neuropathologic outcomes were not improved by NBQX. The density of remaining viable neurons was decreased in parietal cortex and putamen by NBQX treatment. Metabolic defects in cytochrome oxidase activity were worsened by NBQX treatment. Seizure activity during recovery was associated with reduced neuronal viability in neocortex and striatum in piglets from both groups that survived for 96 hours. This neonatal model of asphyxic cardiac arrest and resuscitation generates neurologic deficits, clinical seizure activity, and selective damage in regions of basal ganglia and sensorimotor cortex. In contrast to other studies in mature brain, AMPA receptor blockade with NBQX failed to protect against neurologic damage in the immature piglet and worsened postasphyxic histopathologic outcome in neocortex and putamen.  (+info)

*Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation

... (commonly known as ECPR) is a method of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) that ... Similar to the concept of elective cardiopulmonary bypass, used in open heart surgery, oxygenation and perfusion can be ...

*Anaesthetic technician

Cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Central IV lines. TEG Sampling. Autotransfusion. Anaesthetic Technicians work as a member of a ... Anaesthetic Technician also provide a key role in the emergency resuscitation of patients. Anaesthetic technicians prepare ...

*British Columbia Ambulance Service

... cardiopulmonary resuscitation; basic wound and fracture management; maintenance of airways and ventilation. use of airway ... Frontier Trial Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium (ROC) The BC Ambulance Service is a uniformed organization and as such, has a ...

*Outdoor Emergency Care

BLS cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Automated external defibrillation using the AED. Application of up to 100% Oxygen therapy ...

*Henry Heimlich

Sayre, Michael (2005). Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (PDF). Humana Press, Springer. pp. 111-121. ISBN 978-1-58829-283-4. "The ... International Consensus On Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) and Emergency Cardiovascular Care (ECC) Science With Treatment ... Resuscitation. 44 (2): 105-8. doi:10.1016/S0300-9572(00)00161-1. PMID 10767497. CS1 maint: Multiple names: authors list (link ...

*Automated external defibrillator

"Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) Statistics". American Red Cross. Archived from the original on 19 November 2008. Retrieved ... level cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) classes. The portable version of the defibrillator was invented in the mid-1960s by ... In September 2008, the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation issued a 'universal AED sign' to be adopted throughout ... 1997) BMJ.com "ILCOR presents a universal AED sign". European Resuscitation Council. "Heartstart Home Defibrillator". Philips ...

*Diver rescue

See main article: cardiopulmonary resuscitation. If the casualty has injuries the rescuers will need to provide first aid and ... If the casualty is not breathing, an urgent ascent directly to the surface is needed so that resuscitation can take place there ... Diving hazards and precautions resuscitation first aid oxygen first aid artificial respiration recompression chamber diving ...

*Pediatric basic life support

... start cardiopulmonary resuscitation. if you are alone, call for help after a minute of any CPR; if help has already been called ... the European Resuscitation Council publishes updated guidelines about all stages of resuscitation, both for medical staff and ... if there are not, feel the pulse and if there are no signs of circulation begins resuscitation. If air doesn't pass, consider a ... If, after 15 ventilations (thirty seconds) the heart rate remains below 60 per minute is necessary to begin resuscitation, ...

*Parkinson's disease

... wishes for or against cardiopulmonary resuscitation; and when to use hospice care. Palliative care team members can help answer ...

*Copeptin

"Vasopressin during cardiopulmonary resuscitation : a progress report". Critical Care Medicine. 32 (9 Suppl): S432-S435. doi: ... "Stress hormone response during and after cardiopulmonary resuscitation". Anesthesiology. 77 (4): 662-668. doi:10.1097/00000542- ...

*Peter Safar

Safar, who began to work on cardio pulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in 1956 at Baltimore City Hospital, demonstrated in a series ... His achievements were wide ranging from the development of cardio-pulmonary resuscitation and as a founder of the nation's ... He is credited with pioneering cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Safar was born in Vienna in 1924 into a medical family. His ... Acierno, LJ; Worrell, LT (January 2007). "Peter Safar: father of modern cardiopulmonary resuscitation". Clinical Cardiology. 30 ...

*List of people considered father or mother of a scientific field

Acierno, LJ; Worrell, LT (January 2007). "Peter Safar: father of modern cardiopulmonary resuscitation". Clinical Cardiology. 30 ... 2003) "The resuscitation greats. Andreas Vesalius, the concept of an artificial airway." Resuscitation" 56:3-7 "Page Not Found ...

*Artificial ventilation

Mouth-to-mouth resuscitation is also part of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) making it an essential skill for first aid. In ... Cardiopulmonary resuscitation Medical emergency Medical ventilator Edward Albert Sharpey-Schafer Charles Hederer, inventor of ... "Decisions about cardiopulmonary resuscitation model information leafler". British Medical Association. July 2002. Retrieved ... ISBN 978-0-07-144767-6. Chamberlain D (2003). "Never quite there: a tale of resuscitation medicine". Clin Med. 3 (6): 573-7. ...

*Sternal fracture

Hoke RS, Chamberlain D (December 2004). "Skeletal chest injuries secondary to cardiopulmonary resuscitation". Resuscitation. 63 ... Cardiopulmonary resuscitation, commonly known as CPR, has also been known to cause thoracic injury, including sternum and rib ... doi:10.1016/j.resuscitation.2004.05.019. PMID 15582769. Livingston DH, Hauser CJ (2004). "Trauma to the chest wall and lung". ...

*Ventricular fibrillation

Treatment is with cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and defibrillation. Biphasic defibrillation may be better than monophasic ... as well as cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in between defibrillation attempts. Though ALS/ACLS algorithms encourage the use ... and patients in V-fib should be treated with cardiopulmonary resuscitation and prompt defibrillation. Left untreated, ... 2015 American Heart Association Guidelines Update for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care". ...

*ABC (medicine)

"Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation" (PDF). Centre for Excellence in Teaching and Learning. "First Aid: Prehospital Care (Student ... "Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (Charles University School of Medicine website)". Retrieved 2008-12-19. Mitka, M (May 2003). " ... The protocol was originally developed as a memory aid for rescuers performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and the most ... For this reason, lay rescuers proceed directly to cardiopulmonary resuscitation, starting with chest compressions, which is ...

*Shin Young-rok

Medical staff immediately provided cardiopulmonary resuscitation on site. Once he started breathing again, he was quickly taken ...

*Chain of survival

"Guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation and emergency cardiac care. Emergency Cardiac Care Committee and Subcommittees, ... Cardiac arrest Cardiac Arrest Registry to Enhance Survival Cardiopulmonary resuscitation Defibrillation "Part 12: From Science ... American Heart Association adopted the concept and elaborated on it in its 1992 guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation ... Eisenberg MS, Bergner L, Hallstrom A (1979). "Cardiac resuscitation in the community. Importance of rapid provision and ...

*Slow code

Cardiopulmonary resuscitation may be withheld in some circumstances. One is if the patient has a do not resuscitate ("no code ... The team will perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation in order to re-establish both cardiac and pulmonary function. ... This is referred to as a partial code or partial resuscitation and "such resuscitation commonly violates the ethical obligation ... Resuscitation. 80 (9): 985-989. doi:10.1016/j.resuscitation.2009.05.011. Marks, William J. (1 January 2006). ""Code Blue", " ...

*Targeted temperature management

"Hypothermia for neuroprotection in adults after cardiopulmonary resuscitation". The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. 2 ... Resuscitation. 103: 54-59. doi:10.1016/j.resuscitation.2016.03.024. PMID 27060536. Jacobs, SE; Berg, M; Hunt, R; Tarnow-Mordi, ... Resuscitation. 75 (1): 76-81. doi:10.1016/j.resuscitation.2007.03.001. PMID 17462808. Castren, M.; Nordberg, P.; Svensson, L.; ... 2010 American Heart Association Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care". Circulation. ...

*Vasopressin (medication)

epinephrine alone in cardiopulmonary resuscitation". The New England Journal of Medicine. 359 (1): 21-30. doi:10.1056/ ... The 2010 American Heart Association Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care recommend ... "A comparison of vasopressin and epinephrine for out-of-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation". The New England Journal of ... Resuscitation. 79 (3): 380-6. doi:10.1016/j.resuscitation.2008.07.020. PMID 18951676. Ong ME, Tiah L, Leong BS, Tan EC, Ong VY ...

*Neurointensive care

"Hypothermia for neuroprotection in adults after cardiopulmonary resuscitation". Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. 2. doi ...

*Clinical death

1985). "Survival of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest with early initiation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation". The American ... Prior to the invention of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), defibrillation, epinephrine injection, and other treatments in ... 1990). "Observations of hemodynamics during human cardiopulmonary resuscitation". Critical Care Medicine. Lippincott Williams ... The purpose of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) during cardiac arrest is ideally reversal of the clinically dead state by ...

*Bay Area Medical Academy

BAMA also offers training courses for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR). [1][dead link] Skibola, Nicole (25 May 2011). "The ...

*Heroic measure

Cardiopulmonary resuscitation is a particularly well-known heroic measure; vigorous chest compressions often result in ...

