Cardiobacterium: A genus of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic bacteria in the family CARDIOBACTERIACEAE. It is found in the nasal flora of humans and causes ENDOCARDITIS.Kingella: A genus of gram-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacteria whose organisms are part of the normal flora of the mucous membranes of the upper respiratory tract. Some species are pathogenic for man.Eikenella: A genus of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that occurs in the human mouth and intestine. Organisms of this genus can be opportunistic pathogens.Neisseriaceae: A family of gram-negative, parasitic bacteria including several important pathogens of man.Endocarditis, Bacterial: Inflammation of the ENDOCARDIUM caused by BACTERIA that entered the bloodstream. The strains of bacteria vary with predisposing factors, such as CONGENITAL HEART DEFECTS; HEART VALVE DISEASES; HEART VALVE PROSTHESIS IMPLANTATION; or intravenous drug use.Eikenella corrodens: Gram-negative bacteria isolated from infections of the respiratory and intestinal tracts and from the buccal cavity, intestinal tract, and urogenital tract. They are probably part of the normal flora of man and animals.Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections: Infections caused by bacteria that show up as pink (negative) when treated by the gram-staining method.Haemophilus: A genus of PASTEURELLACEAE that consists of several species occurring in animals and humans. Its organisms are described as gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, coccobacillus or rod-shaped, and nonmotile.RNA, Ribosomal, 16S: Constituent of 30S subunit prokaryotic ribosomes containing 1600 nucleotides and 21 proteins. 16S rRNA is involved in initiation of polypeptide synthesis.Kingella kingae: A species of gram-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacteria which is distinguished from other members of the genus KINGELLA by its beta hemolysis. It occurs normally in human mucous membranes of the upper respiratory tract, but can cause septic arthritis and endocarditis. (From Bergey's Manual of Determinative Bacteriology, 9th ed)Aggregatibacter aphrophilus: A species of Gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic spherical or rod-shaped bacteria indigenous to oral cavity and pharynx. It is associated with BACTERIAL ENDOCARDITIS; and MENINGITIS.Haemophilus parainfluenzae: A species of gram-negative bacteria in the genus HAEMOPHILUS, ubiquitous in the human ORAL CAVITY and PHARYNX. It has low pathogenicity but is occasionally implicated in ENDOCARDITIS in humans.Haemophilus paraphrophilus: A species of gram-negative bacteria in the genus HAEMOPHILUS, found in the normal flora of the human ORAL CAVITY and PHARYNX. It can cause SUBACUTE BACTERIAL ENDOCARDITIS; and BRAIN ABSCESS, among other conditions.Heart Murmurs: Heart sounds caused by vibrations resulting from the flow of blood through the heart. Heart murmurs can be examined by HEART AUSCULTATION, and analyzed by their intensity (6 grades), duration, timing (systolic, diastolic, or continuous), location, transmission, and quality (musical, vibratory, blowing, etc).Endocarditis: Inflammation of the inner lining of the heart (ENDOCARDIUM), the continuous membrane lining the four chambers and HEART VALVES. It is often caused by microorganisms including bacteria, viruses, fungi, and rickettsiae. Left untreated, endocarditis can damage heart valves and become life-threatening.Aortic Valve: The valve between the left ventricle and the ascending aorta which prevents backflow into the left ventricle.Blastocystis hominis: A species of parasitic protozoa found in the intestines of humans and other primates. It was classified as a yeast in 1912. Over the years, questions arose about this designation. In 1967, many physiological and morphological B. hominis characteristics were reported that fit a protozoan classification. Since that time, other papers have corroborated this work and the organism is now recognized as a protozoan parasite of humans causing intestinal disease with potentially disabling symptoms.Cardiobacteriaceae: A family of gram-negative, mostly aerobic bacteria, in the order Cardiobacteriales. There are three genera: CARDIOBACTERIUM; DICHELOBACTER; and Suttonella.History of MedicineGeorgiaGluconatesGammaproteobacteria: A group of the proteobacteria comprised of facultatively anaerobic and fermentative gram-negative bacteria.Directories as Topic: Lists of persons or organizations, systematically arranged, usually in alphabetic or classed order, giving address, affiliations, etc., for individuals, and giving address, officers, functions, and similar data for organizations. (ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)BooksBiological Therapy: Treatment of diseases with biological materials or biological response modifiers, such as the use of GENES; CELLS; TISSUES; organs; SERUM; VACCINES; and humoral agents.Animal Welfare: The protection of animals in laboratories or other specific environments by promoting their health through better nutrition, housing, and care.Legislation, Medical: Laws and regulations, pertaining to the field of medicine, proposed for enactment or enacted by a legislative body.Social Welfare: Organized institutions which provide services to ameliorate conditions of need or social pathology in the community.Government: The complex of political institutions, laws, and customs through which the function of governing is carried out in a specific political unit.Internet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.Software: Sequential operating programs and data which instruct the functioning of a digital computer.User-Computer Interface: The portion of an interactive computer program that issues messages to and receives commands from a user.Editorial Policies: The guidelines and policy statements set forth by the editor(s) or editorial board of a publication.ArchivesChorioamnionitis: INFLAMMATION of the placental membranes (CHORION; AMNION) and connected tissues such as fetal BLOOD VESSELS and UMBILICAL CORD. It is often associated with intrauterine ascending infections during PREGNANCY.Solutions: The homogeneous mixtures formed by the mixing of a solid, liquid, or gaseous substance (solute) with a liquid (the solvent), from which the dissolved substances can be recovered by physical processes. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Abscess: Accumulation of purulent material in tissues, organs, or circumscribed spaces, usually associated with signs of infection.Venous Insufficiency: Impaired venous blood flow or venous return (venous stasis), usually caused by inadequate venous valves. Venous insufficiency often occurs in the legs, and is associated with EDEMA and sometimes with VENOUS STASIS ULCERS at the ankle.Endocardium: The innermost layer of the heart, comprised of endothelial cells.Heart Valves: Flaps of tissue that prevent regurgitation of BLOOD from the HEART VENTRICLES to the HEART ATRIA or from the PULMONARY ARTERIES or AORTA to the ventricles.Heart Valve Diseases: Pathological conditions involving any of the various HEART VALVES and the associated structures (PAPILLARY MUSCLES and CHORDAE TENDINEAE).Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.DNA, Ribosomal: DNA sequences encoding RIBOSOMAL RNA and the segments of DNA separating the individual ribosomal RNA genes, referred to as RIBOSOMAL SPACER DNA.Heart Valve Prosthesis: A device that substitutes for a heart valve. It may be composed of biological material (BIOPROSTHESIS) and/or synthetic material.Bioprosthesis: Prosthesis, usually heart valve, composed of biological material and whose durability depends upon the stability of the material after pretreatment, rather than regeneration by host cell ingrowth. Durability is achieved 1, mechanically by the interposition of a cloth, usually polytetrafluoroethylene, between the host and the graft, and 2, chemically by stabilization of the tissue by intermolecular linking, usually with glutaraldehyde, after removal of antigenic components, or the use of reconstituted and restructured biopolymers.Polymerase Chain Reaction: In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.Endocarditis, Subacute Bacterial: ENDOCARDIUM infection that is usually caused by STREPTOCOCCUS. Subacute infective endocarditis evolves over weeks and months with modest toxicity and rare metastatic infection.Streptococcal Infections: Infections with bacteria of the genus STREPTOCOCCUS.Retinal Hemorrhage: Bleeding from the vessels of the retina.Streptococcus sanguis: A gram-positive organism found in dental plaque, in blood, on heart valves in subacute endocarditis, and infrequently in saliva and throat specimens. L-forms are associated with recurrent aphthous stomatitis.Dictionaries, MedicalDictionaries as Topic: Lists of words, usually in alphabetical order, giving information about form, pronunciation, etymology, grammar, and meaning.Bacteroides: A genus of gram-negative, anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria. Its organisms are normal inhabitants of the oral, respiratory, intestinal, and urogenital cavities of humans, animals, and insects. Some species may be pathogenic.Bacteroides Infections: Infections with bacteria of the genus BACTEROIDES.

