Cardiomyopathies: A group of diseases in which the dominant feature is the involvement of the CARDIAC MUSCLE itself. Cardiomyopathies are classified according to their predominant pathophysiological features (DILATED CARDIOMYOPATHY; HYPERTROPHIC CARDIOMYOPATHY; RESTRICTIVE CARDIOMYOPATHY) or their etiological/pathological factors (CARDIOMYOPATHY, ALCOHOLIC; ENDOCARDIAL FIBROELASTOSIS).Cardiomyopathy, Restrictive: A form of CARDIAC MUSCLE disease in which the ventricular walls are excessively rigid, impeding ventricular filling. It is marked by reduced diastolic volume of either or both ventricles but normal or nearly normal systolic function. It may be idiopathic or associated with other diseases (ENDOMYOCARDIAL FIBROSIS or AMYLOIDOSIS) causing interstitial fibrosis.Cardiomyopathy, Dilated: A form of CARDIAC MUSCLE disease that is characterized by ventricular dilation, VENTRICULAR DYSFUNCTION, and HEART FAILURE. Risk factors include SMOKING; ALCOHOL DRINKING; HYPERTENSION; INFECTION; PREGNANCY; and mutations in the LMNA gene encoding LAMIN TYPE A, a NUCLEAR LAMINA protein.Cardiomyopathy, Hypertrophic: A form of CARDIAC MUSCLE disease, characterized by left and/or right ventricular hypertrophy (HYPERTROPHY, LEFT VENTRICULAR; HYPERTROPHY, RIGHT VENTRICULAR), frequent asymmetrical involvement of the HEART SEPTUM, and normal or reduced left ventricular volume. Risk factors include HYPERTENSION; AORTIC STENOSIS; and gene MUTATION; (FAMILIAL HYPERTROPHIC CARDIOMYOPATHY).Cardiomyopathy, Hypertrophic, Familial: An autosomal dominant inherited form of HYPERTROPHIC CARDIOMYOPATHY. It results from any of more than 50 mutations involving genes encoding contractile proteins such as VENTRICULAR MYOSINS; cardiac TROPONIN T; ALPHA-TROPOMYOSIN.Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Dysplasia: A congenital cardiomyopathy that is characterized by infiltration of adipose and fibrous tissue into the RIGHT VENTRICLE wall and loss of myocardial cells. Primary injuries usually are at the free wall of right ventricular and right atria resulting in ventricular and supraventricular arrhythmias.Myocardium: The muscle tissue of the HEART. It is composed of striated, involuntary muscle cells (MYOCYTES, CARDIAC) connected to form the contractile pump to generate blood flow.Chagas Cardiomyopathy: A disease of the CARDIAC MUSCLE developed subsequent to the initial protozoan infection by TRYPANOSOMA CRUZI. After infection, less than 10% develop acute illness such as MYOCARDITIS (mostly in children). The disease then enters a latent phase without clinical symptoms until about 20 years later. Myocardial symptoms of advanced CHAGAS DISEASE include conduction defects (HEART BLOCK) and CARDIOMEGALY.Isolated Noncompaction of the Ventricular Myocardium: Rare congenital cardiomyopathies characterized by the lack of left ventricular myocardium compaction. The noncompaction results in numerous prominent trabeculations and a loose myocardial meshwork (spongy myocardium) in the LEFT VENTRICLE. Heterogeneous clinical features include diminished systolic function sometimes associated with left ventricular dilation, that presents either neonatally or progressively. Often, the RIGHT VENTRICLE is also affected. CONGESTIVE HEART FAILURE; PULMONARY EMBOLISM; and ventricular ARRHYTHMIA are commonly seen.Sarcomeres: The repeating contractile units of the MYOFIBRIL, delimited by Z bands along its length.Myocarditis: Inflammatory processes of the muscular walls of the heart (MYOCARDIUM) which result in injury to the cardiac muscle cells (MYOCYTES, CARDIAC). Manifestations range from subclinical to sudden death (DEATH, SUDDEN). Myocarditis in association with cardiac dysfunction is classified as inflammatory CARDIOMYOPATHY usually caused by INFECTION, autoimmune diseases, or responses to toxic substances. Myocarditis is also a common cause of DILATED CARDIOMYOPATHY and other cardiomyopathies.Cardiac Myosins: Myosin type II isoforms found in cardiac muscle.Heart Diseases: Pathological conditions involving the HEART including its structural and functional abnormalities.Myocytes, Cardiac: Striated muscle cells found in the heart. They are derived from cardiac myoblasts (MYOBLASTS, CARDIAC).Arrhythmias, Cardiac: Any disturbances of the normal rhythmic beating of the heart or MYOCARDIAL CONTRACTION. Cardiac arrhythmias can be classified by the abnormalities in HEART RATE, disorders of electrical impulse generation, or impulse conduction.Desmin: An intermediate filament protein found predominantly in smooth, skeletal, and cardiac muscle cells. Localized at the Z line. MW 50,000 to 55,000 is species dependent.Genetic Testing: Detection of a MUTATION; GENOTYPE; KARYOTYPE; or specific ALLELES associated with genetic traits, heritable diseases, or predisposition to a disease, or that may lead to the disease in descendants. It includes prenatal genetic testing.Mitochondrial Diseases: Diseases caused by abnormal function of the MITOCHONDRIA. They may be caused by mutations, acquired or inherited, in mitochondrial DNA or in nuclear genes that code for mitochondrial components. They may also be the result of acquired mitochondria dysfunction due to adverse effects of drugs, infections, or other environmental causes.Death, Sudden, Cardiac: Unexpected rapid natural death due to cardiovascular collapse within one hour of initial symptoms. It is usually caused by the worsening of existing heart diseases. The sudden onset of symptoms, such as CHEST PAIN and CARDIAC ARRHYTHMIAS, particularly VENTRICULAR TACHYCARDIA, can lead to the loss of consciousness and cardiac arrest followed by biological death. (from Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine, 7th ed., 2005)Endomyocardial Fibrosis: A condition characterized by the thickening of the ventricular ENDOCARDIUM and subendocardium (MYOCARDIUM), seen mostly in children and young adults in the TROPICAL CLIMATE. The fibrous tissue extends from the apex toward and often involves the HEART VALVES causing restrictive blood flow into the respective ventricles (CARDIOMYOPATHY, RESTRICTIVE).Heart Ventricles: The lower right and left chambers of the heart. The right ventricle pumps venous BLOOD into the LUNGS and the left ventricle pumps oxygenated blood into the systemic arterial circulation.Heart Failure: A heterogeneous condition in which the heart is unable to pump out sufficient blood to meet the metabolic need of the body. Heart failure can be caused by structural defects, functional abnormalities (VENTRICULAR DYSFUNCTION), or a sudden overload beyond its capacity. Chronic heart failure is more common than acute heart failure which results from sudden insult to cardiac function, such as MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Cardiomegaly: Enlargement of the HEART, usually indicated by a cardiothoracic ratio above 0.50. Heart enlargement may involve the right, the left, or both HEART VENTRICLES or HEART ATRIA. Cardiomegaly is a nonspecific symptom seen in patients with chronic systolic heart failure (HEART FAILURE) or several forms of CARDIOMYOPATHIES.Sarcoglycans: A family of transmembrane dystrophin-associated proteins that play a role in the membrane association of the DYSTROPHIN-ASSOCIATED PROTEIN COMPLEX.Echocardiography: Ultrasonic recording of the size, motion, and composition of the heart and surrounding tissues. The standard approach is transthoracic.Troponin T: One of the three polypeptide chains that make up the TROPONIN complex. It is a cardiac-specific protein that binds to TROPOMYOSIN. It is released from damaged or injured heart muscle cells (MYOCYTES, CARDIAC). Defects in the gene encoding troponin T result in FAMILIAL HYPERTROPHIC CARDIOMYOPATHY.Heart: The hollow, muscular organ that maintains the circulation of the blood.Mitochondria, Heart: The mitochondria of the myocardium.Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Cine: A type of imaging technique used primarily in the field of cardiology. By coordinating the fast gradient-echo MRI sequence with retrospective ECG-gating, numerous short time frames evenly spaced in the cardiac cycle are produced. These images are laced together in a cinematic display so that wall motion of the ventricles, valve motion, and blood flow patterns in the heart and great vessels can be visualized.Myosin Heavy Chains: The larger subunits of MYOSINS. The heavy chains have a molecular weight of about 230 kDa and each heavy chain is usually associated with a dissimilar pair of MYOSIN LIGHT CHAINS. The heavy chains possess actin-binding and ATPase activity.Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.Pedigree: The record of descent or ancestry, particularly of a particular condition or trait, indicating individual family members, their relationships, and their status with respect to the trait or condition.Myocardial Contraction: Contractile activity of the MYOCARDIUM.Ventricular Dysfunction, Left: A condition in which the LEFT VENTRICLE of the heart was functionally impaired. This condition usually leads to HEART FAILURE; MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION; and other cardiovascular complications. Diagnosis is made by measuring the diminished ejection fraction and a depressed level of motility of the left ventricular wall.Mutant Proteins: Proteins produced from GENES that have acquired MUTATIONS.Myofibrils: The long cylindrical contractile organelles of STRIATED MUSCLE cells composed of ACTIN FILAMENTS; MYOSIN filaments; and other proteins organized in arrays of repeating units called SARCOMERES .Sports: Activities or games, usually involving physical effort or skill. Reasons for engagement in sports include pleasure, competition, and/or financial reward.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Electrocardiography: Recording of the moment-to-moment electromotive forces of the HEART as projected onto various sites on the body's surface, delineated as a scalar function of time. The recording is monitored by a tracing on slow moving chart paper or by observing it on a cardioscope, which is a CATHODE RAY TUBE DISPLAY.Mutation, Missense: A mutation in which a codon is mutated to one directing the incorporation of a different amino acid. This substitution may result in an inactive or unstable product. (From A Dictionary of Genetics, King & Stansfield, 5th ed)Dystrophin: A muscle protein localized in surface membranes which is the product of the Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy gene. Individuals with Duchenne muscular dystrophy usually lack dystrophin completely while those with Becker muscular dystrophy have dystrophin of an altered size. It shares features with other cytoskeletal proteins such as SPECTRIN and alpha-actinin but the precise function of dystrophin is not clear. One possible role might be to preserve the integrity and alignment of the plasma membrane to the myofibrils during muscle contraction and relaxation. MW 400 kDa.Fibrosis: Any pathological condition where fibrous connective tissue invades any organ, usually as a consequence of inflammation or other injury.Myocardial Ischemia: A disorder of cardiac function caused by insufficient blood flow to the muscle tissue of the heart. The decreased blood flow may be due to narrowing of the coronary arteries (CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE), to obstruction by a thrombus (CORONARY THROMBOSIS), or less commonly, to diffuse narrowing of arterioles and other small vessels within the heart. Severe interruption of the blood supply to the myocardial tissue may result in necrosis of cardiac muscle (MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION).Diastole: Post-systolic relaxation of the HEART, especially the HEART VENTRICLES.Diabetic Cardiomyopathies: Diabetes complications in which VENTRICULAR REMODELING in the absence of CORONARY ATHEROSCLEROSIS and hypertension results in cardiac dysfunctions, typically LEFT VENTRICULAR DYSFUNCTION. The changes also result in myocardial hypertrophy, myocardial necrosis and fibrosis, and collagen deposition due to impaired glucose tolerance.Heart Transplantation: The transference of a heart from one human or animal to another.Ventricular Function, Left: The hemodynamic and electrophysiological action of the left HEART VENTRICLE. Its measurement is an important aspect of the clinical evaluation of patients with heart disease to determine the effects of the disease on cardiac performance.Calcium: A basic element found in nearly all organized tissues. It is a member of the alkaline earth family of metals with the atomic symbol Ca, atomic number 20, and atomic weight 40. Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body and combines with phosphorus to form calcium phosphate in the bones and teeth. It is essential for the normal functioning of nerves and muscles and plays a role in blood coagulation (as factor IV) and in many enzymatic processes.Contrast Media: Substances used to allow enhanced visualization of tissues.Ventricular Remodeling: The geometric and structural changes that the HEART VENTRICLES undergo, usually following MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION. It comprises expansion of the infarct and dilatation of the healthy ventricle segments. While most prevalent in the left ventricle, it can also occur in the right ventricle.Muscle Proteins: The protein constituents of muscle, the major ones being ACTINS and MYOSINS. More than a dozen accessory proteins exist including TROPONIN; TROPOMYOSIN; and DYSTROPHIN.Hypertrophy, Left Ventricular: Enlargement of the LEFT VENTRICLE of the heart. This increase in ventricular mass is attributed to sustained abnormal pressure or volume loads and is a contributor to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.Mice, Transgenic: Laboratory mice that have been produced from a genetically manipulated EGG or EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN.Biopsy: Removal and pathologic examination of specimens in the form of small pieces of tissue from the living body.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Stroke Volume: The amount of BLOOD pumped out of the HEART per beat, not to be confused with cardiac output (volume/time). It is calculated as the difference between the end-diastolic volume and the end-systolic volume.Genetic Predisposition to Disease: A latent susceptibility to disease at the genetic level, which may be activated under certain conditions.DNA, Mitochondrial: Double-stranded DNA of MITOCHONDRIA. In eukaryotes, the mitochondrial GENOME is circular and codes for ribosomal RNAs, transfer RNAs, and about 10 proteins.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Cardiovascular Diseases: Pathological conditions involving the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM including the HEART; the BLOOD VESSELS; or the PERICARDIUM.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Contracts: Agreements between two or more parties, especially those that are written and enforceable by law (American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 4th ed). It is sometimes used to characterize the nature of the professional-patient relationship.Muscle Fibers, Skeletal: Large, multinucleate single cells, either cylindrical or prismatic in shape, that form the basic unit of SKELETAL MUSCLE. They consist of MYOFIBRILS enclosed within and attached to the SARCOLEMMA. They are derived from the fusion of skeletal myoblasts (MYOBLASTS, SKELETAL) into a syncytium, followed by differentiation.Ventricular Outflow Obstruction: Occlusion of the outflow tract in either the LEFT VENTRICLE or the RIGHT VENTRICLE of the heart. This may result from CONGENITAL HEART DEFECTS, predisposing heart diseases, complications of surgery, or HEART NEOPLASMS.Heart Septum: This structure includes the thin muscular atrial septum between the two HEART ATRIA, and the thick muscular ventricular septum between the two HEART VENTRICLES.Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy: A transient left ventricular apical dysfunction or ballooning accompanied by electrocardiographic (ECG) T wave inversions. This abnormality is associated with high levels of CATECHOLAMINES, either administered or endogenously secreted from a tumor or during extreme stress.Encyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active: Drug regimens, for patients with HIV INFECTIONS, that aggressively suppress HIV replication. The regimens usually involve administration of three or more different drugs including a protease inhibitor.Pericardial Effusion: Fluid accumulation within the PERICARDIUM. Serous effusions are associated with pericardial diseases. Hemopericardium is associated with trauma. Lipid-containing effusion (chylopericardium) results from leakage of THORACIC DUCT. Severe cases can lead to CARDIAC TAMPONADE.Ultrasonography: The visualization of deep structures of the body by recording the reflections or echoes of ultrasonic pulses directed into the tissues. Use of ultrasound for imaging or diagnostic purposes employs frequencies ranging from 1.6 to 10 megahertz.Qi: The vital life force in the body, supposedly able to be regulated by acupuncture. It corresponds roughly to the Greek pneuma, the Latin spiritus, and the ancient Indian prana. The concept of life-breath or vital energy was formulated as an indication of the awareness of man, originally directed externally toward nature or society but later turned inward to the self or life within. (From Comparison between Concepts of Life-Breath in East and West, 15th International Symposium on the Comparative History of Medicine - East and West, August 26-September 3, 1990, Shizuoka, Japan, pp. ix-x)Quackery: The fraudulent misrepresentation of the diagnosis and treatment of disease.Prince Edward Island: An island in the Gulf of St. Lawrence constituting a province of Canada in the eastern part of the country. It is very irregular in shape with many deep inlets. Its capital is Charlottetown. Discovered by the French in 1534 and originally named Ile Saint-Jean, it was renamed in 1799 in honor of Prince Edward, fourth son of George III and future father of Queen Victoria. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p981 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p433)Wood: A product of hard secondary xylem composed of CELLULOSE, hemicellulose, and LIGNANS, that is under the bark of trees and shrubs. It is used in construction and as a source of CHARCOAL and many other products.Chemistry, Analytic: The branch of chemistry dealing with detection (qualitative) and determination (quantitative) of substances. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Radius FracturesAcid-Base Imbalance: Disturbances in the ACID-BASE EQUILIBRIUM of the body.Victoria: A state in southeastern Australia, the southernmost state. Its capital is Melbourne. It was discovered in 1770 by Captain Cook and first settled by immigrants from Tasmania. In 1851 it was separated from New South Wales as a separate colony. Self-government was introduced in 1851; it became a state in 1901. It was named for Queen Victoria in 1851. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p1295 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, p574)Angina Pectoris: The symptom of paroxysmal pain consequent to MYOCARDIAL ISCHEMIA usually of distinctive character, location and radiation. It is thought to be provoked by a transient stressful situation during which the oxygen requirements of the MYOCARDIUM exceed that supplied by the CORONARY CIRCULATION.Estrogens: Compounds that interact with ESTROGEN RECEPTORS in target tissues to bring about the effects similar to those of ESTRADIOL. Estrogens stimulate the female reproductive organs, and the development of secondary female SEX CHARACTERISTICS. Estrogenic chemicals include natural, synthetic, steroidal, or non-steroidal compounds.Receptors, Estrogen: Cytoplasmic proteins that bind estrogens and migrate to the nucleus where they regulate DNA transcription. Evaluation of the state of estrogen receptors in breast cancer patients has become clinically important.Internet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.User-Computer Interface: The portion of an interactive computer program that issues messages to and receives commands from a user.Computer Graphics: The process of pictorial communication, between human and computers, in which the computer input and output have the form of charts, drawings, or other appropriate pictorial representation.Microcirculation: The circulation of the BLOOD through the MICROVASCULAR NETWORK.Coronary Circulation: The circulation of blood through the CORONARY VESSELS of the HEART.Microvascular Angina: ANGINA PECTORIS or angina-like chest pain with a normal coronary arteriogram and positive EXERCISE TEST. The cause of the syndrome is unknown. While its recognition is of clinical importance, its prognosis is excellent. (Braunwald, Heart Disease, 4th ed, p1346; Jablonski Dictionary of Syndromes & Eponymic Diseases, 2d ed). It is different from METABOLIC SYNDROME X, a syndrome characterized by INSULIN RESISTANCE and HYPERINSULINEMIA, that has increased risk for cardiovascular disease.Peripartum Period: The period shortly before, during, and immediately after giving birth.Puerperal Disorders: Disorders or diseases associated with PUERPERIUM, the six-to-eight-week period immediately after PARTURITION in humans.Pregnancy Complications, Cardiovascular: The co-occurrence of pregnancy and a cardiovascular disease. The disease may precede or follow FERTILIZATION and it may or may not have a deleterious effect on the pregnant woman or FETUS.Electronic Mail: Messages between computer users via COMPUTER COMMUNICATION NETWORKS. This feature duplicates most of the features of paper mail, such as forwarding, multiple copies, and attachments of images and other file types, but with a speed advantage. The term also refers to an individual message sent in this way.Food Dispensers, Automatic: Mechanical food dispensing machines.Editorial Policies: The guidelines and policy statements set forth by the editor(s) or editorial board of a publication.Authorship: The profession of writing. Also the identity of the writer as the creator of a literary production.Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.Heart Murmurs: Heart sounds caused by vibrations resulting from the flow of blood through the heart. Heart murmurs can be examined by HEART AUSCULTATION, and analyzed by their intensity (6 grades), duration, timing (systolic, diastolic, or continuous), location, transmission, and quality (musical, vibratory, blowing, etc).Heart Sounds: The sounds heard over the cardiac region produced by the functioning of the heart. There are four distinct sounds: the first occurs at the beginning of SYSTOLE and is heard as a "lubb" sound; the second is produced by the closing of the AORTIC VALVE and PULMONARY VALVE and is heard as a "dupp" sound; the third is produced by vibrations of the ventricular walls when suddenly distended by the rush of blood from the HEART ATRIA; and the fourth is produced by atrial contraction and ventricular filling.Dog Diseases: Diseases of the domestic dog (Canis familiaris). This term does not include diseases of wild dogs, WOLVES; FOXES; and other Canidae for which the heading CARNIVORA is used.Heart Auscultation: Act of listening for sounds within the heart.

