Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy: The restoration of the sequential order of contraction and relaxation of the HEART ATRIA and HEART VENTRICLES by atrio-biventricular pacing.Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy Devices: Types of artificial pacemakers with implantable leads to be placed at multiple intracardial sites. They are used to treat various cardiac conduction disturbances which interfere with the timing of contraction of the ventricles. They may or may not include defibrillating electrodes (IMPLANTABLE DEFIBRILLATORS) as well.Cardiac Pacing, Artificial: Regulation of the rate of contraction of the heart muscles by an artificial pacemaker.Heart Failure: A heterogeneous condition in which the heart is unable to pump out sufficient blood to meet the metabolic need of the body. Heart failure can be caused by structural defects, functional abnormalities (VENTRICULAR DYSFUNCTION), or a sudden overload beyond its capacity. Chronic heart failure is more common than acute heart failure which results from sudden insult to cardiac function, such as MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION.Pacemaker, Artificial: A device designed to stimulate, by electric impulses, contraction of the heart muscles. It may be temporary (external) or permanent (internal or internal-external).Defibrillators, Implantable: Implantable devices which continuously monitor the electrical activity of the heart and automatically detect and terminate ventricular tachycardia (TACHYCARDIA, VENTRICULAR) and VENTRICULAR FIBRILLATION. They consist of an impulse generator, batteries, and electrodes.Bundle-Branch Block: A form of heart block in which the electrical stimulation of HEART VENTRICLES is interrupted at either one of the branches of BUNDLE OF HIS thus preventing the simultaneous depolarization of the two ventricles.Coronary Sinus: A short vein that collects about two thirds of the venous blood from the MYOCARDIUM and drains into the RIGHT ATRIUM. Coronary sinus, normally located between the LEFT ATRIUM and LEFT VENTRICLE on the posterior surface of the heart, can serve as an anatomical reference for cardiac procedures.Ventricular Dysfunction, Left: A condition in which the LEFT VENTRICLE of the heart was functionally impaired. This condition usually leads to HEART FAILURE; MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION; and other cardiovascular complications. Diagnosis is made by measuring the diminished ejection fraction and a depressed level of motility of the left ventricular wall.Ventricular Remodeling: The geometric and structural changes that the HEART VENTRICLES undergo, usually following MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION. It comprises expansion of the infarct and dilatation of the healthy ventricle segments. While most prevalent in the left ventricle, it can also occur in the right ventricle.Stroke Volume: The amount of BLOOD pumped out of the HEART per beat, not to be confused with cardiac output (volume/time). It is calculated as the difference between the end-diastolic volume and the end-systolic volume.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Heart Ventricles: The lower right and left chambers of the heart. The right ventricle pumps venous BLOOD into the LUNGS and the left ventricle pumps oxygenated blood into the systemic arterial circulation.Echocardiography: Ultrasonic recording of the size, motion, and composition of the heart and surrounding tissues. The standard approach is transthoracic.Prosthesis Implantation: Surgical insertion of a prosthesis.Electrocardiography: Recording of the moment-to-moment electromotive forces of the HEART as projected onto various sites on the body's surface, delineated as a scalar function of time. The recording is monitored by a tracing on slow moving chart paper or by observing it on a cardioscope, which is a CATHODE RAY TUBE DISPLAY.Electrodes, Implanted: Surgically placed electric conductors through which ELECTRIC STIMULATION is delivered to or electrical activity is recorded from a specific point inside the body.Ventricular Function, Left: The hemodynamic and electrophysiological action of the left HEART VENTRICLE. Its measurement is an important aspect of the clinical evaluation of patients with heart disease to determine the effects of the disease on cardiac performance.Cardiomyopathy, Dilated: A form of CARDIAC MUSCLE disease that is characterized by ventricular dilation, VENTRICULAR DYSFUNCTION, and HEART FAILURE. Risk factors include SMOKING; ALCOHOL DRINKING; HYPERTENSION; INFECTION; PREGNANCY; and mutations in the LMNA gene encoding LAMIN TYPE A, a NUCLEAR LAMINA protein.Echocardiography, Doppler: Measurement of intracardiac blood flow using an M-mode and/or two-dimensional (2-D) echocardiogram while simultaneously recording the spectrum of the audible Doppler signal (e.g., velocity, direction, amplitude, intensity, timing) reflected from the moving column of red blood cells.Heart Conduction System: An impulse-conducting system composed of modified cardiac muscle, having the power of spontaneous rhythmicity and conduction more highly developed than the rest of the heart.Arrhythmias, Cardiac: Any disturbances of the normal rhythmic beating of the heart or MYOCARDIAL CONTRACTION. Cardiac arrhythmias can be classified by the abnormalities in HEART RATE, disorders of electrical impulse generation, or impulse conduction.Cardiac Output, Low: A state of subnormal or depressed cardiac output at rest or during stress. It is a characteristic of CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES, including congenital, valvular, rheumatic, hypertensive, coronary, and cardiomyopathic. The serious form of low cardiac output is characterized by marked reduction in STROKE VOLUME, and systemic vasoconstriction resulting in cold, pale, and sometimes cyanotic extremities.Cicatrix: The fibrous tissue that replaces normal tissue during the process of WOUND HEALING.Ventricular Dysfunction: A condition in which HEART VENTRICLES exhibit impaired function.Electric Countershock: An electrical current applied to the HEART to terminate a disturbance of its rhythm, ARRHYTHMIAS, CARDIAC. (Stedman, 25th ed)Cardiomyopathies: A group of diseases in which the dominant feature is the involvement of the CARDIAC MUSCLE itself. Cardiomyopathies are classified according to their predominant pathophysiological features (DILATED CARDIOMYOPATHY; HYPERTROPHIC CARDIOMYOPATHY; RESTRICTIVE CARDIOMYOPATHY) or their etiological/pathological factors (CARDIOMYOPATHY, ALCOHOLIC; ENDOCARDIAL FIBROELASTOSIS).Cardiography, Impedance: A type of impedance plethysmography in which bioelectrical impedance is measured between electrodes positioned around the neck and around the lower thorax. It is used principally to calculate stroke volume and cardiac volume, but it is also related to myocardial contractility, thoracic fluid content, and circulation to the extremities.Mitral Valve Insufficiency: Backflow of blood from the LEFT VENTRICLE into the LEFT ATRIUM due to imperfect closure of the MITRAL VALVE. This can lead to mitral valve regurgitation.Atrioventricular Node: A small nodular mass of specialized muscle fibers located in the interatrial septum near the opening of the coronary sinus. It gives rise to the atrioventricular bundle of the conduction system of the heart.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Echocardiography, Doppler, Color: Echocardiography applying the Doppler effect, with the superposition of flow information as colors on a gray scale in a real-time image.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Patient Selection: Criteria and standards used for the determination of the appropriateness of the inclusion of patients with specific conditions in proposed treatment plans and the criteria used for the inclusion of subjects in various clinical trials and other research protocols.Electrophysiologic Techniques, Cardiac: Methods to induce and measure electrical activities at specific sites in the heart to diagnose and treat problems with the heart's electrical system.Ventricular Function, Right: The hemodynamic and electrophysiological action of the right HEART VENTRICLE.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Myocardial Contraction: Contractile activity of the MYOCARDIUM.Echocardiography, Three-Dimensional: Echocardiography amplified by the addition of depth to the conventional two-dimensional ECHOCARDIOGRAPHY visualizing only the length and width of the heart. Three-dimensional ultrasound imaging was first described in 1961 but its application to echocardiography did not take place until 1974. (Mayo Clin Proc 1993;68:221-40)Electric Injuries: Injuries caused by electric currents. The concept excludes electric burns (BURNS, ELECTRIC), but includes accidental electrocution and electric shock.Dextrocardia: A congenital defect in which the heart is located on the right side of the THORAX instead of on the left side (levocardia, the normal position). When dextrocardia is accompanied with inverted HEART ATRIA, a right-sided STOMACH, and a left-sided LIVER, the combination is called dextrocardia with SITUS INVERSUS. Dextrocardia may adversely affect other thoracic organs.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Systole: Period of contraction of the HEART, especially of the HEART VENTRICLES.Ventricular Dysfunction, Right: A condition in which the RIGHT VENTRICLE of the heart was functionally impaired. This condition usually leads to HEART FAILURE or MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION, and other cardiovascular complications. Diagnosis is made by measuring the diminished ejection fraction and a depressed level of motility of the right ventricular wall.Phlebography: Radiographic visualization or recording of a vein after the injection of contrast medium.Cardiac Imaging Techniques: Visualization of the heart structure and cardiac blood flow for diagnostic evaluation or to guide cardiac procedures via techniques including ENDOSCOPY (cardiac endoscopy, sometimes refered to as cardioscopy), RADIONUCLIDE IMAGING; MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING; TOMOGRAPHY; or ULTRASONOGRAPHY.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Therapy, Computer-Assisted: Computer systems utilized as adjuncts in the treatment of disease.Myocardial Ischemia: A disorder of cardiac function caused by insufficient blood flow to the muscle tissue of the heart. The decreased blood flow may be due to narrowing of the coronary arteries (CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE), to obstruction by a thrombus (CORONARY THROMBOSIS), or less commonly, to diffuse narrowing of arterioles and other small vessels within the heart. Severe interruption of the blood supply to the myocardial tissue may result in necrosis of cardiac muscle (MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION).Equipment Failure: Failure of equipment to perform to standard. The failure may be due to defects or improper use.Body Surface Potential Mapping: Recording of regional electrophysiological information by analysis of surface potentials to give a complete picture of the effects of the currents from the heart on the body surface. It has been applied to the diagnosis of old inferior myocardial infarction, localization of the bypass pathway in Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, recognition of ventricular hypertrophy, estimation of the size of a myocardial infarct, and the effects of different interventions designed to reduce infarct size. The limiting factor at present is the complexity of the recording and analysis, which requires 100 or more electrodes, sophisticated instrumentation, and dedicated personnel. (Braunwald, Heart Disease, 4th ed)Hemodynamics: The movement and the forces involved in the movement of the blood through the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.Echocardiography, Doppler, Pulsed: Echocardiography applying the Doppler effect, with velocity detection combined with range discrimination. Short bursts of ultrasound are transmitted at regular intervals and the echoes are demodulated as they return.Tachycardia, Ventricular: An abnormally rapid ventricular rhythm usually in excess of 150 beats per minute. It is generated within the ventricle below the BUNDLE OF HIS, either as autonomic impulse formation or reentrant impulse conduction. Depending on the etiology, onset of ventricular tachycardia can be paroxysmal (sudden) or nonparoxysmal, its wide QRS complexes can be uniform or polymorphic, and the ventricular beating may be independent of the atrial beating (AV dissociation).Atrial Fibrillation: Abnormal cardiac rhythm that is characterized by rapid, uncoordinated firing of electrical impulses in the upper chambers of the heart (HEART ATRIA). In such case, blood cannot be effectively pumped into the lower chambers of the heart (HEART VENTRICLES). It is caused by abnormal impulse generation.Heart Atria: The chambers of the heart, to which the BLOOD returns from the circulation.Recovery of Function: A partial or complete return to the normal or proper physiologic activity of an organ or part following disease or trauma.Kaplan-Meier Estimate: A nonparametric method of compiling LIFE TABLES or survival tables. It combines calculated probabilities of survival and estimates to allow for observations occurring beyond a measurement threshold, which are assumed to occur randomly. Time intervals are defined as ending each time an event occurs and are therefore unequal. (From Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1995)Cardiac Output: The volume of BLOOD passing through the HEART per unit of time. It is usually expressed as liters (volume) per minute so as not to be confused with STROKE VOLUME (volume per beat).Fluoroscopy: Production of an image when x-rays strike a fluorescent screen.Gated Blood-Pool Imaging: Radionuclide ventriculography where scintigraphic data is acquired during repeated cardiac cycles at specific times in the cycle, using an electrocardiographic synchronizer or gating device. Analysis of right ventricular function is difficult with this technique; that is best evaluated by first-pass ventriculography (VENTRICULOGRAPHY, FIRST-PASS).Atrioventricular Block: Impaired impulse conduction from HEART ATRIA to HEART VENTRICLES. AV block can mean delayed or completely blocked impulse conduction.Endocardium: The innermost layer of the heart, comprised of endothelial cells.Death, Sudden, Cardiac: Unexpected rapid natural death due to cardiovascular collapse within one hour of initial symptoms. It is usually caused by the worsening of existing heart diseases. The sudden onset of symptoms, such as CHEST PAIN and CARDIAC ARRHYTHMIAS, particularly VENTRICULAR TACHYCARDIA, can lead to the loss of consciousness and cardiac arrest followed by biological death. (from Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine, 7th ed., 2005)Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Equipment Design: Methods of creating machines and devices.Phrenic Nerve: The motor nerve of the diaphragm. The phrenic nerve fibers originate in the cervical spinal column (mostly C4) and travel through the cervical plexus to the diaphragm.