Endocarditis with ruptured cerebral aneurysm caused by Cardiobacterium valvarum sp. nov. (1/18)

A fastidious gram-negative bacterium was isolated from the blood of a 37-year-old man who had insidious endocarditis with a sudden rupture of a cerebral aneurysm. Characterization of the organism through phylogenetic and phenotypic analyses revealed a novel species of Cardiobacterium, for which the name Cardiobacterium valvarum sp. nov. is proposed. C. valvarum will supplement the current sole species Cardiobacterium hominis, a known cause of endocarditis. Surgeries and antibiotic treatment cured the patient's infection and associated complications. During cardiac surgery, a congenital bicuspid aortic valve was found to be the predisposing factor for his endocarditis.  (+info)

Characterization of oral strains of Cardiobacterium valvarum and emended description of the organism. (2/18)

The description of the new species Cardiobacterium valvarum prompted a search for additional strains of the organism. Here we report characterization of four oral Cardiobacterium strains from the Culture Collection of the University of Goteborg. The 16S rRNA gene sequences of the organisms exhibited 99.6% to 99.3% homology with Cardiobacterium valvarum. The cellular fatty acid profiles, electrophoretic patterns of whole-cell proteins, growth rate and nutritional requirement, colonial and cellular morphology, and biochemical reactions were also similar to those of C. valvarum. These results thus classify these organisms as oral strains of C. valvarum. All strains were susceptible to many antibiotics tested. The description of the species was emended. C. valvarum is a rare cause of endocarditis, and its relationship with periodontal diseases may need investigation.  (+info)

The role of 16S rRNA gene sequencing in identification of microorganisms misidentified by conventional methods. (3/18)