The role of oxidative stress in the genesis of heart disease. (1/2902)

Although researchers in radiation and cancer biology have known about the existence of free radicals and their potential role in pathobiology for several decades, cardiac biologists only began to take notice of these noxious species in the 1970s. Exponential growth of free radical research occurred after the discovery of superoxide dismutase in 1969. This antioxidant enzyme is responsible for the dismutation of superoxide radical--a free radical chain initiator. A fine balance between free radicals and a variety of endogenous antioxidants is believed to exist. Any disturbance in this equilibrium in favour of free radicals causes an increase in oxidative stress and initiates subcellular changes leading to cardiomyopathy and heart failure. Our knowledge about the role of free radicals in the pathogenesis of cardiac dysfunction is fast approaching the point where newer therapies employing antioxidants are in sight.  (+info)

Histamine aggravated levothyroxine-induced cardiomyopathy in guinea pigs. (2/2902)

AIM: To study effects of histamine on cardiomyopathy. METHODS: Cardiomyopathy model was developed in guinea pig by i.p. levothyroxine 0.5 mg.kg-1.d-1 for 10 d. Langendroff's hearts were perfused. ECG and contractile force were recorded. Histamine (5 micrograms) was given by intra-aortic injection. Histamine content of coronary venous effluent was determined fluorometrically. RESULTS: Attack of histamine on cardiomyopathy was severer than that in normal hearts. Tachycardia was more prominent; atrioventricular conduction block occurred earlier; decrease in coronary flow was more marked. Uptakes of histamine were 37% in the model and 19% in the normal hearts (P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: Histamine aggravated levothyroxine-cardiomyopathy.  (+info)

Molecular heterogeneity in very-long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency causing pediatric cardiomyopathy and sudden death. (3/2902)

BACKGROUND: Genetic defects are being increasingly recognized in the etiology of primary cardiomyopathy (CM). Very-long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) catalyzes the first step in the beta-oxidation spiral of fatty acid metabolism, the crucial pathway for cardiac energy production. METHODS AND RESULTS: We studied 37 patients with CM, nonketotic hypoglycemia and hepatic dysfunction, skeletal myopathy, or sudden death in infancy with hepatic steatosis, features suggestive of fatty acid oxidation disorders. Single-stranded conformational variance was used to screen genomic DNA. DNA sequencing and mutational analysis revealed 21 different mutations on the VLCAD gene in 18 patients. Of the mutations, 80% were associated with CM. Severe CM in infancy was recognized in most patients (67%) at presentation. Hepatic dysfunction was common (33%). RNA blot analysis and VLCAD enzyme assays showed a severe reduction in VLCAD mRNA in patients with frame-shift or splice-site mutations and absent or severe reduction in enzyme activity in all. CONCLUSIONS: Infantile CM is the most common clinical phenotype of VLCAD deficiency. Mutations in the human VLCAD gene are heterogeneous. Although mortality at presentation is high, both the metabolic disorder and cardiomyopathy are reversible.  (+info)

Cardiac involvement in proximal myotonic myopathy. (4/2902)

Proximal myotonic myopathy (PROMM) is a recently described autosomal dominantly inherited disorder resulting in proximal muscles weakness, myotonia, and cataracts. A few patients with cardiac involvement (sinus bradycardia, supraventricular bigeminy, conduction abnormalities) have been reported. The cases of three relatives with PROMM (weakness of neck flexors and proximal extremity muscles, calf hypertrophy, myotonia, cataracts) are reported: a 54 year old man, his 73 year old mother, and 66 year old aunt. All three presented with conduction abnormalities and one had repeated, life threatening, sustained monomorphic ventricular tachycardia. This illustrates that severe cardiac involvement may occur in PROMM.  (+info)

A calcium antagonist protects against doxorubicin-induced impairment of calcium handling in neonatal rat cardiac myocytes. (5/2902)

The effects of doxorubicin (DOX) on intracellular calcium transients and the cardioprotective effects of a calcium antagonist on DOX-induced impairment of calcium handling were examined in neonatal rat cultured cardiac myocytes. Cultured cardiac myocytes isolated from neonatal Wistar-Kyoto rats were treated with DOX for 24 h. Field-stimulated calcium transients in single myocytes were measured in the presence or absence of isoproterenol using fura-2/AM. Calcium transients were also measured after the addition of DOX to myocytes pretreated with a calcium antagonist, benidipine. DOX reduced the amplitude, maximum velocity of increase and decrease of calcium transients and prolonged the time course of calcium transients and impaired the beta-adrenoceptor responsiveness of calcium transients in a concentration-dependent manner. The DOX-induced impairment of calcium transients and beta-adrenoceptor responsiveness was improved by 10(-8) mol/L of benidipine. However, these improvements decreased with increasing concentrations of benidipine. DOX impaired both the mobilization and removal of intracellular calcium ions in contraction-relaxation cycles and the response of calcium transients to beta-adrenoceptor stimulation. Appropriate concentration of benidipine ameliorated DOX-induced impairment of calcium dynamics, suggesting that benidipine, a long-acting calcium antagonist, has potential clinical usefulness on DOX-induced abnormal calcium handling.  (+info)

Evidence of cell-mediated cardiac myocyte injury involved in the heart failure of a patient with progressive systemic sclerosis. (6/2902)

A 54-year-old woman with progressive systemic sclerosis (PSS) was admitted to hospital because of dyspnea and chest pain. Echocardiogram revealed diffuse hypokinesis of the left ventricle (ejection fraction 24%). Methylprednisolone, heparin, and diuretics were administered, without benefit. Anemia, thrombocytopenia, and renal dysfunction rapidly progressed, and she died of heart failure on the 14th hospital day. Immunohistochemical study of the myocardial tissue showed mild to moderate cell infiltration, mainly consisting of natural killer (NK) cells, macrophages, cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), and T helper cells. Perforin, a cytolytic factor, was expressed in the infiltrating CTLs and NK cells, indicating that these cells were activated killer cells. Furthermore, human leukocyte antigen classes I and II, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, as well as costimulatory molecules B7-1, B7-2, and CD40, all of which are known not to be expressed in cardiac myocytes under normal conditions, were moderately to strongly expressed in cardiac myocytes. There was no detectable level of enterovirus genomes in the polymerase chain reaction products from the myocardial tissue of this patient. These findings strongly suggest that the infiltrating killer cells recognized cardiac myocytes as target cells and directly damaged them by releasing perforin. Enhanced expression of these antigens may have played an important role in the activation and cytotoxicity of the infiltrating killer cells. Absence of enterovirus genomes in the myocardial tissue may suggest that this autoimmune process is primarily induced by PSS.  (+info)

Use of an intravenous contrast agent (Optison) to enhance echocardiography: efficacy and cost implications. Optison Multicenter Study Group. (7/2902)

OBJECTIVE: To compare the overall diagnostic costs associated with non-contrast and contrast echocardiography. STUDY DESIGN: Phase III clinical trial. PATIENTS AND METHODS: In a secondary analysis of data from a phase III clinical trial of the intravenous contrast agent Optison, we compared the costs associated with obtaining a diagnosis in 203 patients who underwent non-contrast and contrast echocardiography. Costs for the initial test and any follow-up tests were derived from adjusted Medicare charges and a transition-1 microcost accounting system. RESULTS: Diagnostic yield from echocardiograms was 87% with the use of Optison (3 mL) and 49% when no contrast agent was used (P < 0.001). Because technically inadequate echocardiograms were more common in the non-contrast group, follow-up testing was recommended for 42% of patients in this group compared with 12% of those who had undergone a contrast-enhanced echocardiogram (P < 0.001). Although use of Optison increased the initial diagnostic cost by $125, overall costs were 17% lower when Optison was used (P < 0.0001). Use of Optison also resulted in a 17% to 70% decrease in confirmatory transesophageal echocardiography, catheterization, and nuclear studies. Optison improved diagnostic accuracy by 2.7-fold in patients with an initial non-diagnostic echocardiogram, resulting in a substantial cost savings of $269 per patient.  (+info)

Transcomplementation between different types of respiration-deficient mitochondria with different pathogenic mutant mitochondrial DNAs. (8/2902)

Two cell lines were used for determination of whether interaction occurred between different types of respiration-deficient mitochondria. One was a respiration-deficient rho- cell line having mutant mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) with a 5,196-base pair deletion including five tRNA genes (tRNAGly, Arg, Ser(AGY), Leu(CUN), His), DeltamtDNA5196, causing Kearns-Sayre syndrome. The other was a respiration-deficient syn- cell line having mutant mtDNA with an A to G substitution at 4,269 in the tRNAIle gene, mtDNA4269, causing fatal cardiomyopathy. The occurrence of mitochondrial interaction was examined by determining whether cybrids constructed by fusion of enucleated rho- cells with syn- cells became respiration competent by exchanging their tRNAs. No cybrids were isolated in selection medium, where only respiration-competent cells could survive, suggesting that no interaction occurred, or that it occurred so slowly that sufficient recovery of mitochondrial respiratory function was not attained by the time of selection. The latter possibility was confirmed by the observations that heteroplasmic cybrids with both mutant mtDNA4269 and DeltamtDNA5196 isolated without selection showed restored mitochondrial respiration activity. This demonstration of transcomplementation between different respiration-deficient mitochondria will help in understanding the relationship between somatic mutant mtDNAs and the roles of such mutations in aging processes.  (+info)

*Cardiomyopathy

Types of cardiomyopathy include hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, dilated cardiomyopathy, restrictive cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogenic ... Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy, Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy and Other Cardiomyopathies, and Myocarditis: A ... Restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM) Acquired Stress cardiomyopathy Myocarditis Ischemic cardiomyopathy Secondary/extrinsic ... Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is often, and dilated cardiomyopathy in a third of cases is inherited from a person's parents. ...