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Natriuretic Peptide, Brain: A PEPTIDE that is secreted by the BRAIN and the HEART ATRIA, stored mainly in cardiac ventricular MYOCARDIUM. It can cause NATRIURESIS; DIURESIS; VASODILATION; and inhibits secretion of RENIN and ALDOSTERONE. It improves heart function. It contains 32 AMINO ACIDS.Exercise Test: Controlled physical activity which is performed in order to allow assessment of physiological functions, particularly cardiovascular and pulmonary, but also aerobic capacity. Maximal (most intense) exercise is usually required but submaximal exercise is also used.Feasibility Studies: Studies to determine the advantages or disadvantages, practicability, or capability of accomplishing a projected plan, study, or project.Treatment Failure: A measure of the quality of health care by assessment of unsuccessful results of management and procedures used in combating disease, in individual cases or series.Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic: Works about clinical trials that involve at least one test treatment and one control treatment, concurrent enrollment and follow-up of the test- and control-treated groups, and in which the treatments to be administered are selected by a random process, such as the use of a random-numbers table.Vena Cava, Superior: The venous trunk which returns blood from the head, neck, upper extremities and chest.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Exercise Tolerance: The exercise capacity of an individual as measured by endurance (maximal exercise duration and/or maximal attained work load) during an EXERCISE TEST.Heart Failure, Systolic: Heart failure caused by abnormal myocardial contraction during SYSTOLE leading to defective cardiac emptying.Heart Rate: The number of times the HEART VENTRICLES contract per unit of time, usually per minute.Psychological Techniques: Methods used in the diagnosis and treatment of behavioral, personality, and mental disorders.Ventricular Fibrillation: A potentially lethal cardiac arrhythmia that is characterized by uncoordinated extremely rapid firing of electrical impulses (400-600/min) in HEART VENTRICLES. Such asynchronous ventricular quivering or fibrillation prevents any effective cardiac output and results in unconsciousness (SYNCOPE). It is one of the major electrocardiographic patterns seen with CARDIAC ARREST.Heart-Assist Devices: Small pumps, often implantable, designed for temporarily assisting the heart, usually the LEFT VENTRICLE, to pump blood. They consist of a pumping chamber and a power source, which may be partially or totally external to the body and activated by electromagnetic motors.Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Cine: A type of imaging technique used primarily in the field of cardiology. By coordinating the fast gradient-echo MRI sequence with retrospective ECG-gating, numerous short time frames evenly spaced in the cardiac cycle are produced. These images are laced together in a cinematic display so that wall motion of the ventricles, valve motion, and blood flow patterns in the heart and great vessels can be visualized.Heart: The hollow, muscular organ that maintains the circulation of the blood.Cardiac Volume: The volume of the HEART, usually relating to the volume of BLOOD contained within it at various periods of the cardiac cycle. The amount of blood ejected from a ventricle at each beat is STROKE VOLUME.Observer Variation: The failure by the observer to measure or identify a phenomenon accurately, which results in an error. Sources for this may be due to the observer's missing an abnormality, or to faulty technique resulting in incorrect test measurement, or to misinterpretation of the data. Two varieties are inter-observer variation (the amount observers vary from one another when reporting on the same material) and intra-observer variation (the amount one observer varies between observations when reporting more than once on the same material).Hospitalization: The confinement of a patient in a hospital.Heart Function Tests: Examinations used to diagnose and treat heart conditions.Diagnostic Imaging: Any visual display of structural or functional patterns of organs or tissues for diagnostic evaluation. It includes measuring physiologic and metabolic responses to physical and chemical stimuli, as well as ultramicroscopy.Dogs: The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)Single-Blind Method: A method in which either the observer(s) or the subject(s) is kept ignorant of the group to which the subjects are assigned.Survival Analysis: A class of statistical procedures for estimating the survival function (function of time, starting with a population 100% well at a given time and providing the percentage of the population still well at later times). The survival analysis is then used for making inferences about the effects of treatments, prognostic factors, exposures, and other covariates on the function.Ventricular Pressure: The pressure within a CARDIAC VENTRICLE. Ventricular pressure waveforms can be measured in the beating heart by catheterization or estimated using imaging techniques (e.g., DOPPLER ECHOCARDIOGRAPHY). The information is useful in evaluating the function of the MYOCARDIUM; CARDIAC VALVES; and PERICARDIUM, particularly with simultaneous measurement of other (e.g., aortic or atrial) pressures.Multicenter Studies as Topic: Works about controlled studies which are planned and carried out by several cooperating institutions to assess certain variables and outcomes in specific patient populations, for example, a multicenter study of congenital anomalies in children.Pericardium: A conical fibro-serous sac surrounding the HEART and the roots of the great vessels (AORTA; VENAE CAVAE; PULMONARY ARTERY). Pericardium consists of two sacs: the outer fibrous pericardium and the inner serous pericardium. The latter consists of an outer parietal layer facing the fibrous pericardium, and an inner visceral layer (epicardium) resting next to the heart, and a pericardial cavity between these two layers.Myocardial Perfusion Imaging: The creation and display of functional images showing where the blood is flowing into the MYOCARDIUM by following over time the distribution of tracers injected into the blood stream.Cardiac Catheterization: Procedures in which placement of CARDIAC CATHETERS is performed for therapeutic or diagnostic procedures.Tomography, Emission-Computed, Single-Photon: A method of computed tomography that uses radionuclides which emit a single photon of a given energy. The camera is rotated 180 or 360 degrees around the patient to capture images at multiple positions along the arc. The computer is then used to reconstruct the transaxial, sagittal, and coronal images from the 3-dimensional distribution of radionuclides in the organ. The advantages of SPECT are that it can be used to observe biochemical and physiological processes as well as size and volume of the organ. The disadvantage is that, unlike positron-emission tomography where the positron-electron annihilation results in the emission of 2 photons at 180 degrees from each other, SPECT requires physical collimation to line up the photons, which results in the loss of many available photons and hence degrades the image.Monitoring, Ambulatory: The use of electronic equipment to observe or record physiologic processes while the patient undergoes normal daily activities.Models, Cardiovascular: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of the cardiovascular system, processes, or phenomena; includes the use of mathematical equations, computers and other electronic equipment.Myocardium: The muscle tissue of the HEART. It is composed of striated, involuntary muscle cells (MYOCYTES, CARDIAC) connected to form the contractile pump to generate blood flow.Catheter Ablation: Removal of tissue with electrical current delivered via electrodes positioned at the distal end of a catheter. Energy sources are commonly direct current (DC-shock) or alternating current at radiofrequencies (usually 750 kHz). The technique is used most often to ablate the AV junction and/or accessory pathways in order to interrupt AV conduction and produce AV block in the treatment of various tachyarrhythmias.EuropeVentricular Premature Complexes: A type of cardiac arrhythmia with premature contractions of the HEART VENTRICLES. It is characterized by the premature QRS complex on ECG that is of abnormal shape and great duration (generally >129 msec). It is the most common form of all cardiac arrhythmias. Premature ventricular complexes have no clinical significance except in concurrence with heart diseases.Equipment Failure Analysis: The evaluation of incidents involving the loss of function of a device. These evaluations are used for a variety of purposes such as to determine the failure rates, the causes of failures, costs of failures, and the reliability and maintainability of devices.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Heart Block: Impaired conduction of cardiac impulse that can occur anywhere along the conduction pathway, such as between the SINOATRIAL NODE and the right atrium (SA block) or between atria and ventricles (AV block). Heart blocks can be classified by the duration, frequency, or completeness of conduction block. Reversibility depends on the degree of structural or functional defects.Survival Rate: The proportion of survivors in a group, e.g., of patients, studied and followed over a period, or the proportion of persons in a specified group alive at the beginning of a time interval who survive to the end of the interval. It is often studied using life table methods.Sleep Apnea, Central: A condition associated with multiple episodes of sleep apnea which are distinguished from obstructive sleep apnea (SLEEP APNEA, OBSTRUCTIVE) by the complete cessation of efforts to breathe. This disorder is associated with dysfunction of central nervous system centers that regulate respiration.Diagnosis, Computer-Assisted: Application of computer programs designed to assist the physician in solving a diagnostic problem.Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.Atrial Function: The hemodynamic and electrophysiological action of the HEART ATRIA.Myocytes, Cardiac: Striated muscle cells found in the heart. They are derived from cardiac myoblasts (MYOBLASTS, CARDIAC).Tricuspid Valve Insufficiency: Backflow of blood from the RIGHT VENTRICLE into the RIGHT ATRIUM due to imperfect closure of the TRICUSPID VALVE.ROC Curve: A graphic means for assessing the ability of a screening test to discriminate between healthy and diseased persons; may also be used in other studies, e.g., distinguishing stimuli responses as to a faint stimuli or nonstimuli.Electrocardiography, Ambulatory: Method in which prolonged electrocardiographic recordings are made on a portable tape recorder (Holter-type system) or solid-state device ("real-time" system), while the patient undergoes normal daily activities. It is useful in the diagnosis and management of intermittent cardiac arrhythmias and transient myocardial ischemia.Oxygen Consumption: The rate at which oxygen is used by a tissue; microliters of oxygen STPD used per milligram of tissue per hour; the rate at which oxygen enters the blood from alveolar gas, equal in the steady state to the consumption of oxygen by tissue metabolism throughout the body. (Stedman, 25th ed, p346)Ventricular Function: The hemodynamic and electrophysiological action of the HEART VENTRICLES.Heart Diseases: Pathological conditions involving the HEART including its structural and functional abnormalities.Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Proportional Hazards Models: Statistical models used in survival analysis that assert that the effect of the study factors on the hazard rate in the study population is multiplicative and does not change over time.Statistics, Nonparametric: A class of statistical methods applicable to a large set of probability distributions used to test for correlation, location, independence, etc. In most nonparametric statistical tests, the original scores or observations are replaced by another variable containing less information. An important class of nonparametric tests employs the ordinal properties of the data. Another class of tests uses information about whether an observation is above or below some fixed value such as the median, and a third class is based on the frequency of the occurrence of runs in the data. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p1284; Corsini, Concise Encyclopedia of Psychology, 1987, p764-5)Electrodes: Electric conductors through which electric currents enter or leave a medium, whether it be an electrolytic solution, solid, molten mass, gas, or vacuum.Chi-Square Distribution: A distribution in which a variable is distributed like the sum of the squares of any given independent random variable, each of which has a normal distribution with mean of zero and variance of one. The chi-square test is a statistical test based on comparison of a test statistic to a chi-square distribution. The oldest of these tests are used to detect whether two or more population distributions differ from one another.Echocardiography, Stress: A method of recording heart motion and internal structures by combining ultrasonic imaging with exercise testing (EXERCISE TEST) or pharmacologic stress.Imaging, Three-Dimensional: The process of generating three-dimensional images by electronic, photographic, or other methods. For example, three-dimensional images can be generated by assembling multiple tomographic images with the aid of a computer, while photographic 3-D images (HOLOGRAPHY) can be made by exposing film to the interference pattern created when two laser light sources shine on an object.