*Advanced airway

2015 American Heart Association Guidelines Update for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care". ...
Outcomes after in-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) are very poor, particularly in patients with oxygen dependent chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or metastatic cancer. Recent work found that in-hospital CPR is being performed more often before death with unchanging survival and that fewer CPR survivors are being discharged home, thus suggesting that CPR is increasingly performed without benefit and that the burden of this ineffective treatment is increasing. Unlike other medical procedures, CPR has become the default provided to all patients even those with tremendously poor outcomes. It is time to change the paradigm of CPR. Through comparing an innovative informed assent approach toward in-hospital CPR (informing patients that their underlying chronic illness makes outcomes of CPR so poor that CPR is not performed while allowing them to disagree) versus usual care in a group of chronically ill patients with reduced life expectancy, the investigators aspire to ...
Cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation outcome reports : update of the Utstein resuscitation registry templates for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest : a statement for healthcare professionals from a task force of the international liaison committee on Resuscitation (American Heart Association, European Resuscitation Council, Australian and New Zealand Council on Resuscitation, Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada, InterAmerican Heart Foundation, Resuscitation Council of Southern Africa, Resuscitation Council of Asia); and the American Heart Association Emergency Cardiovascular Care Committee and the Council on Cardiopulmonary, Critical Care, Perioperative and Resuscitation ...
These Web-based Integrated Guidelines incorporate all relevant recommendations from 2010, 2015 and 2017.. The 2017 American Heart Association Focused Update on Pediatric Basic Life Support and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Quality addresses the comparison of chest compression-only CPR to CPR using chest compressions with rescue breaths for cardiac arrest in infants and children. It includes 2 additional out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) studies published after 2015 that further expand the evidence base used to develop the 2015 Guidelines Update.. The 2015 American Heart Association (AHA) Guidelines Update for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) and Emergency Cardiovascular Care (ECC) section on pediatric basic life support (BLS) differs substantially from previous versions of the AHA Guidelines.1 This publication updates the 2010 AHA Guidelines on pediatric BLS for several key questions related to pediatric CPR. The Pediatric ILCOR Task Force reviewed the topics covered in the 2010 ...
Nolan, J.P. et al. (2016) Critical Care.20(219) Background: In recent years there have been many developments in post-resuscitation care. We have investigated trends in patient characteristics and outcome following admission to UK critical care units following cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) for the period 2004-2014. Our hypothesis is that there has been a reduction in risk-adjusted mortality during this…
2016 China CPR expert consensus released - Sohu health recently, the guidance of Chinas comprehensive prevention and control system of cardiac arrest and CPR clinical practice guidelines for action - the 2016 China cardiopulmonary resuscitation expert consensus (hereinafter referred to as consensus) officially released. It is reported that the consensus by the society of China research-oriented hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation study collection of experts in the field of CPR domestic Specialized Committee, CPR international scientific consensus guidelines based on the combination of Chinas national conditions and practice, and recently by the critical care medicine promulgated. China abdomen cardiopulmonary resuscitation, the founder of Chinese research hospital to learn CPR, Specialized Committee chair, Chinese Medical Association branch chairman of the popularization of science, the armed police general hospital emergency medical center director, doctoral tutor Professor Wang ...
AIM: The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the association between chest compression rates and 1) arterial blood pressure and 2) survival outcomes during pediatric in-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR).. METHODS: Prospective observational study of children ≥37 weeks gestation and ,19 years old who received CPR in an intensive care unit (ICU) as part of the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit Quality of CPR Study (PICqCPR) of the Collaborative Pediatric Critical Care Research Network (CPCCRN). Arterial blood pressure and compression rate were determined from manually extracted arterial line waveform data during the first 10 min of CPR. The primary outcome was survival to hospital discharge. Modified Poisson regression models assessed the association between rate categories (80-,100, 100-120 [Guidelines], ,120-140, ,140) and outcomes.. RESULTS: Compression rate data were available for 164 patients. More than half (98/164; 60%) were ,1 year old. Return of circulation was achieved in ...
Failure of `Predictors of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Outcomes to Predict Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Outcomes: Implications for Do-Not-Resuscitate Policy and Advance ...
The ResQPOD® Impedance Threshold Device (ITD) is a simple, non-invasive device that delivers Intrathoracic Pressure Regulation (IPR) Therapy during basic or advanced life support CPR to improve perfusion.
Our BLS courses are organised every week at our training centre in Bangor. We are Northern Ireland BEST choice for First Aid courses. CPR Courses weekly.
Our BLS courses are organised every week at our training centre in Bangor. We are Northern Ireland BEST choice for First Aid courses. CPR Courses weekly.
Objective: While cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) chest compression fraction (CCF) is associated with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) outcomes, there is no standard method for the determination of CCF. We compared nine methods for calculating CCF. Methods: We studied consecutive adult OHCA patients treated by Alabama Emergency Medical Services (EMS) agencies of the Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium (ROC) during January 1, 2010 to October 28, 2010. Paramedics used portable cardiac monitors with real-time chest compression detection technology (LifePak 12, Physio-Control, Redmond, WA). We performed both automated CCF calculation for the entire care episode as well as manual review of CPR data in 1-min epochs, defining CCF as the proportion of each treatment interval with active chest compressions. We compared the CCF values resulting from 9 calculation methods: (1) mean CCF for the entire patient care episode (automated calculation by manufacturer software), (2) mean CCF for first 3. min ...
The ResQGARD Impedance Threshold Device (ITD) provides a rapid, safe and non-invasive way to improve perfusion in spontaneously breathing hypotensive patients. Learn more.
Using an isolated, fibrillated canine heart-lung preparation, we studied the effects of simultaneous lung inflation and chest compression on blood flow in a model of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The heart and lungs were placed in an artificial thorax with the great vessels and trachea exteriorized and attached to an artificial perfusion circuit and respirator, respectively. The blood volume of the system was adjusted to obtain various levels of static equilibrium pressure. Blood flow was obtained by cyclically raising and lowering the pressure in the artificial thorax, simulating the changes in pleural pressure that occur during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Lung inflation during the compression phase caused an increase in cardiopulmonary resuscitation blood flow when the change in pleural pressure was small and when static equilibrium pressure was high. In contrast, lung inflation caused a decrease in blood flow when changes in pleural pressure were high and when blood volume was low. These ...
Cardiac arrest is a serious complication that must be dealt with swiftly to ensure a higher revival and survival rate for the victims of the attack. Heart attack commonly occurs for older people, but sometimes, there are children and even infants that suffer from this illness. Heart attack does not choose its victims, but there are ways in which someone can help the revival of a person that is undergoing sudden cardiac arrest and that is through the administration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation.. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation is the process of repeated chest compressions along with the inputting of air into a persons lungs. This seemingly simple maneuver takes a long time to master and to successfully administer, but being able to have rudimentary knowledge is good enough for the layperson. For those truly wanting to know how to perform proper and effective cardiopulmonary resuscitation, a training done under the wing of a professional CPR administrator that has the proper equipment that can ...
More than half of the spouses of cardiac patients experience emotional distress,1 and they have higher levels of distress than the patients themselves.2 Despite evidence suggesting that spouses can help with their partners recovery,3 there are few tested interventions to reduce spousal stress and improve their ability to assist in the recovery process.. Moser and Dracup hypothesised that CPR training for spouses would increase perceived control, decrease emotional distress, and therefore, improve the ability to assist in their partners recovery. Although the authors found that higher levels of control were associated with low levels of distress at baseline, they did not assess whether the increase in perceived control resulting from the CPR training had an effect on distress.. The use of a randomised controlled design is a major strength of this study. As most of the spouses were white, had incomes higher than the average, and had completed a mean of 14 years of education, the results may not ...
Callaway and Sunde1 are right when they advise caution in adoption of extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR) given the varying definitions of what ECPR constitutes. However, we believe ECPR is not coming too fast and furious but rather like a Formula One car, dependent on focused high performance teams, bespoke with narrow specifications and at the cutting edge.. Current survival for cardiac arrest by conventional cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CCPR) is indeed dismal at around 10%.2 ECPR has led to improved outcomes compared with CCPR in many regions.3-6 ECPR consideration is in some ways analogous to resuscitative thoracotomy (RT) in trauma. Despite moderate quality of evidence, RT is strongly recommended in pulseless penetrating torso trauma with signs of life in ED.7 … ...
LM087 - Face Shield for CPR Training, FaceShee Features Reasonable price. Those who prefer not to use their mouth on a doll directly or those who are sharing a model while training should use the face shield ...
High quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is crucial for influencing survival from cardiac arrest. Healthcare professionals are expected to know how to perform CPR as they may encounter emergency situations during their work. Physiotherapists, who use exercise as a therapeutic approach, should have good knowledge and skills in CPR not only to cope with possible adverse cardiac events during exercise but also because a widespread CPR application and early defibrillation can greatly reduce mortality due to heart attack. The aim of this study is to investigate knowledge of Greek physiotherapists in European Resuscitation Council guidelines for resuscitation. A secondary aim of this study was to assess and compare the knowledge score between those with and without previous training and/or lower self-confidence in CPR skills. Three hundred and fifty Greek physiotherapists who were working in hospitals and rehabilitation centres (face-to-face and e-mail contact) were randomly selected to ...
Introduction: The 2010 guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) stressed that it is necessary to improve CPR quality. It is not known whether the neurologically intact survival rate will increase if lay rescuers and/or emergency medical service (EMS) personnel perform the CPR procedures according to the 2010 guidelines. We divided the period of each guidelines in the first half and the second half, and compared the first half and the second half.. Methods: From the data of the All-Japan Utstein Registry, a prospective, nationwide, population-based registry of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), we included adult patients who had bystander-witnessed OHCA due to cardiac etiology and in whom shockable arrest was recorded as an initial rhythm. Study patients were divided into two groups based on the different CPR guidelines; the 2005 guidelines (2005G), and 2010 guidelines (2010G). The primary endpoint, favorable neurological outcome at 30 days after OHCA, was compared between the first ...
Background Passive leg raising (PLR), to augment the artificial circulation, was deleted from cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) guidelines in 1992. Increases in end-tidal carbon dioxide (PETCO2) during CPR have been associated with increased pulmonary blood flow reflecting cardiac output. Measurements of PETCO2 after PLR might therefore increase our understanding of its potential value in CPR. We also observed the alteration in PETCO2 in relation to the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and no ROSC. Methods and results The PETCO2 was measured, subsequent to intubation, in 126 patients suffering an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), during 15min or until ROSC. Forty-four patients were selected by the study protocol to PLR 35cm; 21 patients received manual chest compressions and 23 mechanical compressions. The PLR was initiated during uninterrupted CPR, 5min from the start of PETCO2 measurements. During PLR, an increase in PETCO2 was found in all 44 patients within 15s (p=0.003), 45s ...