*Dilated cardiomyopathy

Cardiomyopathy - Stanford Children's Health Cardiomyopathy Association: Dilated cardiomyopathy Children's Cardiomyopathy ... Dilated cardiomyopathy occurs late in gestation or several weeks to months postpartum as a peripartum cardiomyopathy. It is ... "What Is Cardiomyopathy?". NHLBI. 22 June 2016. Retrieved 10 November 2017. "Types of Cardiomyopathy". NHLBI. 22 June 2016. ... cardiomyopathy.html Umana, Ernesto; Solares, C. Arturo; Alpert, Martin A (2003-01-01). "Tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy". ...

*Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

... at Curlie (based on DMOZ) GeneReviews/NIH/NCBI/UW entry on Familial Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy ... "What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Cardiomyopathy?". NHLBI. 22 June 2016. Retrieved 10 November 2017. "What Is Cardiomyopathy ... Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a condition in which a portion of the heart becomes thickened without an obvious cause. ... Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait and is attributed to mutations in one of a ...

*Amyloid cardiomyopathy

... (stiff heart syndrome) is associated with the systemic production and release of many amyloidogenic ... Unusual Cardiomyopathies. 52 (4): 347-361. doi:10.1016/j.pcad.2009.11.007. "Amyloid". Wikipedia. 2017-11-26. ... Liao, Ronglih; Ward, Jennifer E. (2017-06-09). "Amyloid Cardiomyopathy: Disease on the Rise". Circulation Research. 120 (12): ...

*Diabetic cardiomyopathy

... is a disorder of the heart muscle in people with diabetes. It can lead to inability of the heart to ... Given that diabetic cardiomyopathy's definition excludes concomitant atherosclerosis or hypertension, there are no changes in ... Rubler S, Dlugash J, Yuceoglu YZ, Kumral T, Branwood AW, Grishman A (November 1972). "New type of cardiomyopathy associated ... One particularity of diabetic cardiomyopathy is the long latent phase, during which the disease progresses but is completely ...

*Restrictive cardiomyopathy

... (RCM) is a form of cardiomyopathy in which the walls of the heart are rigid (but not thickened). ... "Restrictive Cardiomyopathy Treatment & Management". 2014-12-18. Retrieved 2015-06-10. Pollak, A; Falk, R H (1993-08-01). "Left ... Treatment of restrictive cardiomyopathy should focus on management of causative conditions (for example, using corticosteroids ... "The novel αB-crystallin (CRYAB) mutation p.D109G causes restrictive cardiomyopathy". Human Mutation: n/a-n/a. doi:10.1002/humu. ...

*Noncompaction cardiomyopathy

Non-compaction cardiomyopathy (NCC), also called spongiform cardiomyopathy, is a rare congenital cardiomyopathy that affects ... Heart Association's 2006 classification of cardiomyopathies considers noncompaction cardiomyopathy a genetic cardiomyopathy. ... 1 Case restrictive cardiomyopathy: 1 Case The high number of misdiagnoses can be attributed to non-compaction cardiomyopathy ... Non-compaction cardiomyopathy was first identified as an isolated condition in 1984 by Engberding and Benber. They reported on ...

*Boxer cardiomyopathy

... (also known as "Boxer arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy") is a disease of the myocardium ... Boxer dog cardiomyopathy: An update. Vet Clin North Am Small Anim Pract 2004;34:1235-1244. Meurs KM, Spier AW, Miller MW, et al ... Boxer cardiomyopathy is a genetic disease inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern. The presentation in affected offspring is ... Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy causing sudden cardiac death in Boxer dogs: A new animal model of human disease ...

*Alcoholic cardiomyopathy

... is a type of dilated cardiomyopathy. Due to the direct toxic effects of alcohol on heart muscle, the ... Alcoholic cardiomyopathy is a disease in which the chronic long-term abuse of alcohol (i.e., ethanol) leads to heart failure. ... Treatment for alcoholic cardiomyopathy involves lifestyle changes, including complete abstinence from alcohol use, a low sodium ... Signs and symptoms presented by the occurrence of alcoholic cardiomyopathy are the result of the heart failing and usually ...

*Phidippides cardiomyopathy

... refers to the cardiomyopathic changes that occurs after long periods of endurance training. It was ... After an autopsy, the Albuquerque coroner wrote that "Micah True died as a result of cardiomyopathy during exertion". Since ... The suggested etiology for Phidippides Cardiomyopathy is the cardiac remodeling from prolonged strenuous exercises. The ... Trivax, Justin E.; McCullough, Peter A. (February 2012). "Phidippides cardiomyopathy: a review and case illustration". Clinical ...

*Viral cardiomyopathy

... occurs when viral infections cause myocarditis with a resulting thickening of the myocardium and dilation ... Mutlu H, Alam M, Ozbilgin OF (2011). "A rare case of Epstein-Barr virus-induced dilated cardiomyopathy". Heart Lung. 40 (1): 81 ... Badorff C; Lee G. H.; Knowlton K. U. (2000). "Enteroviral cardiomyopathy: bad news for the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex". ... Coxsackievirus-induced cardiomyopathy Myocarditis Barbandi M, Cordero-Reyes A, Orrego CM, Torre-Amione G, Seethamraju H (Jan ...

*Ischemic cardiomyopathy

... is a type of cardiomyopathy caused by a narrowing of the coronary arteries which supply blood to the ... One of the most important features differentiating ischemic cardiomyopathy from the other forms of cardiomyopathy is the ... "Differentiation between primary dilated cardiomyopathy and ischemic cardiomyopathy based on right ventricular performance". ... This cardiomyopathy is one of the leading causes of sudden cardiac death. The adjective iscehemic means characteristic of, or ...

*Peripartum cardiomyopathy

... (PPCM) is a form of dilated cardiomyopathy that is defined as a deterioration in cardiac function ... Ultrasound of peripartum cardiomyopathy Ultrasound of peripartum cardiomyopathy Early detection and treatment are associated ... March 2000). "Peripartum cardiomyopathy: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and Office of Rare Diseases (National ... As with other forms of dilated cardiomyopathy, PPCM involves systolic dysfunction of the heart with a decrease of the left ...

*Tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy

... (TIC) is a disease where prolonged tachycardia (a fast heart rate) or arrhythmia (an ... Cardiomyopathy Congestive heart failure Ellis, Ethan R.; Josephson, Mark E. (2013-12-01). "Heart failure and tachycardia- ... Thus, TIC is typically diagnosed when (1) tests have excluded other causes of cardiomyopathy and (2) there is improvement in ... The diagnosis of TIC is made after excluding other causes of cardiomyopathy and observing resolution of the left ventricular ...

*Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy screening

Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, or HCM, is the leading cause of sudden cardiac death (SCD) in young athletes. HCM is frequently ... While younger individuals are likely to have a more severe form of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, the condition is seen in people ... Maron, B.J., Thompson, P.D. (2002). Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: Practical steps for preventing sudden death. The Physician and ... Maron BJ (March 2002). "Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: a systematic review". Journal of the American Medical Association. 287 (10 ...

*Familial amyloid cardiomyopathy

... (FAC), or Transthyretin Amyloid Cardiomyopathy (ATTR-CM) results from the aggregation and ... later progressing to a cardiomyopathy). Amyloid Transthyretin Senile systemic amyloidosis Restrictive cardiomyopathy Jacobson, ... Falk, R. H. & Elkayam, U. (2010). Cardiomyopathy: the importance of recognizing the uncommon diagnosis. Prog Cardiovasc Dis 52 ... TTR amyloid fibrils infiltrate the myocardium, leading to diastolic dysfunction from restrictive cardiomyopathy, and eventual ...

*HIV associated cardiomyopathy

HIV is a major cause of cardiomyopathy - in particular dilated cardiomyopathy. Dilated cardiomyopathy can be due to pericardial ... The most common type of HIV induced cardiomyopathy is dilated cardiomyopathy also known as eccentric ventricular hypertrophy ... of HIV patients have dilated cardiomyopathy (176/1000) meaning the incidence has greatly increased. Dilated cardiomyopathy can ... of the myocardium was greater in patients with HIV associated cardiomyopathy (as opposed to idiopathic cardiomyopathy), ...

*Coxsackievirus-induced cardiomyopathy

... resulting in dilated cardiomyopathy. Dilated cardiomyopathy in humans can be caused by multiple factors including hereditary ... Viral induced dilated cardiomyopathy can be characterized using different methods. A recent study showed in coxsackievirus ... Coxsackieviruses-induced cardiomyopathy are positive-stranded RNA viruses in picornavirus family and the genus enterovirus, ... In addition to the genetic defects in dystrophin or other cytoskeletal proteins, a subset of dilated cardiomyopathy is linked ...

*Sudden cardiac death of athletes

Cardiomyopathies are generally inherited as autosomal dominants, although recessive forms have been described, and dilated ... Raju H, Alberg C, Sagoo GS, Burton H, Behr ER (Nov 21, 2011). "Inherited cardiomyopathies". BMJ. 343: d6966. doi:10.1136/bmj. ... Moore JR, Leinwand L, Warshaw DM (Jul 20, 2012). "Understanding cardiomyopathy phenotypes based on the functional impact of ... and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Since HCM, as an example, is typically an autosomal dominant trait, each child of an HCM ...

*Scottish Fold

"Cardiomyopathy". Scottishfold.org. Retrieved 3 October 2009. "Genetic welfare problems of companion animals: Scottish Fold: ... Scottish folds are susceptible to polycystic kidney disease (PKD) and cardiomyopathy. Scottish folds are also prone to ...

*PCNT

... cardiomyopathy; early onset type 2 diabetes; chronic myeloid leukemia (CML); bipolar affective disorder; and other congenital ...

*Myosin binding protein C, cardiac

... such as dilated cardiomyopathy and left ventricular noncompaction cardiomyopathy. In patients with isolated or familial cases ... and proteasomal activities were also depressed in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy or dilated cardiomyopathy. Skinned ... A great understanding of how MYBPC3 mutations lead to the development of inherited cardiomyopathy came from the analyses of ... Another good system for modeling cardiomyopathies in the cell culture dish is the derivation of cardiac myocytes from iPSC. ...

*Srihari S. Naidu

Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is the most common cause of sudden cardiac death among athletes, and a cause of heart failure at ... A co-author on the 2011 ACCF/AHA National Guideline on the Diagnosis and Management of Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy, he is ... Naidu is Director of the Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy National Center of Excellence - with offices in Long Island and ... An academic interventional cardiologist, Naidu is an expert in the management of patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, ...

*Doxorubicin

The rate of cardiomyopathy is dependent on its cumulative dose, with an incidence about 4% when the dose of doxorubicin is 500- ... There are several ways in which doxorubicin is believed to cause cardiomyopathy, including oxidative stress, downregulation of ... The most dangerous side effect of doxorubicin is dilated cardiomyopathy, leading to congestive heart failure. ... Chaterjee, Kanu; Jianqing Zhang; Norman Honbo; Joel S. Karliner (January 2010). "Doxorubicin Cardiomyopathy". Cardiology. 115 ( ...