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Walking: An activity in which the body advances at a slow to moderate pace by moving the feet in a coordinated fashion. This includes recreational walking, walking for fitness, and competitive race-walking.Diastole: Post-systolic relaxation of the HEART, especially the HEART VENTRICLES.Algorithms: A procedure consisting of a sequence of algebraic formulas and/or logical steps to calculate or determine a given task.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Double-Blind Method: A method of studying a drug or procedure in which both the subjects and investigators are kept unaware of who is actually getting which specific treatment.Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted: Methods developed to aid in the interpretation of ultrasound, radiographic images, etc., for diagnosis of disease.Tachycardia, Ectopic Atrial: Abnormally rapid heartbeats originating from one or more automatic foci (nonsinus pacemakers) in the HEART ATRIUM but away from the SINOATRIAL NODE. Unlike the reentry mechanism, automatic tachycardia speeds up and slows down gradually. The episode is characterized by a HEART RATE between 135 to less than 200 beats per minute and lasting 30 seconds or longer.Cost-Benefit Analysis: A method of comparing the cost of a program with its expected benefits in dollars (or other currency). The benefit-to-cost ratio is a measure of total return expected per unit of money spent. This analysis generally excludes consideration of factors that are not measured ultimately in economic terms. Cost effectiveness compares alternative ways to achieve a specific set of results.Cross-Over Studies: Studies comparing two or more treatments or interventions in which the subjects or patients, upon completion of the course of one treatment, are switched to another. In the case of two treatments, A and B, half the subjects are randomly allocated to receive these in the order A, B and half to receive them in the order B, A. A criticism of this design is that effects of the first treatment may carry over into the period when the second is given. (Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Adrenergic beta-Antagonists: Drugs that bind to but do not activate beta-adrenergic receptors thereby blocking the actions of beta-adrenergic agonists. Adrenergic beta-antagonists are used for treatment of hypertension, cardiac arrhythmias, angina pectoris, glaucoma, migraine headaches, and anxiety.Quality-Adjusted Life Years: A measurement index derived from a modification of standard life-table procedures and designed to take account of the quality as well as the duration of survival. This index can be used in assessing the outcome of health care procedures or services. (BIOETHICS Thesaurus, 1994)

Cardiac resynchronization therapy with and without implantable cardioverter-defibrillator. (1/472)

Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is recommended to reduce morbidity and mortality in patients with New York Heart Association class III/IV, who are symptomatic despite optimal medical therapy, and who had a reduced left ventricle (LV) ejection fraction and electrical dyssynchrony. The effects of CRT are reflected mainly by the degree and location of dyssynchrony and by working in insertion of optimal LV lead site. Echocardiography and Doppler echocardiography are considered to be good tools to measure LV dyssynchrony directly. However, the large randomized trials have shown that no single echocardiographic measure of dyssynchrony is recommended to improve patient selection for CRT beyond current guidelines. There were several unsolved issues on CRT, such as patient selection, electrical or electromechanical dyssynchrony criteria to patients for CRT, indication of patients with a narrow or slightly prolonged QRS width, indication of patients with atrial fibrillation, and indication of patients with mild heart failure or asymptomatic LV dysfunction, and device selection; CRT alone (CRT-P) or CRT in combination with implantable cardioverter therapy (CRT-D). This review paper summarized the concept of therapy, the current evidence regarding the indications, effectiveness and safety of CRT-P and CRT-D in patients with LV dysfunction, and unsolved issues.  (+info)

Prevalence and risk factors related to infections of cardiac resynchronization therapy devices. (2/472)

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Resumption of sinus rhythm in patients with heart failure and permanent atrial fibrillation undergoing cardiac resynchronization therapy: a longitudinal observational study. (3/472)

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Upgrading to resynchronization therapy after chronic right ventricular pacing improves left ventricular remodelling. (4/472)

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Effectiveness of cardiac resynchronization therapy in mild congestive heart failure: systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized trials. (5/472)

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Clinical and echocardiographic correlates of improvement in left ventricular diastolic function after cardiac resynchronization therapy. (6/472)

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Impact of reduction in early- and late-systolic functional mitral regurgitation on reverse remodelling after cardiac resynchronization therapy. (7/472)

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Optimization of myocardial strain imaging and speckle tracking for resynchronization after congenital heart surgery in children. (8/472)

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In recent decades, the prevalence of heart failure has steadily increased and can be considered a contemporary cardiovascular epidemic. Therefore, treatment of heart failure is a primary focus of cardiovascular disease management strategies. Cardiac resynchronization therapy: an established pacing therapy for heart failure and mechanical dyssynchrony provides basic knowledge about congestive heart failure and also covers the evolution of cardiac resynchronization therapy. State-of-the-art information and future directions of this therapeutic tool are explained. As cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is a new therapy which still undergoes rapid advancement, it is imperative to provide updates on key issues. These include technological advances, the unique role of imaging to assess mechanical dyssynchrony, troubleshooting, recent key clinical trials, and the incorporation of monitoring capabilities into CRT or CRT plus defibrillation devices. Cardiac resynchronization therapy is an exciting ...
Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy (CRT) has emerged as a promising therapeutic addition in patients with drug refractory heart failure (HF). Along with providing relief of symptoms of HF, cardiac resynchronization therapy defibrillators (CRT-D) are used for the prevention of sudden cardiac death (SCD). Although there are concerns that the defibrillation threshold (DFT) estimates are elevated in the heart failure (HF) patient population due to lower LV ejection fraction (EF) and left ventricular (LV) dysfunction, there is paucity of data available to evaluate this theory.. Recently, two different studies in a retrospective manner evaluated the energy requirements in patients receiving cardiac resynchronization therapy defibrillators (CRT-D). Burke et al analyzed DFTs in 50 patients each implanted with a cardiac resynchronization therapy defibrillators (CRT-D) device and an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD). Although the ejection fraction (EF) in cardiac resynchronization therapy ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Association of corrected QT dispersion with symptoms improvement in patients receiving cardiac resynchronization therapy. AU - Hina, Kazuyoshi. AU - Kawamura, Hiroshi. AU - Murakami, Takashi. AU - Yamamoto, Keizo. AU - Yamaji, Hirosuke. AU - Murakami, Masaaki. AU - Hirohata, Satoshi. AU - Ogawa, Hiroko. AU - Sakane, Kohsuke. AU - Kusachi, Shozo. PY - 2008. Y1 - 2008. N2 - Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is theoretically expected to affect repolarization as well as depolarization. We studied the effects of CRT on corrected QT (QTc) dispersion in association with symptomatic improvement. QTc dispersion was analyzed in 26 consecutive patients (67 ± 6 years old, 18 men and 8 women) who underwent CRT. CRT responders and nonresponders were defined as patients showing and not showing ≥1 class New York Heart Association symptomatic improvement 3 months after CRT, respectively. QTc interval, QRS width, and QTc dispersion were measured automatically from digital data using an ...
Two recent studies in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology (JACC) look at findings from the MADIT-CRT (Multicenter Automatic Defibrillator Implantation Trial With Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy) Study. New data from MADIT-CRT study identifies who are the "super-responders," and a second paper finds a possible new effect of statins. The first study looked at predictors of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) super-response to cardiac resynchronization therapy with defibrillator (CRT-D) and whether super-response translated into improved, event-free survival in patients with mildly symptomatic heart failure (HF). Currently, few data exist on predictors of super-response to CRT-D and associated morbidity and mortality in mildly symptomatic HF populations. Based on the findings from the study, researchers concluded that six baseline factors predict LVEF super-response in CRT-D-treated patients with mild HF. These factors are: female sex, no prior myocardial infarction, QRS ...
© 2016 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier. Objectives The goal of this study was to assess the contemporary and historical success rates of transvenous left ventricular (LV) lead placement for cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT), their change over time, and the reasons for failure. Background In selected patients, CRT improves morbidity and mortality, but the placement of the LV lead can be technically challenging. Methods A literature search was used to identify all studies reporting success rates of LV lead placement for CRT via the coronary sinus (CS) route. A total of 164 studies were identified, and a meta-analysis was performed. Results The studies included 29,503 patients: 74% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 72% to 76%) were male; their mean age was 66 years (95% CI: 65 to 67); their mean New York Heart Association functional class was 2.8 (95% CI: 2.7 to 2.9); the mean LV ejection fraction was 26% (95% CI: 25% to 28%); and the mean QRS duration was 155 ms (95%
A large observational study published in JAMA suggests that patients with left bundle-branch block (LBBB) and longer QRS duration derive the most benefit from a cardiac resynchronization therapy defibrillator (CRT-D). The findings appear to support current, but often criticized, guidelines from the American College of Cardiology, American Heart Association, and the Heart Rhythm Society, in which a class I […]. ...
In this study, subjects will be randomized to CRT-D or ICD-only. Randomization will be stratified by clinical center and ischemic status. Approximately 60% of the subjects will be randomly assigned to receive a CRT-D with biventricular pacing, and 40% will receive an ICD only. Optimal pharmacological therapy for heart failure will be required in both treatment arms. Length of follow-up for each subject will depend on the date of entry into the study, since all subjects will be followed to a common study termination date ...
Cardiac-resynchronization therapy (CRT) has known benefits in patients with severe left ventricular systolic dysfunction and prolonged QRS duration (,120 ms). However, up to half of patients with systolic dysfunction appear to have left ventricular dyssynchrony by echocardiographic measures, despite a QRS duration of less than 120 ms. As a result, CRT is often used for patients with echocardiographic evidence of dyssynchrony and a narrow QRS complex, despite a lack of clear benefit to this approach. The Echocardiography Guided Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy (EchoCRT) study sought to determine the effect of CRT on patient outcomes in the setting of symptomatic heart failure, echocardiographic findings of dyssynchrony, and QRS duration ,120 ms.. In this multicenter double blind trial, patients with severe symptomatic left ventricular failure (EF,35% and NYHA class III or IV) with a QRS duration of ,130ms (mean 105ms) and evidence of dyssynchrony either on tissue Doppler or speckle tracking echo ...
Introduction In selecting patients that may benefit from cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT), dyssynchrony assessment by echocardiography based only upon the timing of regional contraction is limited by being inherently independent of underlying myocardial contractility. We hypothesised that patient selection may be enhanced using a strain-based parameter based not only on the timing of myocardial segmental motion, but also on the amplitude of contraction, a potential measure of contractile reserve. We assessed a combined early and late strain index (ELSI) to predict CRT response.. Methods Speckle tracking radial strain was performed in 42 patients scheduled for CRT (age 69 +/− 9 years, ischemic 56%, QRS 154 +/− 12ms, NYHA III/IV - 38/4, ejection fraction 23 +/− 7%). The ELSI was calculated as the sum, for each of the 12 non apical segments, of the difference in peak radial strain and strain at aortic valve closure. CRT response was defined as a ,15% reduction in LV end systolic volume ...
