A genus of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic bacteria in the family CARDIOBACTERIACEAE. It is found in the nasal flora of humans and causes ENDOCARDITIS.
A genus of gram-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacteria whose organisms are part of the normal flora of the mucous membranes of the upper respiratory tract. Some species are pathogenic for man.
A genus of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that occurs in the human mouth and intestine. Organisms of this genus can be opportunistic pathogens.
A family of gram-negative, parasitic bacteria including several important pathogens of man.
Inflammation of the ENDOCARDIUM caused by BACTERIA that entered the bloodstream. The strains of bacteria vary with predisposing factors, such as CONGENITAL HEART DEFECTS; HEART VALVE DISEASES; HEART VALVE PROSTHESIS IMPLANTATION; or intravenous drug use.
Gram-negative bacteria isolated from infections of the respiratory and intestinal tracts and from the buccal cavity, intestinal tract, and urogenital tract. They are probably part of the normal flora of man and animals.
Infections caused by bacteria that show up as pink (negative) when treated by the gram-staining method.
A genus of PASTEURELLACEAE that consists of several species occurring in animals and humans. Its organisms are described as gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, coccobacillus or rod-shaped, and nonmotile.
Constituent of 30S subunit prokaryotic ribosomes containing 1600 nucleotides and 21 proteins. 16S rRNA is involved in initiation of polypeptide synthesis.
A species of gram-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacteria which is distinguished from other members of the genus KINGELLA by its beta hemolysis. It occurs normally in human mucous membranes of the upper respiratory tract, but can cause septic arthritis and endocarditis. (From Bergey's Manual of Determinative Bacteriology, 9th ed)
A species of Gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic spherical or rod-shaped bacteria indigenous to oral cavity and pharynx. It is associated with BACTERIAL ENDOCARDITIS; and MENINGITIS.
A species of gram-negative bacteria in the genus HAEMOPHILUS, ubiquitous in the human ORAL CAVITY and PHARYNX. It has low pathogenicity but is occasionally implicated in ENDOCARDITIS in humans.
A species of gram-negative bacteria in the genus HAEMOPHILUS, found in the normal flora of the human ORAL CAVITY and PHARYNX. It can cause SUBACUTE BACTERIAL ENDOCARDITIS; and BRAIN ABSCESS, among other conditions.
Heart sounds caused by vibrations resulting from the flow of blood through the heart. Heart murmurs can be examined by HEART AUSCULTATION, and analyzed by their intensity (6 grades), duration, timing (systolic, diastolic, or continuous), location, transmission, and quality (musical, vibratory, blowing, etc).
Inflammation of the inner lining of the heart (ENDOCARDIUM), the continuous membrane lining the four chambers and HEART VALVES. It is often caused by microorganisms including bacteria, viruses, fungi, and rickettsiae. Left untreated, endocarditis can damage heart valves and become life-threatening.
The valve between the left ventricle and the ascending aorta which prevents backflow into the left ventricle.
A species of parasitic protozoa found in the intestines of humans and other primates. It was classified as a yeast in 1912. Over the years, questions arose about this designation. In 1967, many physiological and morphological B. hominis characteristics were reported that fit a protozoan classification. Since that time, other papers have corroborated this work and the organism is now recognized as a protozoan parasite of humans causing intestinal disease with potentially disabling symptoms.
Inflammatory responses of the epithelium of the URINARY TRACT to microbial invasions. They are often bacterial infections with associated BACTERIURIA and PYURIA.
The duct which coveys URINE from the pelvis of the KIDNEY through the URETERS, BLADDER, and URETHRA.
Inflammation of the KIDNEY involving the renal parenchyma (the NEPHRONS); KIDNEY PELVIS; and KIDNEY CALICES. It is characterized by ABDOMINAL PAIN; FEVER; NAUSEA; VOMITING; and occasionally DIARRHEA.
Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)
Discharge of URINE, liquid waste processed by the KIDNEY, from the body.
Inflammation of the URINARY BLADDER, either from bacterial or non-bacterial causes. Cystitis is usually associated with painful urination (dysuria), increased frequency, urgency, and suprapubic pain.
A musculomembranous sac along the URINARY TRACT. URINE flows from the KIDNEYS into the bladder via the ureters (URETER), and is held there until URINATION.
A family of gram-negative, mostly aerobic bacteria, in the order Cardiobacteriales. There are three genera: CARDIOBACTERIUM; DICHELOBACTER; and Suttonella.
A group of the proteobacteria comprised of facultatively anaerobic and fermentative gram-negative bacteria.
An island in the Lesser Antilles, one of the Windward Islands. Its capital is Fort-de-France. It was discovered by Columbus in 1502 and from its settlement in 1635 by the French it passed into and out of Dutch and British hands. It was made a French overseas department in 1946. One account of the name tells of native women on the shore calling "Madinina" as Columbus approached the island. The meaning was never discovered but was entered on early charts as Martinique, influenced by the name of St. Martin. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p734 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p339)
Widely scattered islands in the Atlantic Ocean as far north as the AZORES and as far south as the South Sandwich Islands, with the greatest concentration found in the CARIBBEAN REGION. They include Annobon Island, Ascension, Canary Islands, Falkland Islands, Fernando Po (also called Isla de Bioko and Bioko), Gough Island, Madeira, Sao Tome and Principe, Saint Helena, and Tristan da Cunha.
A condition in which closely related persons, usually in the same family, share the same delusions.
Heat- and storage-labile plasma glycoprotein which accelerates the conversion of prothrombin to thrombin in blood coagulation. Factor V accomplishes this by forming a complex with factor Xa, phospholipid, and calcium (prothrombinase complex). Deficiency of factor V leads to Owren's disease.
A plasma protein that is the inactive precursor of thrombin. It is converted to thrombin by a prothrombin activator complex consisting of factor Xa, factor V, phospholipid, and calcium ions. Deficiency of prothrombin leads to hypoprothrombinemia.
Cylindrical epithelial cells in the innermost layer of the ENAMEL ORGAN. Their functions include contribution to the development of the dentinoenamel junction by the deposition of a layer of the matrix, thus producing the foundation for the prisms (the structural units of the DENTAL ENAMEL), and production of the matrix for the enamel prisms and interprismatic substance. (From Jablonski's Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)
A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.
Sequential operating programs and data which instruct the functioning of a digital computer.
The portion of an interactive computer program that issues messages to and receives commands from a user.
The guidelines and policy statements set forth by the editor(s) or editorial board of a publication.
INFLAMMATION of the placental membranes (CHORION; AMNION) and connected tissues such as fetal BLOOD VESSELS and UMBILICAL CORD. It is often associated with intrauterine ascending infections during PREGNANCY.
The homogeneous mixtures formed by the mixing of a solid, liquid, or gaseous substance (solute) with a liquid (the solvent), from which the dissolved substances can be recovered by physical processes. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)
Lists of persons or organizations, systematically arranged, usually in alphabetic or classed order, giving address, affiliations, etc., for individuals, and giving address, officers, functions, and similar data for organizations. (ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)
Treatment of diseases with biological materials or biological response modifiers, such as the use of GENES; CELLS; TISSUES; organs; SERUM; VACCINES; and humoral agents.
The protection of animals in laboratories or other specific environments by promoting their health through better nutrition, housing, and care.
Laws and regulations, pertaining to the field of medicine, proposed for enactment or enacted by a legislative body.
Organized institutions which provide services to ameliorate conditions of need or social pathology in the community.
The complex of political institutions, laws, and customs through which the function of governing is carried out in a specific political unit.