*Complications of hypertension

Okoshi K, Guimarães JF, Di Muzio BP, Fernandes AA, Okoshi MP (March 2007). "[Diabetic cardiomyopathy]". Arquivos Brasileiros de ...
Background: Past data suggest ischemic cardiomyopathy (ICM) is associated with worse prognosis when compared to non-ischemic cardiomyopathy(NICM). With advances in heart failure management, this relationship deserves a fresh look. We hypothesize that all cause mortality from NICM is lower when compared to ICM over five year period.. Methods: We retrospectively studied consecutive heart failure patients with left ventricular ejection fraction(EF) less than 35% admitted to Einstein Medical Center Philadelphia between 01/01/2007 to 12/31/2007. Data pertaining to patient demographics and clinical characteristics were obtained. All cause mortality was obtained at 5 years using hazard ratio to account for time to event.. Results: The final cohort consisted of 360 patients of which 63%(224 of 360) had NICM. Mean age was 61±16 years for NICM and 66±11 yrs for ICM. African Americans constituted 83%(185 of 224) of NICM and 59%(80 of 136) of ICM. The clinical characteristics are as shown in the table. ...
Cardiomyopathy refers to diseases of the heart muscle which cause the heart to become weaker. There are many different causes of cardiomyopathy. This study is looking at patients with cardiomyopathy that is not due to a reduced blood supply to the heart muscle. Reduced blood supply is called "ischemic," so this study is looking at patients with "non-ischemic" cardiomyopathy (NICM). Ejection fraction (EF) is the amount of blood leaving the heart each time it contracts. EF is a measure of the strength, or how well the heart pumps with each beat and it is measured on tests such as echocardiogram (ultrasound) and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR). Patients newly diagnosed with NICM who have a reduced ejection fraction (EF) of less than or equal to 40% may be eligible for this study. Patients with NICM are at increased risk for hospitalizations due to congestive heart failure, abnormal heart rhythms and are also at an increased risk of sudden cardiac death. An implanted device, called an ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Ventricular arrhythmias in non-ischemic cardiomyopathy. AU - Chung, Fa Po. AU - Lin, Chin Yu. AU - Lin, Yenn Jiang. AU - Chang, Shih Lin. AU - Lo, Li Wei. AU - Hu, Yu Feng. AU - Tuan, Ta Chuan. AU - Chao, Tze Fan. AU - Liao, Jo Nan. AU - Chang, Yao Ting. AU - Chang, Ting Yung. AU - Lin, Chung-Hsing. AU - Te, Abigail Louise D.. AU - Yamada, Shinya. AU - Chen, Shih Ann. PY - 2017/1/1. Y1 - 2017/1/1. N2 - Non-ischemic cardiomyopathies (NICMs) are composed of variable disease entities, including primary and secondary cardiomyopathies. Determining the etiology of NICM provides pivotal roles of not only the understanding of the individual pathogenesis, but also the clinical management, such as risk stratification, pharmacological treatment, and intervention therapies. Despite the diverse causes of NICM, these cases mostly require clinical attention owing to progressive myocardial injury, resulting in ventricular dysfunction and heart failure. The interaction between the diseased ...
Rituximab is an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody frequently used for the treatment of non-Hodgkins lymphoma, chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and anti-neutrophilic cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis. In addition, rituximab has recently been increasingly used as an off-label treatment in a number of inflammatory and systemic autoimmune diseases. It is advised that rituximab infusion may cause infusion reactions and adverse cardiac effects including arrhythmia and angina, especially in patients with prior history of cardiovascular diseases. However, its detailed cardiotoxicity profile and effects on cardiac function were not well described. We report a 51-year-old man who developed non-ischemic cardiomyopathy after rituximab treatment for membranous nephropathy. The patient experienced reduced cardiac functions within 48 hours after the initial infusion, which remained markedly reduced at 9-month follow-up. As the utility of rituximab expands, physicians must be
Genetic test that analyzes 106 genes that cause inherited cardiomyopathies, inherited arrhythmias, and other inherited cardiovascular conditions. Testing uses Sanger and next generation sequencing.
This study showed that 1 the improvement of left ventricular systolic function and remodeling was reduced in ischemic cardiomyopathy patients compared with non-ischemic cardiomyopathy patients; 2 compared with non-ischemic cardiomyopathy patients, ischemic cardiomyopathy patients exhibited more severe diastolic dysfunction; and 3 severe diastolic dysfunction (restrictive filling) was an independent factor influencing the CRT response.. Many randomized controlled trials and observational studies 3,4,13-15 have shown that CRT results in less improvement in LV systolic function and remodeling in ICM patients than in NICM patients. This study showed that the ICM group had lower CRT response rates six months after implantation; improvements in LVEF and LVOT-VTI, which reflect LV function, and improvements in LVESV, which reflect remodeling, were smaller in the ICM group than in the NICM group. These results are not surprising. Several groups reported similar findings as long as a decade ago 16-18. ...
Referenzen: 1. Ivandic BT, Utz HF, Kaczmarek PM, Aherrahrou Z, Axtner SB, Klepsch C, Lusis AJ, Katus HA. New Dyscalc loci for myocardial cell necrosis and calcification (dystrophic cardiac calcinosis) in mice. Physiol Genomics. 2001;6:137-44. 2. Ivandic BT, Qiao JH, Machleder D, Liao F, Drake TA, Lusis AJ. A locus on chromosome 7 determines myocardial cell necrosis and calcification (dystrophic cardiac calcinosis) in mice. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 1996;93:5483-8. 3. Korff S, Riechert N, Schoensiegel F, Weichenhan D, Autschbach F, Katus HA, Ivandic BT. Calcification of myocardial necrosis is common in mice. Virchows Arch. 2005 Oct 7;:1-9 [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 16211391 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] 4. Churchill GA, Airey DC, Allayee H, Angel JM, Attie AD, Beatty J, Beavis WD, Belknap JK, Bennett B, Berrettini W, Bleich A, Bogue M, Broman KW, Buck KJ, Buckler E, Burmeister M, Chesler EJ, Cheverud JM, Clapcote S, Cook MN, Cox RD, Crabbe JC, Crusio WE, Darvasi A, Deschepper CF, Doerge ...
Background: Progressive apoptosis following the primary injury has been implicated in the progression to end-stage heart failure. Survivin, a member of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein, is one of the most potent suppressor of apoptosis. We hypothesized that preventing apoptosis by survivin gene therapy may prevent deterioration in left ventricular (LV) systolic dysfunction in a doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy model in rats.. Methods and Results: A reproducible model of doxorubicin (dox)-induced cardiomyopathy was established in male Fisher rats by 6 equal doses (2.5 mg/kg bw) of i.p. injection every other day for 2 weeks. Echocardiographic assessment was performed at week 0, 3, and 6. A subset of animals (DOX+SURV, n=8) was treated with the survivin gene using the ultrasound targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD) technique at week 3. Control animals (DOX, n=12) did not receive any treatment at week 3. At week 0 (pre-dox), LV% fractional shortening (FS) was comparable in DOX+SURV and DOX ...
Its arrhythmia week on The Rounds Table! Should heart failure patients give up a caffeine jolt in the morning? How can we better identify appropriate patients for ICDs? Paxton Bach, fellow in General Internal Medicine at UBC, joins Kieran to discuss two exciting studies:. Studies that inform practice toward the best medical treatments are of utmost importance. But, arguably, studies that inform day to day lifestyle choice are those that provide real meaning to patients. For example, does a patient with a heart condition need to give up coffee? Kieran and Paxton discuss a study which examines whether, in patients with decreased ejection fraction, caffeine increases cardiac arrhythmias.. Next, Kieran takes listeners through the DANISH trial. The benefit of an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) in patients with symptomatic systolic heart failure caused by ischemic heart disease has been well documented. However, before the DANISH trial, the evidence for implantation of an ICD for primary ...
Get natural cures for Doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy that can make a difference in your life or the life of someone you love with alternative treatments.
Increased circulating levels of free fatty acid (FA) in obesity and diabetes lead to the accumulation of FA in non-adipose tissue such as myocardium and this is known to be a major contributor to cardiomyopathy. In this present study, we investigated the role of APPL1 (Adaptor protein containing PH domain, PTB domain and Leucine zipper motif-1), an important regulator of insulin signaling, in a model of high fat diet (HFD) induced cardiomyopathy. We fed APPL1 transgenic (Tg) or wild type (wt) mice a high fat (60% kcal) or normal chow diet. After 16 weeks, in wt mice HFD induced hyperinsulinemia and hyperlipidemia, as well as cardiac dysfunction determined by echocardiography system (Vevo 2100). Furthermore, HFD induced cardiac insulin resistance and acetyl CoA carboxylase (ACC) phosphorylation. Lipid analysis using LC/MS/MS showed HFD significantly increased intracellular level of distinct ceramide and diacylglycerol (DAG) species in heart tissue. Interestingly, HFD fed APPL1 Tg mice showed a ...
Authors: Enkhsaikhan Purevjav, Takuro Arimura, Sibylle Augustin, Anne-Cecile Huby, Ken Takagi, Shinichi Nunoda, Debra L Kearney, Michael D Taylor, Fumio Terasaki, Johan M Bos, Steve R Ommen, Hiroki Shibata, Megumi Takahashi, Manatsu Itoh-Satoh, William J McKenna, Ross T Murphy, Siegfried Labeit, Yoichi Yamanaka, Noboru Machida, Jeong-Euy Park, Peta MA Alexander, Robert G Weintraub, Yasushi Kitaura, Michael J Ackerman, Akinori Kimura, Jeffrey A Towbin
PMCMP : Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is estimated to occur at an incidence of between 50 to 100 per 100,000 individuals in North America and Europe each year, claiming between 250,000 and 450,000 lives in the United States annually. In younger individuals (ages 15-35), the incidence of SCD is between 1 to 2 per 100,000 young individuals. Sudden cardiac death, particularly in young individuals, may suggest an inherited form of heart disease. In some cases of sudden cardiac death, autopsy may identify a structural abnormality such as a form of cardiomyopathy. Postmortem diagnosis of a hereditary cardiomyopathy may assist in confirmation of the cause and manner of death, as well as risk assessment in living family members.   The cardiomyopathies are a group of disorders characterized by disease of the heart muscle. Cardiomyopathies are often caused by inherited, genetic, factors. When the identified structural or functional abnormality observed in a patient cannot be explained by acquired causes,
F49 Molecular Cloning and Sequencing of the HRC Gene from Mouse Heart Reveals a Highly Unstable GAG Repeat. Shundi Shi, Steven R. Brunnert. Columbia University, Institute of Comparative Medicine 630 W. 168th Street, Mail Box 17, New York, NY 10032. Histidine-rich calcium binding protein (HRC) is a luminal sarcoplasmic reticulum protein that has been mapped to human Chromosome 19 and mouse Chromosome 7 and considered a candidate gene of several genetic diseases in humans and mice. We derived a 2407-bp clone encoding for a 738 AA protein by PCR from C57BL/6J mouse heart and found a highly unstable GAG repeat in the middle of the coding region. The instability of the GAG repeat could be detected within individual C57BL/6J and DBA/2J mice in both genomic DNA and cDNA, and no polymorphism was found between two mouse HRC cDNAs except the unstable GAG repeats. At normal physiologic conditions, no GAG expansion was found in the unstable GAG repeat region in the dystrophic cardiac calcinosis (DCC) ...
Late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging is a tool for noninvasive evaluation of myocardial viability that has the advantage over other imaging techniques of being able to directly visualize nonviable myocardium with excellent contrast and spatial resolution. In addition to use in patients with coronary artery disease, this imaging technique has diagnostic value in the setting of nonischemic cardiomyopathy.. Variable patterns of LGE have been described in a wide variety of cardiomyopathies. These patterns are usually quite distinct from LGE seen after myocardial infarction and may even be disease specific. Mid-myocardial enhancement is found in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy at the site of collagen deposition (1), and small patches of predominantly subepicardial enhancement may be seen with acute myocarditis (2). Hence, CMR is a tool for differentiation between ischemic and nonischemic cardiomyopathy and for identification of disease-specific patterns of ...
The role of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in the assessment of non-ischemic cardiomyopathy.: Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) plays an incre
Objective: Diabetic cardiomyopathy is associated with increased mortality in patients with diabetes mellitus. The underlying pathology of this disease is still under discussion. We studied the role of the kinin B1 receptor on the development of experimental diabetic cardiomyopathy.. Research Design and Methods: We utilized B1 receptor knockout mice and investiged cardiac inflammation, fibrosis and oxidative stress after induction of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes mellitus. Furthermore, the left ventricular function was measured by pressure-volume loops after 8 weeks of diabetes mellitus.. Results: B1 receptor knockout mice showed an attenuation of diabetic cardiomyopathy with improved systolic and diastolic function in comparison with diabetic control mice. This was associated with a decreased activation state of the MAP kinase p38, less oxidative stress as well as normalized cardiac inflammation, shown by fewer invading cells and, no increase in matrix metalloproteinase-9 as well as the ...
Doxorubicin (DOX) is an effective antineoplastic agent used for the treatment of a variety of cancers. Unfortunately, its use is limited as this drug induces cardiotoxicity and heart failure as a side effect. There is no report that describes whether
Background: Impairment of systolic function and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) are well-known negative prognostic markers in non-ischemic cardiomyopathies (NICMPs). There is limited knowledge of the geometrical rearrangements of the ventricle volumes over size of the left atrium and their connections with systolic dysfunction and existence of LGE. Material/Methods: Consecutive cases of NICMPs with impaired systolic function and controls were included from a computerized database of cardiac magnetic resonance exams for a 2.5-year period. Ratios made from volumetric parameters over left atrial area (LAA) area were calculated. Results: Our study included 205 cases referred to cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR); age was 48.7±17.0 years (range 15.2-80.4), male-to-female ratio 137 (66.8%): 68 (33.2%), (both p,0.05). LGE was significantly correlated with impairment of systolic function (Rho CC=0.395; p,0.001). For detection of systolic impairment, a critical value of end-systolic-volume (ESV)/LAA of ...
Nitric oxide is produced in cardiac microvascular endothelial cells and cardiomyocytes from either constitutive or inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS), which catalyses the conversion of L-arginine to L-citrulline. Cardiomyocytes principally express endothelial NOS, localized near invaginations of the plasmalemma termed caveolae, and neuronal NOS, localized on the sarcoplasmic reticulum (61). A third isoform, the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), may be expressed upon stimulation with inflammatory mediators. While NO synthesized by neuronal NOS and endothelial NOS has cardioprotective effects through improvement of perfusion and inhibition of apoptosis, NO derived from iNOS has a cardiotoxic effect through the suppression of muscle wall contractility and induction of apoptosis (62). Nitric oxide is released in a pulsatile manner from the beating heart. Changes in ventricular filling induce parallel increases or decreases in cardiac NO synthesis, which, in turn, modulate the function of ...
The Heart Failure and Cardiomyopathies Cardiology Clinical Topic Collection gathers the latest guidelines, news, JACC articles, education, meetings and clinical images pertaining to its cardiovascular topical area - all in one place for your convenience.
Family screening urgently needed to prevent early death in apparently healthy relatives Four in ten cardiomyopathies - a major cause of sudden cardiac...
Cardiac hypertrophy is viewed as a compensatory response to increased load common to diverse clinical settings such as hypertension, valvular disease, and inherited cardiomyopathies (Sadoshima and Izumo, 1997; MacLellan and Schneider, 2000). Myocytes respond to pressure overload with the addition of sarcomeres, resulting in an increase in ventricular wall thickness, which itself is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular mortality (Mathew et al., 2001; Verdecchia et al., 2001). Hence, blunting hypertrophic growth might be beneficial to cardiac function, and previous studies of genetically engineered mice disrupting certain hypertrophic pathways confirm this prediction (Esposito et al., 2002; Sano and Schneider, 2002). However, we still do not know which pathways hold greatest potential for therapeutic benefit. Although the signaling pathways that activate hypertrophy have been described in detail (McKinsey and Olson, 1999; Molkentin and Dorn, 2001), still very little is known of mechanisms ...
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Cardiomyopathies are disorders of the myocardium of unknown cause that are not associated with other disorders (figure 9-1). Specific heart muscle diseases, once known as secondary cardiomyopathies,...
Good Morning, I am wondering if I coded this note correctly: INDICATIONS: A 66 year old man with history of severe cardiomyopathy and congestive heart
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San Diego, CA based Cytori Therapeutics has announced the results of their PRECISE trial, in which patients with severe cardiomyopathy were treated with au
Gupte TM, Haque F, Gangadharan B, Sunitha MS, Mukherjee S, Anandhan S, Rani DSelvi, Mukundan N, Jambekar A, Thangaraj K et al.. 2015. Mechanistic heterogeneity in contractile properties of α-tropomyosin (TPM1) mutants associated with inherited cardiomyopathies.. J Biol Chem. 290(11):7003-15. ...
Gupte TM, Haque F, Gangadharan B, Sunitha MS, Mukherjee S, Anandhan S, Rani DSelvi, Mukundan N, Jambekar A, Thangaraj K et al.. 2015. Mechanistic heterogeneity in contractile properties of α-tropomyosin (TPM1) mutants associated with inherited cardiomyopathies.. J Biol Chem. 290(11):7003-15. ...
The cardiomyopathies are a group of heart diseases that are defined by myocardial (heart muscle) dysfunction as the initial event.
Both the ESC and AHA panels recognized that the current classification system has some important limitations. They also have a common purpose in seeking to assist diagnostic and therapeutic decision-making. The AHA and ESC systems use similar morphological and physiological criteria to describe sub-types of cardiomyopathy and both sub-classify disease into genetic and non-genetic forms. Of the differences between the two systems, perhaps the least important is the primary versus secondary issue. The ESC working groups view was that this distinction has always been arbitrary and that abandonment of the terminology results in a simpler and more consistent approach to classification of heart muscle disease. The classification of ion channellopathies as cardiomyopathies by the AHA panel is quite another matter. The ESC working groups view is that it is inappropriate to reclassify a whole group of diseases that have little or no clinically detectable effect on cardiac morphology and haemodynamics. ...
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contacts provided below. For general information, Learn About Clinical Studies. ...
The term cardiomyopathy refers to a diseased state of the heart involving abnormalities of the muscle fibers, which contract with each heartbeat. Learn about the different types found in children.
OBJECTIVES. Recently the plication of the left ventricular free wall (PLVFW) was described in healthy dogs, reducing the left ventricular cavity. Based on La Places law this reduction could decrease the tension on the left ventricular wall and improve the ventricular contractility. The goal of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of this technique in dogs with doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy and normal ones in a period of six months.. MATERIALS. Five normal mongrel dogs (control group) and three dogs with cardiomyopathy induced by doxorubicin were submitted to PLVFW. After induction with propofol (10 mg/kg) and administration of sevoflurane (3,5 V%)in a oxygen mixture, in a semi-closed circuit system, left thoracotomy on the 6th space, pericardiotomy and PLVPW were performed. The dogs were evaluated 1 day before and 1,2,7,15,21,30,60,90,120,150 and 180 days after the surgery by physical examination, measurement of arterial blood pressure, electrocardiography(ECG), ...
Isolated left ventricular non-compaction is the result of incomplete myocardial morphogenesis, leading to persistence of the embryonic myocardium. The condition is recognised by an excessively prominent trabecular meshwork and deep intertrabecular recesses of the left ventricle. These intertrabecular recesses are prone to thrombus formation, with resultant embolic sequelae. We describe a case of cerebral thrombo-embolism in a young woman due to isolated left ventricular non-compaction.