Left ventricular (LV) electrical activation pattern could determine optimal LV lead placement site during cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) device implant. We sought to determine the feasibility of using EnSite NavX™ electroanatomic mapping s
In cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT), even if patient selection is made according to Japanese adaptive criteria, there are non-responders. Its main factor is consid..
APPROVAL FOR A MODIFICATION TO THE INDICATIONS FOR USE FOR THE COGNIS CRT-D MODELS N118, N119; LIVIANCRT-D MODELS H220, H225, H227 AND H229; AND CONTAK RENEWAL 3 RF HE CRT-D MODELSH210, H215, H217, H219 CARDIAC RESYNCHRONIZATION THERAPY DEFIBRILLATORS (CRT-DS) AS FOLLOWS:THESE BOSTON SCIENTIFIC CARDIAC RESYNCHRONIZATION THERAPY DEFIBRILLATORS (CRT-DS) ARE INDICATED FOR PATIENTS WITH HEART FAILURE WHO RECEIVE STABLE OPTIMAL PHARMACOLOGIC THERAPY (OPT) FOR HEART FAILURE AND WHO MEET ANY ONE OF THE FOLLOWING CLASSIFICATIONS:1) MODERATE TO SEVERE HEART FAILURE (NYHA CLASS III-IV) WITH EF <= 35% AND QRS DURATION>= 120 MS; OR2) LEFT BUNDLE BRANCH BLOCK (LBBB) WITH QRS >= 130 MS, EF <= 30%, AND MILD (NYHACLASS II) ISCHEMIC OR NONISCHEMIC HEART FAILURE OR ASYMPTOMATIC (NYHA CLASS I)ISCHEMIC HEART FAILURE ...
The global cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) market is expected to reach USD 9.2 billion by 2025, according to a new report by Grand View Research, Inc. Increasing prevalence of cardiac disorders and rising incidences of heart failure are expected to boost the CRT market growth over the forecast period.. According to statistics published by the Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation in 2016, about 6.0 million people within the U.S. region suffer from cardiac disorders, of which 0.8 million are affected by atrioventricular block leading to cardiac failure. Such a huge number leads to an increased cost of about USD 20.0-56.0 billion annually. CRT devices are being predominantly used to prevent the surgical cost and readmission rate in hospitals, thereby propelling its growth.. In addition, the on-going research to develop smaller, wireless/leadless and long-lasting CRT devices is expected to be a vital impact rendering driver. For instance, in September 2016, EBR Systems Inc., announced that it ...
The DYNAGEN X4 CRT-D features 17 pacing vector options designed to resolve phrenic nerve stimulation and high thresholds. It brings forward the same long lasting battery technology as previous generations of Boston Scientific devices.
AIMS: Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) has reportedly not been effective in the absence of electrical or mechanical dyssynchrony. We present six patients with severe left ventricular (LV) dilation, mitral regurgitation (MR), and non-ischaemic
Objective Ethnic and racial disparities in cardiac care may partially result from over-provision of care among white patients. We hypothesized that whites were more likely than blacks and Hispanics to receive cardiac resynchronization therapy with defibrillator (CRT-D) devices outside of ACC/AHA/HRS guidelines.. Methods We analyzed 01/2005- 04/2007 data from the ACC-National Cardiovascular Data Registry for implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs). We identified white, black and Hispanic patients who received CRT-D. We then fit a multivariable hierarchical logistic regression model with full ACC/AHA/HRS guideline concordance (QRS duration ,=0.12 ms, LVEF ,,26,35%, and class III or IV CHF) as a binary outcome. Independent variables included race/ethnicity, age, gender, cardiomyopathy etiology, duration of CHF, LVEF, blood pressure, QRS duration/morphology, prior coronary revascularization, atrial fibrillation, cerebrovascular disease, hypertension, diabetes, renal failure, and pulmonary ...
Heart failure patients with a condition called heart block derive significant benefit from cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT), according to the results of the Block HF clinical trial, presented at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions 2012 meeting in Los Angeles. Anne B. Curtis, MD, Charles and Mary Bauer Professor and Chair of Medicine in the University at Buffalo School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences is principal investigator of Block HF.
Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy (CRT), also referred to as biventricular pacing, is often recommended for patients with severe heart dysfunction and congestive heart failure (CHF). Learn more.
If youve been diagnosed with heart failure, learn about Medtronics Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy, what to expect during CRT surgery, & other heart failure resources.
The study of the Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy (CRT) Devices Market provides the market size information and market trends along with the factors an
Chalil, Shajil, Foley, Paul W X, Muyhaldeen, Sarkaw A, Patel, Kiran C R, Yousef, Zaheer R, Smith, Russell E A, Frenneaux, Michael P and Leyva, Francisco (2007) Late gadolinium enhancement-cardiovascular magnetic resonance as a predictor of response to cardiac resynchronization therapy in patients with ischaemic cardiomyopathy. EP-Europace, 9 (11). pp. 1031-7. ISSN 1099-5129 Full text not available from this repository. (Request a copy ...
Care guide for Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy (Aftercare Instructions). Includes: possible causes, signs and symptoms, standard treatment options and means of care and support.
Definition : Implantable cardiac pacemaker and/or defibrillator/cardiac pacemakers leads used for sensing cardiac bioelectric signals and delivering electrical stimuli to synchronize ventricular contractions. These leads are connected to implantable cardiac pacemakers or defibrillator/cardioverter/pacemakers for resynchronization therapy in patients with advanced heart failure (e.g., dilated cardiomyopathy) and/or serious heart-rhythm problems such as delayed ventricular activation and contraction (i.e., ventricular dysynchrony).. Entry Terms : "Biventricular Pacemaker/Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators (Bi-V/ICDs)" , "Biventricular Pacemakers" , "Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy Leads" , "Ventricular Resynchronization Leads" , "Resynchronization Cardiac Rhythm Leads" , "Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy Defibrillator (CRT-D) Systems" , "Biventricular Pacing Devices" , "Defibrillation Electrodes" , "Electrodes, Defibrillation". UMDC code : 20377 ...
We expected to see a difference, but we were struck by the magnitude of these results," said Daniel B. Kramer, M.D., M.P.H., lead author of the study and assistant professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School in Boston, Massachusetts.. "Patients functional status clearly predicts survival. Our hope would be to use activity as a factor in not just predicting outcomes but also to guide strategies that may improve outcomes. But that is much further down the line." Researchers studied the ALTITUDE registry, a nationwide database that involved 98,437 patients enrolled in a remote monitoring program. About 57 percent of the patients had received a new or replacement ICD and 43 percent had received cardiac resynchronization therapy cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT-D) devices in 2008-12. CRT-D therapy combines an ICD with cardiac resynchronization therapy. Patients were followed for a median 2.2 years.. "What is intriguing about our results is that looking at just one piece of information ...
BACKGROUND: Functional mitral regurgitation (FMR) is associated with reduced survival in dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) can improve FMR. We sought to identify the predictors of FMR improvement after CRT in DCM. METHODS: From January 2003 to December 2013, 430 DCM patients consecutively enrolled were retrospectively analyzed. Inclusion criteria were successful CRT implantation in the presence of conventional indications (i.e., left bundle branch block, left ventricular ejection fraction ≤35%, New York Heart Association functional class ≥II) and moderate-to-severe FMR at the time of procedure. Early echocardiographic evaluation after CRT implantation (median 2.5 days) has been performed in each patient. Improvement in FMR (absent/mild) at midterm (7 months; interquartile range 4-10) was considered as the primary study end point. RESULTS: A total of 44 patients (10% of the overall cohort) were included. A significant reduction in FMR severity was observed ...
A pacing system computes optimal cardiac resynchronization pacing parameters using intrinsic conduction intervals. In various embodiments, values for atrio-ventricular delay intervals are each computed as a function of an intrinsic atrio-ventricular interval and a parameter reflective of an interventricular conduction delay. Examples of the parameter reflective of the interventricular conduction delay include QRS width and interval between right and left ventricular senses.
The patients included in this study, who presented with a long history of apparently isolated LBBB and progressive LV dysfunction, possessed the characteristics of an original syndrome suspected from previous animal experiments, epidemiological studies, and clinical observations, though never demonstrated in individual patients. These original observations strongly support the concept of LBBB-induced cardiomyopathy treatable with CRT.. Isolated LBBB causes abnormalities of LV dysfunction, manifest by a shortening of the filling time, a decreased septal contribution to LV ejection, and a globally depressed EF, compared with normal matched controls (5). High-amplitude oscillations of the interventricular septum were also described, similar to the "septal flash," a sign of mechanical dyssynchrony (present in 4 of our 6 patients) and a putative predictor of echocardiographic response to CRT (16).. The clinical value of several techniques and measures proposed to detect and quantify LBBB-induced ...
Comparison of pharmacological treatment alone versus treatment combined with cardiac resynchronization therapy in patients over 75 years. Cruz, Elena; Cortés, Marcelino; Farré, Jerónimo; Palfy, Julia; Ávila, Paloma; Hernández, Ignacio; Romero, Angélica; Benezet, Juan; Franco, Juan; Navas, Miguel; Hernandez, Jose; Briongos, Sem; Rubio, José // Journal of Interventional Cardiac Electrophysiology;Jun2015, Vol. 43 Issue 1, p13 Background: The role of cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) in patients aged ≥75 years is not well established. Methods: We identified 607 patients aged ≥75 years with left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) of ≤35 %, of whom 78 met the guidelines for indication of CRT.... ...
LV endocardial pacing has been proposed and has been shown to be superior to conventional LV epicardial pacing in the CRT setting in computer simulations (54) and preclinical experiments (55,56). In various canine LBBB models, superiority has been shown in electrical resynchronization and acute hemodynamic response (55,56). However, clinical studies showed less reproducible differences. Derval et al. (57) was not able to show significantly better hemodynamic response between pacing in the endocardial position and immediately below the position of the coronary sinus lead, although in each patient there was an endocardial position that resulted in superior improvement in pump function. Similarly, Spragg et al. (58) found that endocardial pacing tended to be superior to epicardial pacing in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy, but that the location of optimal LV endocardial pacing varied among patients. Shetty et al. (59) showed that LV endocardial pacing was superior to epicardial pacing and ...
This is generally performed subsequent to RV lead placement, with the RV lead providing a backup in case of accidental damage to the electric fibers of the heart, causing an asystolic event. As with the RV lead, a guide wire is first inserted, allowing for the insertion of a multi-delivery catheter. The catheter is subsequently maneuvered to the opening of the coronary sinus in the right atrium. From here a contrast media is injected, allowing the surgical team to obtain a coronary sinus phleobogram to direct the placement of the lead into the most suitable coronary vein.[1]. Once the phlebogram has been obtained, the multi-delivery catheter is used to guide in the lead, from the chosen vein of entry, into the right atrium, through the coronary sinus and into the relevant cardiac vein.[1]. Left ventricular lead placement is the most complicated and potentially hazardous element of the operation, due to the significant variability of coronary venous structure. Alterations in heart structure, ...
PubMed comprises more than 30 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.
The FDA approved two quadripolar leads for use in cardiac resynchronization therapy defibrillators for patients with heart failure.