Endocarditis with ruptured cerebral aneurysm caused by Cardiobacterium valvarum sp. nov. (1/18)

A fastidious gram-negative bacterium was isolated from the blood of a 37-year-old man who had insidious endocarditis with a sudden rupture of a cerebral aneurysm. Characterization of the organism through phylogenetic and phenotypic analyses revealed a novel species of Cardiobacterium, for which the name Cardiobacterium valvarum sp. nov. is proposed. C. valvarum will supplement the current sole species Cardiobacterium hominis, a known cause of endocarditis. Surgeries and antibiotic treatment cured the patient's infection and associated complications. During cardiac surgery, a congenital bicuspid aortic valve was found to be the predisposing factor for his endocarditis.  (+info)

Characterization of oral strains of Cardiobacterium valvarum and emended description of the organism. (2/18)

The description of the new species Cardiobacterium valvarum prompted a search for additional strains of the organism. Here we report characterization of four oral Cardiobacterium strains from the Culture Collection of the University of Goteborg. The 16S rRNA gene sequences of the organisms exhibited 99.6% to 99.3% homology with Cardiobacterium valvarum. The cellular fatty acid profiles, electrophoretic patterns of whole-cell proteins, growth rate and nutritional requirement, colonial and cellular morphology, and biochemical reactions were also similar to those of C. valvarum. These results thus classify these organisms as oral strains of C. valvarum. All strains were susceptible to many antibiotics tested. The description of the species was emended. C. valvarum is a rare cause of endocarditis, and its relationship with periodontal diseases may need investigation.  (+info)

The role of 16S rRNA gene sequencing in identification of microorganisms misidentified by conventional methods. (3/18)

Traditional methods for microbial identification require the recognition of differences in morphology, growth, enzymatic activity, and metabolism to define genera and species. Full and partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing methods have emerged as useful tools for identifying phenotypically aberrant microorganisms. We report on three bacterial blood isolates from three different College of American Pathologists-certified laboratories that were referred to ARUP Laboratories for definitive identification. Because phenotypic identification suggested unusual organisms not typically associated with the submitted clinical diagnosis, consultation with the Medical Director was sought and further testing was performed including partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing. All three patients had endocarditis, and conventional methods identified isolates from patients A, B, and C as a Facklamia sp., Eubacterium tenue, and a Bifidobacterium sp. 16S rRNA gene sequencing identified the isolates as Enterococcus faecalis, Cardiobacterium valvarum, and Streptococcus mutans, respectively. We conclude that the initial identifications of these three isolates were erroneous, may have misled clinicians, and potentially impacted patient care. 16S rRNA gene sequencing is a more objective identification tool, unaffected by phenotypic variation or technologist bias, and has the potential to reduce laboratory errors.  (+info)

Utility of extended blood culture incubation for isolation of Haemophilus, Actinobacillus, Cardiobacterium, Eikenella, and Kingella organisms: a retrospective multicenter evaluation. (4/18)

The incidence of and average time to detection for Haemophilus, Actinobacillus, Cardiobacterium, Eikenella, and Kingella (HACEK) bacteria in blood cultures with standard incubation and the utility of extended incubation of blood culture bottles were reviewed at four tertiary care microbiology laboratories. HACEK organisms were isolated from 35 (<0.005%) of 59,203 positive blood cultures. None of 407 blood cultures with extended incubation grew HACEK or other bacteria. Bacteremia from HACEK bacteria is rare, and extended incubation of blood cultures to recover HACEK bacteria is unnecessary.  (+info)

Endocarditis caused by Cardiobacterium valvarum. (5/18)

A fastidious, gram-negative bacterium was isolated from the blood of a 51-year-old man who had acute infectious endocarditis (IE). Characterization of the organism through phenotypic and genotypic analyses revealed the causative role of Cardiobacterium valvarum. This is the third reported case of IE caused by C. valvarum.  (+info)

Direct detection of Cardiobacterium hominis in serum from a patient with infective endocarditis by broad-range bacterial PCR. (6/18)

Bacterial DNA was detected directly in the serum of a patient with endocarditis by broad-range 16S rRNA PCR followed by sequencing and analysis of the results by the BLAST search. Using these methods, Cardiobacterium hominis was identified in 2 days from the date of serum collection. The microorganism was also isolated and identified using conventional methods (bacterial culture and biochemical tests) 17 days from the date of sample collection. This is the first report showing the direct detection of C. hominis in a patient's serum using molecular-based methods, emphasizing their potential usefulness as additional and rapid diagnostic tools for the detection and identification of fastidious bacteria.  (+info)

Cardiobacterium hominis endocarditis: Two cases and a review of the literature. (7/18)

Cardiobacterium hominis, a member of the HACEK group (Haemophilus parainfluenzae, Haemophilus aphrophilus, and Haemophilus paraphrophilus, Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, C. hominis, Eikenella corrodens, and Kingella species), is a rare cause of endocarditis. There are 61 reported cases of C. hominis infective endocarditis in the English-language literature, 15 of which involved prosthetic valve endocarditis. There is one reported case of C. hominis after upper endoscopy and none reported after colonoscopy. Presented here are two cases of C. hominis prosthetic valve endocarditis following colonoscopy and a review of the microbiological and clinical features of C. hominis endocarditis. Patients with C. hominis infection have a long duration of symptoms preceding diagnosis (138+/-128 days). The most common symptoms were fever (74%), fatigue/malaise (53%), weight loss/anorexia (40%), night sweats (24%), and arthralgia/myalgia (21%). The most common risk factors were pre-existing cardiac disease (61%), the presence of a prosthetic valve (28%), and history of rheumatic fever (20%). Of the 61 cases reviewed here, the aortic valve was infected in 24 (39%) and the mitral valve in 19 (31%) patients. The average duration of blood culture incubation before growth was detected was 6.3 days (range, 2-21 days). Complications were congestive heart failure (40%), central nervous system (CNS) emboli (21%), arrhythmia (16%), and mycotic aneurysm (9%). C. hominis is almost always susceptible to beta-lactam antibiotics. Ceftriaxone is recommended by the recently published American Heart Association guidelines. The prognosis of C. hominis native valve and prosthetic valve endocarditis is favorable. The cure rate among 60 patients reviewed was 93% (56/60). For prosthetic valve endocarditis, the cure rate was 16/17 (94%). Valve replacement was required in 27 (45%) cases.  (+info)

Activity of DX-619 compared to other agents against viridans group streptococci, Streptococcus bovis, and Cardiobacterium hominis. (8/18)

Against 198 viridans group streptococci, 25 Streptococcus bovis strains, and 5 Cardiobacterium hominis strains, MICs of DX-619, a des-F(6)-quinolone, were between 0.004 and 0.25 microg/ml. These MICs were lower than those of other quinolones (< or = 0.008 to > 32 microg/ml). Beta-lactam MICs were between < or = 0.008 and 16 microg/ml. Azithromycin resistance was found in most species, while most were telithromycin susceptible. Glycopeptides and linezolid were active against viridans group strains but inactive against C. hominis.  (+info)