A basic life support working group of the European Resuscitation Council was set up in 1991. It was given the objective of producing agreed standards of basic life support to ensure uniform teaching of the techniques to health care professionals and lay people throughout Europe. A common complaint in the past, particularly from members of the public who have received instruction in basic life support, is that different organisations teach different techniques. This problem exists within countries as well as among countries. The European Resuscitation Council presents below its basic life support guidelines, which it hopes will be detailed enough to avoid any ambiguities and to be acceptable for use in all the countries represented by the council. ...
Cardiopulmonary resuscitation, also known by the acronym CPR is an emergency procedure performed in an effort to manually preserve intact brain function until further measures are taken to restore spontaneous blood circulation and breathing in a person who is in cardiac arrest. It is a basic but proven first aid skill, practiced throughout the world. It is an effective method of keeping a victim of cardiac arrest alive long enough for definitive treatment to be delivered (usually defibrillation and intravenous cardiac drugs). Prior to the inception of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation, there had been some techniques to keep people alive developed in the 18th century, both in Japan and in Europe, however it was not until the mid-20th century that James Elam and Peter Safar discovered and published the method now known as CPR. Safar conducted research on existing basic life support procedures including controlling a persons breathing airway by tilting back his or her head with an open mouth; and ...
The first treatment involves using a device called the Impedance Threshold Device (ITD). The ITD is a small hard plastic device about the size of a fist that is attached to the face mask or airway tube used during CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation). The ITD provides increased blood flow back to the heart during chest compressions until the heart starts beating on its own again.. The other treatment involves the amount of CPR given before the emergency medical services (EMS) providers first look at the heart rhythm to determine if a shock is needed. A person would receive either about 30 seconds of chest compressions or about 3 minutes of compressions before checking the heart rhythm. Giving some compressions before checking the heart rhythm increases the blood being circulated to the body. Researchers do not know how many compressions before the rhythm check are necessary to save more lives.. Depending on the circumstances of the cardiac arrest a person may receive only one of these treatments ...
In a system and a method of testing a person in the performance of cardiopulmonary resuscitation and for evaluating training exercises therein, a training device simulating a patient includes sensors for detecting various resuscitation procedures performed thereon. Parameter signals from the sensors are fed to a computer including a series of counters, a timing means and various memories, for analyzing the parameter signals and assessing whether the corresponding operations have been correctly or incorrectly performed. The values processed by the computer are then displayed on a display providing a clear moving representation of the procedures performed on the training device, the representation taking place in real time on the basis of corresponding signals from the timing means, whereby, by viewing the display, the trainee operator can directly check and if appropriate correct the resuscitation procedures he is performing. The display can display the whole of the cardiopulmonary resuscitation
INTRODUCTION: In spite of the advances and worldwide standardization for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), knowledge on the effectiveness of in-hospital CPR is not yet sufficient in Brazil.. Methods: This cross-sectional study included, prospectively, 763 patients who presented in-hospital cardiac arrest (CA) from 2007 to 2010, in 17 hospitals. CPR was performed in 575 patients.. RESULTS: Asystole was the CA modality most frequently found (40.7%), followed by pulseless electrical activity (39,3%). Immediate survival (recovery of spontaneous circulation - ROSC up to 24 h) was 48,8%, survival until hospital discharge was 13%, 4.3% in 6 m and 3.8% in 12 months. Independent predictors associated with higher immediate survival were: ventricular fibrillation (VF) or ventricular tachycardia (VT) without pulse as the initial rhythm of CA (RR 1.31; IC 95% 1.10 to 1.55; p = 0.002); presence of victim consciousness signs when the emergency staff arrived (RR 1.37; IC95% 1.16 to 1.61; p , 0.001); use of ...
Søholm et al report on consecutive 2527 attempted resuscitations of out of hospital cardiac arrest in Copenhagen between 2007 and 2011. The authors identify correlates for successful resuscitation attempts. Shockable rhythm, witnessed arrest and public location were associated with increased survival. Cardiac arrest between midnight and 8 am was associated with lower probability of successful…
One study will compare continuous chest compressions combined with pause-free rescue breathing to standard cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The other trial will compare treatment with the drug amiodarone, another drug called lidocaine or a salt-water placebo in participants with shock-resistant ventricular fibrillation, a condition in which the heart beats chaotically instead of pumping blood.. "Although immediate CPR can be lifesaving, more than 90 percent of people who experience a cardiac arrest outside of a hospital die before reaching a hospital or soon thereafter," said Jeffrey Kerby, M.D., Ph.D., UAB trauma surgeon and lead investigator at UAB. "The goal of both of these trials is to reduce that number." "Increasing survival rates for people who experience out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is a major public health goal," said Susan B. Shurin, M.D., acting director of the NIHs National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, which is the lead federal sponsor of the studies. "These new trials could ...
Cardiopulmonary resuscitation should begin between one to four minutes after a cardiac arrest in order to be a success. (A) Cardiopulmonary resuscitation should begin between ...
Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), is an emergency procedure performed in an effort to… Read More ». ...
Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), is an emergency procedure performed in an effort to… Read More ». ...
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Provide Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (HLTAID001) This nationally recognised course satisfies 1 Unit of Competency from the new HLT Health Training Package. It describes the skills and knowledge required to perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation (C...
CareLinx has 177 highly qualified Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) caregivers in San Rafael, CA. Join us, and find the perfect Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) caregiver for your loved ones today.
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Non-occlusive colonic ischaemia is a recognized albeit rare entity related to low blood flow within the visceral circulation and in most reported cases the right colon was affected. This is the second case report in the literature of extensive colonic necrosis following cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). A 83-year-old Caucasian woman was admitted to our hospital due to a low energy hip fracture. On her way to the radiology department she sustained a cardiac arrest. CPR started immediately and was successful. A few hours later, the patient developed increasing abdominal distension and severe metabolic acidocis. An abdominal multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) scan was suggestive of intestinal ischaemia. At laparotomy, the terminal ileum was ischaemic and extensive colonic necrosis was found, sparing only the proximal third of the transverse colon. The rectum was also spared. The terminal ileum and the entire colon were resected and an end ileostomy was fashioned. Although the
BACKGROUND: The Guidelines 2000 for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care recommend that for adult cardiac arrest the single rescuer performs "two quick breaths followed by 15 chest compressions." This cycle is continued until additional help arrives. Previous studies have shown that lay persons and medical students take 16 +/- 1 and 14 +/- 1 s, respectively, to perform these "two quick breaths." The purpose of this study was to determine the time required for trained professional paramedic firefighters to deliver these two breaths and the effects that any increase in the time it takes to perform rescue breathing would have on the number of chest compressions delivered during single rescuer BLS CPR. We hypothesized that trained professional rescuers would also take substantially longer then the Guidelines recommendation for delivering the two rescue breaths before every 15 compressions during simulated single rescuer BLS CPR.. METHODS: Twenty-four paramedic firefighters ...
Guest speaker was Dr Mark Taubert, Clinical Director and Consultant in Palliative Medicine at Velindre NHS Trust, Cardiff and contributor to the BBC Horizon programme We Need to Talk about Death. Dr Taubert led us in a series of reflections on cardiopulmonary resuscitation.
Take our free online course on CPR training that could save lives in emergency conditions. This e-learning course teaches you steps on how to perform Cardiopulmonary resuscitation.
As we approach the 50th anniversary of modern cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), there has been a renewed interest in the practical details of CPR, including training methods, the quality of CPR delivery and the very composition of CPR itself-that is, the ratio of chest compressions and ventilations given in a period of time. This latter topic has been the focus of intensive study and debate for the past decade. For example, increasing data have suggested that hyperventilation during CPR is both common and probably deleterious to patient survival. In addition, it has been recognised that most cardiac arrest victims do not receive bystander CPR, in part due to reluctance by the public to engage in mouth-to-mouth (MTM) respirations. Ramaraj and Ewy1 presented the case for removing ventilations altogether from the composition of CPR provided by the lay public (so-called continuous chest compression (CCC)-CPR or, in current American Heart Association parlance, hands-only CPR).. The history of ...
AIM OF THE STUDY: As most cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) efforts last longer than 15min, the aim of this study was to compare brain blood flow between the Head Up (HUP) and supine (SUP) body positions during a prolonged CPR effort of 15min, using active compression-decompression (ACD) CPR and impedance threshold device (ITD) in a swine model of cardiac arrest. METHODS: Ventricular fibrillation (VF) was induced in anesthetized pigs. After 8min of untreated VF followed by 2min of ACD-CPR+ITD in the SUP position, pigs were randomized to 18min of continuous ACD-CPR+ITD in either a 30° HUP or SUP position ...
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BACKGROUND We performed a multicenter controlled trial to assess the knowledge and attitude (KA) about cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) among secondary school children in a district in Malaysia. METHODS This was a prospective intervention study. The primary endpoint of the study was to determine the level of KA about resuscitation after CPR training. The six schools and classes from selected schools were chosen by randomization among the form three and four classes using sealed envelopes. A fully validated questionnaire consisting of three sections (sociodemographic, knowledge and attitude) was given to the pupils before and 2 weeks after the intervention. The intervention group was given a lecture, video show, pamphlet and 1-h practical session on CPR training. The control group received a placebo in order to overcome the learning effect. The maximum scores for the knowledge and attitude sections were 72 and 28, respectively. Repeated measures ANOVA analysis was used for specific objectives ...
Our mission is to build healthier lives, free of cardiovascular diseases and stroke. That single purpose drives all we do. The need for our work is beyond question. Find Out More about the American Heart Association. ...
American Heart Association Moves to Annual Guidelines Update, a First for the Organization Dallas, TX - More people will survive cardiac arrest if emergency medical dispatchers give chest compression-only CPR instructions over the phone and if infants and children receive chest compressions with rescue breaths,
The unit of competency teaches the skills and knowledge required to perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in line with the Australian Resuscitation Council (ARC) Guidelines. The unit applies to everyone who may require training in providing CPR. *This workshop is delivered in conjunction with Allens Training, RTO 90909. HLTAID001
LEARN HOW TO SAVE A LIFE!Our half-day nationally recognised CPR course will provide you with the skills and knowledge required to perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in line with the Australian Resuscitation Council (ARC) Guidelines. This course
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INTRODUCTION: As a part of the emergency medical services, the Swedish fire brigade can increase the survival rate in out-of-hospital cardiac arrests.. AIM: To compare the quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) performed by firefighters at a routine CPR practice versus when involved in a simulated life-saving event.. METHODS: In this study, 80 firefighters divided into two groups performed CPR according to guidelines: one group indoors during a routine training session; the other group outdoors during a smoke diving exercise wearing personal protective clothing and self-contained breathing apparatus. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyze the data.. RESULTS: The results showed a tendency for the outdoor group to perform CPR with better ventilation and compression quality, as compared to the indoor group. The ventilation of the manikin was not hampered by the firefighters wearing personal protective clothes and self-contained breathing apparatus, as the Swedish ...