In this observational analysis of a large real-world cohort of patients with NYHA class III or IV heart failure and reduced ejection fraction, we found that, compared with ICD, CRT-D was associated with a greater difference in mortality in women than in men, but this lower mortality risk was more evident in both male and female patients with LBBB. Among all LBBB patients, both women and men generally had lower mortality risks with QRS ≥130 ms; however, the mortality difference associated with CRT-D was greater in women. In the non-LBBB cohort, there was no mortality risk difference between CRT-D and ICD in women or men with RBBB or in men with IVCD. The finding that there seems to be reduced mortality in patients with LBBB and QRS 130 to 150 ms is important because professional society guidelines for CRT only assign a class I recommendation to patients with LBBB and QRS ≥150 ms.8. That CRT is effective in LBBB has been shown in recent meta-analyses of clinical trials,7,16,22 whereas other ...
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Fifteen dialysis-dependent patients with HF were implanted with CRT. Twenty percent of the subjects were women. The mean EF was 21 ± 7%, 53% had a left bundle branch block, and 67% had an ischemic cardiomyopathy. Eighty-seven percent of the patients had CRT with defibrillator. By 6-month follow-up, one third of the patients had died. At 3 years, Kaplan-Meier modeling predicted a 31% incidence of HF hospitalization, 100% incidence of hospitalization for any cause, 73% mortality, and 82% incidence of HF hospitalization or death. Patients on dialysis did not demonstrate a significant improvement in EF or LV diameters.. ...
The ALTITUDE clinical science program is analyzing comprehensive data from the LATITUDE® Patient Management system to provide insight into meaningful questions related to implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) and cardiac resynchronization therapy defibrillator (CRT-D) therapy ...
Heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HF-rEF) is responsible for high costs and increased rates of hospital admissions along with high mortality and morbidity risks. Only treatment for HF-rEF has been shown to be efficacious compared to HF-pEF which currently has no useful treatment options. Here is the latest research on HF-rEF. ...
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PubMed comprises more than 30 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.
Introductions: Wide QRS complex with left bundle branch block morphology is one of the three criteria for cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) in heart failure (HF) patients who do not improve on medical management. Approximately 30% of patients do not respond to CRT. This study investigates to find out to what extent the wide QRS duration correlates with the intraventricular mechanical dyssynchrony (IVMD) as measured by Tissue Doppler Imaging (TDI) echocardiography.. Methods: The HF patients of dilated or ischemic cardiomyopathy with ejection fraction £35% admitted in the medical ward of Patan Hospital, Nepal from March to August 2017 were enrolled in the study. They were divided into two groups, narrow QRS duration of ,120ms (Gr1) and wide QRS duration of ³120ms (Gr2). TDI was performed to measure time to peak systolic velocity of the left ventricular walls. The IVMD, defined as 60 ms (millisecond) or greater difference in time to peak velocity between any two points of the left ...
Heart failure patients with left ventricular (LV) ejection fractions of ,35% who are on optimal medical therapy with QRS durations of ≥120 ms on surface electrocardiography have derived clinical benefit from cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). Although this well-established and guideline-recommended treatment has shown reductions in heart failure progression and risk for ventricular tachyarrhythmias, there are also shortcomings. Nearly one-third of patients with CRT implants fail to show clinical benefit. Although potential explanations for the lack of response to CRT may be multifactorial, one of the most important prerequisites for successful CRT is proper LV lead placement. And that can be technically challenging.. LV lead placement to deliver CRT typically involves cannulating the coronary sinus, performing coronary venous angiography, selecting a target vein, and advancing the pacing lead into the selected vein to achieve adequate resynchronization. Although it is still an evolving ...
Clinical trials evaluating cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) have demonstrated improved heart failure status, quality of life, exercise capacity, systolic function of the left ventricle (LV), mortality, and numerous other outcomes in heart failure patients (1,2). Current guidelines recommend CRT for heart failure patients with LV ejection fraction (EF) ,35%, New York Heart Association functional class I to III symptoms on optimal medical therapy, and QRS duration ≥120 ms on the surface electrocardiogram. Although most patients respond to CRT, up to 30% of patients meeting implant criteria fail to show clinical benefit. This rate of CRT nonresponders has been represented as the "Achilles heel" of CRT. Multiple investigations have focused on techniques of optimizing LV lead position to improve response rates. Although the evidence supporting CRT is robust, the inability to develop proven techniques to optimize LV lead position and improve outcomes remains a notable weakness.. Because QRS ...
Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) can restore normal cardiac function in patients with left ventricular dysfunction and an extended QRS duration. The 7-year follow-up of patients with mild heart failure and left bundle branch block who received CRT with a defibrillator (CRT-D) are reported in a new paper and were presented at the ACC 2014 Scientific Sessions.
Zareba added that future research will examine female versus male ICD patients to better determine how gender influences outcomes.. This and 11 other studies were presented by members of the Heart Research Follow-up Program team at the AHA annual meeting. Research fellow Yitschak Biton, M.D., identified several risk factors - 65 years or older, past coronary artery bypass graft surgery, diminished ability of the heart to pump blood throughout the body, and others - that predict long-term survival in mild heart failure patients treated with CRT-D therapy (cardiac resynchronization therapy plus defibrillator). Patients with one or two of these risk factors survived longer when they received CRT-D therapy, as opposed to ICD therapy. In contrast, lower-risk patients with no risk factors, and higher-risk patients with three or more risk factors, did not survive any longer with CRT-D therapy.. CRT-D therapy combines an ICD, which senses dangerous abnormal heart rhythms and attempts to shock the heart ...
Newly FDA approved, additional Attain Performa® Quadripolar Leads deliver more options so physicians can optimize delivery of Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy
Almost all attempts to improve patient selection for cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) using echo-derived indices have failed so far. We sought to assess: the performance of homemade software for the automatic quantification of integral 3D regional longitudinal strain curves exploring left ventricular (LV) mechanics and the potential value of this tool to predict CRT response. Forty-eight heart failure patients in sinus rhythm, referred for CRT-implantation (mean age: 65 years; LV-ejection fraction: 26%; QRS-duration: 160 milliseconds) were prospectively explored. Thirty-four patients (71%) had positive responses, defined as an LV end-systolic volume decrease ≥15% at 6-months. 3D-longitudinal strain curves were exported for analysis using custom-made algorithms. The integrals of the longitudinal strain signals (I L,peak) were automatically measured and calculated for all 17 LV-segments. The standard deviation of longitudinal strain peak (SDI L
BACKGROUND: Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) using biventricular pacing (BVP) is effective in patients with heart failure, bundle branch block (BBB), or right ventricular pacing. Permanent His-bundle pacing (HBP) has been reported as an alternative option for CRT. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility and outcomes of HBP in CRT eligible or failed patients. METHODS: HBP was attempted as a rescue strategy in patients with failed left ventricular lead or nonresponse to BVP (group I), or as a primary strategy in patients with AV block, BBB, or high ventricular pacing burden as an alternative to BVP (group II) in patients with indications for CRT ...
Patients receive new Biotronik cardiac resynchronization therapy implantable defibrillators that grant MRI access and reduce shocks
Penn J, Goldenberg I, Moss AJ, et al. Improved outcome with preventive cardiac resynchronization therapy in the elderly: a MADIT-CRT substudy. J Cardiovasc Electrophysiol. 2011;22:892-897. Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1540-8167.2011.02011.x/abstract.. Huang DT, Sesselberg HW, McNitt S, et al. Improved survival associated with prophylactic implantable defibrillators in elderly patients with prior myocardial infarction and depressed ventricular function: a MADIT-II substudy. J Cardiovasc Electrophysiol. 2007;18:833-838.. Wakslak M, Goldenberg I, McNitt S, et al. Effect of age on the long term benefit of primary ICD therapy. Heart Rhythm. 2010;7:S5-S10.. Dickstein K, Cohen-Solal A, Filippatos G, et al. ESC guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of acute and chronic heart failure 2008. The task force for the diagnosis and treatment of acute and chronic heart failure 2008 of the European Society of Cardiology. Developed in collaboration with the Heart Failure ...
Evaluation of regional function with tissue Doppler or speckle tracking is currently an integral part of the assessment of cardiac dyssynchrony. Original research presented at the meeting provided additional refinement of this role. The importance of radial assessment of dyssynchrony compared with the conventional longitudinal evaluation was highlighted by a few investigations. Suffoletto et al. (20) showed that improvement in radial synchrony after cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) by speckle tracking was associated with longitudinal synchrony and with greater improvement in stroke volume than when radial synchrony was not optimized. The work by Seo et al. (21) demonstrated that assessment of radial dynamics is superior to longitudinal dyssynchrony in predicting the hemodynamic outcome after CRT. The greatest increase in cardiac output and dP/dt was seen in those with the most marked radial dyssynchrony.. Patients with segmental paradoxical regional expansion, assessed by strain imaging ...
Recommendations for the practical management of CRT patients have been set out for the first time in an international consensus statement on cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) in heart failure.
Heart Failure clinical trial. Clinical trial for Electrical Activation Mapping Guided Tailor Made Approach for Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy.
Background: The electrical field (E-field) of the biventricular (BV) stimulation is important for the success of cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) in patients with cardiac insufficiency and widened QRS complex. The 3D modeling allows the simulation of CRT and high frequency (HF) ablation. Purpose: The aim of the study was to model different pacing and ablation electrodes and to integrate them into a heart model for the static and dynamic simulation of atrial and BV stimulation and high frequency (HF) ablation in atrial fibrillation (AF). Methods: The modeling and simulation was carried out using the electromagnetic simulation software CST (CST Darmstadt). Five multipolar left ventricular (LV) electrodes, one epicardial LV electrode, four bipolar right atrial (RA) electrodes, two right ventricular (RV) electrodes and one HF ablation catheter were modeled. Selected electrodes were integrated into the Offenburg heart rhythm model for the electrical field simulation. The simulation of an AV ...
Advancements in cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) have made it possible to accurately assess not only standard clinical metrics such as ejection fraction (EF) and ventricular volumes, but also advanced measures of cardiac mechanics such as strain and torsion [1]-[3]. These measures of cardiac mechanics demonstrate a higher prognostic value when combined with both clinical risk factors and more traditional metrics such as ejection fraction [4]. Cine displacement encoding with stimulated echoes (DENSE) is an advanced CMR technique for measuring cardiac mechanics which encodes the displacement of the myocardium into the phase of the MR signal [5]. DENSE data can be used to reproducibly quantify cardiac mechanics, ventricular volumes, and ejection fraction [6]-[8]. Recent work has demonstrated the clinical utility of DENSE, specifically for predicting response to cardiac resynchronization therapy [9]. Despite its apparent clinical utility, DENSE has yet to see widespread adoption in clinical ...
Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) improves functional classification among patients with left ventricle malfunction and ventricular electric conduction disorders. and a HF group of 42 subjects (53.12 15.05 years, LVEF < 35%) were studied. The proposed classifiers had hit rates of 90%, 50%, and 80% to distinguish between absent, mild, and moderate-severe interventricular dyssynchrony, respectively. For […] ...
Yangang Su is the author of this article in the Journal of Visualized Experiments: Benefits of Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy in an Asynchronous Heart Failure Model Induced by Left Bundle Branch Ablation and Rapid Pacing
Arrhythmia: An irregular heartbeat that is either abnormally slow (bradycardia) or too fast (tachycardia).. Biomarker: Generally refers to a measurable indicator of some biological state or condition. Biomarkers are often measured and evaluated to examine normal biological processes, pathogenic processes, or pharmacologic responses to a therapeutic intervention.. Cardiac arrest: When the heart stops beating suddenly and respiration (breathing) and other body functions cease as a result. Without immediate treatment, the affected person will die.. Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT): Implantable device therapy for people with moderate to severe heart failure who also have ventricular desynchrony. Helps the lower chambers of the heart (left and right ventricles) beat together in a normal rhythm again.. Coronary artery disease: Chronic condition in which a clogged artery prevents the heart from receiving sufficient blood.. Echocardiogram (or «echo»): A cardiac imaging test that provides ...