In their letter on endocarditis due to a novel Cardiobacterium species, I believe that Hoover and colleagues (1) described the second case of Cardiobacterium valvarum endocarditis. The first case, along with the isolation and establishment of the novel species C. valvarum, was reported in April 2004 (2), and the species name was validated in the same year (3). This case of insidious endocarditis was not diagnosed until sudden rupture of a cerebral aneurysm. Headache, aphasia, and the stigmata of aortic valve endocarditis (diastolic heart murmur, anemia, and leukocytosis) were initial diagnostic features in this 37-year-old man. The lack of fever, the history of dental work, and the presence of a bicuspid aortic valve (discovered during cardiac surgery) were also similar to Hoover and colleagues case. Since the initial isolation of C. valvarum in late 2001, efforts were made to search for additional strains and a possible reservoir of the organism. Four oral strains were found in the Culture ...
CARDIOBACTERIUM HOMINIS PDF - Cardiobacterium hominis is a slow-growing, fastidious, capnophilic, Gram- negative bacillus represented by the C in HACEK, an acronym for.
False-colour scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of Cardiobacterium hominis, a Gram-negative bacillus (rod-like bacterium) that causes endocarditis in humans. C. hominis is the only member of the genus & endocarditis, inflammation of the interior of the heart, is the only human disease it causes. The bacterium enters the bloodstream via the mouth as a consequence of dental disease or procedures. Its virulence is associated with preexisting heart disease, as it adheres to damaged heart tissue & multiplies. Antibiotics provide effective treatment. Magnification: x2000 at 6x7cm size, x1000 at 35mm size. - Stock Image B220/0534
Cardiobacterium hominis is a member of the HACEK group (Haemophilus paraphrophilus, Haemophilus parainfluenzae, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Aggregatibacter aphrophilus, C hominis, Eikenella corrodens, and Kingella kingae), which are fastidious, gram-negative, aerobic bacilli that normally reside in the respiratory tract. They have ...
ID G9ZGC1_9GAMM Unreviewed; 341 AA. AC G9ZGC1; DT 22-FEB-2012, integrated into UniProtKB/TrEMBL. DT 22-FEB-2012, sequence version 1. DT 07-JUN-2017, entry version 20. DE SubName: Full=Putative 2-keto-3-deoxygluconate transporter {ECO:0000313,EMBL:EHM53297.1}; GN ORFNames=HMPREF9080_01824 {ECO:0000313,EMBL:EHM53297.1}; OS Cardiobacterium valvarum F0432. OC Bacteria; Proteobacteria; Gammaproteobacteria; Cardiobacteriales; OC Cardiobacteriaceae; Cardiobacterium. OX NCBI_TaxID=797473 {ECO:0000313,EMBL:EHM53297.1, ECO:0000313,Proteomes:UP000004750}; RN [1] {ECO:0000313,EMBL:EHM53297.1, ECO:0000313,Proteomes:UP000004750} RP NUCLEOTIDE SEQUENCE [LARGE SCALE GENOMIC DNA]. RC STRAIN=F0432 {ECO:0000313,EMBL:EHM53297.1, RC ECO:0000313,Proteomes:UP000004750}; RA Weinstock G., Sodergren E., Clifton S., Fulton L., Fulton B., RA Courtney L., Fronick C., Harrison M., Strong C., Farmer C., RA Delahaunty K., Markovic C., Hall O., Minx P., Tomlinson C., RA Mitreva M., Hou S., Chen J., Wollam A., Pepin K.H., ...
Although infective endocarditis (IE) is relatively uncommon, it remains an important clinical entity with a high in-hospital and 1-year mortality. It is most commonly caused by viridans streptococci. Staphylococcus aureus is responsible for a malignant course of IE and often requires early surgery to eradicate. Other rarer causes are various bacilli, including the HACEK (Haemophilus, Actinobacillus, Cardiobacterium, Eikenella and Kingella spp.) group of organisms and fungi. The clinical presentation varies. Patients may present with a nonspecific illness, valve dysfunction, heart failure (HF) and symptoms due to peripheral embolisation. The diagnosis is traditionally based on the modified Duke criteria and rests mainly on clinical features and to a lesser extent on certain laboratory findings, microbiological assessment and cardiovascular imaging. Identification of the offending micro-organism is not only important from a diagnostic point of view, but also makes targeted antibiotic treatment possible
Zymoseptoria tritici is a host-specific, necrotrophic pathogen of wheat. Infection by Z. tritici is characterized by its extended latent period, which typically lasts two weeks, and is followed by extensive host cell death and rapid proliferation of fungal biomass. This work characterizes the level of genomic variation in 13 isolates for which we have measured virulence on 11 wheat cultivars with differential resistance genes. Between the reference isolate, IPO323, and the 13 Australian isolates we identified over 800,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms, of which ~10% had an effect on the coding regions of the genome. Furthermore we identified over 1700 probable presence/absence polymorphisms in genes across the Australian isolates using de novo assembly. Finally, we developed a gene tree sorting method that quickly identifies groups of isolates within a single gene alignment whose sequence haplotypes correspond with virulence scores on a single wheat cultivar. Using this method we have ...
The HACEK organisms are a group of fastidious gram-negative bacteria that are an unusual cause of infective endocarditis, which is an inflammation of the heart due to bacterial infection. HACEK is an abbreviation of the initials of the genera of this group of bacteria: Haemophilus, Aggregatibacter (previously Actinobacillus), Cardiobacterium, Eikenella, Kingella. The HACEK organisms are a normal part of the human microbiota, living in the oral-pharyngeal region. The bacteria were originally grouped because they were thought to be a significant cause of infective endocarditis, but recent literature has shown that they are rare and only responsible for 1.4-3% of all cases of this disease. HACEK originally referred to Haemophilus parainfluenzae, Haemophilus aphrophilus, Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Cardiobacterium hominis, Eikenella corrodens, and Kingella kingae. However, taxonomic rearrangements have changed the A to Aggregatibacter species and the H to Haemophilus species to reflect the ...
To the editor: Attention has focused recently on a number of slow-growing, fastidious, gram-negative bacteria, all upper respiratory commensal flora, as causes of infective endocarditis (1): Cardiobacterium hominis, Haemophilus aphrophilus, and Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, patients with underlying valvular heart disease presumably develop vegetations on their valves after bacteremia from an upper respiratory site. Due to the unusual growth characteristics of these organisms, isolation is difficult and the diagnosis may be missed. We haave seen a patient with endocarditis caused by Kingella denitrificans, another member of this group.. A 31-year-old man with aortic stenosis and insufficiency was admitted to Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center ...