PubMed comprises more than 30 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.
The combination of ACD-CPR with an ITD has been studied in 4 RCTs reported in 5 publications.80,84-87 Two of these trials evaluated ACD-CPR with the ITD in comparison with ACDCPR alone.80,84 The first of these used femoral artery catheters to measure improved hemodynamic parameters but found no difference in ROSC, 24-hour survival, or survival to hospital discharge.80 In a follow-up RCT of 400 patients, the ACD-CPR with a functioning ITD increased 24-hour survival, but again there was no difference in survival to hospital discharge or survival with good neurologic function as compared with the ACD-CPR with sham ITD group.84. The remaining 2 RCTs compared ACD-CPR with the ITD versus conventional CPR. The first was a single-center RCT in which 210 patients were randomly assigned to ACD-CPR+ITD or conventional CPR after intubation by the advanced life support team, which arrived on scene a mean of 9.5 minutes after the 9-1-1 call.85 The chest compression and ventilation rates in both arms were ...
Cardiovascular disease is the most common cause of sudden cardiac arrest, which causes over 60% of adult coronary heart disease deaths. In Europe, the annual incidence of out-of-hospital cardiopulmonary arrests treated by emergency medical systems is 38 per 100 000.Survival from cardiac arrest depends on a sequence of interventions-the Chain of Survival-comprising (1) early recognition and call for help, (2) early cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), (3) early defibrillation, and (4) postresuscitation care. The division between basic life support and advanced life support (ALS) is arbitrary-the resuscitation process is a continuum....
Background: In the event of a cardiac arrest, emergency medical dispatchers (EMDs) play a critical role by providing telephone-assisted cardiopulmonary resuscitation (T-CPR) to laypersons. The aim of our investigation was to describe compliance with the T-CPR protocol, the performance of the laypersons in a simulated T-CPR situation, and the communication between laypersons and EMDs during these actions. Methods: We conducted a retrospective observational study by analysing 20 recorded video and audio files. In a simulation, EMDs provided laypersons with instructions following T-CPR protocols. These were then analysed using a mixed method with convergent parallel design. Results: If the EMDs complied with the T-CPR protocol, the laypersons performed the correct procedures in 71% of the actions. The single most challenging instruction of the T-CPR protocol, for both EMDs and laypersons, was airway control. Mean values for compression depth and frequency did not reach established guideline goals ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Does the presence or absence of sonographically identified cardiac activity predict resuscitation outcomes of cardiac arrest patients?. AU - Salen, Philip. AU - Melniker, Larry. AU - Chooljian, Carolyn. AU - Rose, John S. AU - Alteveer, Janet. AU - Reed, James. AU - Heller, Michael. PY - 2005/7. Y1 - 2005/7. N2 - This study evaluated the ability of cardiac sonography performed by emergency physicians to predict resuscitation outcomes of cardiac arrest patients. A convenience sample of cardiac arrest patients prospectively underwent bedside cardiac sonography at 4 emergency medicine residency-affiliated EDs as part of the Sonography Outcomes Assessment Program. Cardiac arrest patients in pulseless electrical activity (PEA) and asystole underwent transthoracic cardiac ultrasound B-mode examinations during their resuscitations to assess for the presence or absence of cardiac kinetic activity. Several end points were analyzed as potential predictors of resuscitations: presenting ...
We agree with most points made by Burns and colleagues.1 In fact, their letter is an excellent example of the enthusiasm that surrounds extracoporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR), and that is essential to bring novel approaches to resuscitation. Their own data and experience reinforce the impression that mechanical cardiac support may benefit some patients after cardiac arrest. In addition, it is clear that ECPR, if it is deployed, should be part of optimising the entire system of emergency care. Doing system-wide optimisation will benefit the majority … ...
The ResQCPR™ System is a CPR adjunct that consists of two synergistic devices-the ResQPOD® ITD 16 and the ResQPUMP® ACD-CPR device. Together, they increase the likelihood of survival. A major clinical study of more than 1600 patients showed a 49% increase in one-year survival from cardiac arrest.*. ...
A I f HE APPEARANCE OF thick spontaneous echo contrast (SEC) and frank thrombosis in the intracardiac chambers nd aorta after cardiac arrest has been uniformly associated ith adverse outcome.1 The use of transesophageal echocardigraphy (TEE) during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) ay be extremely helpful in making such diagnosis by enabling n early visualization of SEC. This may lead to the early nitiation of specific therapy and improved outcome. A case eport is presented of a patient scheduled for peripheral vascuar surgery who suffered a cardiac arrest after induction of eneral anesthesia (GA). During resuscitation, the TEE examnation showed severely depressed biventricular function and hick SEC in the ascending and descending thoracic aorta. In esponse to this finding, 10,000 U of unfractionated heparin ere administered intravenously and inotropic therapy was nitiated. The SEC gradually cleared, biventricular function mproved, and he made a full recovery and was discharged rom the hospital a few
A vest system for generating cyclic fluctuations in intrathoracic pressure for use in cardiopulmonary resuscitation and non-invasive circulatory assistance. The vest is preferably provided with a two bladder inflation system. A high pressure bladder contacts the chest wall while a bias bladder is disposed between the high pressure bladder and the vest material. The bias bladder is pressurized to press the high-pressure bladder tightly against the chest wall so that cyclic inflation of the high-pressure bladder can generate large changes in intrathoracic pressure. The bias bladder is released periodically to allow the chest to expand for adequate ventilation. Air flow into and out of each bladder is controlled by sequencing large bore 3-way and 2-way solenoid valves and the rate of air flow into the high-pressure bladder is controlled by a variable resistor.
Looking for more information on ACLS Pulseless Electrical Activity and Asystole? Here is the guide from NHCPS you can bookmark and keep handy!
Learn more about Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation for Children Age 1 to Early Teens at Reston Hospital Center DefinitionReasons for ProcedurePossible ComplicationsWhat...
This article updates nurses on the laws governing cardiopulmonary resuscitation in relation to patients who have capacity at the time of admission to hospital, and promotes thoughtful ethical practice.. ...
A recent article raised the issue of whether cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is currently being performed in the most effective manner.1 According to the article, many of the skills that are carefully taught in CPR classes are neglected in the stress of an actual real-life emergency. Certainly, everyone hopes that an awareness of the problem and new monitoring techniques will improve patient care. There are, however, several other aspects of CPR where ethical concerns are not adequately addressed.
... - We have everything that you need to teach or administer proper CPR techniques during an emergency.
Understand Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation for Teens and Adults, usages in various health conditions, and side effects and warnings. Explore other smart treatment options, see research evidence, and find out about peoples experiences with many popular treatments, including feedback from patients and professionals.
Simply select and download Cardiopulmonary resuscitation brochure templates, customize it with your favourite software application, and print. Create high-impact brochures that promote your business.
High-level prescribing trends for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (BNF section 2.7.3) across all GP practices in NHS England for the last five years. You can explore prescribing trends for this section by CCG, or learn more about this site.. View all matching dm+d items.. ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - A ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm that requires preoperative cardiopulmonary resuscitation is not necessarily lethal. AU - Broos, Pieter P. H. L.. AU - t Mannetje, Yannick W.. AU - Loos, Maarten J. A.. AU - Scheltinga, Marc R.. AU - Bouwman, Lee H.. AU - Cuypers, Philippe W. M.. AU - van Sambeek, Marc R. H. M.. AU - Teijink, Joep A. W.. PY - 2016/1. Y1 - 2016/1. U2 - 10.1016/j.jvs.2015.08.061. DO - 10.1016/j.jvs.2015.08.061. M3 - Article. VL - 63. SP - 49. EP - 54. JO - Journal of Vascular Surgery. JF - Journal of Vascular Surgery. SN - 0741-5214. IS - 1. ER - ...
Study Objective of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Market • To provide detailed analysis of the market structure along with forecast for the next 10 years of
Dispatcher assistance in bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) improves neurological outcomes in children with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.
This course is intended for students in healthcare-related programs needing CPR certification, as well as students desiring more depth in their knowledge in Basic Life Support (BLS). The student will receive an American Heart Association card showing certification as a provider of BLS for Healthcare Providers. Anatomy, physiology and pathophysiology as it relates to heart disease and stroke will be discussed. Certification in adult, child, and infant Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) and choking will be provided using the latest guidelines provided by the American Heart Association. Personal and victim safety, ethical/legal considerations, and special resuscitation situations will also be discussed.
Clinical Question: Which method of resuscitation optimizes outcomes of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: manual chest compression or the use of an automated chest compression device?. Setting: Population-based. Study Design: Randomized controlled trial (nonblinded). Allocation: Unconcealed. Synopsis: The investigators randomized (allocation not concealed) 1,071 eligible adults 18 years or older, with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest presumed to be of cardiac origin, to cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) via standard manual chest compression or the use of an automated load-distributing band (LDB) chest compression device. Study outcomes included survival with spontaneous circulation at four hours, survival to hospital discharge, and neurologic function at discharge.. Individuals assessing outcomes were not blinded to treatment group survival, but the major outcome of interest (i.e., mortality) is not subject to interpretation. Follow-up occurred for all eligible patients until hospital discharge. ...
August 23, 2017-CHELMSFORD, MASS.-ZOLL® Medical Corporation, an Asahi Kasei Group Company that manufactures medical devices and related software solutions, announced today that Curaçao Emergency Medical Services used the ZOLL AutoPulse® Resuscitation System to revive a Venezuelan tourist who was experiencing sudden cardiac arrest.. When Curaçao EMS arrived at the hotel, they found bystanders trying to revive an 88-year-old man, who was nearly dead, with CPR. Curaçao EMS immediately placed the man, a hotel guest, on the AutoPulse for the delivery of high-quality, automated chest compressions, and within minutes, he regained his color and a pulse. No shock was needed for the return to spontaneous circulation (ROSC).. Only a few minutes after Curaçao EMS arrived on the scene, the patient was lifted onto the devices new Quick Case™* carry sheet while the AutoPulse continued the automated compressions; he was placed in the ambulance for transport to the hospital. "The AutoPulse was so ...
1. Holzer M, Bernard SA, Hachimi‑ Idrissi S et al. Hypothermia for neuroprotection after cardiac arrest: systematic review and individual patient data meta‑analysis. Crit Care Med 2005; 33: 414- 418. 2. Nolan JP, Morley PT, Hoek TL et al. Advancement Life support Task Force of the International Liaison committee on Resuscitation. Therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest. An advisory statement by the Advancement Life support Task Force of the International Liaison committee on Resuscitation. Resuscitation 2003; 57: 231- 235. 3. American Heart Association Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care. Part 7.5: postresuscitation Support. Circulation 2005; 112 (Suppl 1): IV- 84- 8. 4. Safar P. Effects of the postresuscitation syndrome on cerebral recovery from cardiac arrest. Crit Care Med 1985; 13: 932- 935. 5. Safar P, Behringer W, Böttiger BW et al. Cerebral resuscitation potentials for cardiac arrest. Crit Care Med 2002; 30 (Suppl 4): S140- S144. 6. Abe ...
CPR alone is unlikely to restart the heart; its main purpose is to restore partial flow of oxygenated blood to the brain and heart. The objective is to delay tissue death and to extend the brief window of opportunity for a successful resuscitation without permanent brain damage. Administration of an electric shock to the subjects heart, termed defibrillation, is usually needed in order to restore a viable or "perfusing" heart rhythm. Defibrillation is only effective for certain heart rhythms, namely ventricular fibrillation or pulseless ventricular tachycardia, rather than asystole or pulseless electrical activity. CPR may succeed in inducing a heart rhythm which may be shockable. CPR is generally continued until the patient has a return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) or is declared dead ...