Some people with heart failure develop abnormal heartbeats, or arrhythmias. Some arrhythmias may reduce how well the hearts lower chambers (ventricles) function.Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy (CRT), also known as biventricular pacing, may be needed. In this procedure, a special pacemaker is used to make the ventricles contract at the same time. This helps the lower heart […]. Continue Reading → ...
Some people with heart failure develop abnormal heartbeats, or arrhythmias. Some arrhythmias may reduce how well the hearts lower chambers (ventricles) function.Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy (CRT), also known as biventricular pacing, may be needed. In this procedure, a special pacemaker is used to make the ventricles contract at the same time. This helps the lower heart […]. Continue Reading → ...
Effectiveness of cardiac resynchronization therapy in mild congestive heart failure: systematic review and meta‐analysis of randomized trials Introduction Advanced heart failure poses a ... European Journal of Heart Failure, Lubitz, Steven A., Leong‐Sit, Peter, Fine, Nowell, Kramer, Daniel B., Singh, Jagmeet, Ellinor, Patrick T. ...
Dr. Rajagopal Jambunathan specializes in Cardiology at Cauvery Heart & Multispecialty Hospital in Mysore. After completing his MD in General Medicine from Vijaynagar Institute of Medical Sciences, Bellary in 2002, he specialized further, completing DM (Cardiology) from LPS Institute of Cardiology, Kanpur in 2007. He has participated in several clinical trials. He has presented 52 papers in National and 8 papers in International conferences. He is well trained in non-invasive cardiology including Echo, TMT, Holler, TEE and interpreting cardiac stress MRI. He is proficient in Angiogram, routine and complex Angioplasty and Balloon Valvuloplasty. He has implanted a number of aortic stent grafts including AAA grafts. He is trained in all types of Pediatric intervention and pacemaker implantation and interpretation. He is also trained in Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy. He has conducted 14 Hands-on workshops on Pediatric Interventions and device closure at Kolhapur, Maharashtra. Had deployed the ...
A device and method for cardiac rhythm management in which a heart chamber is paced in accordance with sense signals from the opposite chamber or other distant cardiac site. The method is particularly useful in delivering cardiac resynchronization therapy.
Despite the success of CRT in clinical treatment of patients with HF and cardiac dyssynchrony,1,2 little is known about restoration of subcellular structures and functions related to EC coupling. Fluorescent labeling, 3D confocal microscopy, and image analysis provide a quantitative way of describing subcellular structures, their remodeling, and restoration. Using this approach, we demonstrated for the first time substantial remodeling of the t-system as a deleterious consequence of DHF and subsequent structural restoration of the t-system that result from CRT. In addition, we characterized the location of specific effects of DHF-associated structural remodeling of the t-system and its relationship to RyR clusters. Remodeling of t-tubules in DHF ranged from minor alterations in anterior left ventricular cells to nearly complete depletion in lateral cells. Our analyses did not reveal remodeling of the t-system by atrial tachypacing, indicating that remodeling in DHF is a consequence of cardiac ...
As our population ages and multiple factors contribute to an increased prevalence of cardiovascular disease, more patients than ever before will be candidates for implantable devices as part of their treatment for heart rhythm abnormalities. Electrophysiologists have a widening array of sophisticated devices from which to choose, and important new data about efficacy, long-term outcomes and possible complications has emerged, impacting how devices are chosen and utilized. Overall, the management of patients with pacemakers and ICDs and other devices remains a complex topic and the need for clear-headed, expert guidance has never been greater. Now in its 3rd edition, Cardiac Pacing, Defibrillation and Resynchronization: A Clinical Approach is a clinically focused guide to Pacing and ICDs that caregivers can rely on for answers to common but challenging questions on all aspects of device preparation, from selection and programming to proper implantation and long-term patient management.
Health, ...Athens-- The 2013 ESC Guidelines on Cardiac Pacing and Cardiac Resynch... By taking this user friendly approach we hope to get our messages out...The 2013 guidelines revised for the first time since 2007 were devel...The first part of the guidelines explores indications for pacing in pa...,Practical,approach,makes,new,ESC,cardiac,pacing,and,resynchronization,guidelines,accessible,to,all,medicine,medical news today,latest medical news,medical newsletters,current medical news,latest medicine news
Results: Clinical response to CRT was observed in 74% of patients. However, only 57% of patients were responder according to the echo criteria. There were statistically significant differences between CRT responders and non-responders for GMPS-derived variables, including phased histogram bandwidth (PHB), phase SD (PSD), and Entropy. Moreover, a cutoff value of 112° for PHB with a sensitivity of 72% and specificity of 70%, a cutoff value of 21° for PSD with a sensitivity of 90% and specificity of 74%, and a cutoff of 52% for Entropy with a sensitivity of 90% and a specificity of 80% were considered to discriminate responders and non-responders. CRT response was more likely in patients with concordant LV lead position compared to those with discordant LV lead position. ...
Methods, apparatus, and systems are provided to control contraction of the heart. At least one sensing element receives signals indicating electrical activity of sinus rhythm of the heart. Based on t
Looking for online definition of resynchronization therapy in the Medical Dictionary? resynchronization therapy explanation free. What is resynchronization therapy? Meaning of resynchronization therapy medical term. What does resynchronization therapy mean?
William S Weintraub Emory University May 2, 2005 Cost Effectiveness of Therapy With Abnormal LV Function Post-MI Dr. Al-Khatib and colleagues are to be commended for their evaluation of the cost-effectiveness of implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD) based on the Multicenter Automatic Defibrillator Implantation Trial-II (MADIT-II).1 At 20 months, mortality was 14.2% in the ICD group and 19.8% in the controls, an absolute difference of 5.6%.2 Cost in the ICD group was estimated at $131,490 and in the medical therapy group $40,661, a difference of $90,829, and a gain in life years of 1.8 years.(1) The authors find ICDs to be marginally cost-effective, with a base-case estimate of the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of $50,500 per life-year gained. Sensitivity analysis suggested that the ICER could vary greatly, from a somewhat lower to a great deal higher value, depending on the assumptions made. The ICER was especially sensitive to the effectiveness of the ICD. The MADIT-II ...
Paper Survival with Cardiac-Resynchronization Therapy in Mild Heart Failure Presenter MD Summary BACKGROUND The Multicenter Automatic Defibrillator Implantation Trial with Cardiac Resynchro-nization Therapy (MADIT-CRT) showed that early intervention with cardiac-resyn-chronization therapy with a defibrillator (CRT-D) in patients with an electrocardio-graphic pattern showing left bundle-branch block was associated with a significant reduction in heart-failure events over…
A comparison of acoustic cardiography and echocardiography for optimizing pacemaker settings in cardiac resynchronization therapy
CIDS is the fourth reported randomized controlled trial that compared ICDs with antiarrhythmic drugs in recent years. The other 3 studies were the AVID (Antiarrhythmics versus Implantable Defibrillators) trial (1), the MADIT (Multicenter Automatic Defibrillator Implantation Trial) (2), and the CASH (Cardiac Arrest Study Hamburg) trial (3). CIDS allocated 600 patients to either ICD or amiodarone therapy. The current economic analysis limited itself to the first 430 patients. CIDS showed a small, statistically nonsignificant mortality advantage for patients in the ICD group, but the cost-benefit analysis showed a very high cost per year-of-life saved by ICDs. The authors concluded that ICD implantation was not cost-effective in these patients. Several points should be made about this study relative to its predecessors. First, the patient populations in these trials have been different. For example, the CIDS patients had resuscitated VF, VT, or unmonitored syncope, whereas the CASH patients had all ...
Quality of life was reported in 15 of the 25 trials. Overall, CRT was associated with an improvement in scores on the Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire (MLHFQ) compared with control participants (14 trials, 4283 participants; WMD, 6.56 points [CI, 4.08 to 9.04 points]), but substantial statistical heterogeneity was found (I2 = 72%) that was largely attributable to symptom status at baseline. Two of the 3 trials (787 participants) including patients with NYHA class I or II symptoms had better MLHFQ scores at baseline (mean scores, 40 [35] and 28 [11]) and did not show any appreciable improvement with CRT (WMD, 1.82 points [CI, −0.77 to 4.41 points]; I2 = 0%). The remaining trial in patients with NYHA class I or II symptoms (12, 42) reported no difference between the CRT and control groups in Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire scores (mean change at 12 months, 13.9 vs. 12.1, respectively; P = 0.059). In contrast, in the 12 trials (3496 patients) including predominantly ...
Medtronic has received US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval for the Claria MRI Quad cardiac resynchronisation therapy defibrillator (CRT-D) SureScan device for patients with heart failure.. The Claria MRI CRT-D is approved for scanning in both 1.5 and 3 Tesla (T) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) machines, and features EffectivCRT, a new algorithm that automatically tailors the therapy to individual patients by adjusting pacing rates.. "Until now, CRT devices have shown only whether a pacing pulse was sent, but we have not been able to determine if that stimulation actually improves the hearts pumping ability," says Suneet Mittal, director, Electrophysiology Laboratory, Arrhythmia Institute of the Valley Health System, Ridgewood, USA. "With the Claria device, physicians are now able to verify the effectiveness of left ventricular pacing, which is especially beneficial for improving outcomes in patients with atrial fibrillation, who have been difficult to treat because this irregular ...
Adabag S, Roukoz H, Anand IS, Moss AJ. Cardiac resynchronization therapy in patients with minimal heart failure: a systematic review and meta-analysis. J Am Coll Cardiol. 2011 Aug 23;58(9):935-41.. Allen LA, Stevenson LW, Grady KL, Goldstein NE, Matlock DD, Arnold RM, et al. Decision Making in Advanced Heart Failure: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association. Circulation. 2012 Apr 17;125(15):1928-1952. Epub 2012 Mar 5.. Al-Majed NS, McAlister FA, Bakal JA, Ezekowitz JA. Meta-analysis: cardiac resynchronization therapy for patients with less symptomatic heart failure. Ann Intern Med. 2011 Mar 15;154(6):401-12. Epub 2011 Feb 14.. Bibbins-Domingo K, Pletcher MJ, Lin F, Vittinghoff E, Gardin JM, et al. Racial differences in incident heart failure among young adults. N Engl J Med. 2009 Mar 19;360(12):1179-90.. Carlson MD, Wilkoff BL, Maisel WH, Carlson MD, Ellenbogen KA, Saxon LA, et al. Recommendations from the Heart Rhythm Society Task Force on Device Performance Policies and ...
Abbott recieved CE mark approval for Gallant implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) and cardiac resynchronization therapy defibrillator (CRT-D) in EU.
Medtronic has treated more than 140,000 heart failure patients with CRT, an implantable heart device that may improve the hearts ability to pump blood.
Ventricular dysynchrony is something that often happens in patients who have heart failure. It is essentially the inability of the heart to beat in a coordinated fashion. This can be remedied in many cases using cardiac resynchronization therapy. This is simply a pacemaker that helps force the heart to beat in a coordinated manner. The advantages of having cardiac resynchronization therapy -- or CRT -- are that the patient can feel better, less shortness of breath, and can potentially walk farther.