Introduction. The incidence of infective endocarditis (IE) has increased over the past years as survival rates of patients with congenital heart disease improve.1 Main agents of IE are: (i) Viridans group Streptococci (S. milleri, S. mitior, S. salivarius, S. mutans and S. sanguis), mainly on patients with congenital heart disease; (ii) Staphylococcus aureus, generally associated with placement of central venous catheter and use of injecting drugs; (iii) Staphylococcus epidermidis, usually affecting patients following cardiac surgery and catheterized premature newborns.1 On the other hand, the HACEK group of bacteria (Haemophilus ssp, Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Cardiobacterium hominis, Eikenella corrodens and Kingella kingae) is responsible for 3% of IE in adults.1-3 The objective of this study is to report a case of rare occurrence of IE caused by Haemophilus aphrophilus in a child. Report of case The patient was a 12-year-old boy with a 20-day history of fever accompanied by chills ...
Referencias:. 1. Hill JD, OBrien TG, Murray JJ, et al. Prolonged Extracorporeal Oxygenation for Acute Post-Traumatic Respiratory Failure (Shock-Lung Syndrome)-Use of the Bramson Membrane Lung. N Eng J Med 1972;286:629-34. [ Links ] 2. Extracorporeal Life Support Organization Database, International Summary. (2016, July). Recuperado de www.elso.org. [ Links ] 3. El Houmami N, Cointat V, Mirand A. An Outbreak of Kingella kingae Infections Complicating a Severe Hand, Foot, And Mouth Disease Outbreak in Nice, France, 2016. Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2017;36(5):530-32. [ Links ] 4. Petti CA, Bhally HS, Weinstein MP, et al. Utility of Extended Blood Culture Incubation for Isolation of Haemophilus, Actinobacillus, Cardiobacterium, Eikenella, and Kingella Organisms: a Retrospective Multicenter Evaluation. Journal of Clinical Microbiology. 2006;44(1):257-59. [ Links ] 5. Martínez P, Romero C, Torroba L, Pérez A. Endocarditis por Kingella Kingae. An Pediatr (Barc). 2011;74(4):274-5. [ Links ] 6. Berkun Y, ...
Looking for online definition of Eikenella in the Medical Dictionary? Eikenella explanation free. What is Eikenella? Meaning of Eikenella medical term. What does Eikenella mean?
In his first email to the department since being named interim chair of Computer Science on July 3rd, 2017, Professor Larry Davis sent the following email celebrating Emeritus Professor Jack Minker: Congratulations to Professor Emeritus Jack Minker on celebrating his 90th birthday tomorrow, July 4. Jack joined the University of Maryland in 1971 and was the founding chair (1974) of our department. Through his hard work both as chair, and as a pioneer in the logical foundations of artificial intelligence, he set the high standards that we have all strived to maintain for nearly 50 years. Jack ...
The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases defines food allergy as an adverse immune response occurring reproducibly on exposure to a given food
Cardiobacterium Cardiobacterium hominis. Most common species in the Cardiobacterium genus. Cardiobacterium valvarum Eikenella ... Cardiobacterium, Eikenella, Kingella. The HACEK organisms are a normal part of the human microbiota, living in the oral- ... Cardiobacterium hominis, Eikenella corrodens, and Kingella kingae. However, taxonomic rearrangements have changed the A to ...
A urinary tract infection (UTI) is an infection that affects part of the urinary tract.[1] When it affects the lower urinary tract it is known as a bladder infection (cystitis) and when it affects the upper urinary tract it is known as a kidney infection (pyelonephritis).[9] Symptoms from a lower urinary tract infection include pain with urination, frequent urination, and feeling the need to urinate despite having an empty bladder.[1] Symptoms of a kidney infection include fever and flank pain usually in addition to the symptoms of a lower UTI.[9] Rarely the urine may appear bloody.[6] In the very old and the very young, symptoms may be vague or non-specific.[1][10] The most common cause of infection is Escherichia coli, though other bacteria or fungi may rarely be the cause.[2] Risk factors include female anatomy, sexual intercourse, diabetes, obesity, and family history.[2] Although sexual intercourse is a risk factor, UTIs are not classified as sexually transmitted infections (STIs).[11] ...
The word cholera is from Greek: χολέρα kholera from χολή kholē "bile". Cholera likely has its origins in the Indian subcontinent as evidenced by its prevalence in the region for centuries.[13] Early outbreaks in the Indian subcontinent are believed to have been the result of poor living conditions as well as the presence of pools of still water, both of which provide ideal conditions for cholera to thrive.[71] The disease first spread by trade routes (land and sea) to Russia in 1817, later to the rest of Europe, and from Europe to North America and the rest of the world.[13] Seven cholera pandemics have occurred in the past 200 years, with the seventh pandemic originating in Indonesia in 1961.[72] The first cholera pandemic occurred in the Bengal region of India, near Calcutta starting in 1817 through 1824. The disease dispersed from India to Southeast Asia, the Middle East, Europe, and Eastern Africa.[73] The movement of British Army and Navy ships and personnel is believed to have ...
... (TD) is a stomach and intestinal infection. TD is defined as the passage of unformed stool (one or more by some definitions, three or more by others) while traveling.[2][3] It may be accompanied by abdominal cramps, nausea, fever, and bloating.[3] Occasionally bloody diarrhea may occur.[5] Most travelers recover within four days with little or no treatment.[3] About 10% of people may have symptoms for a week.[3] Bacteria are responsible for more than half of cases.[3] The bacteria enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are typically the most common except in Southeast Asia, where Campylobacter is more prominent.[2][3] About 10% to 20% of cases are due to norovirus.[3] Protozoa such as Giardia may cause longer term disease.[3] The risk is greatest in the first two weeks of travel and among young adults.[2] People affected are more often from the developed world.[2] Recommendations for prevention include eating only properly cleaned and cooked food, drinking bottled water, and ...
Protective levels of anticapsular antibodies are not achieved until 7-14 days following administration of a meningococcal vaccine, vaccination cannot prevent early onset disease in these contacts and usually is not recommended following sporadic cases of invasive meningococcal disease. Unlike developed countries, in sub-Saharan Africa and other under developed countries, entire families live in a single room of a house.[21][22] Meningococcal infection is usually introduced into a household by an asymptomatic person. Carriage then spreads through the household, reaching infants usually after one or more other household members have been infected. Disease is most likely to occur in infants and young children who lack immunity to the strain of organism circulating and who subsequently acquire carriage of an invasive strain.[23] By preventing susceptible contacts from acquiring infection by directly inhibiting colonization. Close contacts are defined as those persons who could have had intimate ...
Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization ...
... is a large family of Gram-negative bacteria. It was first proposed by Rahn in 1936, and now includes over 30 genera and more than 100 species. Its classification above the level of family is still a subject of debate, but one classification places it in the order Enterobacterales of the class Gammaproteobacteria in the phylum Proteobacteria.[2][3][4][5] Enterobacteriaceae includes, along with many harmless symbionts, many of the more familiar pathogens, such as Salmonella, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella, and Shigella. Other disease-causing bacteria in this family include Enterobacter and Citrobacter. Members of the Enterobacteriaceae can be trivially referred to as enterobacteria or "enteric bacteria",[6] as several members live in the intestines of animals. In fact, the etymology of the family is enterobacterium with the suffix to designate a family (aceae)-not after the genus Enterobacter (which would be "Enterobacteraceae")-and the type genus is Escherichia. ...
... are a class of gram-negative bacteria, and one of the eight classes of the phylum Proteobacteria.[1] The Betaproteobacteria are a class comprising over 75 genera and 400 species of bacteria.[2] Together, the Betaproteobacteria represent a broad variety of metabolic strategies and occupy diverse environments from obligate pathogens living within host organisms to oligotrophic groundwater ecosystems. Whilst most members of the Betaproteobacteria are heterotrophic, deriving both their carbon and electrons from organocarbon sources, some are photoheterotrophic, deriving energy from light and carbon from organocarbon sources. Other genera are autotrophic, deriving their carbon from bicarbonate or carbon dioxide and their electrons from reduced inorganic ions such as nitrite, ammonium, thiosulfate or sulfide [1] - many of these chemolithoautotrophic Betaproteobacteria are economically important, with roles in maintaining soil pH and in elementary cycling. Other economically ...
Toxoplasmosis is becoming a global health hazard as it infects 30-50% of the world human population. Clinically, the life-long presence of the parasite in tissues of a majority of infected individuals is usually considered asymptomatic. However, a number of studies show that this 'asymptomatic infection' may also lead to development of other human pathologies. ... The seroprevalence of toxoplasmosis correlated with various disease burden. Statistical associations does not necessarily mean causality. The precautionary principle suggests however that possible role of toxoplasmosis as a triggering factor responsible for development of several clinical entities deserves much more attention and financial support both in everyday medical practice and future clinical research ...
... [1], previously known as Enterobacter aerogenes, is a Gram-negative, oxidase negative, catalase positive, citrate positive, indole negative, rod-shaped bacterium.[2] The bacterium is approximately 1-3 microns in length, and is capable of motility via peritrichous flagella.[3] K. aerogenes is a nosocomial and pathogenic bacterium that causes opportunistic infections including most types of infections. The majority are sensitive to most antibiotics designed for this bacteria class, but this is complicated by their inducible resistance mechanisms, particularly lactamase, which means that they quickly become resistant to standard antibiotics during treatment, requiring a change in antibiotic to avoid worsening of the sepsis. Some of the infections caused by K. aerogenes result from specific antibiotic treatments, venous catheter insertions, and/or surgical procedures. K. aerogenes is generally found in the human gastrointestinal tract and does not generally cause disease in ...
... , also known simply as typhoid, is a bacterial infection due to Salmonella typhi that causes symptoms.[3] Symptoms may vary from mild to severe and usually begin six to thirty days after exposure.[1][2] Often there is a gradual onset of a high fever over several days.[1] Weakness, abdominal pain, constipation, and headaches also commonly occur.[2][6] Diarrhea is uncommon and vomiting is not usually severe.[6] Some people develop a skin rash with rose colored spots.[2] In severe cases there may be confusion.[6] Without treatment, symptoms may last weeks or months.[2] Other people may carry the bacterium without being affected; however, they are still able to spread the disease to others.[4] Typhoid fever is a type of enteric fever along with paratyphoid fever.[3]. The cause is the bacterium Salmonella typhi, also known as Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi, growing in the intestines and blood.[2][6] Typhoid is spread by eating or drinking food or water contaminated with the feces of ...
Traditionally, gonorrhea was diagnosed with Gram stain and culture; however, newer polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based testing methods are becoming more common.[16][28] In those failing initial treatment, culture should be done to determine sensitivity to antibiotics.[29] Tests that use polymerase chain reaction (PCR, aka nucleic acid amplification) to identify genes unique to N. gonorrhoeae are recommended for screening and diagnosis of gonorrhea infection. These PCR-based tests require a sample of urine, urethral swabs, or cervical/vaginal swabs. Culture (growing colonies of bacteria in order to isolate and identify them) and Gram-stain (staining of bacterial cell walls to reveal morphology) can also be used to detect the presence of N. gonorrhoeae in all specimen types except urine.[30][31] If Gram-negative, oxidase-positive diplococci are visualized on direct Gram stain of urethral pus (male genital infection), no further testing is needed to establish the diagnosis of gonorrhea ...
... (PUD) is a break in the inner lining of the stomach, the first part of the small intestine, or sometimes the lower esophagus.[1][7] An ulcer in the stomach is called a gastric ulcer, while one in the first part of the intestines is a duodenal ulcer.[1] The most common symptoms of a duodenal ulcer are waking at night with upper abdominal pain and upper abdominal pain that improves with eating.[1] With a gastric ulcer, the pain may worsen with eating.[8] The pain is often described as a burning or dull ache.[1] Other symptoms include belching, vomiting, weight loss, or poor appetite.[1] About a third of older people have no symptoms.[1] Complications may include bleeding, perforation, and blockage of the stomach.[2] Bleeding occurs in as many as 15% of cases.[2] Common causes include the bacteria Helicobacter pylori and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).[1] Other, less common causes include tobacco smoking, stress due to serious illness, Behcet disease, ...