Heart failure, irrespective of its etiology may be viewed as a progressive disorder initiated by a different events and sustained by a multifaceted pathophysiological mechanisms. Regardless of the nature of the initiating events and optimized therapy used, loss of functioning cardiac myocytes developed and the disease progressed. One potential explanation for such progression is that not all pathological mechanisms underlying the disease are antagonized enough by currently used therapeutic strategy. Accordingly, impaired myocardial perfusion secondary to microvascular dysfunction has been postulated to play a major role in the progression of heart failure despite standard therapy for heart failure (1). It has been hypothesized that diffuse subendocardial ischemia due to altered coronary physiology may contribute to the global cardiac dysfunction seen in heart failure patients (2). Accordingly, coronary endothelial dysfunction at the microvascular and epicardial level in patients with acute-onset ...
Left ventricular noncompaction (LVNC) is a cardiomyopathy associated with sporadic or familial disease, the latter having an autosomal dominant mode of transmission. The clinical features associated with LVNC vary from asymptomatic to symptomatic patients, with the potential for heart failure, supraventricular and ventricular arrhythmias, thromboembolic events, and sudden cardiac death. Echocardiography is the diagnostic modality of choice, revealing the pathognomonic features of a thick, bilayered myocardium; prominent ventricular trabeculations; and deep intertrabecular recesses. Widespread use and advances in the technology of echocardiography and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging are increasing awareness of LVNC, and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging is improving the ability to stage the severity of the disease and potential for adverse clinical consequences. Study of LVNC through research in embryology, imaging, and genetics has allowed enormous strides in the understanding of this heterogeneous
We attempted to alter the inherited myocardial damage and loss of contractility of the cardiomyopathic Syrian hamster (strain U-MX7-1) by giving cardiac drugs that altered intracellular calcium and myocardial workload. Thirty-seven 21-day-old cardiomyopathic and thirty-seven 21-day-old normal hamsters were divided into five groups each: verapamil-, propranolol-, digoxin-, hydralazine-, and saline-injected. On their 90th day of life, the hamsters were killed. Of the five cardiomyopathic groups, only verapamil reduced myocardial damage. When both "control" and cardiomyopathic hamsters were treated with saline, digoxin, or propranolol, the cardiomyopathic hamsters had significantly less contractile force, maximal rate of force development, and maximum velocity of unloaded shortening. When both groups were treated with verapamil or hydralazine, there were no significant group differences in the indices of contractility. However, when saline-treated cardiomyopathic hamsters were compared with ...
We describe a newborn infant with del(1)(q) syndrome, presenting with rare congenital cardiomyopathy and left ventricular noncompaction myocardium (LVNC), as well as typical clinical features such as facial dysmorphism and psychomotor retardation. Although conventional chromosome banding at 850 bands per haploid set indicated a karyotype of 46,XX,add(1)(q42.3), FISH analysis confirmed that the deleted portion was limited to within q43, and q44 was preserved. Therefore, the chromosome constitution is 46,XX,del(1)(q43q43), which has not previously been reported in the literature. Screening for the mutations in the candidate genes for LVNC, i.e. G4.5, CSX, Dystrobrevin, FKBP12, and Desmin, produced negative results. Interestingly, the deleted portion includes the locus for the cardiac ryanodine receptor type 2 gene (RyR2), that selectively binds to the FKBP12 homolog, FKBP12.6. The relationship between this rare myocardial abnormality and deletion of q43 is currently unknown and awaits further accumulation
According to the WHO definition cardiomyopathies are classified by the dominant pathophysiology or, if possible, by aetiological or pathogenetic factors.2 Although the cause of IVNC is not fully elucidated, the disease is thought to be a morphogenetic abnormality involving an arrest of compaction of the loose myocardial meshwork during fetal ontogenesis. This implies that IVNC should be present at birth in all patients, a notion supported by two previous reports.6 19 Since IVNC has so far lacked a pathophysiological characterisation, this congenital anomaly has been unspecifically assigned to a heterogeneous group of "unclassified cardiomyopathies". This may contribute to the fact that the diagnosis of IVNC is mostly missed, as was true for almost 90% of the patients with IVNC in a series recently reported by Ichida and colleagues.6 Prominent left ventricular trabeculation can be found in healthy hearts as well as in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and in LVH secondary to dilated, valvar, or ...
Background There is controversy regarding the best echocardiographic diagnostic criteria for left ventricular noncompaction (LVNC). We assessed the diagnostic utility and reproducibility of the...
Cardiomyopathies. Introduction. Define Cardiomyopathy Primary Cardiomyopathies Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy ARVD Ion Channelopathies Dilated Cardiomyopathy Restrictive Cardiomyopathy Myocarditis Others Secondary Cardiomyopathies Infiltrative Disease. Evolving Definition. Slideshow...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Psychiatric Illness in Takotsubo (Stress) Cardiomyopathy. T2 - A Review. AU - Nayeri, Arash. AU - Rafla-Yuan, Eric. AU - Krishnan, Srikanth. AU - Ziaeian, Boback. AU - Cadeiras, Martin. AU - McPherson, John A.. AU - Wells, Quinn S.. PY - 2018/5/1. Y1 - 2018/5/1. N2 - Background: Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TC), also known as stress-induced cardiomyopathy, has been increasingly described in relation to psychiatric illness. Methods: We performed a literature review to identify the key findings related to psychiatric illness in TC that may be relevant to the practice of mental health and other health care providers. Results: The association of psychiatric illness with TC in addition to the spectrum of psychiatric illness found in TC, the role of exacerbation or treatment of psychiatric illness in triggering TC, different modes of presentation, prognostic implications, and long-term management of psychiatric illness in TC are discussed. Additionally, we review the limitations of the ...
Noncompaction cardiomyopathy (NCC) is a congenital cardiovascular disease that causes ventricular dysfunction and large mortality rate in children. phenotype of NCC individuals. Further molecular evaluation of cardiomyocytes and uncovered that SRC-1/3 up-regulate cyclin E2 straight, cyclin B1 and myocardin to market cardiomyocyte differentiation and proliferation. In conclusion, SRC-1/3 are necessary for cardiomyocyte differentiation and proliferation at previously developmental levels, and their dysfunction causes NCC-like abnormalities in the hearts of adult and newborn mice. and null PF-03084014 mice display impaired lung maturation and neonatal mice Mouse monoclonal antibody to D6 CD54 (ICAM 1). This gene encodes a cell surface glycoprotein which is typically expressed on endothelial cellsand cells of the immune system. It binds to integrins of type CD11a / CD18, or CD11b / CD18and is also exploited by Rhinovirus as a receptor. [provided by RefSeq, Jul 2008] and lethality are completely ...
There were 24,701 patients with takotsubo cardiomyopathy. Critical illnesses were present in 28% (n = 6,892) of patients, including acute renal failure (10.5%), sepsis (7.1%), and stroke (2.7%). In-hospital mortality was 4.2% (n = 1,027). Mortality was higher in men (odds ratio [OR], 2.4; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.1-2.8) with a trend toward higher mortality in patients ≥65 years of age (OR, 1.2; 95% CI, 0.96-1.5). Underlying concomitant critical illnesses (e.g., renal failure, stroke, sepsis) were present in 81% of patients who died with takotsubo cardiomyopathy. Patients with concomitant critical illnesses had a mortality of 12.1% compared with 1.1% for those without a concomitant critical illness. Complications developed in 35% of patients with takotsubo cardiomyopathy including cardiogenic shock (4.7%), acute heart failure (41%), cardiac arrest (2.8%), and respiratory failure (6.7%). Men with takotsubo cardiomyopathy were more likely to suffer cardiogenic shock (OR, 1.27; 95% CI, ...
Mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) may cause maternally-inherited cardiomyopathy and heart failure. In homoplasmy all mtDNA copies contain the mutation. In heteroplasmy there is a mixture of normal and mutant copies of mtDNA. The clinical phenotype of an affected individual depends on the type of genetic defect...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Surgical options for the management of ischemic cardiomyopathy. AU - Michler, Robert E.. PY - 2013/10. Y1 - 2013/10. N2 - Opinion statement: Novel surgical alternatives and the refinement of conventional surgical therapies for the treatment of ischemic cardiomyopathy are in constant evolution. Current approaches involve the determined application of the appropriateness criteria for CABG surgery, the extension of mitral valve repair to complex patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy, finding appropriate patients who might benefit from surgical ventricular reconstruction, and surgical attempts to regenerate lost or damaged myocardium with transplanted stem cells. The refinement of surgical techniques and the medical optimization of candidates for surgery remain a cornerstone of management for patients with complex heart disease like ischemic cardiomyopathy. The horizon is bright for patients suffering from this condition and concentrated research efforts by groups such as the ...
Jack-just a heads-up on chronic hydroxychloroquine use. While serving as in locums hospital attending at Westchester Medical Center recently I became aware of 3-4 cases of biopsy proven cardiomyopathy due to HCQ. Unlike the rare case of acute cardiac toxicity associated with short-term use of HCQ, these were all long-term treatments for RA and the patients presented with cardiac decompensation misattributed to ischemic and/or non-ischemic cardiomyopathy. Also note that HCQ toxicity is now more apparent than in the past.(In early toxicity there are no visible signs, but field, OCT and mfERG changes can be detected). Have a good meeting in Hawaii- ...
Dilated cardiomyopathy, a disease of unknown etiology and pathogenesis, is associated with heart failure and compensatory hypertrophy. Although cell and animal models suggest a role for altered gene expression in the transition to heart failure, there is a paucity of data derived from the study of human heart tissue. In this study, we used DNA microarray profiling to investigate changes in the expression of genes involved in apoptosis that occur in human idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathic hearts that had progressed to heart failure.
A variant form of acute reversible cardiomyopathy: a case report. . Biblioteca virtual para leer y descargar libros, documentos, trabajos y tesis universitarias en PDF. Material universiario, documentación y tareas realizadas por universitarios en nuestra biblioteca. Para descargar gratis y para leer online.
The term "cardiomyopathy" is used to indicate myocardial dysfunction in the absence of an obstructive lesion or sustained hypertension. Cardiomyopathy can occur either in isolation or as a manifestation of a multisystem disease. Neonates who have an unrecognized cardiomyopathy may come to medical attention with a life-threatening decompensation associated with an otherwise minor illness, such as a viral upper respiratory infection. Alternatively, evidence of cardiomyopathy may be noted on an echocardiogram performed for evaluation of an unrelated problem. Other conditions cause ventricular dysfunction but may not have a long-term impact on cardiac muscle function, such as myocarditis or anomalous origin of the left coronary artery from the pulmonary artery, and will be discussed at the end of the chapter. ...
UniProt Consortium, Apweiler R, Martin MJ, ODonovan C, Magrane M, Alam-Faruque Y, Antunes R, Barrell D, Bely B, Bingley M, Binns D, Bower L, Browne P, Chan WM, Dimmer E, Eberhardt R, Fazzini F, Fedotov A, Foulger R, Garavelli J, Castro LG, Huntley R, Jacobsen J, Kleen M, Laiho K, Legge D, Lin Q, Liu W, Luo J, Orchard S, Patient S, Pichler K, Poggioli D, Pontikos N, Pruess M, Rosanoff S, Sawford T, Sehra H, Turner E, Corbett M, Donnelly M, van Rensburg P, Xenarios I, Bougueleret L, Auchincloss A, Argoud-Puy G, Axelsen K, Bairoch A, Baratin D, Blatter MC, Boeckmann B, Bolleman J, Bollondi L, Boutet E, Quintaje SB, Breuza L, Bridge A, deCastro E, Coudert E, Cusin I, Doche M, Dornevil D, Duvaud S, Estreicher A, Famiglietti L, Feuermann M, Gehant S, Ferro S, Gasteiger E, Gateau A, Gerritsen V, Gos A, Gruaz-Gumowski N, Hinz U, Hulo C, Hulo N, James J, Jimenez S, Jungo F, Kappler T, Keller G, Lara V, Lemercier P, Lieberherr D, Martin X, Masson P, Moinat M, Morgat A, Paesano S, Pedruzzi I, Pilbout S, ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Response by Golwala et al to Letter Regarding Article, "implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator for Nonischemic Cardiomyopathy. T2 - An Updated Meta-Analysis". AU - Golwala, Harsh. AU - Bajaj, Navkaranbir Singh. AU - Arora, Garima. AU - Arora, Pankaj. PY - 2017/6/20. Y1 - 2017/6/20. UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85020942448&partnerID=8YFLogxK. UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85020942448&partnerID=8YFLogxK. U2 - 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.117.028200. DO - 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.117.028200. M3 - Letter. C2 - 28630275. AN - SCOPUS:85020942448. VL - 135. SP - e1200-e1202. JO - Circulation. JF - Circulation. SN - 0009-7322. IS - 25. ER - ...
Cellular hypertrophy is a fundamental response of the stressed heart. Many of the pathways associated with cell division are known to be activated in this hypertrophic response, leading to the hypothesis that cardiomyocyte hypertrophy might be the result of a fundamental block in karyokinesis and cytokinesis, by which the adult cardiomyocyte is unable to disassemble sarcomeres, uncouple from neighboring cells and divide (Ahuja et al., 2007). Nuclear division and polyploidy are observed in the latest stages of human heart failure and reverse with ventricular unloading, but cellular dynamics earlier in the pathophysiological cascade have not yet been explored (Rivello et al., 2001). In the zebrafish model that we generated, we were able to explore the effects of disrupted sarcomere gene function during cardiogenesis. We found that when the embryonic heart is exposed to a hypertrophic stimulus, in contrast to the response in the adult mammalian heart, a hyperplastic response occurs. Whereas ...
Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, also known as stress-induced cardiomyopathy, is an acquired form of left ventricular systolic dysfunction seen in the setting of physiologic stress and the absence of coronary artery disease. It is thought to be caused by ex
TY - JOUR. T1 - Human eHAND, but not dHAND, is down-regulated in cardiomyopathies. AU - Natarajan, Aruna. AU - Yamagishi, Hiroyuki. AU - Ahmad, Ferhaan. AU - Li, Duanxiang. AU - Roberts, Robert. AU - Matsuoka, Rumiko. AU - Hill, Sandra. AU - Srivastava, Deepak. PY - 2001. Y1 - 2001. N2 - The progression of cardiomyopathy to congestive heart failure is often associated with the expression of fetal cardiac-specific genes. In mice, the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors, dHAND and eHAND, are expressed in a cardiac chamber-specific fashion and are essential for fetal cardiac development, but are down-regulated in the adult. Their expression in specific chambers of healthy and diseased human hearts has not been studied previously. Human dHAND and eHAND were mapped to human chromosomes 4q33 and 5q33, respectively, by fluorescent in situ hybridization, RNA from the four chambers of healthy human adult hearts, and from hearts of patients with several forms of cardiomyopathy, was obtained and ...
Familial dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is characterized by a weakening of the ventricular muscle that results in a reduction in the contraction force of the heart muscle. Genetic analysis of the DCM primarily focuses on genes that encode the sarcomere, cytoskeleton and ion channel proteins.
Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, described as transient regional contractile abnormalities limited to the apical and mid-segments of the left ventricle (LV), has also been reported to involve basal and/or mid LV segments (inverted Takotsubo); fewer reports, however, have addressed right ventricular (RV) dysfunction. To assess the distribution of regional abnormalities and RV involvement in Takotsubo cardiomyopathy and compare it to the literature. We evaluated 23 patients with both classical and inverted presentations (19 female, aged 64 ± 19 years), including 2 recurrences, totaling 25 episodes. Classical Takotsubo was observed in 15 patients, while 10 had the inverted form. LV ejection fraction (EF) was lower for classical compared to inverted presentation (30 ± 7 vs. 45 ± 4%, P | 0.001) with higher troponin values (1.3 ± 1.4 vs. 0.5 ± 0.6, P = 0.034). RV abnormalities were found in 7 patients (28%), mainly with classical presentation (6 patients), presenting with mid and apical RV impairment. One
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PubMed comprises more than 28 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.
... - Patients with end-stage heart failure secondary to either ischemic or idiopathic cardiomyopathy frequently demonstrate worsening..
Introduction: Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death worldwide, with coronary heart disease being the most common manifestation disease. While deaths attributed to coronary heart disease are falling in the developed world, the number of patients with cardiomyopathy continues to increase. In this paper, the current literature on imaging modalities for infiltrative and inflammatory cardiomyopathies is reviewed, focusing on the three most common diagnoses, namely sarcoidosis, amyloidosis, and myocarditis. Case report A 43-year-old male presented with palpitations and left ventricular systolic dysfunction for a second opinion following an initial nondiagnostic workup. The employed clinical and radiologic approach that led to a definitive diagnosis and disease-specific treatment is presented here. Conclusion: The current algorithms and the strengths and weaknesses of the various radiologic techniques in establishing a diagnosis in patients who present with new onset cardiomyopathy are ...
Scientists have identified the first gene linked to childhood-onset familial dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), one of the most common heart muscle diseases in children.
The term diabetic cardiomyopathy refers to a state of cardiac dysfunction independent of associated coronary artery disease that arises within weeks of hyperglycemia (HG) leading to longer term diabetes mellitus (DM) [1]. Diabetic cardiomyopathy in humans and animals is characterized in part by elevated end-diastolic left ventricular (LV) pressure, reduced end-diastolic LV volume, impaired augmentation of LV function in response to physiological stresses, reduced phosphocreatine resources and reduced LV filling rates [1-5]. Patients with diabetic cardiomyopathy often experience exertional dyspnea and a higher incidence of hospitalization due to heart failure. Currently there are no proven effective treatments for long term management of diabetic cardiomyopathy.. Cardiomyopathic effects in rodents or rabbits with HG or type 1 DM induced by treatments targeting pancreatic β-islet cells [6, 7] are characterized at the cardiomyocyte level by depressed adrenergic responsiveness [8, 9], prolonged ...
Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. This type involves abnormal growth or thickening of your heart muscle, particularly affecting the muscle of your hearts main pumping chamber. As thickening occurs, the heart tends to stiffen and the size of the pumping chamber may shrink, interfering with your hearts ability to deliver blood to your body. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy can develop at any age, but the condition tends to be more severe if it becomes apparent during childhood. Most affected people have a family history of the disease, and some genetic mutations have been linked to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy ...
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The reasons for concentrating on the earliest stages of HF stems from the common idea that this condition is more susceptible to reversal and also from the data of the EMPAREG OUTCOME trial showing the more robust effects, both in terms of hospitalization for HF and cardiovascular death, in the patients without HF at baseline or diagnosed during the study [10]. We therefore focused on patients with normal EF without current or prior symptoms of overt HF, but at high risk for the condition for presence of T2D and allowing for arterial hypertension and structural (LV hypertrophy) or functional (diastolic dysfunction) or biochemical (NT-pro-BNP) evidence of initial myocardial disease (Stage A and B HF according to ACC/AHA guidelines). In terms of pathophysiological changes the data are essentially based on few experimental studies and speculations [49]. SGLT2 inhibitors might actually affect myocardial functions through mechanisms that can act both directly and indirectly on the myocardium. Chronic ...
The following are excerpts from HRS Expert ConsensusStatement on theDiagnosisand Management of Arrhythmias Associated With Cardiac Sarcoidosis. This is a comprehensive review.
Takotsubo cardiomyopathy occurs when there is an abnormal contraction of the transient left ventricle, creating a balloon shape appearance initially during systole. The Japanese first described the heart condition around 1991. The shape of the heart resembles a Japanese octopus trapping pot with a rounded bottom and narrow neck; hence the name tako-tsubo.[1]
Cardiomyopathies in children are the focus of a new scientific statement from the American Heart Association that provides insight into the diagnosis and treatment of the diseases as well as identifying future research priorities.
Garg, J., Mann, K., Kimber, J. (2015, April 30). Pacemaker Induced Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy. Poster presented at: POMA, Philadelphia, PA.. ...
Dilated and ischemic cardiomyopathy diagnosis (costs for program #82535) ✔ University Hospital Düsseldorf ✔ Department of Cardiology, Pneumology and Angiology ✔ BookingHealth.com
Kelsey Gumm was diagnosed with left ventricular non-compaction cardiomyopathy, ending her military career. Find out how Kelsey reinvented herself and moved forward.