Traditional methods for microbial identification require the recognition of differences in morphology, growth, enzymatic activity, and metabolism to define genera and species. Full and partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing methods have emerged as useful tools for identifying phenotypically aberrant microorganisms. We report on three bacterial blood isolates from three different College of American Pathologists-certified laboratories that were referred to ARUP Laboratories for definitive identification. Because phenotypic identification suggested unusual organisms not typically associated with the submitted clinical diagnosis, consultation with the Medical Director was sought and further testing was performed including partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing. All three patients had endocarditis, and conventional methods identified isolates from patients A, B, and C as a Facklamia sp., Eubacterium tenue, and a Bifidobacterium sp. 16S rRNA gene sequencing identified the isolates as Enterococcus faecalis, Cardiobacterium valvarum, and Streptococcus mutans, respectively. We conclude that the initial identifications of these three isolates were erroneous, may have misled clinicians, and potentially impacted patient care. 16S rRNA gene sequencing is a more objective identification tool, unaffected by phenotypic variation or technologist bias, and has the potential to reduce laboratory errors.  (+info)

Utility of extended blood culture incubation for isolation of Haemophilus, Actinobacillus, Cardiobacterium, Eikenella, and Kingella organisms: a retrospective multicenter evaluation. (4/18)

The incidence of and average time to detection for Haemophilus, Actinobacillus, Cardiobacterium, Eikenella, and Kingella (HACEK) bacteria in blood cultures with standard incubation and the utility of extended incubation of blood culture bottles were reviewed at four tertiary care microbiology laboratories. HACEK organisms were isolated from 35 (<0.005%) of 59,203 positive blood cultures. None of 407 blood cultures with extended incubation grew HACEK or other bacteria. Bacteremia from HACEK bacteria is rare, and extended incubation of blood cultures to recover HACEK bacteria is unnecessary.  (+info)

Endocarditis caused by Cardiobacterium valvarum. (5/18)

A fastidious, gram-negative bacterium was isolated from the blood of a 51-year-old man who had acute infectious endocarditis (IE). Characterization of the organism through phenotypic and genotypic analyses revealed the causative role of Cardiobacterium valvarum. This is the third reported case of IE caused by C. valvarum.  (+info)

Direct detection of Cardiobacterium hominis in serum from a patient with infective endocarditis by broad-range bacterial PCR. (6/18)

Bacterial DNA was detected directly in the serum of a patient with endocarditis by broad-range 16S rRNA PCR followed by sequencing and analysis of the results by the BLAST search. Using these methods, Cardiobacterium hominis was identified in 2 days from the date of serum collection. The microorganism was also isolated and identified using conventional methods (bacterial culture and biochemical tests) 17 days from the date of sample collection. This is the first report showing the direct detection of C. hominis in a patient's serum using molecular-based methods, emphasizing their potential usefulness as additional and rapid diagnostic tools for the detection and identification of fastidious bacteria.  (+info)

Cardiobacterium hominis endocarditis: Two cases and a review of the literature. (7/18)

Cardiobacterium hominis, a member of the HACEK group (Haemophilus parainfluenzae, Haemophilus aphrophilus, and Haemophilus paraphrophilus, Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, C. hominis, Eikenella corrodens, and Kingella species), is a rare cause of endocarditis. There are 61 reported cases of C. hominis infective endocarditis in the English-language literature, 15 of which involved prosthetic valve endocarditis. There is one reported case of C. hominis after upper endoscopy and none reported after colonoscopy. Presented here are two cases of C. hominis prosthetic valve endocarditis following colonoscopy and a review of the microbiological and clinical features of C. hominis endocarditis. Patients with C. hominis infection have a long duration of symptoms preceding diagnosis (138+/-128 days). The most common symptoms were fever (74%), fatigue/malaise (53%), weight loss/anorexia (40%), night sweats (24%), and arthralgia/myalgia (21%). The most common risk factors were pre-existing cardiac disease (61%), the presence of a prosthetic valve (28%), and history of rheumatic fever (20%). Of the 61 cases reviewed here, the aortic valve was infected in 24 (39%) and the mitral valve in 19 (31%) patients. The average duration of blood culture incubation before growth was detected was 6.3 days (range, 2-21 days). Complications were congestive heart failure (40%), central nervous system (CNS) emboli (21%), arrhythmia (16%), and mycotic aneurysm (9%). C. hominis is almost always susceptible to beta-lactam antibiotics. Ceftriaxone is recommended by the recently published American Heart Association guidelines. The prognosis of C. hominis native valve and prosthetic valve endocarditis is favorable. The cure rate among 60 patients reviewed was 93% (56/60). For prosthetic valve endocarditis, the cure rate was 16/17 (94%). Valve replacement was required in 27 (45%) cases.  (+info)

Activity of DX-619 compared to other agents against viridans group streptococci, Streptococcus bovis, and Cardiobacterium hominis. (8/18)