With a fatality risk approaching 15% within 12 hours of infection, it is crucial to initiate testing as quickly as possible, but not to wait for the results before initiating antibiotic therapy. A small amount of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is sent to the laboratory as soon as possible for analysis. The diagnosis is suspected, when Gram-negative diplococci are seen on Gram stain of a centrifuged sample of CSF; sometimes they are located inside white blood cells. The microscopic identification takes around 1-2 hours after specimen arrival in the laboratory.[3] The gold standard of diagnosis is microbiological isolation of N. meningitidis by growth from a sterile body fluid, which could be CSF or blood.[5] Diagnosis is confirmed when the organism has grown, most often on a chocolate agar plate, but also on Thayer-Martin agar. To differentiate any bacterial growth from other species a small amount of a bacterial colony is tested for oxidase, catalase for which all clinically relevant Neisseria show a ...
Plague has a long history as a biological weapon. Historical accounts from ancient China and medieval Europe detail the use of infected animal carcasses, such as cows or horses, and human carcasses, by the Xiongnu/Huns, Mongols, Turks and other groups, to contaminate enemy water supplies. Han Dynasty General Huo Qubing is recorded to have died of such a contamination while engaging in warfare against the Xiongnu. Plague victims were also reported to have been tossed by catapult into cities under siege. In 1347, the Genoese possession of Caffa, a great trade emporium on the Crimean peninsula, came under siege by an army of Mongol warriors of the Golden Horde under the command of Janibeg. After a protracted siege during which the Mongol army was reportedly withering from the disease, they decided to use the infected corpses as a biological weapon. The corpses were catapulted over the city walls, infecting the inhabitants. This event might have led to the transfer of the plague (Black Death) via ...
... , also known simply as paratyphoid, is a bacterial infection caused by one of the three types of Salmonella enterica.[1] Symptoms usually begin 6-30 days after exposure and are the same as those of typhoid fever.[1][3] Often, a gradual onset of a high fever occurs over several days.[1] Weakness, loss of appetite, and headaches also commonly occur.[1] Some people develop a skin rash with rose-colored spots.[2] Without treatment, symptoms may last weeks or months.[1] Other people may carry the bacteria without being affected; however, they are still able to spread the disease to others.[3] Both typhoid and paratyphoid are of similar severity.[3] Paratyphoid and typhoid fever are types of enteric fever.[7] Paratyphoid is caused by the bacterium Salmonella enterica of the serotypes Paratyphi A, Paratyphi B, or Paratyphi C growing in the intestines and blood.[1] They are usually spread by eating or drinking food or water contaminated with the feces of an infected person.[1] They may ...
and Assignment of the Genera Cardiobacterium, Dichelobacter, and Suttonella to Cardiobacteriaceae fam. nov. in the Gamma ... "Cardiobacterium", "Dichelobacter", and "Suttonella" to the new family of Cardiobacteriaceae. See below for the phylogeny of the ...
Cardiobacterium, Eikenella, and Kingella organisms: a retrospective multicenter evaluation". J. Clin. Microbiol. 44 (1): 257-9 ...
HACEK taldeko mikroorganimoak (Haemophilus parainfluenzae, Actinobacillus, Cardiobacterium, Eikenella corrodens y Kingella ...
... microaerophilic bacterium species in the genus Campylobacter Cardiobacterium hominis, a bacterium species that normally resides ...
The HACEK organisms (Haemophilus, Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Cardiobacterium hominis, Eikenella corrodens, Kingella ...
Cardiobacterium MeSH B03.660.250.080.550 --- Dichelobacter nodosus MeSH B03.660.250.110 --- chromatiaceae MeSH B03.660.250.110. ... Cardiobacterium MeSH B03.440.450.342.550 --- Dichelobacter nodosus MeSH B03.440.450.360 --- Chromobacterium MeSH B03.440. ...
ಇದಕ್ಕೆ ಪ್ರಮುಖ ಕಾರಣವೆಂದರೆ (60%ರಷ್ಟು ಜಠರದ/ಗ್ಯಾಸ್ಟ್ರಿಕ್‌ಗೆ ಹಾಗೂ ಸುಮಾರು 90%ರಷ್ಟು ಡ್ಯುವೋಡೆನಮ್‌ನ ಹುಣ್ಣು/ವ್ರಣಗಳಿಗೆ) ಹೆಲಿಕೋಬ್ಯಾಕ್ಟರ್‌ ಪೈಲೊರಿ ಯು ಕೋಟರದ ಲೋಳೆಪೊರೆಯನ್ನು ಆಕ್ರಮಿಸಿಕೊಳ್ಳುವದರಿಂದಾಗುವ ಬೇರೂರಿದ/ಸತತವಾಗಿ ಇರುವ ಉರಿಯೂತ. ಪ್ರತಿಕಾಯಗಳು ಕಂಡುಬಂದರೂ ರೋಗನಿರೋಧಕ ವ್ಯವಸ್ಥೆಯು ಸೋಂಕನ್ನು ನಿವಾರಿಸಲಾಗುವುದಿಲ್ಲ. ಆದ್ದರಿಂದ ಬ್ಯಾಕ್ಟೀರಿಯ/ಸೂಕ್ಷ್ಮಜೀವಿ/ಏಕಾಣುಜೀವಿಯು ಬೇರೂರಿದ ಸಕ್ರಿಯ ಜಠರದುರಿತ (ವಿಧ B ...
... is a Gram-negative bacillus (rod-shaped) bacterium commonly grouped with other bacteria into the HACEK ... Malani, AN; Aronoff, DM; Bradley, SF; Kauffman, CA (September 2006). "Cardiobacterium hominis endocarditis: Two cases and a ... Savage, DD; Kagan, RL; Young, NA; Horvath, AE (January 1977). "Cardiobacterium hominis endocarditis: Description of two ... full citation needed] Image: Cardibacterium hominins Type strain of Cardiobacterium hominis at BacDive - the Bacterial ...
... is a newly described HACEK organism causing endocarditis. When compared morphologically, the two ... 16S PCR can be used to distinguish the Cardiobacterium species. Clinical Microbiology Newsletter (CMN) Vol. 37, No. 16, August ... Cardiobacterium species are indistinguishable in culture, Gram stain, and growth characteristics. Isolates of C. valvarum show ...
പൊതുസ്ഥലങ്ങളിലെ ശുചിത്വവും വ്യക്തിശുചിത്വമുമാണ് ടൈഫോയ്ഡ് തടയാനുള്ള പ്രധാന പ്രധിരോധമാർഗ്ഗങ്ങൾ. മൃഗങ്ങളിലൂടെ ടൈഫോയ്ഡ് പകരാറില്ല. അതുകൊണ്ട് മനുഷ്യരിലൂടെ മാത്രമാണിത് പകരുന്നത്. മനുഷ്യർ അധിവസിക്കുന്ന സ്ഥലങ്ങളിൽ കുടിവെള്ളത്തിൽ മനുഷ്യവിസർജ്ജ്യവും മറ്റു മാലിന്യങ്ങളും കൂടിക്കലരുന്ന സാഹചര്യമുള്ള പരിതഃസ്ഥിതികളിലാണ് പ്രധാനമായും ടൈഫോയ്ഡ് പടരുന്നത്. ശ്രദ്ധാപൂർവ്വമായ ...
কলেরা একটি সংক্রামক রোগ যা পাশ্চাত্যে এশীয় কলেরা নামেই বেশি পরিচিত। ভিব্রিও কলেরী নামক ব্যাকটেরিয়ার আক্রমণে এই রোগ হয়ে থাকে যার প্রধান উপসর্গ মারাত্মক উদরাময় ndash; মুহূর্মহু প্রচুর জলের মত পাতলা পায়খানা, সঙ্গে পেটব্যথা, জলাভাবে শারীরিক দৌর্বল্য এবং চিকিৎসা না হলে শেষপর্যন্ত দেহে জলাভাবের ফলে মৃত্যু। মানব শরীরে সংক্রমণের প্রধান বাহক পানীয় জল অথবা খাদ্য। রোগটির প্রাকৃতিক ...
Cardiobacterium hominis is a member of the HACEK group (Haemophilus paraphrophilus, Haemophilus parainfluenzae, Aggregatibacter ... encoded search term (Cardiobacterium) and Cardiobacterium What to Read Next on Medscape. Related Conditions and Diseases. * ... Cardiobacterium Workup. Updated: Feb 29, 2016 * Author: Kerry O Cleveland, MD; Chief Editor: Michael Stuart Bronze, MD more... ... Cardiobacterium hominis is a rare cause of neonatal sepsis. Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2012 May. 31 (5):541-2. [Medline]. ...
In their letter on endocarditis due to a novel Cardiobacterium species, I believe that Hoover and colleagues (1) described the ... Han X. Cardiobacterium valvarum Endocarditis. Ann Intern Med. 2005;143:614. doi: 10.7326/0003-4819-143-8-200510180-00016 ... second case of Cardiobacterium valvarum endocarditis. The first case, along with the isolation and establishment of the novel ...
... of Cardiobacterium hominis, a Gram-negative bacillus (rod-like bacterium) that causes endocarditis in humans. C. hominis is the ... Keywords: bacteria, bacterial, bacteriology, bacterium, c. hominis and, cardiobacterium hominis, endocarditis, gram-negative ... Caption: False-colour scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of Cardiobacterium hominis, a Gram-negative bacillus (rod-like ...