10. The system of claim 1, wherein the processor is configured to control the electrical stimulation module to deliver the pacing stimulus to the first ventricle by at least: detecting a first atrial pace or sense event; and controlling the electrical stimulation module to deliver a first pacing stimulus after expiration of a first pacing interval from the first atrial pace or sense event, and wherein the processor is configured to determine whether the surrogate indication of intrinsic conduction from the atrium of the heart to the second ventricle of the heart of the patient is detected by at least: detecting, based on electrical cardiac activity sensed by the sensing module, a first activation of the second ventricle within the predetermined window of time immediately following delivery of the first pacing stimulus to the first ventricle; determining a first time interval between the first atrial pace or sense event and the first activation of the second ventricle and a second time interval ...
a. Authors retain copyright and grant the journal right of first publication with the work simultaneously licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution License that allows others to share the work with an acknowledgement of the works authorship and initial publication in this journal.. b. Authors are able to enter into separate, additional contractual arrangements for the non-exclusive distribution of the journals published version of the work (e.g., post it to an institutional repository or publish it in a book), with an acknowledgement of its initial publication in this journal.. c. Authors are permitted and encouraged to post their work online (e.g., in institutional repositories or on their website) prior to and during the submission process, as it can lead to productive exchanges, as well as earlier and greater citation of published work (See The Effect of Open Access).. ...
A method and apparatus for selection of one or more ventricular chambers to stimulate for ventricular resynchronization therapy. Intrinsic intracardia electrograms that include QRS complexes, are recorded from a left and right ventricle. A timing relationship between the intrinsic intracardia electrograms recorded from the left and right ventricle is then determined. In one embodiment, the timing relationship is determined using a delay between a left ventricular and a right ventricular sensed intrinsic ventricular depolarizations and a duration interval of one or more QRS complexes. In one embodiment, the duration of QRS complexes is determined from either intracardiac electrograms or from surface ECG recordings. One or more ventricular chambers in which to provide pacing pulses are then selected based on the timing relationship between intrinsic intracardia electrograms recorded from the right and left ventricle, and the duration of one or more QRS complexes.
June 23, 2009 - Today, Medtronic Inc. announced the first worldwide enrollments in the MORE-CARE (Monitoring Resynchronization in Cardiac Patients) trial, which will compare two disease management strategies for heart failure patients treated with an implantable device for cardiac resynchronization therapy. MORE-CARE aims to demonstrate that remote monitoring of these patients via the Medtronic CareLink Network is superior to in-office visits alone in terms of clinical effectiveness and healthcare system utilization.. The trial will utilize Medtronic wireless cardiac resynchronization therapy-defibrillators (CRT-Ds) equipped with OptiVol Fluid Status Monitoring and Medtronic CareAlert Notifications. The devices automatically notify a physician with a text message (SMS), e-mail or a Medtronic CareLink Web site message when certain pre-programmed thresholds are crossed without an in-office diagnosis by the physician. OptiVol CareAlert notifications are not available in the U.S., and no U.S. ...
Study To Assess Feasibility of First Application of Companys Proprietary Platform Technology to Improve Myocardial Efficiency. Proteus Biomedical Inc., a pioneer in intelligent medicine, announced today the initiation of the RETIME 2.0 (Resynchronization using Electric Tomography to Improve Myocardial Efficiency 2.0) study. RETIME 2.0 is designed to assess the performance of Proteus Biomedicals cardiac electric tomography (CET) and multi-sensor lead system for the measurement of cardiac performance in heart failure patients undergoing implantation of a cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) device.. Cardiac electric tomography is a proprietary, operator-independent modality developed by Proteus Biomedical. The first product application, in the field of heart failure, is intended to improve heart failure outcomes by objectively assessing the relative hemodynamic effect of lead placement sites during and after CRT device implantation, and by quantitatively tracking a range of standard cardiac ...
Heart failure (HF) has a prevalence of five million individuals in the United States. Approximately 25-30% of patients with HF due to left ventricular (LV) systolic dysfunction have prolonged QRS. Prolonged QRS duration (,120ms) on ECG in HF patients is associated with increased morbidity and mortality.. Delayed electrical activation of the LV translates to temporal delay in ventricular contraction. This is referred to as mechanical dyssynchrony. Patients with advanced HF, low ejection fraction (EF) of less than 35% and QRS of more than 120ms are indicated for cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). While most patients undergoing CRT implantation show dramatic improvement in HF symptoms, 30-40% of the HF patients undergoing CRT placement do not show a clinical response. The site of placement of the LV lead has been shown to be an important determinant of the effects of CRT.. Measurement of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) is performed using non-invasive measures such as the MUGA. By ...
Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) with biventricular (BV) pacing is an established therapy in approximately two-thirds of symptomatic heart failure (HF) patients (P) with left bundle branch block (LBBB). The aim of this study was to evaluate left atrial (LA) conduction delay (LACD) and left ventricular (LV) conduction delay (LVCD) using pre-implantational transesophageal electrocardiography (ECG) in sinus rhythm (SR) CRT responder (R) and non-responder (NR). Methods: SR HF P (n=52, age 63.6±10.4 years; 6 females, 46 males) with New York Heart Association (NYHA) class 3.0±0.2, 24.4±7.1 % LV ejection fraction and 171.2±37.6 ms QRS duration (QRSD) were measured by bipolar filtered transesophageal LA and LV ECG recording with hemispherical electrodes (HE) TO catheter (Osypka AG, Rheinfelden, Germany). LACD was measured between onset of P-wave in the surface ECG and onset of LA deflection in the LA ECG. LVCD was measured between onset of QRS in the surface ECG and onset of LV deflection in ...
With the development of Dyssynchrony Imaging, Toshiba is providing cardiologists with a new innovation that expands the quantification capabilities of ultrasound to aid in diagnosing cardiovascular disease," said Gordon Parhar, director, Ultrasound Business Unit, Toshiba America Medical Systems, Inc. "The DI method makes it easier for clinicians to determine the severity of dyssynchrony by having an automated detection of maximum values and a visual display of time to peak for each region. DI also will be a valuable tool in assessing patients for cardiac resynchronization therapy, providing clinicians with a pathway treatment from pre-implant to post implantation of the pacemaker ...
Accidental malpositioning of a right ventricular (RV) electrode has not been previously reported in the context of cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). The case of a 75-year old male patient with dilative cardiomyopathy, left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction 23%, New York Heart Association functional heart failure status stage III, left bundle branch block (LBBB) with QRS width of 136 ms, and misplacement of the RV lead to the LV apex during implantation of a CRT defibrillator is described. Following unremarkable implantation, routine interrogation of the CRT device on the first day after the implantation revealed uneventful technical findings. The 12-lead surface electrocardiogram (ECG) showed biventricular stimulation featuring a narrow QRS complex with incomplete right bundle branch block (RBBB) and R|S in V1. The biplane postoperative chest X-ray was graded normal. On routine follow-up one month later, a transthoracic echocardiogram revealed an increased ejection fraction of 51% but the RV
Aims. The independent clinical correlates and prognostic impact of QRS prolongation in heart failure (HF) with reduced and preserved ejection fraction (EF) are poorly understood. The rationale for cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) in preserved EF is unknown. The aim was to determine the prevalence of, correlates with, and prognostic impact of QRS prolongation in HF with reduced and preserved EF.. Methods and results. We studied 25 171 patients (age 74.6 ± 12.0 years, 39.9% women) in the Swedish Heart Failure Registry. We assessed QRS width and 40 other clinically relevant variables. Correlates with QRS width were assessed with multivariable logistic regression, and the association between QRS width and all-cause mortality with multivariable Cox regression. Pre-specified subgroup analyses by EF were performed. Thirty-one per cent had QRS ≥120 ms. Strong predictors of QRS ≥120 ms were higher age, male gender, dilated cardiomyopathy, longer duration of HF, and lower EF. One-year survival ...
DISCUSSION. The greatest advantage of the S-ICD is avoiding the implantation of leads within cardiovascular system, thus preserving central venous circulation, with no risks of mechanical traumas, such as vascular damages or pneumothorax, and with a very low risk of systemic infection[8]. An important disadvantage is the impossibility of the system to provide heart pacing. For this reason, it is contraindicated for patients with indication for bradycardia pacing, cardiac resynchronization therapy or antitachycardia pacing (ATP) since S-ICD cannot provide cardiac pacing other than for a short period post-shock, when necessary[9]. Based on the benefits and after pre-selecting the patients, this new technology was chosen to be used.. After selecting the patients, they were submitted to the screening phase using a customized plastic ruler supplied by the manufacturer with the purpose of evaluating if the generated electric signal would be able to provide an appropriate functioning of the S-ICD. ...
MINNEAPOLIS & BOSTON--(BUSINESS WIRE)--May 10, 2012-- Medtronic, Inc.. (NYSE: MDT) today announced results from the first and only clinical trial to show that Medtronic cardiac devices can safely extend detection time before triggering therapy in primary and secondary prevention patients. The ADVANCE III study, presented today as a late-breaking presentation at Heart Rhythm 2012, the Heart Rhythm Societys 33rd Annual Scientific Sessions, evaluated patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) and cardiac resynchronization therapy with defibrillation (CRT-D), and found devices programmed with longer duration (increased number of intervals) to detect arrhythmias provided therapy (shocks and anti-tachycardia pacing, ATP) only when needed and without increased risk to patients.. Patients in the study were randomized to two groups: an extended detection (30/40 intervals) and the standard detection interval (18/24 intervals). The study met its primary endpoint by demonstrating a 37 ...
St. Jude Medical recently announced that patient enrollment has begun in the Atrial Fibrillation Suppression Pacing in Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy Devices (CRT-D) clinical study.
The report segments the global electrophysiology devices market according to three criteria: electrophysiology monitoring devices, electrophysiology treatment devices, and key regional markets. The segment of electrophysiology monitoring devices is further categorized into electrocorticograph (ECoG), electrocardiograph (ECG), electroencephalograph (EEG), electrooculograph (EOG), imaging and 3D mapping systems, electroretinograph (ERG), holter monitoring devices, X-ray systems, diagnostic electrophysiology catheters, and electromyograph (EMG).The segment of electrophysiology treatment devices is further divided into implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs), cardiac resynchronization therapy devices (CRT), catheters, and pacemakers.. Geographically, the market is segmented into North America, Europe, Asia-Pacific, and the Rest of the World. Of these regional markets, North America accounted for the largest share of revenues in 2012, followed by Europe. In developed countries such as United ...
Findings advance opportunities for a pacemaker in a bottle. Johns Hopkins heart researchers are unraveling the mystery of how a modified pacemaker used to treat many patients with heart failure, known as cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT), is able to strengthen the heart muscle while making it beat in a coordinated fashion. In a new study conducted on animal heart cells described in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, the scientists show that CRT changes these cells so they can contract more forcefully. The researchers also identified an enzyme that mimics this effect of CRT without use of the device.. "These discoveries potentially give us new pathways to benefit more heart failure patients - not only those whose hearts beat out of sync, but also those who currently do not qualify for CRT therapy yet still need an effective treatment to help their heart pump stronger," says David Kass, M.D., professor of medicine and biomedical engineering at the Johns Hopkins University School of ...
We offer the full breadth of the most advanced, leading-edge protocols for the diagnosis and treatment of cardiac rhythm abnormalities, also known as arrhythmias. These include device therapies, invasive EP studies and interventional electrophysiology.. Device-based treatments include pacemakers for slow rhythms, implantable cardiac defibrillators (ICDs) for abnormally fast rhythms that can result in sudden death, and cardiac resynchronization therapy (biventricular devices) for advanced heart failure.. Interventional electrophysiology utilizes radiofrequency energy (heat) or cryotherapy (cold) to selectively ablate or eliminate the source or the structures critical for an arrhythmia to perpetuate. The target for ablation can be pinpointed with an invasive EP study, where electrode catheters are strategically placed in the heart, permitting precise mapping of an arrhythmia.. Interventional cardiology includes:. ...