Against 198 viridans group streptococci, 25 Streptococcus bovis strains, and 5 Cardiobacterium hominis strains, MICs of DX-619, a des-F(6)-quinolone, were between 0.004 and 0.25 microg/ml. These MICs were lower than those of other quinolones (< or = 0.008 to > 32 microg/ml). Beta-lactam MICs were between < or = 0.008 and 16 microg/ml. Azithromycin resistance was found in most species, while most were telithromycin susceptible. Glycopeptides and linezolid were active against viridans group strains but inactive against C. hominis.  (+info)

*Cardiobacterium valvarum

... is a newly described HACEK organism causing endocarditis. When compared morphologically, the two ... 16S PCR can be used to distinguish the Cardiobacterium species. Clinical Microbiology Newsletter (CMN) Vol. 37, No. 16, August ... Cardiobacterium species are indistinguishable in culture, Gram stain, and growth characteristics. Isolates of C. valvarum show ...

*Cardiobacterium hominis

... is a Gram-negative bacillus (rod-shaped) bacterium commonly grouped with other bacteria into the HACEK ... Malani, AN; Aronoff, DM; Bradley, SF; Kauffman, CA (September 2006). "Cardiobacterium hominis endocarditis: Two cases and a ... Savage, DD; Kagan, RL; Young, NA; Horvath, AE (January 1977). "Cardiobacterium hominis endocarditis: Description of two ... full citation needed] Image: Cardibacterium hominins Type strain of Cardiobacterium hominis at BacDive - the Bacterial ...

*HACEK organisms

Cardiobacterium Cardiobacterium hominis. Most common species in the Cardiobacterium genus. Cardiobacterium valvarum Eikenella ... Cardiobacterium, Eikenella, Kingella. The HACEK organisms are a normal part of the human microbiota, living in the oral- ... Cardiobacterium hominis, Eikenella corrodens, and Kingella kingae. However, taxonomic rearrangements have changed the A to ...

*Suttonella indologenes

and Assignment of the Genera Cardiobacterium, Dichelobacter, and Suttonella to Cardiobacteriaceae fam. nov. in the Gamma ... "Cardiobacterium", "Dichelobacter", and "Suttonella" to the new family of Cardiobacteriaceae. See below for the phylogeny of the ...

*Kingella kingae

Cardiobacterium, Eikenella, and Kingella organisms: a retrospective multicenter evaluation". J. Clin. Microbiol. 44 (1): 257-9 ...

*C. hominis

... microaerophilic bacterium species in the genus Campylobacter Cardiobacterium hominis, a bacterium species that normally resides ...

*Pharynx

The HACEK organisms (Haemophilus, Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Cardiobacterium hominis, Eikenella corrodens, Kingella ...

*List of MeSH codes (B03)