Cardiobacterium hominis is a slow-growing, fastidious, capnophilic, Gram- negative bacillus represented by the C in HACEK, an ... Cardiobacterium hominis endocarditis - hpminis case report. Cardiobacterium hominis endocarditis - a case report. Pacemaker ... Cardiobacterium hominis is a slow-growing, fastidious, capnophilic, Gram- negative bacillus represented by the "C" in HACEK, an ... Cardiobacterium hominis, a microaerophilic, pleomorphic gram-negative bacillus , is one of the AACEK organisms. C. hominis is a ...
OC Bacteria; Proteobacteria; Gammaproteobacteria; Cardiobacteriales; OC Cardiobacteriaceae; Cardiobacterium. OX NCBI_TaxID= ...
Other rarer causes are various bacilli, including the HACEK (Haemophilus, Actinobacillus, Cardiobacterium, Eikenella and ... Other rarer causes are various bacilli, including the HACEK (Haemophilus, Actinobacillus, Cardiobacterium, Eikenella and ...
Cardiobacterium hominis is a Gram-negative bacillus (rod-shaped) bacterium commonly grouped with other bacteria into the HACEK ... Malani, AN; Aronoff, DM; Bradley, SF; Kauffman, CA (September 2006). "Cardiobacterium hominis endocarditis: Two cases and a ... Savage, DD; Kagan, RL; Young, NA; Horvath, AE (January 1977). "Cardiobacterium hominis endocarditis: Description of two ... full citation needed] Image: Cardibacterium hominins Type strain of Cardiobacterium hominis at BacDive - the Bacterial ...
Cardiobacterium valvarum is a newly described HACEK organism causing endocarditis. When compared morphologically, the two ... 16S PCR can be used to distinguish the Cardiobacterium species. Clinical Microbiology Newsletter (CMN) Vol. 37, No. 16, August ... Cardiobacterium species are indistinguishable in culture, Gram stain, and growth characteristics. Isolates of C. valvarum show ...
Cardiobacterium hominis, a member of the HACEK group of organisms, is an uncommon but important cause of subacute bacterial ... Subacute Bacterial Endocarditis Caused by Cardiobacterium hominis: A Case Report. Davie Wong,1 Julie Carson,2,3 and Andrew ...
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Cardiobacterium species answers are found in the Johns Hopkins ABX Guide powered by Unbound Medicine. Available for iPhone, ... Cardiobacterium species is a topic covered in the Johns Hopkins ABX Guide. To view the entire topic, please sign in or purchase ... "Cardiobacterium Species." Johns Hopkins ABX Guide, The Johns Hopkins University, 2019. Johns Hopkins Guide, www.hopkinsguides. ... com/hopkins/view/Johns_Hopkins_ABX_Guide/540710/7/Cardiobacterium_species. Cardiobacterium species. Johns Hopkins ABX Guide. ...
Cardiobacterium species answers are found in the Johns Hopkins ABX Guide powered by Unbound Medicine. Available for iPhone, ... Cardiobacterium species is a topic covered in the Johns Hopkins ABX Guide. To view the entire topic, please sign in or purchase ... "Cardiobacterium Species." Johns Hopkins ABX Guide, The Johns Hopkins University, 2019. Pediatrics Central, peds.unboundmedicine ... Major species: Cardiobacterium hominis is the most common human pathogen species, through remains a rare infection overall. * ...
A urinary tract infection (UTI) is an infection that affects part of the urinary tract.[1] When it affects the lower urinary tract it is known as a bladder infection (cystitis) and when it affects the upper urinary tract it is known as a kidney infection (pyelonephritis).[9] Symptoms from a lower urinary tract infection include pain with urination, frequent urination, and feeling the need to urinate despite having an empty bladder.[1] Symptoms of a kidney infection include fever and flank pain usually in addition to the symptoms of a lower UTI.[9] Rarely the urine may appear bloody.[6] In the very old and the very young, symptoms may be vague or non-specific.[1][10] The most common cause of infection is Escherichia ...
The word cholera is from Greek: χολέρα kholera from χολή kholē "bile". Cholera likely has its origins in the Indian subcontinent as evidenced by its prevalence in the region for centuries.[13] Early outbreaks in the Indian subcontinent are believed to have been the result of poor living conditions as well as the presence of pools of still water, both of which provide ideal conditions for cholera to thrive.[71] The disease first spread by trade routes (land and sea) to Russia in 1817, later to the rest of Europe, and from Europe to North America and the rest of the world.[13] Seven cholera pandemics have occurred in the past 200 years, with the seventh pandemic originating in Indonesia in 1961.[72] The first cholera pandemic occurred in the Bengal region of India, near Calcutta starting in 1817 through 1824. The disease dispersed from India to Southeast Asia, the Middle East, Europe, and Eastern Africa.[73] The movement of British Army and Navy ships and personnel is believed to have ...
Cardiobacterium species are, however, only rarely the aetiology of infective endocarditis. An infective endocarditis case is ... Phenotypically, the two species within the genus Cardiobacterium resemble each other greatly. When using the Vitek 2 Neisseria- ... Haemophilus identification card, the reaction for phenylphosphonate was positive for all Cardiobacterium hominis strains, but ... Cardiobacterium valvarum is a newly recognized human pathogen related to infective endocarditis. ...
Cardiobacterium hominis, Eikenella corrodens, and Kingella species. These organisms share an enhanced capacity to produce ... Cardiobacterium hominis endocarditis: Two cases and a review of the literature. Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2006 Sep. 25(9 ...
This is a shortened version of the first chapter of the ICD-9: Infectious and Parasitic Diseases. It covers ICD codes 001 to 139. The full chapter can be found on pages 49 to 99 of Volume 1, which contains all (sub)categories of the ICD-9. Volume 2 is an alphabetical index of Volume 1. Both volumes can be downloaded for free from the website of the World Health Organisation. ...
Cardiobacterium hominis Is the Subject Area "Cardiobacterium hominis" applicable to this article? Yes. No. ...
Cardiobacterium hominis; Kingella species; Corynebacterium species; Propionibacterium species; and Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae ...
Brainscape is a web and mobile study platform that helps you learn things faster. Our mission is to create a smarter world by simplifying and accelerating the learning process. © 2018 Bold Learning Solutions ...
Cardiobacterium hominis endocarditis: two cases and a review of the literature. Eur. J. Clin. Microbiol. Infect. Dis.25:587-595 ... In particular, Neisseria and Haemophilus, Actinobacillus, Cardiobacterium, Eikenella, and Kingella (HACEK) organisms are ... Cardiobacterium, Eikenella, Gardnerella, Haemophilus, Kingella, Moraxella, Neisseria, Oligella, and Suttonella. The NH card is ... Cardiobacterium, Eikenella, Gardnerella, Haemophilus, Kingella, Moraxella, and Neisseria were investigated. The NH card was ...
Chadefaud, M. & Emberger, L. (eds.). 1960. Traité de botanique systématique. Masson et Cie., Paris. Tome I. Les végétaux non vasculaires (Cryptogamie), par M. Chadefaud, 1960, 1 vol. de 1016 pages, [6]. Tome II. Les végétaux vasculaires, par L. Emberger, 1960, deux fascicules, 1540 pages, [7], [8]. Monde vivant ...
Cardiobacterium hominis Is the Subject Area "Cardiobacterium hominis" applicable to this article? Yes. No. ...