Today, mercury is one of the most potent neurotoxins known, causing severe alterations in the body tissues that lead to a wide range of adverse health effects in animals and humans. Mercurys creeping neurotoxicity is highly devastating, particularly in the central and peripheral nervous system. Decreased performance in areas of motor function and memory has been reported[…]. ...
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Jurko T, Jurko A, Mistinova Polakova J, Jurko A, Minarik M, Mestanik M, Bona Olexova L, Tonhajzerova I. Risk of delayed diagnosis in young patients with left ventricular non-compaction - a potential benefit of magnetic resonance imaging. Neuro Endocrinol Lett. 2019 Oct; 40(2): 68-74 ...
For the first time, scientists have successfully edited the DNA in a human embryo without causing any unintended harmful mutations.. An international team of scientists conducted an experiment using a powerful new gene-editing technique. Sperm was obtained from a donor carrying a genetic mutation that causes cardiomyopathy, a disorder that weakens the heart and causes irregular heartbeats, heart valve problems, and heart failure.. The sperm was used to fertilize donor eggs, and then the gene-editing tool was used to alter the mutation. Scientists described it as a microscopic surgery in which they administered a precise cut to the mutated gene.. When the gene was cut, the embryo was triggered to repair the defective gene on its own. The technique was used on 58 embryos, and the gene mutation was successfully corrected in 70 percent of them. Most importantly, the correction did not result in unintended defects in other areas of the DNA, as was the case in earlier experiments. The embryos were not ...
Date: Tuesday, April 7th, 2015Time: 8:30AM PST, 11:30AM EST, 5:30PM CETThe development of new medicines for Diabetes Type 2 complications has proven to be challenging due to the use of cell
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A microscope image of cardiac calcification in a mouse showing cardiac fibroblasts (red) expressing the ENPP1 protein (green and yellow) ...
The first consensus paper on atrial cardiomyopathies is set to be published simultaneously in EP Europace, HeartRhythm, and the Journal of Arrhythmia. The key contents are launched at CARDIOSTIM EHRA EUROPACE 2016.1
Epstein AE, DiMarco JP, Ellenbogen KA, et al. ACC/AHA/HRS 2008 Guidelines for Device-Based Therapy of Cardiac Rhythm Abnormalities: a report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice Guidelines (Writing Committee to Revise the ACC/AHA/NASPE 2002 Guideline Update for Implantation of Cardiac Pacemakers and Antiarrhythmia Devices) developed in collaboration with the American Association for Thoracic Surgery and Society of Thoracic Surgeons. J Am Coll Cardiol 2008; 51:e1-62. ...
A 34-year-old male patient with known atypical, predominantly right ventricular noncompaction cardiomyopathy1 was admitted to our department because of repeated ventricular tachycardias and implantable cardioverter defibrillator shocks (Figure A). An extracorporal life support system was implanted because of hemodynamic instability, and an electrophysiological study was performed. Epicardial access was achived by subxiphoid puncture. Endo- and epicardial electroanatomical voltage mapping (Ensite NavX, St Jude) revealed earliest activation in the area of the noncompaction myocardium (Figure B). Ablation was attempted with radiofrequency (irrigated tip, max 40 Watt) from epi- and endocardial access. However, the patient was still inducible in programmed ventricular stimulation, and during monitoring at the intensive care unit, sustained ventricular arrhythmias occurred. Stepwise, antiarrhythmic treatment including amiodarone, sotalol, and finally ranolazin was used to establish a stable sinus ...
Diabetic cardiomyopathy is a disorder of the heart muscle in people with diabetes. It can lead to inability of the heart to circulate blood through the body effectively, a state known as heart failure, with accumulation of fluid in the lungs (pulmonary edema) or legs (peripheral edema). Most heart failure in people with diabetes results from coronary artery disease, and diabetic cardiomyopathy is only said to exist if there is no coronary artery disease to explain the heart muscle disorder. One particularity of diabetic cardiomyopathy is the long latent phase, during which the disease progresses but is completely asymptomatic. In most cases, diabetic cardiomyopathy is detected with concomitant hypertension or coronary artery disease. One of the earliest signs is mild left ventricular diastolic dysfunction with little effect on ventricular filling. Also, the diabetic patient may show subtle signs of diabetic cardiomyopathy related to decreased left ventricular compliance or left ventricular ...
The Syrian cardiomyopathic hamster (BIO14.6), that develops both muscular dystrophy and progressive cardiomyopathy, is widely used as an animal model of autosomal recessive cardiomyopathy mimicking human hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and five genes have been proposed as strong candidates for the cause of cardiomyopathy. We recently mapped the cardiomyopathy locus of the hamster to the centromeric region of chromosome 9qa2.1-b1 by construction of a genetic linkage map of the Syrian hamster. Thus, we analyzed the loci of the five candidate genes, α tropomyosin, cardiac troponin T, adhalin, calpain 3 and cardiac myosin binding protein-C, by the FISH method, and found that these genes were mapped on the distal portion of chromosome 12qa5 and 4pa2 and the proximal portion of chromosomes 9qb7, 1qc1.1 and 1qb3, respectively. These results provide strong evidence that the five candidate genes previously proposed are not related to the hamster cardiomyopathy.. ...
Ischemic cardiomyopathy is a type of cardiomyopathy caused by a narrowing of the coronary arteries which supply blood to the heart. Typically, patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy have a history of acute myocardial infarction, however, it may occur in patients with coronary artery disease, but without a past history of acute myocardial infarction. This cardiomyopathy is one of the leading causes of sudden cardiac death. The adjective iscehemic means characteristic of, or accompanied by ischemia - local anaemia due to mechanical obstruction of the blood supply.[citation needed] Signs and symptoms of ischemic cardiomyopathy include sudden fatigue, shortness of breath, dizziness, and palpitations.[citation needed] Ischemic cardiomyopathy is the cause of more than 60% of all cases of systolic congestive heart failure in most countries of the world. A chest radiograph that demonstrates coronary artery calcification is a probable indication of ischemic cardiomyopathy. The following are causes of ...
MalaCards based summary : Mitochondrial Cardiomyopathy, also known as cardiomyopathy, maternally transmitted, is related to congenital cataract-hypertrophic cardiomyopathy-mitochondrial myopathy syndrome and mitochondrial complex v deficiency, mitochondrial 1. An important gene associated with Mitochondrial Cardiomyopathy is MT-TL2 (Mitochondrially Encoded TRNA Leucine 2 (CUN)), and among its related pathways/superpathways are Glucose / Energy Metabolism and tRNA Aminoacylation. The drugs Iron and Chelating Agents have been mentioned in the context of this disorder. Affiliated tissues include heart, skeletal muscle and kidney ...
Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, also known as broken heart syndrome, apical ballooning syndrome, or stress cardiomyopathy, occurs when a stressful emotional or physical event causes the left ventricle of the heart to dilate, leading to acute heart failure. The syndrome was first described in Japan in 1990. Signs and symptoms of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy are similar to acute myocardial infarction. The syn...
Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, apical ballooning syndrome or stress-induced cardiomyopathy is characterised by transient left ventricular dysfunction, mimicking myocardial infarction in the absence of obstructive coronary artery disease or acute plaque rupture on coronary angiography. The exact mechanism of myocardial dysfunction in Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is unknown; however, due to its association with physical and emotional stress, it is postulated that catecholamines play a central role in its pathogenesis. We present a case of a patient who was admitted with acute asthma exacerbation and was treated with β-2 agonist nebulisation and intravenous aminophylline. During her hospital stay she developed Takotsubo cardiomyopathy.
Background: Diabetic cardiomyopathy is a distinct cardiac pathology and the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Elevated glycogen content has been observed in the diabetic human myocardium, first recorded 80 years ago, suggesting that despite impaired glucose uptake cardiomyocytes accumulate glycogen. Anecdotal evidence of glycogen accumulation in the diabetic myocardium has since been recorded in the literature but a systematic investigation of this paradoxical phenomenon has not been conducted. Glycogen storage diseases demonstrate that increased cardiac glycogen is associated with severe functional deficits, and therefore the observed glycogen excess in diabetic hearts may be an important and novel agent of pathology in diabetic cardiomyopathy. Aim: This body of work aimed to systematically investigate the role myocardial glycogen accumulation in diabetic cardiomyopathy, with a focus on glycophagy, a glycogen-specific autophagy process. Key metabolic signaling pathways (insulin, AMPK, ...
Mutations in the DES gene coding for the intermediate filament protein desmin may cause skeletal and cardiac myopathies, which are frequently characterized by cytoplasmic aggregates of desmin and associated proteins at the cellular level. By atomic force microscopy, we demonstrated filament formation defects of desmin mutants, associated with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy. To understand the pathogenesis of this disease, it is essential to analyze desmin filament structures under conditions in which both healthy and mutant desmin are expressed at equimolar levels mimicking an in vivo situation. Here, we applied dual color photoactivation localization microscopy using photoactivatable fluorescent proteins genetically fused to desmin and characterized the heterozygous status in living cells lacking endogenous desmin. In addition, we applied fluorescence resonance energy transfer to unravel short distance structural patterns of desmin mutants in filaments. For the first time, we ...
Purpose: To estimate the cost-effectiveness of diagnostic pathways for assessing patients with ischaemic cardiomyopathy to identify patients with viable myocardium with a view to revascularisation Method: A decision analytic model was developed to estimate the cost-effectiveness of diagnostic strategies for assessing patients with ischaemic cardiomyopathy. The different diagnostic pathways were applied to a hypothetical cohort of patients with ischaemic cardiomyopathy and the probability of successful identification of viable myocardium and non-viable myocardium was determined by the accuracy of the diagnostic pathway. It was assumed that patients diagnosed with viable myocardium would be managed promptly by revascularisation and that the patients diagnosed with non-viable myocardium would be on medical therapy. The model assigned each patient a risk of death and rehospitalisation depending upon whether they are truly viable and whether they had revascularisation or not. Each patient then ...
Accepted on December 14, 2011.. Introduction. Cardiomyopathies are myocardial disorders in which the heart muscle is structurally and functionally abnormal in the absence of coronary artery disease, hypertension, valvular disease and congenital heart disease, sufficient to cause the observed myocardial abnormality. They are classified into a number of morphological and functional phenotypes that can be caused by genetic and non-genetic mechanisms. A few key themes have been dominant in 2010 to 2011, foremost of which are the use (and interpretation) of increasingly sophisticated genetic analyses and the use of new non-invasive imaging techniques to study clinical phenotypes. There were few advances in treatment reported and it remains clear that there is a need for properly conducted randomised trials in all forms of cardiomyopathy.. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). HCM is defined by the presence of myocardial hypertrophy unexplained by loading conditions. It is a genetic disorder ...
Despite various advances in cardiovascular imaging and blood-based biomarkers, the detection of cardiac sarcoidosis can be incredibly challenging, as there is no single reliable test for diagnosing this condition. Endomyocardial biopsy has limited sensitivity to detect cardiac involvement, in part because of the focal nature of this disease, and various proposed clinical criteria have uncertain diagnostic accuracy and have not been adequately validated. Consequently, imaging plays a central role in evaluating patients with known or suspected sarcoidosis. Yet, because of the absence of a reliable gold reference standard, the true diagnostic accuracy of various tests is unknown, and therefore, there has been significant debate regarding what is the most optimal initial imaging test to detect cardiac sarcoidosis. Because of the uncertainty that exists with various clinical criteria and imaging findings, and because of marked variability in the natural history, presentation, and outcomes of patients ...
Background Still left ventricular noncompaction (LVNC) is a rare congenital abnormality. be aware of LVNC due to its high likelihood of misdiagnosis and PHT-427 associated high complication rates. Early diagnosis intervention and screening among family members can decrease the morbidity and mortality associated with LVNC. Background Noncompaction of the ventricular myocardium also called left ventricular noncompaction (LVNC) is usually a rare congenital abnormality seen in only 0.05% of adults [1]. It is characterized by spongy myocardium and results from arrest of the compaction of the loosely interwoven meshwork of myocardial fibers during endomyocardial morphogenesis between 5-8 weeks of fetal life. With the introduction of new diagnostic imaging techniques more cases of LVNC are being detected. Early diagnosis is crucial due to associated high morbidity and mortality. Case Report A 60-year-old Caucasian woman with a frequent history of asthma presented to the hospital with several weeks ...
Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a heterogeneous, often familial disease, characterized by cardiac hypertrophy, predominantly affecting the interventricular septum. To date, no study has systematically analysed the genetic and phenotypic aspects of the disease in a Swedish population. The aim of this thesis was to identify the genotypes causing HCM in northern Sweden, to characterize the disease phenotypes and correlate these findings.. Forty-six patients were recruited for the genetic studies (21 women), 11 familial and 35 sporadic cases. Eight sarcomeric protein genes were screened for mutations. A total of 11 different disease causing mutations were found in four genes. Six of the mutations were previously not described. A novel mutation (a 33 base pair deletion) in the troponin I gene was found in one HCM family. Despite the severe genetic defect, the associated phenotype displayed only mild cardiac hypertrophy and few symptoms. Most mutations (64%) were identified in the myosin binding ...
In regards to the recently published paper by Hurst et al. (1), I would like to emphasize some of the classic echocardiographic features that are useful for early diagnosis of stress cardiomyopathy (2). In the classic case, the most important feature is apical ballooning involving all left ventricular (LV) walls with a hyperdynamic base, not limited to any single coronary territory (Fig. 1). The diagnosis of apical ballooning syndrome should be strongly considered based on this echocardiographic feature in conjunction with clinical data. In selected cases, it is reasonable to defer coronary angiography and wait for full recovery of LV function in a few days or weeks by repeating echocardiography. The second most important feature is involvement of the right ventricular apex in the same manner as the LV apical involvement. This feature occurs in approximately one-fourth of the patients (2-5), and if present, makes the diagnosis of apical ballooning syndrome almost certain (Fig. 2). In reverse or ...
MalaCards based summary : Keshan Disease, also known as caused by deficiency of selenium in the diet, is related to atrial standstill 1 and dilated cardiomyopathy. An important gene associated with Keshan Disease is GPX1 (Glutathione Peroxidase 1), and among its related pathways/superpathways are Allograft rejection and Immune response NFAT in immune response. The drugs Selenium and Micronutrients have been mentioned in the context of this disorder. Affiliated tissues include heart, liver and thyroid, and related phenotype is immune system ...
Background. Selected patients with cardiac sarcoidosis undergo heart transplantation, but outcomes may be adversely affected by recurrent cardiac sarcoidosis or progressive extra-cardiac sarcoidosis. Objectives. We present our single-center experience of patients with cardiac sarcoidosis who underwent heart transplantation.. Methods. Consecutive patients that underwent heart transplantation between 1990 and 2012 were assessed. Cardiac sarcoidosis was defined by the presence of multiple non-caseating epithelioid cell granulomata in the explanted heart. Baseline characteristics and clinical outcomes were compared with a control group without cardiac sarcoidosis that underwent heart transplantation during this period.. Results. 901 patients underwent heart transplantation during the study period, of whom 4 patients had a pre-transplant diagnosis of cardiac sarcoidosis and 8 patients had sarcoidosis identified in the explanted heart. Patients with cardiac sarcoidosis had excellent post-transplant ...
Background There are still ambiguities existing in regard to left ventricular non-compaction (LVNC) diagnostic imaging. The aim of our study was to analyze diagnostic potential of late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) and ventricle geometry in patients with LVNC and controls. Methods Data on cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) studies for LVNC were reassessed from the hospitals database (3.75 years; n=1975 exams). Matching sample of controls included cases with no structural heart disease, hypertrophic or dilative cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia or subacute myocarditis. Eccentricity of the left ventricle was measured at end diastole in the region with pronounced NC and maximal to minimal ratio (MaxMinEDDR) was calculated. Results Study included 255 patients referred for CMR, 100 (39.2%) with LVNC (prevalence in the studied period 5.01%) and 155 (60.8%) controls. Existing LGE had sensitivity of 52.5% (95%-CI:42.3-62.5), specificity of 80.4% (95%-CI:73.2-86.5) for ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Cardiac sarcoidosis masquerading as right ventricular dysplasia. AU - Ott, Peter -. AU - Marcus, Frank I.. AU - Sobonya, Richard E. AU - Morady, Fred. AU - Knight, Bradley P.. AU - Fuenzalida, Charles E.. PY - 2003/7/1. Y1 - 2003/7/1. N2 - Patients with cardiac sarcoidosis may present with clinical and morphological features similar to arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia (ARVD) or cardiomyopathy (ARVC). Three cases of cardiac sarcoidosis are presented that clinically mimicked ARVD or ARVC until a pathology diagnosis of sarcoidosis was made at biopsy or autopsy. A diagnostic distinction, while often difficult to make, is important since treatment with corticosteroids may benefit those with sarcoidosis but is not expected to be useful in cases with ARVD or ARVC.. AB - Patients with cardiac sarcoidosis may present with clinical and morphological features similar to arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia (ARVD) or cardiomyopathy (ARVC). Three cases of cardiac sarcoidosis ...
Looking for online definition of endomyocardial fibrosis in the Medical Dictionary? endomyocardial fibrosis explanation free. What is endomyocardial fibrosis? Meaning of endomyocardial fibrosis medical term. What does endomyocardial fibrosis mean?
Familial Amyloid Polyneuropathy (Transthyretin Amyloidosis, Corino de Andrades Disease) - Pipeline Review, H1 2014. Summary. Global Markets Direct s, Familial Amyloid Polyneuropathy (Transthyretin Amyloidosis, Corino de Andrades Disease) - Pipeline Review, H1 2014, provides an overview of the indication s therapeutic pipeline. This report provides information on the therapeutic development for Familial Amyloid Polyneuropathy (Transthyretin Amyloidosis, Corino de Andrades Disease), complete with latest updates, and special features on late-stage and discontinued projects. It also reviews key players involved in the therapeutic development for Familial Amyloid Polyneuropathy (Transthyretin Amyloidosis, Corino de Andrades Disease). Familial Amyloid Polyneuropathy (Transthyretin Amyloidosis, Corino de Andrades Disease) - Pipeline Review, Half Year is built using data and information sourced from Global Markets Direct s proprietary databases, Company/University websites, SEC filings, investor ...
Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC), also called arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia (ARVD), is an underrecognized clinical entity manifested by ventricular arrhythmias and a specific ventricular pathology. It is characteriz
̣̣̣̺ Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia (ARVD), also called arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) or arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia/cardiomyopathy (ARVD/C), is an inherited heart disease.Wikipedia ARVD is caused by genetic defects of the parts of heart muscle (also called myocardium or cardiac muscle) known as desmosomes, areas on the surface of heart muscle cells which link the cells together. The desmosomes are composed of several proteins, and many of those proteins can have harmful mutations. The disease is a type of nonischemic cardiomyopathy that involves primarily the right ventricle. It is characterized by hypokinetic areas involving the free wall of the right ventricle, with fibrofatty replacement of the right ventricular myocardium, with associated arrhythmias originating in the right ventricle. ARVD can be found in association with diffuse palmoplantar keratoderma, and woolly hair, in a autosomal recessive condition called Naxos disease, ...