Cardiobacterium MeSH B03.660.250.080.550 --- Dichelobacter nodosus MeSH B03.660.250.110 --- chromatiaceae MeSH B03.660.250.110. ... Cardiobacterium MeSH B03.440.450.342.550 --- Dichelobacter nodosus MeSH B03.440.450.360 --- Chromobacterium MeSH B03.440. ...
In their letter on endocarditis due to a novel Cardiobacterium species, I believe that Hoover and colleagues (1) described the second case of Cardiobacterium valvarum endocarditis. The first case, along with the isolation and establishment of the novel species C. valvarum, was reported in April 2004 (2), and the species name was validated in the same year (3). This case of insidious endocarditis was not diagnosed until sudden rupture of a cerebral aneurysm. Headache, aphasia, and the stigmata of aortic valve endocarditis (diastolic heart murmur, anemia, and leukocytosis) were initial diagnostic features in this 37-year-old man. The lack of fever, the history of dental work, and the presence of a bicuspid aortic valve (discovered during cardiac surgery) were also similar to Hoover and colleagues case. Since the initial isolation of C. valvarum in late 2001, efforts were made to search for additional strains and a possible reservoir of the organism. Four oral strains were found in the Culture ...
False-colour scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of Cardiobacterium hominis, a Gram-negative bacillus (rod-like bacterium) that causes endocarditis in humans. C. hominis is the only member of the genus & endocarditis, inflammation of the interior of the heart, is the only human disease it causes. The bacterium enters the bloodstream via the mouth as a consequence of dental disease or procedures. Its virulence is associated with preexisting heart disease, as it adheres to damaged heart tissue & multiplies. Antibiotics provide effective treatment. Magnification: x2000 at 6x7cm size, x1000 at 35mm size. - Stock Image B220/0534
Cardiobacterium hominis is a member of the HACEK group (Haemophilus paraphrophilus, Haemophilus parainfluenzae, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Aggregatibacter aphrophilus, C hominis, Eikenella corrodens, and Kingella kingae), which are fastidious, gram-negative, aerobic bacilli that normally reside in the respiratory tract. They have ...
ID G9ZGC1_9GAMM Unreviewed; 341 AA. AC G9ZGC1; DT 22-FEB-2012, integrated into UniProtKB/TrEMBL. DT 22-FEB-2012, sequence version 1. DT 07-JUN-2017, entry version 20. DE SubName: Full=Putative 2-keto-3-deoxygluconate transporter {ECO:0000313,EMBL:EHM53297.1}; GN ORFNames=HMPREF9080_01824 {ECO:0000313,EMBL:EHM53297.1}; OS Cardiobacterium valvarum F0432. OC Bacteria; Proteobacteria; Gammaproteobacteria; Cardiobacteriales; OC Cardiobacteriaceae; Cardiobacterium. OX NCBI_TaxID=797473 {ECO:0000313,EMBL:EHM53297.1, ECO:0000313,Proteomes:UP000004750}; RN [1] {ECO:0000313,EMBL:EHM53297.1, ECO:0000313,Proteomes:UP000004750} RP NUCLEOTIDE SEQUENCE [LARGE SCALE GENOMIC DNA]. RC STRAIN=F0432 {ECO:0000313,EMBL:EHM53297.1, RC ECO:0000313,Proteomes:UP000004750}; RA Weinstock G., Sodergren E., Clifton S., Fulton L., Fulton B., RA Courtney L., Fronick C., Harrison M., Strong C., Farmer C., RA Delahaunty K., Markovic C., Hall O., Minx P., Tomlinson C., RA Mitreva M., Hou S., Chen J., Wollam A., Pepin K.H., ...
Although infective endocarditis (IE) is relatively uncommon, it remains an important clinical entity with a high in-hospital and 1-year mortality. It is most commonly caused by viridans streptococci. Staphylococcus aureus is responsible for a malignant course of IE and often requires early surgery to eradicate. Other rarer causes are various bacilli, including the HACEK (Haemophilus, Actinobacillus, Cardiobacterium, Eikenella and Kingella spp.) group of organisms and fungi. The clinical presentation varies. Patients may present with a nonspecific illness, valve dysfunction, heart failure (HF) and symptoms due to peripheral embolisation. The diagnosis is traditionally based on the modified Duke criteria and rests mainly on clinical features and to a lesser extent on certain laboratory findings, microbiological assessment and cardiovascular imaging. Identification of the offending micro-organism is not only important from a diagnostic point of view, but also makes targeted antibiotic treatment possible
Zymoseptoria tritici is a host-specific, necrotrophic pathogen of wheat. Infection by Z. tritici is characterized by its extended latent period, which typically lasts two weeks, and is followed by extensive host cell death and rapid proliferation of fungal biomass. This work characterizes the level of genomic variation in 13 isolates for which we have measured virulence on 11 wheat cultivars with differential resistance genes. Between the reference isolate, IPO323, and the 13 Australian isolates we identified over 800,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms, of which ~10% had an effect on the coding regions of the genome. Furthermore we identified over 1700 probable presence/absence polymorphisms in genes across the Australian isolates using de novo assembly. Finally, we developed a gene tree sorting method that quickly identifies groups of isolates within a single gene alignment whose sequence haplotypes correspond with virulence scores on a single wheat cultivar. Using this method we have ...
The HACEK organisms are a group of fastidious gram-negative bacteria that are an unusual cause of infective endocarditis, which is an inflammation of the heart due to bacterial infection. HACEK is an abbreviation of the initials of the genera of this group of bacteria: Haemophilus, Aggregatibacter (previously Actinobacillus), Cardiobacterium, Eikenella, Kingella. The HACEK organisms are a normal part of the human microbiota, living in the oral-pharyngeal region. The bacteria were originally grouped because they were thought to be a significant cause of infective endocarditis, but recent literature has shown that they are rare and only responsible for 1.4-3% of all cases of this disease. HACEK originally referred to Haemophilus parainfluenzae, Haemophilus aphrophilus, Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Cardiobacterium hominis, Eikenella corrodens, and Kingella kingae. However, taxonomic rearrangements have changed the A to Aggregatibacter species and the H to Haemophilus species to reflect the ...
To the editor: Attention has focused recently on a number of slow-growing, fastidious, gram-negative bacteria, all upper respiratory commensal flora, as causes of infective endocarditis (1): Cardiobacterium hominis, Haemophilus aphrophilus, and Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, patients with underlying valvular heart disease presumably develop vegetations on their valves after bacteremia from an upper respiratory site. Due to the unusual growth characteristics of these organisms, isolation is difficult and the diagnosis may be missed. We haave seen a patient with endocarditis caused by Kingella denitrificans, another member of this group.. A 31-year-old man with aortic stenosis and insufficiency was admitted to Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center ...
Introduction. The incidence of infective endocarditis (IE) has increased over the past years as survival rates of patients with congenital heart disease improve.1 Main agents of IE are: (i) Viridans group Streptococci (S. milleri, S. mitior, S. salivarius, S. mutans and S. sanguis), mainly on patients with congenital heart disease; (ii) Staphylococcus aureus, generally associated with placement of central venous catheter and use of injecting drugs; (iii) Staphylococcus epidermidis, usually affecting patients following cardiac surgery and catheterized premature newborns.1 On the other hand, the HACEK group of bacteria (Haemophilus ssp, Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Cardiobacterium hominis, Eikenella corrodens and Kingella kingae) is responsible for 3% of IE in adults.1-3 The objective of this study is to report a case of rare occurrence of IE caused by Haemophilus aphrophilus in a child. Report of case The patient was a 12-year-old boy with a 20-day history of fever accompanied by chills ...
Looking for online definition of Eikenella in the Medical Dictionary? Eikenella explanation free. What is Eikenella? Meaning of Eikenella medical term. What does Eikenella mean?
In his first email to the department since being named interim chair of Computer Science on July 3rd, 2017, Professor Larry Davis sent the following email celebrating Emeritus Professor Jack Minker: "Congratulations to Professor Emeritus Jack Minker on celebrating his 90th birthday tomorrow, July 4. Jack joined the University of Maryland in 1971 and was the founding chair (1974) of our department. Through his hard work both as chair, and as a pioneer in the logical foundations of artificial intelligence, he set the high standards that we have all strived to maintain for nearly 50 years. Jack ...
The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases defines food allergy as an adverse immune response occurring reproducibly on exposure to a given food