Cardiobacterium hominis, Eikenella corrodens, and Kingella spp.) if the growth of the isolate is sufficient to permit in vitro ...
Cardiobacterium hominis *infections*. endocarditis, infect aortic valve. Eikenella corrodens *colony morphology*. nonhemolytic ... Cardiobacterium hominis *epidemiology*. attachment to heart valves usually damaged or prosthetic, normal biota of the oral ... Cardiobacterium hominis *testing results*. oxidase-positive, catalase-negative, and indole-positve. negative for urase, nitrate ... Cardiobacterium hominis *colony morphology*. form rosettes, swelling, long filaments, or sticklike structures ...
The word cholera is from Greek: χολέρα kholera from χολή kholē "bile". Cholera likely has its origins in the Indian subcontinent as evidenced by its prevalence in the region for centuries.[14] The disease appears in the European literature as early as 1642, from the Dutch physician Jakob de Bondts description it in his De Medicina Indorum.[81] (The "Indorum" of the title refers to the East Indies. He also gave first European descriptions of other diseases.) Early outbreaks in the Indian subcontinent are believed to have been the result of poor living conditions as well as the presence of pools of still water, both of which provide ideal conditions for cholera to thrive.[82] The disease first spread by trade routes (land and sea) to Russia in 1817, later to the rest of Europe, and from Europe to North America and the rest of the world,[14] (hence the name "Asiatic cholera"[1]). Seven cholera pandemics have occurred in the past 200 years, with the seventh pandemic originating in ...
The electronic Irish Statute Book (eISB) comprises the Acts of the Oireachtas (Parliament), Statutory Instruments, Legislation Directory, Constitution and a limited number of pre-1922 Acts.
Rocky Mountain spotted fever (or "black measles" because of its characteristic rash) was recognized in the early 1800s, and in the last 10 years of the 1800s (1890-1900) it became very common, especially in the Bitterroot Valley of Montana. The disease was originally noted to be concentrated on the west-side of the Bitterroot river.[24] Though it would be decades before scientists discovered the tick as the carrier of the disease, in as early as 1866, Doctor John B. Buker (establishing a practice in Missoula, MT) noticed a tick embedded in the skin of one of his patients. His notes were later studied as part of later research.[25] In 1901, Dr. A. F. Longeway was appointed to solve "the black measles problem" in Montana. He in turn enlisted his friend, Dr. Earl Strain to help him. Strain suspected that the illness was from ticks. In 1906, Howard T. Ricketts, a pathologist recruited from the University of Chicago, was the first to establish the identity of the infectious organism (the organism ...
  • Wong D, Carson J, Johnson A. Subacute bacterial endocarditis caused by Cardiobacterium hominis: A case report. (medscape.com)
  • This page cardiobqcterium last edited on 15 Novemberat Cardiobacterikm mycotic aneurysm in a patient with endocarditis caused by Cardiobacterium hominis. (naughtydad.pro)
  • Apparent culture-negative endocarditis of the prosthetic valve caused by Cardiobacterium hominis. (naughtydad.pro)
  • Choudhury S, Isais FS, Lee CC. Nonsurgical management of mitral valve endocarditis due to Cardiobacterium valvarum in a patient with a ventricular septal defect. (medscape.com)
  • Aortic vascular graft infection caused by Cardiobacterium valvarum: a case report. (medscape.com)
  • El Hajjaji I, Mansencal N, Dubourg O. Diagnosis of Cardiobacterium hominis endocarditis: usefulness of positron emission tomography. (medscape.com)
  • Cardiobacterium hominis endocarditis - hpminis case report. (naughtydad.pro)
  • Cardiobacterium hominis is a slow-growing, fastidious, capnophilic, Gram- negative bacillus represented by the "C" in HACEK, an acronym for. (naughtydad.pro)
  • Pacemaker lead infection and vertebral osteomyelitis presumed due to Cardiobacterium hominis [Letter]. (naughtydad.pro)
  • Despite this, some experts continue to recommend holding blood cultures for an extended period (up to 1 mo) when a diagnosis of Cardiobacterium endocarditis is considered. (medscape.com)
  • Overall, Treponema, Campylobacter, Capnocytophaga, and Cardiobacterium species were found in greater amounts in healthy than in diseased sites. (umich.edu)
  • O. anthropi es una bacteria emergente en infecciones intrahospitalarias con notable resistencia antimicrobiana, y es un patógeno inusual en humanos.A case report of bacteraemia by Ochrobactrum anthropi probably associated with bacterial hepatitis, in a inmuno competent patient, who was admitted to the hospital with the diagnostic impression of cholangitis and biliary obstruction. (worldwidescience.org)
  • When compared morphologically, the two Cardiobacterium species are indistinguishable in culture, Gram stain, and growth characteristics. (wikipedia.org)
  • 16S PCR can be used to distinguish the Cardiobacterium species. (wikipedia.org)
  • In their letter on endocarditis due to a novel Cardiobacterium species, I believe that Hoover and colleagues (1) described the second case of Cardiobacterium valvarum endocarditis. (annals.org)
  • Cardiobacterium species is a topic covered in the Johns Hopkins ABX Guide . (hopkinsguides.com)
  • Cardiobacterium hominis is the most common human pathogen species, through remains a rare infection overall. (hopkinsguides.com)
  • Johns Hopkins Guide , www.hopkinsguides.com/hopkins/view/Johns_Hopkins_ABX_Guide/540710/7/Cardiobacterium_species. (hopkinsguides.com)
  • Pediatrics Central , peds.unboundmedicine.com/pedscentral/view/Johns_Hopkins_ABX_Guide/540710/all/Cardiobacterium_species. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • Cardiobacterium species are, however, only rarely the aetiology of infective endocarditis. (microbiologyresearch.org)
  • Phenotypically, the two species within the genus Cardiobacterium resemble each other greatly. (microbiologyresearch.org)
  • False-colour scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of Cardiobacterium hominis, a Gram-negative bacillus (rod-like bacterium) that causes endocarditis in humans. (sciencephoto.com)
  • Cardiobacterium hominis, a microaerophilic, pleomorphic gram-negative bacillus , is one of the AACEK organisms. (naughtydad.pro)
  • Characterization of oral strains of Cardiobacterium valvarum and emended description of the organism. (microbiologyresearch.org)
  • Cardiobacterium hominis is a rare cause of neonatal sepsis. (medscape.com)
  • In the present study, a consortium of Cardiobacterium hominis and Pseudomonas stutzeri was isolated from an effluent treatment plant of a textile industry, based on its ability to decolourise azo dyes including direct black 38 (DB38), a benzidine-based azo dye. (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • Is the Subject Area "Cardiobacterium hominis" applicable to this article? (plos.org)
  • Cardiobacterium hominis: review of microbiologic and clinical features. (medscape.com)
  • Choudhury S, Isais FS, Lee CC. Nonsurgical management of mitral valve endocarditis due to Cardiobacterium valvarum in a patient with a ventricular septal defect. (medscape.com)