The primary purpose of CPR is to maintain a flow of oxygenated blood to the brain and the heart. Effective CPR helps by delaying tissue death and provides an opportunity for a successful resuscitation without permanent brain damage if initiated quickly and effectively. Permanent cellular damage and death start to occur within 3 to 5 minutes of a cardiac arrest.. CPR buys time until the arrival of a defibrillator. A defibrillator is a device that delivers an electrical shock to the heart in an attempt to restore a normal heartbeat. Automated External Defibrillators (AEDs) can be found in many public places and are designed to be used by laypeople with no formal training.. Survival is greatly increased when CPR is started immediately. Roughly 300,000 individuals suffer cardiac arrest outside of a hospital each year in the United States. Only an estimated 6% of that 300,000 survive. Knowing how to perform CPR may make the difference between life and death.. ...
By AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION NEWS. Emergency dispatchers should be taught how to give compression-only CPR instructions over the phone, according to updated CPR guidelines for adults and children issued Tuesday by the American Heart Association.. Such coaching is provided by only half of the nations 911 dispatchers, a 2015 study shows.. During […]. ...
The Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada (HSF) is an international leader in developing the science behind cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and Emergency Cardiovascular Care (ECC) and is a leading funder of Heart and Stroke research in Canada. HSF is a founding member of and is the only Canadian delegate to the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR). HSF maintains a leadership role in resuscitation in Canada through its commitment to guideline development, providing the most current educational training, raising public awareness, advocacy, investment in research and the development of partnerships in support of a strong Chain of Survival™.. Heart and Strokes resuscitation legacy in Canada began in 1966 when training was given to medical, allied health and other professional personnel on the skill and use of CPR. In 1973, upon recommendation at the AHA Conference on CPR, CPR training was offered to the public. These courses not only taught the CPR skills, but also the ...
Echocardiography during preresuscitation care, cardiopulmonary resuscitation and postresuscitation is suggested to be an important tool in critical care medicine. At present a structured process integrating advanced life support and transtoracic echocardiography is not included in guidelines of cardiac resuscitation. However identification and treatment of reversible causes or complicating factors during cardiopulmonary resuscitation is rational and aimed to improve the outcomes. Furthermore, echocardiography has the potential to define the efficiency of the chest compressions and the optimal duration of the resuscitation maneuvers and/or the right time to switch to extracorporeal resuscitation.. ...
In this instructor-led course, students participate in simulated clinical scenarios. Students work with the BLS instructor to complete BLS skills practice and skills testing.
Despite the advances made in recent years, cardiac arrest in children carries a high mortality. In Spain, considerable progress has been made in its management,1 the dissemination of guidelines on paediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR)2 and training of clinical and non-clinical staff in basic and advanced CPR techniques.3 However, significant problems remain that hinder the appropriate prevention and management of cardiac arrest in children. In order to continue to improve outcomes, the survival chain must be implemented in a coordinated manner, and a key aspect in achieving this goal is to establish a structured approach to the management of cardiac arrest. The chain of survival must be adapted to the specific needs of each child and hospital.. To assess how the management of cardiac arrest is organised, the Spanish Group on Paediatric and Neonatal CPR (Grupo Español de Reanimación Cardiopulmonar Pediátrica y Neonatal [GERCPPyN]) developed a questionnaire on some aspects of its ...
In total, 106 adult patients were treated using an LTS-II/LTS-D. The main indication for placement was a difficult airway (75%, n=80), followed by cardiopulmonary resuscitation (25%, n=26) or an overlap between both (18%, n=19). In 94% of patients (n=100), users placed the laryngeal tube during the first attempt. In 93% of patients (n=98), the tube was placed within 30 seconds. A significant increase in SpO2 from 97% (0-100) to 99% (5-100) was observed in the whole population and in cardiopulmonary resuscitation patients. The average initial etCO2 of 39.5 mmHg (0-100 mmHg) decreased significantly to an average of 38.4 mmHg (10-62 mmHg) after 5 minutes. A comparison of cardiopulmonary resuscitation patients with non-cardiopulmonary resuscitation patients regarding gastric contents showed no significant difference. ...
Coronary perfusion pressure (CPP) refers to the pressure gradient that drives coronary blood pressure, meaning the difference between the diastolic aortic pressure and the right atrial end diastolic pressure. It is a term used mainly in research concerning cardiac arrest. In this context, it is assumed that the minimum CPP needed for a successful outcome is 15mm Hg. CPP is a part of normal blood pressure that is specifically responsible for coronary blood flow. CPP is also, generally, a surrogate term for coronary blood flow. During cardiac arrest, CPP is one of the most important variables associated with the likelihood of return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), the restoration of a pulse. A CPP of at least 15 mmHg is thought to be necessary for ROSC. Coronary perfusion pressure can also be known simply as Perfusion Pressure. Sutton; et al. (August 2014). "Hemodynamic-directed cardiopulmonary resuscitation during in-hospital cardiac arrest". Resuscitation. 85 (8): 983-986. ...
April 26, 2007 - ZOLL Medical Corp., manufacturer of resuscitation devices and related software solutions, announced today the release of a new model of the ZOLL AutoPulse Non-Invasive Cardiac Support Pump, which can document, store and upload device and patient data.. The new capability allows uploading of information from as many as four patients to ZOLL RescueNet Code Review or CodeNet software via an infrared communications port on the AutoPulse. The AutoPulse data is combined with manual CPR data, defibrillator and other resuscitation data in a user-friendly Code Summary format that can document virtually all CPR and resuscitation efforts over an entire event. Quality measures, such as CPR compression depth, rate and interruptions, as well as all AutoPulse use data, are all easily reviewed. In addition, its new on-screen timer enhances American Heart Association Guidelines compliance by allowing the user to see in real time the exact compression time, and, perhaps more importantly, ...
The University of California, San Diego (UCSD) Medical Center is using ZOLL technology as part of an innovative and very successful advanced resuscitation training program that emphasizes the importance of preventing interruptions in CPR. The UCSD hospitals use ZOLL defibrillators with Real CPR Help, CPR Dashboard, and ZOLLs industry-exclusive See-Thru CPR® technology, which reduces the duration of pauses in CPR by enabling providers to see the patients underlying cardiac rhythm during CPR. In addition, for post-code debriefing and training, the hospital uses RescueNet® Code Review.. Since implementing this program at UCSD hospitals in 2007, the incidence of cardiac arrest is down, and the survival-to-discharge rate among patients who do suffer cardiac arrest now approaches 50%, increasing from 21% to 45% (Figure 2).2 This improvement was documented in a seven-year study that ended in 2012.2 The same study found that the odds of surviving cardiac arrest with a good neurological outcome ...
This latest 2016 revision (3rd edition, 1st revision) of professional guidance on CPR decision-making is in response to public and professional debate about CPR decisions, and to recent statutory changes and legal judgments. The key ethical and legal principles that should inform all CPR decisions remain, but even greater emphasis has been placed on ensuring high-quality timely communication, decision-making and recording in relation to decisions about CPR. This guidance is issued jointly by the BMA, the Resuscitation Council (UK) and the Royal College of Nursing, and was previously known as the "Joint Statement".. ...
Continuous balloon occlusion of the descending aorta is an experimental method that may improve blood flow to the myocardium and the brain during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). The aim of the present investigation was to evaluate the effects of this intervention on haemodynamics and the frequency of restoration of spontaneous circulation. Ventricular fibrillation was induced in 39 anaesthetised piglets, followed by an 8-min non-intervention interval. In a haemodynamic study (n = 10), closed chest CPR was performed for 7 min before the intra-aortic balloon was inflated. This intervention increased mean arterial blood pressure by 20%, reduced cardiac output by 33%, increased coronary artery blood flow by 86%, and increased common carotid artery blood flow by 62%. All these changes were statistically significant. Administration of epinephrine further increased mean arterial blood pressure and coronary artery blood flow, while cardiac output and common carotid artery blood flow decreased. In a ...
The Resuscitation Council and partner Unit 9 took our breath away at this years awards with their LIFESAVER project. It was the first programme to pick up five awards in one evening, all awarded by different review panels. In a year when the standard of entries across the board had risen dramatically, this was no mean feat. So what was it about the project that caught the collective imaginations of this years judges?. An estimated 60,000 people each year in the UK have an out of hospital cardiac arrest. If a bystander is able to start CPR they double the persons chances of survival, but all too often, a bystander doesnt have the knowledge or confidence to help. As a result, the survival rate for out of hospital cardiac arrests is only 10%. The Lifesaver programme can help change this situation by providing participants with the confidence and knowledge to intervene in an emergency.. From inception to execution, this learning programme stands out from the crowd and has lessons to teach us ...
St John knows that bystanders having the confidence to take action when a person is in cardiac arrest can be the difference between a life saved or a life lost. Early intervention can increase a persons survivability by more than 50 per cent.. Monday, October 16 is Restart a Heart Day which is supported by St John and colleagues in Fire Emergency New Zealand, the Heart Foundation and Wellington Free Ambulance.. The Restart A Heart Day campaign, initiated by the European Resuscitation Council in 2013, was established to stem the international death toll from sudden cardiac arrest - estimated to be more than three million people every year.. Its widely accepted that the survival of many apparently healthy victims of sudden cardiac arrest, depends on CPR administered by bystanders in conjunction with early defibrillation.. Intervention within three to four minutes can increase the chance of patient survival by up to 50 per cent. [See patient story - Would-be passers-by key to doctors healthy ...
The overall results achieved by ambulance service staff in our study compare favourably with other systems in the United Kingdom, Europe, and North America. The overall rate of survival to hospital discharge of 14.9% for patients with witnessed cardiac arrest and a primary rhythm of ventricular fibrillation is higher than the national figure3 4 and is similar to values from other well established programmes.10. We have not shown any improvement in outcome with the presence of a paramedic after cardiac arrest occurring out of hospital. There were small nonsignificant differences between the two groups in the proportion of patients who presented in ventricular fibrillation, whose arrests were witnessed, and who received bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation. For all of these variables, however, the group treated by paramedics contained a higher proportion of patients who would be expected to have had a better prognosis.. The length of time at the scene of the arrest was significantly longer for ...
Olasveengen TM, de Caen AR, Mancini ME, Maconochie IK, Aickin R, Atkins DL, Berg RA, Bingham RM, Brooks SC, Castrén M, Chung SP, Considine J, Couto TB, Escalante R, Gazmuri RJ, Guerguerian AM, Hatanaka T, Koster RW, Kudenchuk PJ, Lang E, Lim SH, Løfgren B, Meaney PA, Montgomery WH, Morley PT, Morrison LJ, Nation KJ, Ng KC, Nadkarni VM, Nishiyama C, Nuthall G, Ong GY, Perkins GD, Reis AG, Ristagno G, Sakamoto T, Sayre MR, Schexnayder SM, Sierra AF, Singletary EM, Shimizu N, Smyth MA, Stanton D, Tijssen JA, Travers A, Vaillancourt C, Van de Voorde P, Hazinski MF, Nolan JP. 2017 International Consensus on Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care Science With Treatment Recommendations Summary. Circulation. 2017 12 05; 136(23):e424-e440 ...
The experienced staff at Medical Emergency Training offer a wide variety of resuscitation courses for both the healthcare setting and commercial businesses:. Adult & Paediatric Basic Life Support. Automated External Defibrillation (AED) Training. Qualsafe Awards First Aid Courses. Medical Emergencies & Intramuscular Injection. 12-Lead ECG Recording and interpretation. C-Spine Immobilisation Training. Scenario Practice & Staff Debrief. We cover Yorkshire and the Midlands areas and boast over 10 years experience of teaching resuscitation. Our courses are interactive and informative; based on the current Resuscitation Council (UK) 2010 guidelines. A certificate will be issued to all thoses attending the training course.. We offer GP training to all newly formed Clinical Commissioning Groups. Please take a look at the section within the site.. All training is conducted by experienced Resuscitation Advisers who are trained at the highest level of Resuscitation Council (UK) advanced courses. All our ...