Cardiobacterium valvarum Endocarditis | Annals of Internal Medicine | American College of PhysiciansCardiobacterium valvarum Endocarditis | Annals of Internal Medicine | American College of Physicians

In their letter on endocarditis due to a novel Cardiobacterium species, I believe that Hoover and colleagues (1) described the ... Han X. Cardiobacterium valvarum Endocarditis. Ann Intern Med. 2005;143:614. doi: 10.7326/0003-4819-143-8-200510180-00016 ... second case of Cardiobacterium valvarum endocarditis. The first case, along with the isolation and establishment of the novel ...
more infohttp://annals.org/aim/article-abstract/718791/cardiobacterium-valvarum-endocarditis

Cardiobacterium valvarum - WikipediaCardiobacterium valvarum - Wikipedia

Cardiobacterium valvarum is a newly described HACEK organism causing endocarditis. When compared morphologically, the two ... 16S PCR can be used to distinguish the Cardiobacterium species. Clinical Microbiology Newsletter (CMN) Vol. 37, No. 16, August ... Cardiobacterium species are indistinguishable in culture, Gram stain, and growth characteristics. Isolates of C. valvarum show ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cardiobacterium_valvarum

Cardiobacterium hominis - WikipediaCardiobacterium hominis - Wikipedia

Cardiobacterium hominis is a Gram-negative bacillus (rod-shaped) bacterium commonly grouped with other bacteria into the HACEK ... Malani, AN; Aronoff, DM; Bradley, SF; Kauffman, CA (September 2006). "Cardiobacterium hominis endocarditis: Two cases and a ... Savage, DD; Kagan, RL; Young, NA; Horvath, AE (January 1977). "Cardiobacterium hominis endocarditis: Description of two ... full citation needed] Image: Cardibacterium hominins Type strain of Cardiobacterium hominis at BacDive - the Bacterial ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cardiobacterium_hominis

Cardiobacterium Workup: Laboratory Studies, Imaging StudiesCardiobacterium Workup: Laboratory Studies, Imaging Studies

Cardiobacterium hominis is a member of the HACEK group (Haemophilus paraphrophilus, Haemophilus parainfluenzae, Aggregatibacter ... encoded search term (Cardiobacterium) and Cardiobacterium What to Read Next on Medscape. Related Conditions and Diseases. * ... Cardiobacterium Workup. Updated: Feb 29, 2016 * Author: Kerry O Cleveland, MD; Chief Editor: Michael Stuart Bronze, MD more... ... Cardiobacterium hominis is a rare cause of neonatal sepsis. Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2012 May. 31 (5):541-2. [Medline]. ...
more infohttps://emedicine.medscape.com/article/214021-workup

Subacute Bacterial Endocarditis Caused by Cardiobacterium hominis: A Case ReportSubacute Bacterial Endocarditis Caused by Cardiobacterium hominis: A Case Report

Cardiobacterium hominis, a member of the HACEK group of organisms, is an uncommon but important cause of subacute bacterial ... Subacute Bacterial Endocarditis Caused by Cardiobacterium hominis: A Case Report. Davie Wong,1 Julie Carson,2,3 and Andrew ...
more infohttps://www.hindawi.com/journals/cjidmm/2015/568750/abs/

Cardiobacterium hominis bacteria - Stock Image B220/0534 - Science Photo LibraryCardiobacterium hominis bacteria - Stock Image B220/0534 - Science Photo Library