Broken Heart Syndrome (Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy) Triggered by Orthotopic Liver TransplantationBroken Heart Syndrome (Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy) Triggered by Orthotopic Liver Transplantation

Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is a special form of cardiomyopathy which is also known as Broken Heart Syndrome, Stress ... 2012) Stress-induced cardiomyopathy(takotsubo cardiomyopathy) after liver transplantation_report of two cases. Transplant Proc ... 17 of those patients were found to have non-ischemic cardiomyopathy. 76% of the patients with stress cardiomyopathy were found ... Takotsubo cardiomyopathy; Broken heart syndrome; Stress cardiomyopathy; Left ventricular apical ballooning syndrome; Liver ...
more infohttp://medcraveonline.com/GHOA/GHOA-06-00213.php

Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy/dysplasia | Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases | Full TextArrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy/dysplasia | Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases | Full Text

... like dilated cardiomyopathy, nor a sarcomeric disease, like hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The key for interpretation came from a ... dilated cardiomyopathy; HCM = hypertrophic cardiomyopathy; NonATS CAD = non-atherosclerotic coronary artery disease; Postop CHD ... Advances in cardiomyopathies. Edited by: Baroldi G, Camerini F, Goodwin JF. Milano: Springer Verlag; 1990:397-408.View Article ... Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy/Dysplasia. Edited by: Marucs FI, Nava A, Thiene G. Milano: Springer; 2007:7-14. ...
more infohttps://ojrd.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1750-1172-2-45

Takotsubo cardiomyopathy with use of salbutamol nebulisation and amino by Yousuf Hasan Khwaja and Javed Tai"Takotsubo cardiomyopathy with use of salbutamol nebulisation and amino" by Yousuf Hasan Khwaja and Javed Tai

The exact mechanism of myocardial dysfunction in Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is unknown; however, due to its association with ... During her hospital stay she developed Takotsubo cardiomyopathy. ... apical ballooning syndrome or stress-induced cardiomyopathy is ... Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, apical ballooning syndrome or stress-induced cardiomyopathy is characterised by transient left ... Takotsubo cardiomyopathy with use of salbutamol nebulisation and aminophylline infusion in a patient with acute asthma ...
more infohttps://ecommons.aku.edu/pakistan_fhs_mc_med_med/495/

Cardiomyopathy | Enlarged Heart | MedlinePlusCardiomyopathy | Enlarged Heart | MedlinePlus

Cardiomyopathy is a disease that causes the heart to become enlarged, thick, or stiff. Read about the different types, their ... Causes of Cardiomyopathy (Childrens Cardiomyopathy Foundation) * Diastolic Dysfunction (Texas Heart Institute) Also in Spanish ... Restrictive Cardiomyopathy (Texas Heart Institute) Also in Spanish * Takotsubo (Stress) Cardiomyopathy (American Heart ... Heart attacks, high blood pressure, infections, and other diseases can all cause cardiomyopathy. Some types of cardiomyopathy ...
more infohttps://medlineplus.gov/cardiomyopathy.html