믺굯 심잜 혐횊 (AHA)늏 즼낛 8월 15읺, 2019녌 1월뵿턳 신햊핓늏 심폎 솈샡숣 싫슴 관젖엔섙늏 피드백 즼신 잜칖읙 삪욧읃 핇수욑거윸롟 핞닧곟 받푞햊슴닆닧. 읺 잜칖릀 톸해섙 핓샡드윸 각슴 앏밐 솈돆왃 깃읺, 귵릭곟 솓윀칖 듲읺 옭밐릀즼엔 닾해 신첯각저읺 아낱왃 폃각릀 받읃 수 자슴닆닧.. 믺굯엔섙늏 매녌 350,000 거 읺샀읙 심젖즼각 볍웓 받엔섙 받샡핓곟 자곟, 읺드 줕 단 46 %읙 홝자많읺 저묲 굯긋닾각 현잜엔 돆찪핓긷 저깎즼 CPR읃 받곟 자슴닆닧. CPR윸 홝자읙 솈샡 각능섯읃 둖 백 똈늏 섺 백깎즼 늚릸 수 자슴닆닧.. On. Aug. 15, the American Heart Association (AHA) announced CPR training courses will require use of an instrumented directive feedback device, effective Jan. 39, 2019. Using the devices, students receive audiovisual evaluation and corrective instruction on chest compression rate, depth and proper hand ...
Hans Friberg, MD, PhD is a Professor of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine at Lund University and a Senior Consultant at Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden. Dr Friberg did his PhD-work at the Laboratory of Experimental Brain Research at Lund University, where he studied brain injury, mitochondrial dysfunction and the mitochondrial permeability transition pore in rodent models of global and focal brain ischemia.. His present research area is post-resuscitation care and temperature management after cardiac arrest and he was the senior author of the Target Temperature Management after cardiac arrest trial (TTM-trial). His research field includes assessment of brain injury and prognosis after cardiac arrest and he is a co-author of the European Resuscitation Council guidelines on this topic. He was an initiator of the Hypothermia Network which has become the International Cardiac Arrest Registry (INTCAR), a transatlantic research collaboration with more than 6000 registered patients. ...
Commenting on the study, European Society of Cardiology (ESC) spokesperson, Professor Gerasimos Filippatos from Athens University Hospital Attikon (Greece) said: "This paper is important because it proves what we have suspected (and intuitively recommended) all along, that the management of cardiac arrest should be different in children." The majority of cardiac arrests in adults have a cardiac origin, he said, while in children non cardiac causes are far more common. "The study shows clearly that when children experience an out of hospital cardiac arrest, both their circulation and respiration need to be supported. Such rescue breaths should remain a key feature of paediatric guidelines," said Professor Filippatos, adding that the study also made the important point that the results of studies in adult populations cannot be extrapolated directly to children.. Last year the American Heart Association (AHA) said that if a bystander is not trained in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), they ...
The use of adrenaline in cardiac arrest resuscitation has been advocated since the 1960s. Laboratory studies and anecdotal experience showed improved rates of return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) with the use of adrenaline at a dosage of approximately 0.01 mg/kg. This led to the widespread adoption of adrenaline administration during cardiac arrest into every resuscitation guideline for decades to come. Extensive laboratory studies characterized the beneficial physiological effects of adrenaline during cardiac arrest and closed-chest cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CC-CPR). Adrenaline administered during CC-CPR results in peripheral arterial vasoconstriction that raises the aortic pressure, particularly during the relaxation phase of CC-CPR. This increase in aortic pressure results in an increased aortic to right atrial pressure gradient that drives blood flow to the myocardium during CC-CPR. This pressure gradient is known as the coronary perfusion pressure (CPP) and has been shown to ...
Among patients who experienced in-hospital cardiac arrest requiring vasopressors (drugs that increase blood pressure), use of a combination therapy during cardiopulmonary resuscitation resulted in improved survival to hospital discharge with favorable neurological status, according to a study in the July 17 issue of JAMA.. "Neurological outcome after cardiac arrest has been the main end point of several randomized clinical trials (RCTs). Neurologically favorable survival differs from overall survival. Among cardiac arrest survivors, the prevalence of severe cerebral disability or vegetative state ranges from 25 percent to 50 percent. In a previous single-center RCT, combined vasopressin-epinephrine during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and corticosteroid supplementation during and after CPR vs. epinephrine [adrenaline] alone during CPR and no steroids resulted in improved overall survival to hospital discharge," according to background information in the article. "However, this preliminary ...
Background. Ventricular fibrillation (VF) is considered the out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OOHCA) rhythm with the highest likelihood of neurologically intact survival. Unfortunately, there are occasions when VF does not respond to standard defibrillatory shocks. Current American Heart Association (AHA) guidelines acknowledge that the data are insufficient in determining the optimal pad placement, waveform, or energy level that produce the best conversion rates from OOHCA with VF.. Objective. To describe a technique of double sequential external defibrillation (DSED) for cases of refractory VF (RVF) during OOHCA resuscitation.. Methods. A retrospective case series was performed in an urban/suburban emergency medical services (EMS) system with advanced life support care and a population of 900,000. Included were all adult OOHCAs having RVF during resuscitation efforts by EMS providers. RVF was defined as persistent VF following at least 5 unsuccessful single shocks, epinephrine administration, ...
Check for a pulse by feeling for 5-10 seconds at side of the victims neck.. If there is a pulse but the victim is not breathing, give breaths at rate of 1 breath every 5 seconds (12 breaths a minute). If there is no pulse, begin chest compressions as follows. The compressions will pump blood around manually until a defibrillator is available to restart the heart: Place victim flat on his or her back on a hard surface. Kneel next to the victims chest. To find the correct hand position, place the heel of the hand closest to the feet on the lower part of the ribcage. Place your other hand on top of the first. You can either interlace your fingers or keep them straight, but to avoid injuring the ribs, only the heel of your hand should touch the chest. Shift your weight forward on your knees until your shoulders are directly over your hands and your elbows are locked. Bear down and then come up, bear down and come up, keeping your elbows locked. In order to create enough pressure to circulate the ...
The idea is that this system will perform CPR properly for a much longer time than a human rescuer can provide. CPR training, since its inception, has relied on the skill and the memory of the provider. Unfortunately many who end up performing CPR are individuals with minimal medical training and in the confusion and panic of the moment often dont provide CPR correctly. The AutoPulse can hopefully help eliminate that problem from the treatment loop ...
Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is a major cause of death worldwide. This systematic review aimed to assess the effects of continuous chest compression CPR (with or without rescue breathing) versus conventional CPR plus rescue breathing (interrupted chest compression with pauses for breaths) of non-asphyxial OHCA. It identified 4 randomized controlled trials. Three studies assessed CPR provided by untrained bystanders and 1 assessed CPR provided by trained professionals. When CPR was performed by bystanders, survival to hospital discharge was higher with chest compression alone than with interrupted chest compression with pauses for rescue breathing. When CPR was performed by professionals, survival to hospital discharge was slightly lower with continuous chest compressions plus asynchronous rescue breathing compared with interrupted chest compression plus rescue breathing. The number of people who survived to hospital admission was slightly higher in those treated with interrupted chest ...
Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) is a course developed by the American Heart Association for the training of health care providers. It emphasizes the knowledge and skills necessary to provide the appropriate early treatment for cardiopulmonary arrest. Additional important areas of emphasis include the proper management of situations likely to lead to cardiac arrest and the stabilization of the patient in the early period following a successful resuscitation. ACLS includes, the use of adjunctive equipment and special techniques for establishing and maintaining effective ventilation and circulation. In addition, this program teaches how to treat the patient with suspected acute myocardial infarction and stroke. Upon successful completion, participants will be granted an ACLS provider card through the American Heart Association. Provider status is valid for two years, and a renewal course is required to remain an ACLS provider.. ...
Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) - Salary - Get a free salary comparison based on job title, skills, experience and education. Accurate, reliable salary and compensation comparisons for United Arab Emirates
Critical care nurses are registered nurses who have specialized training which prepares them to provide care to patients with life threatening illnesses, injuries or complex medical issues. Intensive care unit nurses work in specialized units; however some use their expertise to provide educational services to patients rehabilitating from critical health problems. New graduate nurses are not usually hired directly into critical care units. Most employers require that nurses applying to work in critical care areas have a minimum of one to two years of general nursing experience prior to being considered for employment in intensive care.. Intensive care nurses are required to have certification in Advanced Cardiac Life Support. Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) training prepares nurses and other health care providers to provide emergency care to patients suffering from cardiac arrest, life threatening cardiac arrhythmias, and other medical emergencies.. Critical care nurses need to be ...
Looking for online definition of pediatric advanced life support in the Medical Dictionary? pediatric advanced life support explanation free. What is pediatric advanced life support? Meaning of pediatric advanced life support medical term. What does pediatric advanced life support mean?
Acute Medical Emergencies is based on the popular Advanced Life Support Group course MedicALS (Medical Advanced Life Support) and is an invaluable resource for all doctors dealing with medical emergencies.This comprehensive guide deals with the medical aspects of diagnosis and treatment of acute emergencies. Its structured approach teaches the novice how to assess and recognise a patient in an acute condition, and how to interpret vital symptoms such as breathlessness and chest or abdominal pain.There are separate sections on interpretation of investigations, and procedures for managing the emergency. It covers procedures for acute emergencies occurring anywhere - on hospital wards or beyond. The clarity of the text, including simple line illustrations, ensure its tried and tested procedures provide clear, concise advice on recognition and management of medical emergencies.
Dr. Eitan Gross is board certified with the American Dental Board of Anesthesiology and is an active member of the American Society of Dentist Anesthesiologists. Dr. Gross has completed extensive post-doctoral training in anesthesiology in one of the most respected dental anesthesia residency programs in the country. He is licensed by the State of Florida to provide general anesthesia and is required to maintain continuing education in anesthesia, advanced cardiac life support, and pediatric advanced life support.. Florida Dental Anesthesia Services provides in-office sedation and anesthesia for patients undergoing dental procedures. We work with many dentists in South Florida. Whether it is a young toddler needing extensive dental treatment or an adult who would just like the option of sleeping peacefully through their dental procedure, we can help. If your dentist is not currently working with Florida Dental Anesthesia Services, we would be glad to discuss our in-office anesthesia services ...
CHAPTER 420-2-1 ALABAMA EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES RULES 420-2-1-.02 Definitions. The following definitions apply to these rules:. (1) Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS). The course of instruction of the same title developed and sponsored by the American Heart Association.. (2) Advanced Life Support (ALS). The treatment of potentially life-threatening medical emergencies through the use of invasive medical techniques specified as advanced life support techniques in these rules, which ordinarily would be performed or provided by physicians, but which may be performed by emergency medical technicians pursuant to these rules.. (3) Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS). The course of instruction of the same title developed and sponsored by the American College of Surgeons.. (4) Advisory Board. The twenty-six member Advisory Board authorized by the Code of Alabama, 1975, 22-18-5, to assist in the establishment of rules necessary to carry out the provisions of said Act.. (5) The Alabama Department of ...
Keith Grey, 41, was working out in his gym when he suffered a cardiac arrest in October last year.. Luckily for primary schoolteacher Keith, the staff at the Central YMCA Club, Bloomsbury, had been trained by the London Ambulance Service in basic life support and how to use a defibrillator.. The gym has a public-access defibrillator which was partly funded by the British Heart Foundation.. Gym staff immediately recognised Keiths symptoms, called 999 for an ambulance and began basic life support.. They shocked his heart with the defibrillator and his heartbeat returned.. A motorcycle paramedic, ambulance crew and single responder arrived soon afterwards and provided advanced life support. Keith was taken to University College Hospital for further treatment.. Keith was diagnosed with an irregular heart rhythm and fitted with an internal cardioverter defibrillator. He was back at work in the New Year.. Central YMCA Club Director Barry Cronin said: "With an average of 1,000 people using Central ...