... of Cardiobacterium hominis, a Gram-negative bacillus (rod-like bacterium) that causes endocarditis in humans. C. hominis is the ... Keywords: bacteria, bacterial, bacteriology, bacterium, c. hominis and, cardiobacterium hominis, endocarditis, gram-negative ... Caption: False-colour scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of Cardiobacterium hominis, a Gram-negative bacillus (rod-like ...
more infohttp://www.sciencephoto.com/media/11163/view

Cardiobacterium species | Johns Hopkins ABX GuideCardiobacterium species | Johns Hopkins ABX Guide

Cardiobacterium species answers are found in the Johns Hopkins ABX Guide powered by Unbound Medicine. Available for iPhone, ... Cardiobacterium species is a topic covered in the Johns Hopkins ABX Guide. To view the entire topic, please sign in or purchase ... "Cardiobacterium Species." Johns Hopkins ABX Guide, The Johns Hopkins University, 2019. Pediatrics Central, peds.unboundmedicine ... Major species: Cardiobacterium hominis is the most common human pathogen species, through remains a rare infection overall. * ...
more infohttps://peds.unboundmedicine.com/pedscentral/view/Johns_Hopkins_ABX_Guide/540710/all/Cardiobacterium_species

Cardiobacterium valvarum infective endocarditis and phenotypic/molecular characterization of 11 Cardiobacterium species strains...Cardiobacterium valvarum infective endocarditis and phenotypic/molecular characterization of 11 Cardiobacterium species strains...

Cardiobacterium species are, however, only rarely the aetiology of infective endocarditis. An infective endocarditis case is ... Phenotypically, the two species within the genus Cardiobacterium resemble each other greatly. When using the Vitek 2 Neisseria- ... Haemophilus identification card, the reaction for phenylphosphonate was positive for all Cardiobacterium hominis strains, but ... Cardiobacterium valvarum is a newly recognized human pathogen related to infective endocarditis. ...
more infohttps://www.microbiologyresearch.org/content/journal/jmm/10.1099/jmm.0.025353-0

Alasdair Scotts notes Flashcards by Scott Godfrey | BrainscapeAlasdair Scott's notes Flashcards by Scott Godfrey | Brainscape

Brainscape is a web and mobile study platform that helps you learn things faster. Our mission is to create a smarter world by simplifying and accelerating the learning process. © 2018 Bold Learning Solutions ...
more infohttps://www.brainscape.com/flashcards/alasdair-scott-s-notes-6572377/packs/10368755

Urinary tract infection - WikipediaUrinary tract infection - Wikipedia

A urinary tract infection (UTI) is an infection that affects part of the urinary tract.[1] When it affects the lower urinary tract it is known as a bladder infection (cystitis) and when it affects the upper urinary tract it is known as a kidney infection (pyelonephritis).[9] Symptoms from a lower urinary tract infection include pain with urination, frequent urination, and feeling the need to urinate despite having an empty bladder.[1] Symptoms of a kidney infection include fever and flank pain usually in addition to the symptoms of a lower UTI.[9] Rarely the urine may appear bloody.[6] In the very old and the very young, symptoms may be vague or non-specific.[1][10] The most common cause of infection is Escherichia coli, though other bacteria or fungi may rarely be the cause.[2] Risk factors include female anatomy, sexual intercourse, diabetes, obesity, and family history.[2] Although sexual intercourse is a risk factor, UTIs are not classified as sexually transmitted infections (STIs).[11] ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Urinary_Tract_Infections

Cholera - WikipediaCholera - Wikipedia

The word cholera is from Greek: χολέρα kholera from χολή kholē "bile". Cholera likely has its origins in the Indian subcontinent as evidenced by its prevalence in the region for centuries.[13] Early outbreaks in the Indian subcontinent are believed to have been the result of poor living conditions as well as the presence of pools of still water, both of which provide ideal conditions for cholera to thrive.[71] The disease first spread by trade routes (land and sea) to Russia in 1817, later to the rest of Europe, and from Europe to North America and the rest of the world.[13] Seven cholera pandemics have occurred in the past 200 years, with the seventh pandemic originating in Indonesia in 1961.[72] The first cholera pandemic occurred in the Bengal region of India, near Calcutta starting in 1817 through 1824. The disease dispersed from India to Southeast Asia, the Middle East, Europe, and Eastern Africa.[73] The movement of British Army and Navy ships and personnel is believed to have ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cholera

Molecular Characterization of Cryptosporidium spp. among Children in Rural GhanaMolecular Characterization of Cryptosporidium spp. among Children in Rural Ghana

Cardiobacterium hominis Is the Subject Area "Cardiobacterium hominis" applicable to this article? Yes. No. ...
more infohttps://journals.plos.org/plosntds/article?id=10.1371/journal.pntd.0003551

List of ICD-9 codes 001-139: infectious and parasitic diseasesList of ICD-9 codes 001-139: infectious and parasitic diseases