Dilated cardiomyopathy: MedlinePlus Medical EncyclopediaDilated cardiomyopathy: MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia

Cardiomyopathy is disease in which the heart muscle becomes weakened, stretched, or has another structural problem. ... Cardiomyopathy - dilated; Primary cardiomyopathy; Diabetic cardiomyopathy; Idiopathic cardiomyopathy; Alcoholic cardiomyopathy ... There are many types of cardiomyopathy. Dilated cardiomyopathy is the most common form. ... Dilated cardiomyopathy is a condition in which the heart muscle becomes weakened and enlarged. As a result, the heart cannot ...
more infohttps://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000168.htm

Pediatric CardiomyopathiesPediatric Cardiomyopathies

... cardiomyopathy refers to a diseased state of the heart involving abnormalities of the muscle fibers, which contract with each ... What is cardiomyopathy?. The term cardiomyopathy refers to a diseased state of the heart involving abnormalities of the ... In most cases, the diagnosis of cardiomyopathy in a child elicits concern in both the child (if old enough to understand) and ... According to the Pediatric Cardiomyopathy Registry, one in every 100,000 children in the U.S. under the age of 18 is diagnosed ...
more infohttps://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/Conditions/More/CardiovascularConditionsofChildhood/Pediatric-Cardiomyopathies_UCM_312219_Article.jsp

New compendium on cardiomyopathiesNew compendium on cardiomyopathies

Cardiomyopathy refers to diseases of the heart muscle causing cardiac myocyte injury and myocardial dysfunction, which impair ... Chapters cover different kinds of cardiomyopathies: hypertrophic cardiomyopathies, pediatric cardiomyopathies, arrhythmogenic ... right ventricular cardiomyopathy, inherited cardiomyopathies, Chagas disease, Takotsubo cardiomyopathy and more. Readers will ... Cardiomyopathy refers to diseases of the heart muscle causing cardiac myocyte injury and myocardial dysfunction, which impair ...
more infohttps://www.news-medical.net/news/20200218/New-compendium-on-cardiomyopathies.aspx

Cardiomyopathy | cdc.govCardiomyopathy | cdc.gov

Learn about cardiomyopathy, a collection of conditions that affect the heart muscle. Read about its causes and treatment and ... Pediatric Cardiomyopathy. Cardiomyopathy can occur in children regardless of age, race, and gender. Pediatric cardiomyopathy ... How common is cardiomyopathy?. Cardiomyopathy often goes undiagnosed,5 so the numbers can vary. As many as 1 of 500 adults may ... Treatment also depends on which type of cardiomyopathy you have.. Genetic or inherited types of cardiomyopathy cannot be ...
more infohttps://www.cdc.gov/heartdisease/cardiomyopathy.htm

Hypertrophic CardiomyopathyHypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

[A condition in which the myocardium is hypertrophied without an obvious cause. The hypertrophy is generally asymmetric and may be associated with obstruction of the ventricular outflow tract.]
more infohttps://www.ebi.ac.uk/ols/ontologies/NCIT/terms?iri=http%3A%2F%2Fpurl.obolibrary.org%2Fobo%2FNCIT_C34449

Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy | OHSUHypertrophic Cardiomyopathy | OHSU

The Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Clinic at OHSU is the first of its kind in Oregon dedicated to treating this complicated ... Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy The Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) Clinic at OHSU is the first of its kind in Oregon dedicated ... What is hypertrophic cardiomyopathy?. Dr. Stephen Heitner, cardiologist at the OHSU Knight Cardiovascular Institute, talks ... Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common genetic cardiac condition, is difficult to diagnose and affects each ...
more infohttps://www.ohsu.edu/knight-cardiovascular-institute/hypertrophic-cardiomyopathy

cardiomyopathy - Postscardiomyopathy - Posts

Treatments and Tools for cardiomyopathy. Find cardiomyopathy information, treatments for cardiomyopathy and cardiomyopathy ... cardiomyopathy - MedHelps cardiomyopathy Center for Information, Symptoms, Resources, ... Posts on cardiomyopathy. Hypertropic Cardiomyopathy and Congenital Myocardial Bridging - Heart Disease Community ... My husband is 42 years old with dilated cardiomyopathy. At first he was told that he had p... ...
more infohttp://www.medhelp.org/tags/show/1503/cardiomyopathy?section=subjects

Myocarditis & the CardiomyopathiesMyocarditis & the Cardiomyopathies

The Cardiomyopathies *Primary Dilated Cardiomyopathy *Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy *Restrictive Cardiomyopathy Rheumatic Heart ... It is likely that most myocarditides are subclinical, though they may present later as idiopathic cardiomyopathy or with ... At this stage, patients present with cardiomyopathy, conduction disturbances, and sudden death. Associated gastrointestinal ... Many cases of dilated cardiomyopathy may represent the end stage of viral myocarditis. ...
more infohttp://www.health.am/cardio/more/myocarditis_the_cardiomyopathies/

Dilated CardiomyopathyDilated Cardiomyopathy

... What is Dilated Cardiomyopathy?. Dilated Cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a disease process that affects the ... Special testing for taurine levels may be indicated in animals suspected of dilated cardiomyopathy secondary to nutritional ...
more infohttps://www.lsu.edu/vetmed/veterinary_hospital/services/cardiology/diseases/acquired_diseases/dilated_cardiomyopathy.php

HIV associated cardiomyopathy - WikipediaHIV associated cardiomyopathy - Wikipedia

HIV is a major cause of cardiomyopathy - in particular dilated cardiomyopathy. Dilated cardiomyopathy can be due to pericardial ... The most common type of HIV induced cardiomyopathy is dilated cardiomyopathy also known as eccentric ventricular hypertrophy ... of HIV patients have dilated cardiomyopathy (176/1000) meaning the incidence has greatly increased. Dilated cardiomyopathy can ... of the myocardium was greater in patients with HIV associated cardiomyopathy (as opposed to idiopathic cardiomyopathy), ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HIV_associated_cardiomyopathy

Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy ScreeningHypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Screening

Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a genetic condition in which the heart fails to pump normally due to the muscular walls of the ... http://www.nhs.uk/conditions/cardiomyopathy/Pages/Introduction.aspx. *http://www.cardiomyopathy.org/genetics-of-cardiomyopathy/ ... www.bhf.org.uk/heart-health/conditions/cardiomyopathy/hypertrophic-cardiomyopathy. Further Reading. *All Hypertrophic ... Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a genetic condition in which the heart fails to pump normally due to the muscular walls of the ...
more infohttps://www.news-medical.net/health/Hypertrophic-Cardiomyopathy-Screening.aspx

Cardiomyopathy - ConservapediaCardiomyopathy - Conservapedia

Cardiomyopathy can have a specific cause, such as damage to the heart from a heart attack, high blood pressure, or a viral ... As cardiomyopathy progresses, the heart becomes weaker and less able to pump blood through the body. This can lead to heart ... In cardiomyopathy, the heart muscle becomes enlarged or abnormally thick or rigid. In rare cases, the muscle tissue in the ... Some types of cardiomyopathy are caused by a gene mutation and run in families. In many cases, the cause is unknown. ...
more infohttp://www.conservapedia.com/Cardiomyopathy

What is cardiomyopathy?What is cardiomyopathy?

... It is caused by a variety of things, including viral infection, vitamin and mineral deficiency, ... Cardiomyopathy can be defined simply as an inflammatory disorder of the heart muscle, which then becomes weakened and unable to ... Avoiding these factors where possible will reduce ones risk of developing cardiomyopathy. Occasionally there is a significant ... I am after any background information into the medical condition of cardiomyopathy. ...
more infohttps://www.netdoctor.co.uk/ask-the-expert/cardiovascular/a992/what-is-cardiomyopathy/

Glossary: CardiomyopathyGlossary: Cardiomyopathy

Cardiomyopathy. Definition:. A disorder affecting the heart muscle [cells] that usually results in the heart being unable to ... Alcoholic cardiomyopathy refers to heart damage and failure caused by intake of too much alcohol. ...
more infohttp://www.greenfacts.org/glossary/abc/cardiomyopathy.htm

Diabetic cardiomyopathy.  - PubMed - NCBIDiabetic cardiomyopathy. - PubMed - NCBI

Diabetic cardiomyopathy.. Fein FS1, Sonnenblick EH.. Author information. 1. Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY ... Diabetic cardiomyopathy as a distinct entity was first recognized by Rubler et al. in diabetics with congestive heart failure ( ...
more infohttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8086330?dopt=Abstract

Plus itPlus it

Puerperal Cardiomyopathy. Br Med J 1959; 2 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.2.5139.5 (Published 04 July 1959) Cite this as: Br ...
more infohttps://www.bmj.com/content/2/5139/5

Hypertrophic CardiomyopathyHypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

... (HCM) is a genetic condition that causes your heart walls to thicken. ... Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Symptoms. Often, people with HCM dont have any symptoms until sudden cardiac death occurs. If you ... Although hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is common (about 1 in 500 people have it), it affects each person differently. Some people ... This testing helps us find genes that put your family at risk of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. This lets you or your family get ...
more infohttps://www.emoryhealthcare.org/heart-vascular/hypertrophic-cardiomyopathy.html

Anthracycline and Peripartum Cardiomyopathies.Anthracycline and Peripartum Cardiomyopathies.

Anthracycline-associated cardiomyopathy and peripartum cardiomyopathy are nonischemic cardiomyopathies that often afflict ... Anthracycline and Peripartum Cardiomyopathies. Circ Res. 2019 May 24;124(11):1633-1646 Authors: Cowgill JA, Francis SA, Sawyer ... Anthracycline-associated cardiomyopathy and peripartum cardiomyopathy are nonischemic cardiomyopathies that often afflict ... Anthracycline and Peripartum Cardiomyopathies. Circ Res. 2019 May 24;124(11):1633-1646 Authors: Cowgill JA, Francis SA, Sawyer ...
more infohttps://medworm.com/697527225/anthracycline-and-peripartum-cardiomyopathies/

Cardiomyopathy | CirculationCardiomyopathy | Circulation

Christopher E. Woods, Ching Shang, Fouad Taghavi, Peter Downey, Adrian Zalewski, Gabriel R. Rubio, Jing Liu, Julian R. Homburger, Zachary Grunwald, Wei Qi, Christian Bollensdorff, Porama Thanaporn, Ayyaz Ali, R. Kirk Riemer, Peter Kohl, Daria Mochly-Rosen, Edward Gerstenfeld, Stephen Large, Ziad A. Ali and Euan A. Ashley ...
more infohttp://circ.ahajournals.org/collection/cardiomyopathy?page=4

Conditions: Cardiomyopathy | The TimesConditions: Cardiomyopathy | The Times

... hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) and restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM ... Dilated cardiomyopathy: The heart becomes enlarged and pumps less strongly. The heart muscle becomes weak, thin or floppy and ... Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: This is characterised by an excessive thickening of the heart muscle. The cardiac muscle cells are ... There are four main forms - dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), ...
more infohttps://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/conditions-cardiomyopathy-klzbwk6xwb2

CARDIOMYOPATHY Implanted he ... - The Washington PostCARDIOMYOPATHY Implanted he ... - The Washington Post

BOTTOM LINE People with cardiomyopathy may want to ask their doctor whether a pacemaker or a defibrillator, or both, might ... THE QUESTION The most common type of heart muscle disease, or cardiomyopathy, occurs when the organ becomes enlarged, or ... THIS STUDY randomly assigned 1,520 people diagnosed with advanced heart failure caused by cardiomyopathy to be treated one of ... LEARN MORE ABOUT cardiomyopathy at www.americanheart.org and at www.tmc.edu/thi. ...
more infohttps://www.washingtonpost.com/archive/lifestyle/wellness/2004/06/08/cardiomyopathy-implanted-he/47ca05bc-91d9-4207-bcfe-60721047adb5/
  • Despite its importance, chronic chagas cardiomyopathy (CCC) pathophysiology is yet poorly understood, and independently of its social, clinical, and epidemiological importance, the therapeutic approach of CCC is still transposed from the knowledge acquired from other cardiomyopathies. (hindawi.com)
  • Therefore, the objective of this review is to describe the treatment of Chagas cardiomyopathy with emphasis on its peculiarities. (hindawi.com)
  • Acute and reversible cardiomyopathy provoked by stress in women from the United States," Circulation , vol. 111, no. 4, pp. 472-479, 2005. (hindawi.com)
  • For both cardiomyopathies, recent advances in basic and molecular sciences have illuminated the complex balance between cardiomyocyte and endothelial homeostasis via 3 broad pathways: reactive oxidative stress, interference in apoptosis/growth/metabolism, and angiogenic imbalance. (medworm.com)
  • Advances in the understanding of cardiomyopathies and the growth of cardiology have paralleled one another. (intechopen.com)
  • In most cases, the diagnosis of 'cardiomyopathy' in a child elicits concern in both the child (if old enough to understand) and the parent. (heart.org)
  • Readers will be informed about current research on different aspects of these cardiomyopathies such as etiology, important imaging methods used in diagnosis and treatment, genetics and clinical management. (news-medical.net)
  • The diagnosis of cardiomyopathy is made by a physician via a thorough history and physical exam. (healthcentral.com)
  • Alcohol abuse (alcoholic cardiomyopathy) Nonalcoholic toxic insults include administration of certain chemotherapeutic agents, in particular doxorubicin (Adriamycin), and cobalt. (wikipedia.org)
  • If you are diagnosed with cardiomyopathy, your doctor may tell you to change your diet and physical activity, reduce stress, avoid alcohol and other drugs, and take medicines. (cdc.gov)
  • When cardiomyopathy occurs, the normal muscle in the heart can thicken, stiffen, thin out, or fill with substances the body produces that do not belong in the heart muscle. (cdc.gov)
  • Further indications of the condtion may include: Arrhythmia Fainting Dizziness Cardiomyopathies are either confined to the heart or are part of a generalized systemic disorder, both often leading to cardiovascular death or progressive heart failure-related disability. (wikipedia.org)
  • Written by a panel of recognized experts, this Web site brochure familiarizes children and/or their parents with the basic concepts of cardiomyopathy from its definition to the latest potential treatment options. (heart.org)
  • Over the years, many classification methods have been developed for cardiomyopathies based on aetiology, structural models and the functional approach. (intechopen.com)
  • The current American Heart Association definition divides cardiomyopathies into primary, which affect the heart alone, and secondary, which are the result of illness affecting other parts of the body. (wikipedia.org)
  • This compendium also introduces the reader to new terms describing groups of cardiomyopathies to enable them to apply modern clinical management principles while treating patients. (news-medical.net)