A medical drama in the classroom | Sci-EdA medical drama in the classroom | Sci-Ed

Cardiopulmonary resuscitation on television. Miracles and misinformation. N Engl J Med.1996;334:1578-1582. ...
more infohttp://blogs.plos.org/scied/2014/01/13/a-medical-drama-in-the-classroom/

Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) - AsanteAdvanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) - Asante

2018 Neonatal Resuscitation Program (NRP) The NRP course is designed specifically for healthcare providers who need an American ... ACLS is designed for healthcare professionals who either direct or participate in the management of cardiopulmonary arrest and ... Demonstrate effective communication as a member or leader of a resuscitation team and recognize the impact of team dynamics on ... It emphasizes the knowledge and skills necessary to provide the appropriate early treatment for cardiopulmonary arrest. ...
more infohttps://www.asante.org/classes-events/event-details/?eventId=8c4df73b-4130-e211-8842-001cc4150de6

Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) Recertification - The Michener InstituteAdvanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) Recertification - The Michener Institute

Demonstrate effective communication as a member or leader of a resuscitation team and recognize the impact of team dynamics on ... Knowledge of primary pharmacology specific to cardiopulmonary emergencies. *Registration with Heart and Stroke for your Heart ... Recognize and initiate early management of periarrest conditions that may result in cardiac arrest or complicate resuscitation ... Recognize and manage cardiac arrest until termination of resuscitation or transfer of care, including immediate post-cardiac ...
more infohttp://michener.ca/ce_course/advanced-cardiac-life-support-acls-recertification/

Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation - WikipediaExtracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation - Wikipedia

Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (commonly known as ECPR) is a method of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) that ... Similar to the concept of elective cardiopulmonary bypass, used in open heart surgery, oxygenation and perfusion can be ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Extracorporeal_cardiopulmonary_resuscitation

Cardiopulmonary resuscitation - WikipediaCardiopulmonary resuscitation - Wikipedia

"Skeletal chest injuries secondary to cardiopulmonary resuscitation". Resuscitation. 63 (3): 327-38. doi:10.1016/j.resuscitation ... July 2013). "Cardiopulmonary resuscitation quality: [corrected] improving cardiac resuscitation outcomes both inside and ... "Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. The Cerebral Resuscitation Study Group". ... "Chest injuries after active compression-decompression cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ACD-CPR) in cadavers". Resuscitation. 43 ( ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cardiopulmonary_resuscitation

cardiopulmonary resuscitation - Everything2.comcardiopulmonary resuscitation - Everything2.com

Everything2 is a community for fiction, nonfiction, poetry, reviews, and more. Get writing help or enjoy nearly a half million pieces of original writing.
more infohttps://everything2.com/title/cardiopulmonary+resuscitation

New cardiopulmonary resuscitation | The..."New" cardiopulmonary resuscitation | The...

"New" cardiopulmonary resuscitation Br Med J (Clin Res Ed) 1981; 282 :1318 ... "New" cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Br Med J (Clin Res Ed) 1981; 282 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.282.6272.1318-b ( ...
more infohttp://www.bmj.com/content/282/6272/1318.3

RCW 28A.230.179: Cardiopulmonary resuscitation instruction.RCW 28A.230.179: Cardiopulmonary resuscitation instruction.

Cardiopulmonary resuscitation instruction.. (1) Each school district that operates a high school must offer instruction in ... 2) Instruction in cardiopulmonary resuscitation under this section must:. (a) Be an instructional program developed by the ... When administered immediately, cardiopulmonary resuscitation doubles or triples survival rates from cardiac arrest. Sudden ... Beginning with the 2013-14 school year, instruction in cardiopulmonary resuscitation must be included in at least one health ...
more infohttps://apps.leg.wa.gov/rcw/default.aspx?cite=28A.230.179

Cardiopulmonary resuscitation by American Red Cross | LibraryThingCardiopulmonary resuscitation by American Red Cross | LibraryThing

All about Cardiopulmonary resuscitation by American Red Cross. LibraryThing is a cataloging and social networking site for ... Cardiopulmonary resuscitation. by American Red Cross. Series: Clinical Symposia by Ciba-Geigy (26.5). ... 0269 (1) cardiopulmonary resuscitaton (1) emergency care (1) first aid (4) health (4) heart (1) illustrated (1) journal (1) ...
more infohttp://www.librarything.com/work/789617

Cardiopulmonary ResuscitationCardiopulmonary Resuscitation

For neonatal resuscitation please refer to newborn resuscitation guidelines. For adult resuscitation please refer to Adult CPR ... Resuscitation Guidelines 2010. www.resus.org.au. New Zealand Resuscitation Council. Resuscitation Guidelines 2010 www.nzrc.org. ... Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation. This document is only valid for the day on which it is accessed. Please read our disclaimer. ... Consultants attending a resuscitation must make it clear to their respective registrar, who is running the resuscitation. If ...
more infohttps://www.starship.org.nz/for-health-professionals/starship-clinical-guidelines/v/ventricular-tachycardia-vt-pulseless/

Appraisal of pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation | CMAJAppraisal of pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation | CMAJ

Appraisal of pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation. R. M. Friesen, P. Duncan, W. A. Tweed and G. Bristow ... Part 13: Pediatric Basic Life Support: 2010 American Heart Association Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and ... 2005 American Heart Association (AHA) Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) and Emergency Cardiovascular Care (ECC ... A Prospective Investigation Into the Epidemiology of In-Hospital Pediatric Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Using the ...
more infohttps://www.cmaj.ca/content/126/9/1055/tab-e-letters

Cardiopulmonary resuscitation | Define Cardiopulmonary resuscitation at Dictionary.comCardiopulmonary resuscitation | Define Cardiopulmonary resuscitation at Dictionary.com