This is a shortened version of the first chapter of the ICD-9: Infectious and Parasitic Diseases. It covers ICD codes 001 to 139. The full chapter can be found on pages 49 to 99 of Volume 1, which contains all (sub)categories of the ICD-9. Volume 2 is an alphabetical index of Volume 1. Both volumes can be downloaded for free from the website of the World Health Organisation. ...
more infohttp://www.let.rug.nl/~gosse/termpedia2/termpedia.php?language=dutch_general&density=7&link_color=000000&termpedia_system=perl_db&url=http%3A%2F%2Fen.wikipedia.org%2Fwiki%2FList_of_ICD-9_codes_001%25E2%2580%2593139%3A_infectious_and_parasitic_diseases%23Human_immunodeficiency_virus_%28HIV%29_infection_%28042%E2%80%93044%29

UniProt: G9ZGC1 9GAMMUniProt: G9ZGC1 9GAMM

OC Bacteria; Proteobacteria; Gammaproteobacteria; Cardiobacteriales; OC Cardiobacteriaceae; Cardiobacterium. OX NCBI_TaxID= ...
more infohttp://www.genome.jp/dbget-bin/www_bget?uniprot:G9ZGC1_9GAMM

Prokaryota - WikispeciesProkaryota - Wikispecies

Chadefaud, M. & Emberger, L. (eds.). 1960. Traité de botanique systématique. Masson et Cie., Paris. Tome I. Les végétaux non vasculaires (Cryptogamie), par M. Chadefaud, 1960, 1 vol. de 1016 pages, [7]. Tome II. Les végétaux vasculaires, par L. Emberger, 1960, deux fascicules, 1540 pages, [8], [9]. Monde vivant ...
more infohttps://species.wikimedia.org/wiki/Prokaryota

Microbiological Evaluation of the New VITEK 2 Neisseria-Haemophilus Identification Card | Journal of Clinical MicrobiologyMicrobiological Evaluation of the New VITEK 2 Neisseria-Haemophilus Identification Card | Journal of Clinical Microbiology

Cardiobacterium hominis endocarditis: two cases and a review of the literature. Eur. J. Clin. Microbiol. Infect. Dis.25:587-595 ... In particular, Neisseria and Haemophilus, Actinobacillus, Cardiobacterium, Eikenella, and Kingella (HACEK) organisms are ... Cardiobacterium, Eikenella, Gardnerella, Haemophilus, Kingella, Moraxella, Neisseria, Oligella, and Suttonella. The NH card is ... Cardiobacterium, Eikenella, Gardnerella, Haemophilus, Kingella, Moraxella, and Neisseria were investigated. The NH card was ...
more infohttps://jcm.asm.org/content/45/11/3493

S.I. No. 248/1998 - Safety, Health and Welfare At Work (Biological Agents) (Amendment) Regulations, 1998S.I. No. 248/1998 - Safety, Health and Welfare At Work (Biological Agents) (Amendment) Regulations, 1998

The electronic Irish Statute Book (eISB) comprises the Acts of the Oireachtas (Parliament), Statutory Instruments, Legislation Directory, Constitution and a limited number of pre-1922 Acts.
more infohttp://www.irishstatutebook.ie/eli/1998/si/248/made/en/print

Free Laboratory Science Flashcards about Unit 3 Chapter 18Free Laboratory Science Flashcards about Unit 3 Chapter 18

Cardiobacterium hominis *infections*. endocarditis, infect aortic valve. Eikenella corrodens *colony morphology*. nonhemolytic ... Cardiobacterium hominis *epidemiology*. attachment to heart valves usually damaged or prosthetic, normal biota of the oral ... Cardiobacterium hominis *testing results*. oxidase-positive, catalase-negative, and indole-positve. negative for urase, nitrate ... Cardiobacterium hominis *colony morphology*. form rosettes, swelling, long filaments, or sticklike structures ...
more infohttps://www.studystack.com/flashcard-2241823

Ampicillin (Professional Patient Advice) - Drugs.comAmpicillin (Professional Patient Advice) - Drugs.com

Cardiobacterium hominis, Eikenella corrodens, and Kingella spp.) if the growth of the isolate is sufficient to permit in vitro ...
more infohttps://www.drugs.com/ppa/ampicillin.html

Penicillin | Technology TrendsPenicillin | Technology Trends

Cardiobacterium Hominis - Antibiotic Sensitivity. ... hominis has been sensitive to penicillin and penicillin derivatives such ...
more infohttp://www.primidi.com/penicillin

Dr. Roses Peripheral Brain--ENDOCARDITISDr. Rose's Peripheral Brain--ENDOCARDITIS

Cardiobacterium hominis, Eikenella corrodens and Kingella kingae). ...
more infohttp://faculty.washington.edu/momus/PB/endocard.htm

Do nového oknaDo nového okna

Cardiobacterium hominis. 2. Chlamydophila pneumoniae. 2. Chlamydia trachomatis. 2. Chlamydophila psittaci (vtáčie kmene). 3. ...
more infohttp://www.epi.sk/zz/2013-83