Cardiopulmonary resuscitation definition, emergency procedure for reviving heart and lung function, involving special physical ... cardiopulmonary resuscitation in Medicine Expand. cardiopulmonary resuscitation n. Abbr. CPR Restoration of cardiac output and ... cardiopulmonary resuscitation in Culture Expand. cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) [(kahr-dee-oh- pool-muh-nair-ee ri-sus-i- ... cardiopulmonary resuscitation. noun 1. an emergency measure to revive a patient whose heart has stopped beating, in which ...
more infohttp://www.dictionary.com/browse/cardiopulmonary-resuscitation

CPR | Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation | MedlinePlusCPR | Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation | MedlinePlus

... cardiopulmonary resuscitation) is an emergency technique used on someone whose heart or breathing has stopped. Learn it; you ... Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR): First Aid (Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research) Also in Spanish ... If you know how to perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), you could save a life. CPR is an emergency procedure for a ... Article: International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation: COVID-19 consensus on science, treatment recommendations... ...
more infohttps://medlineplus.gov/cpr.html

cardiopulmonary resuscitation Archivescardiopulmonary resuscitation Archives

English News in Spain * Costa del Sol * Costa Blanca * Costa de Almeria * Axarquia * Costa Tropical * Mallorca * Gibraltar * Canary Islands * Lifestyle * Columnists * FREE printed edition 580.667 copies per month
more infohttps://www.euroweeklynews.com/tag/cardiopulmonary-resuscitation/

Global Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation CPR Market ResearchGlobal Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation CPR Market Research

... Report forecasted to 2022 - published on openPR.com ... 1 Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation CPR Market Overview. 1.1 Product Overview and Scope of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation CPR. 1.2 ... 2.5.1 Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation CPR Market Concentration Rate. 2.5.2 Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation CPR Market Share of Top ... 1.4 Global Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation CPR Market by Region (2012-2022). 1.4.1 Global Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation CPR ...
more infohttps://www.openpr.com/news/765860/global-cardiopulmonary-resuscitation-cpr-market-research-report-forecasted-to-2022.html

Cardiopulmonary resuscitation: who makes the decision? | The BMJCardiopulmonary resuscitation: who makes the decision? | The BMJ

Age and other determinants of survival after in-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation.Q J Med1991;296:1005-10. ... Withholding cardiopulmonary resuscitation; proposals for formal guidelines.BMJ1993;306:1593-6. ... Recent guidelines suggested that cardiopulmonary resuscitation should not be given (a) when a patient competent to give ... Results of survey of 100 general medical inpatients about cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Values are numbers (percentages) of ...
more infohttps://www.bmj.com/content/308/6945/1677.1?ijkey=65384871fc0c040454a79401bf584a9c125c8a3a&keytype2=tf_ipsecsha

CPR or Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation | Cleveland ClinicCPR or Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation | Cleveland Clinic

Learn about cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) from experts at Cleveland Clinic. Discover how to do hands-only CPR (chest ... What is cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR)?. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a way to save the life of someone who is ... Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) can save the life of someone who is in cardiac arrest. ...
more infohttps://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/articles/17680-cardiopulmonary-resuscitation-cpr

Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) overview --Doctors LoungeCardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) overview --Doctors Lounge

CPR or cardiopulmonary resuscitation is an emergency first aid procedure used to help a person who has lost their pulse and ... Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) overview. Published: June 21, 2009. Updated: July 04, 2009 ... The Resuscitation Council also says: "Only stop to recheck for signs of a circulation if the victim makes a movement or takes a ... Current advice (at least in the United Kingdom: from the Resuscitation Council (UK), and from the current First aid manual (8th ...
more infohttps://www.doctorslounge.com/index.php/reference/procedures/80

Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiac Care | CirculationCardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiac Care | Circulation

Improving Neonatal Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation HemodynamicsAre Sustained Inflations During Compressions the Answer? Myra H. ... Performance Goals for Dispatcher-Assisted Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Joseph P. Ornato. Circulation. 2013;128:1490-1491, ... Dispatcher-Assisted Cardiopulmonary ResuscitationClinical PerspectiveTime to Identify Cardiac Arrest and Deliver Chest ... Letter by Xue et al Regarding Article, "Duration of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Illness Category Impact Survival and ...
more infohttp://circ.ahajournals.org/collection/cardiopulmonary-resuscitation-and-emergency-cardiac-care?page=7

Respiration, Artificial[MeSH] AND Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation[Me - PubMed - NCBI"Respiration, Artificial"[MeSH] AND "Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation"[Me - PubMed - NCBI

Ventilation during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in children: a survey on clinical practice.. González R, Pascual L, Sava A, ... Effect of one-lung ventilation on end-tidal carbon dioxide during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a pig model of cardiac ... Development of a decision aid for cardiopulmonary resuscitation and invasive mechanical ventilation in the intensive care unit ... face-mask ventilation during cardiopulmonary resuscitation - a multicenter prospective randomized trial.. Fiala A, Lederer W, ...
more infohttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?db=PubMed&cmd=Search&term=%22Respiration,+Artificial%22%5BMeSH%5D+AND+%22Cardiopulmonary+Resuscitation%22%5BMeSH%5D

Papillary Muscle Infarction After Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation | CirculationPapillary Muscle Infarction After Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation | Circulation

The influence of cardiopulmonary resuscitation without defibrillation on serum levels of cardiac enzymes: a time course study ... Papillary Muscle Infarction After Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation. Pier Giorgio Masci, Steven Dymarkowski, Jan Bogaert ... Basic and advanced cardiopulmonary resuscitation were successfully accomplished. During hospitalization, cardiac troponin I ... Resuscitation from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: implications for cardiac enzyme estimation. Resuscitation. 1996; 33: 35-41. ...
more infohttp://circ.ahajournals.org/content/116/8/e308

Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) - NCHACardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) - NCHA

Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR). A medical procedure involving repeated compression of a patients chest, performed in an ...
more infohttps://www.ncha.org/glossary/cardiopulmonary-resuscitation/

Irrational Exuberance: Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation as Fetish					Irrational Exuberance: Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation as Fetish

Irrational Exuberance: Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation as Fetish Philip M. Rosoff & Lawrence J. Schneiderman. More ... to expand the performance of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in response to out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Widespread ... based upon extolling the virtues of rapid initiation of resuscitation, untempered by information about the often distressing ...
more infohttp://www.bioethics.net/articles/irrational-exuberance-cardiopulmonary-resuscitation-as-fetish/

A Reliable Method for Rhythm Analysis during Cardiopulmonary ResuscitationA Reliable Method for Rhythm Analysis during Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

... U. Ayala,1 U. Irusta,1 J. Ruiz,1 T. Eftestøl,2 J. ... "Detection of ventricular fibrillation in the presence of cardiopulmonary resuscitation artefacts," Resuscitation, vol. 72, no. ... European Resuscitation Council, Australian Resuscitation Council, New Zealand Resuscitation Council, Heart and Stroke ... "European Resuscitation Council Guidelines for resuscitation 2010 section 4. Adult advanced life support," Resuscitation, vol. ...
more infohttps://www.hindawi.com/journals/bmri/2014/872470/

Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation - Nina Godson; Kelly Ryan; | Foyles BookstoreCardiopulmonary Resuscitation - Nina Godson; Kelly Ryan; | Foyles Bookstore

Do you need guidance and information on CPR? Do you need to understand the procedures and guidelines that govern the use of CPR? If you do, this pocket-sized reference guide provides you with all the information you need to conduct CPR safely and successfully. The Nursing & Health Survival Guides have evolved - take a look at our our app for iPhone and iPad.
more infohttps://www.foyles.co.uk/witem/medical-veterinary/nursing-health-survival-guide,nina-godson-kelly-ryan-9780273744023
  • Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation, commonly known as CPR, is a life-saving measure that is performed to restore breathing and circulation in a patient who has no pulse and is no longer breathing. (scribd.com)
  • Cardiopulmonary resuscitation(CPR) is the key to success for high-quality early cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and its success in the restoration of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), therefore, monitoring the quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation and early identification ROSC is very important. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Calcified myocardial necrosis in pediatric patients after cardiopulmonary resuscitation. (biomedsearch.com)
  • We report three autopsy cases of wide-spread myocardial necrosis with calcification in pediatric patients after temporary generalized hypoxia and initially successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation, but subsequent in-hospital death. (biomedsearch.com)
  • In addition, not only does ECPR provide possibly desirable cardiopulmonary rest, but also ECPR may be used to bridge patients to subsequent orthotopic heart transplantation [ 2 , 16 , 17 ] or a ventricular assist device [ 16 ]. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • The sight of emergency medical personnel pushing against the chest of a heart attack victim may become a thing of the past if a new method of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) proves successful in expanded trials. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Similar to the concept of elective cardiopulmonary bypass, used in open heart surgery, oxygenation and perfusion can be maintained with an ECMO device in patients undergoing cardiovascular collapse. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is administered when someone's breathing or pulse stops. (nyhq.org)
  • Results of survey of 100 general medical inpatients about cardiopulmonary resuscitation. (bmj.com)
  • If you know how to perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), you could save a life. (medlineplus.gov)
  • This research study is titled as "Global Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation CPR Market" 2017 which presents an in-depth study about the production, consumption, market volume, revenue (million USD) and market share across different geographical regions. (openpr.com)
  • A new study suggests that television shows depict cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) as an unrealistically effective procedure. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Van Hoeyweghen R, Mullie A, Bossaert L. Decision making in continuing or cease cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), cerebral resuscitation study group. (springer.com)
  • We are very grateful to Dr. Nalini Prabhu, MD and Dr. V. Dedeepiya Devaprasad, MD, DNB, IDCC of the Critical Care department, Apollo Hospitals, who participated in the resuscitation of this patient. (springer.com)
  • If there are no extenuating circumstances such as a request from the patient to maintain life so that some final business can be concluded or family visit accomplished, then there appears to be no ethical problem with allowing the patient to die without attempted resuscitation. (cbhd.org)
  • A recent article raised the issue of whether cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is currently being performed in the most effective manner. (cbhd.org)
  • Cardiopulmonary resuscitation: who makes the decision? (bmj.com)
  • Senior Deputy Greg Margetin, who was in the area, administered cardiopulmonary resuscitation on the child, who was not breathing. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • In April 2002, a task force of the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR) met in Melbourne, Australia, to review worldwide experience with the Utstein definitions and reporting templates. (ahajournals.org)
  • The pdf Advances in Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation under-reporting problem has understood. (moclips.org)