A cardiac rhythm management system detects edema. In response to an episode of detected edema, it initiates or adjusts a cardiac resynchronization therapy and/or a cardiac contractility modulation (CCM) therapy.
Possibilities to obtain information from the patient heart have grown strongly with the development of new imaging modalities such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Computed Tomography and Ultrasound. The translation of this information into a patient specific diagnosis and treatment is not trivial, due to the complex relation between image information and underlying cardiac pathology. In addition, the understanding of various treatment strategies, such as cardiac resynchronization therapy, or mechanical support through cardiac assist devices, is incomplete. Aim in the track Heart at Work is to assist in clinical decision making on the basis of mathematical and experimental models. The mathematical models link cardiac function at tissue level, organ level and complete patient level and enable translation of information on cardiac function, observed in the clinic (e.g. pressures, deformations, heart rates), into information on the mechanical, electrical and metabolic state of the tissue. The ...
Abstract: The focus of this PhD project (as part of Impuls 2) is on improving decision making by healthcare professionals through providing decision support based on fusing data from multiple sources, including patient self-monitoring information. The health information gathered in daily life circumstances complements information from professional diagnostic tools and can thereby contribute to clinical decision making. Philips Research has developed a prototype eWatch that is able to collect different hemodynamic parameters based on photoplethysmography. Within the PhD project, special attention will be given to laboratory data from the Catharina Hospital as many high- quality data are generated here and the data are also well documented. One part of the project is focused on cardiology, i.e. categorizing and treating heart failure as well as on improving the outcome of cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). Heart failure is now categorized in four stages based on subjective data. The ...
Following the diagnosis, Dr. Tung-Takher may use a variety of therapies to treat the patient in the Hybrid OR. Those include implanting devices - such as pacemakers or implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) and cardiac resynchronization therapy - for heart failure management. Many arrhythmias also are corrected using a procedure Dr. Tung-Takher conducts in the Hybrid OR called cardiac ablation. She does this by introducing a long, slender, flexible tube (catheter) into a vein through a very tiny incision and threading it to the heart. She then uses either cold (cryoablation) or heat (radiofrequency ablation) to destroy the tissue that generates irregular heartbeats the patient was experiencing. "There are not many physicians or centers in Phoenix or the country that use both cryoablation and radiofrequency ablation," Dr. Tung-Takher said.. Dr. Tung-Takher commuted between the Quad Cities and the Phoenix area for more than three years before permanently choosing YRMC. "Everybody at YRMC, ...
In some moderate or severe cases cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) may be suggested[17] or cardiac contractility ... "Cardiac-Resynchronization Therapy in Heart Failure with a Narrow QRS Complex". N Engl J Med. 369 (15): 1395-405. doi:10.1056/ ... biventricular cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) can initiate a normal sequence of ventricular depolarization. In people ... insertion of an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator or cardiac resynchronization therapy. Echocardiography can also help ...
Applications include atrial fibrillation and cardiac resynchronization therapy. Pre-operative MRI or CT is used to plan the ... In cardiac surgery, shared control systems can perform mitral valve replacement or ventricular pacing by small thoracotomies. ...
In addition, this approach has been applied in cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) as a new biological pacemaker as a ... "Optogenetics for in vivo cardiac pacing and resynchronization therapies". Nature Biotechnology. 33 (7): 750-754. doi:10.1038/ ... A recent study explored the possibilities of optogenetics as a method to correct for arrythmias and resynchronize cardiac ... 2016). "Optogenetics design of mechanistically-based stimulation patterns for cardiac defibrillation". Sci Rep. 6. doi:10.1038/ ...
"Registration with Adjacent Anatomical Structures for Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy Guidance". Statistical Atlases and ... However, over the last few years, there has been a growing interest in the predictive assessment of disease or therapy course. ... Image-based patient-specific modelling, combined with models of medical devices and pharmacological therapies, opens the way to ...
Oct 10, 2013). "Cardiac-Resynchronization Therapy in Heart Failure with a Narrow QRS Complex". N Engl J Med. 369 (15): 1395-405 ... Cardiac Resynchronization-Heart Failure (CARE-HF) Study Investigators. (2005). "The effect of cardiac resynchronization on ... 2004). "Cardiac-resynchronization therapy with or without an implantable defibrillator in advanced chronic heart failure". N ... or less and a QRS interval of 120 ms or more may benefit from cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT; pacing both the left and ...
"Building a pipeline for in-silico modelling of cardiac resynchronization therapy". vph-noe. p. 11. Archived from the original ... from medical images to characterization and quantification of myocardial diseases and Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy (CRT) ... "Advance Tool for Visualization of Multi-modal and Multi-scale Cardiac Data" (PDF). UPF. p. 42. "GIMIAS Home Page". Archived ... Gimias has been used to develop clinical prototypes in the fields of cardiac imaging and simulation, angiography imaging and ...
Recent studies suggest that cardiac resynchronization therapy can reduce the incidence of ventricular dyssynchrony and thus ... "Review - The Pathology of Ventricular Dyssynchrony and the Role of Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy". Medscape. Retrieved 13 ... Large differences in timing of contractions can reduce cardiac efficiency and is correlated with heart failure. Three chief ... increase cardiac efficiency. Ejection fraction Bundle branch block Pacemaker syndrome Speckle tracking echocardiography ...
... therapy in South Asia. He is also credited with the introduction of Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy in India. He is a ... Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy India portal Medicine portal "K.K. Talwar on WHFS". ... In 2000, he brought the Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy to India for the first time. The introduction of multisite pacing ... His work on Cardiac arrhythmia helped develop it as a specialty in India and he was associated with Heart transplant program at ...
Relation of cardiac output to QRS duration during temporary resynchronization therapy after cardiac surgery. ASAIO J. 2010; ... also known as cardiac resynchronization therapy), which involves installation of pacemakers to fix delays in heart ventricle ... Cardiac output measurement by arterial pressure waveform analysis during optimization of biventricular pacing after cardiac ... Surgical Considerations of Pacemakers and Automatic Defibrillators, in Cohn L, Cardiac Surgery in the Adult. Spotnitz HM. 2nd ...
Indications for cardiac resynchronization therapy: 2011 update from the Heart Failure Society of America guideline committee. J ... Patients with LBBB require complete cardiac evaluation, and those with LBBB and syncope or near-syncope may require a pacemaker ... Left bundle branch block (LBBB) is a cardiac conduction abnormality seen on the electrocardiogram (ECG). In this condition, ... hypertension leading to aortic root dilatation and subsequent aortic regurgitation Lyme disease Side effect of some cardiac ...
"Cardiac-resynchronization therapy with or without an implantable defibrillator in advanced chronic heart failure". N Engl J Med ... "The effect of cardiac resynchronization on morbidity and mortality in heart failure". N. Engl. J. Med. 352 (15): 1539-49. doi: ... "The effect of cardiac resynchronization on morbidity and mortality in heart failure". N Engl J Med 352 (15): 1539-49. doi: ... "Pacemakers and Implantable Cardiac Defibrillators: Software Radio Attacks and Zero-Power Defenses"(PDF). {{{booktitle}}}. 2008- ...
"What Is a Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy Device?". Medtronic. "U.S. Supreme Court tosses out Medtronic pacemaker patent loss ... which dealt with cardiac resynchronization therapy, a pacemaker that is used to treat congestive heart failure. Medtronic ...
cardiac resynchronization therapy. *by specific molecules: molecular therapy (although most drugs are specific molecules, ... First-line therapy (sometimes called induction therapy, primary therapy, or front-line therapy)[2] is the first therapy that ... palliative therapy See supportive therapy for connotative distinctions. preventive therapy. (prophylactic therapy) A therapy ... salvage therapy (rescue therapy) A therapy tried after others have failed; it may be a "last-line" therapy. ...
On September 25, 2004, Babec became the first gorilla to undergo the successful implant of a cardiac resynchronization therapy ...
"Long-Term Prognosis After Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy Is Related to the Extent of Left Ventricular Reverse Remodeling at ... Besides, the cardiac interstitium which consisted of largely Type I and Type III collagen fibres are also involved in cardiac ... Ventricular Reverse Remodeling but Not Clinical Improvement Predicts Long-Term Survival After Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy ... Besides, reduced expression of V1 mysoin and L-type calcium channels on cardiac myocytes are also thought to cause cardiac ...
... a dementia treatment Cardiac resynchronization therapy, a treatment for heart failure CRT-D, an implanted cardiac ... resynchronization device Corneal Refractive Therapy, in optometrics Certified Respiratory Therapist, a respiratory therapist ... the rate at which blood refills empty capillaries Cognitive Retention Therapy, ...
Simple regional strain pattern analysis to predict response to cardiac resynchronization therapy: rationale, initial results, ... additional echo criteria for selection of Heart failure patients with LBBB who may respond to Cardiac resynchronization therapy ... Movements of the base of the ventricle and relative constancy of the cardiac volume. Am J Physiol 1932;102:559-65. Hoffman EA, ... It has an advantage over Ejection fraction (EF), it shows reduced cardiac function also in hypertrophic hearts with small ...
... and cardiac resynchronization therapy. 2004: Canadian Medical Association Award for Young Leaders 2015: Fellowship in the ... followed by a Heart and Stroke Foundation Fellowship in cardiac electrophysiology at the University of Western Ontario in 1999 ... of Medicine at Queen's University and completed a 10-year term as Chief of Cardiology and Medical Director of the Cardiac ...
... cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT), laser lead extraction and ablation of atrial fibrillation and ventricular tachycardia ... "precise electrical measurements at the tip of a cardiac catheter, providing cardiac specialists with both numbers and a visual ... He has published research into complex ablation and pioneered cardiac ablation methods. Khaykin attended the University of ... 2009). "Cost Comparison of Ablation Versus Antiarrhythmic Drugs As First-Line Therapy for Atrial Fibrillation: An Economic ...
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Main article: Cardiac resynchronization therapy. Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is used for people with heart failure ... "Cardiac resynchronization therapy: a decade of experience and the dilemma of nonresponders". Texas Heart Institute Journal. 38 ... Three leads can be seen in this example of a cardiac resynchronization device: a right atrial lead (solid black arrow), a right ... "The effect of cardiac resynchronization on morbidity and mortality in heart failure". N. Engl. J. Med. 352 (15): 1539-49. doi: ...
"Cardiac contractility modulation in non-responders to cardiac resynchronization therapy" (PDF). Europace. 10 (12): 1375-1380. ... Cardiac contractility modulation is a name of a therapy developed by Impulse Dynamics NV, who implements the therapy within its ... In Cardiac contractility modulation therapy, electrical stimulation is applied to the cardiac muscle during the absolute ... Adverse interactions between Cardiac contractility modulation therapy and other electrical stimulation therapies have not been ...
Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is used for people with heart failure in whom the left and right ventricles do not ... Ganjehei L, Razavi M, Massumi A (2011). "Cardiac resynchronization therapy: a decade of experience and the dilemma of ... What is Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy? Podcast from the Medical University of South Carolina[permanent dead link] Current ... "The effect of cardiac resynchronization on morbidity and mortality in heart failure". N. Engl. J. Med. 352 (15): 1539-49. doi: ...
An implanted cardiac resynchronization device is a medical device used in cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). It ... Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is an effective therapy in patients with heart failure and dyssynchrony identified as a ... "Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy and Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator Therapy in Advanced Heart Failure". Heart Failure ... "Impact of Diabetes Mellitus on the Clinical Response to Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy in Elderly People". Journal of ...
"Cardiac resynchronization therapy" - news · newspapers · books · scholar · JSTOR (August 2016) (Learn how and when to remove ... "Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy and Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator Therapy in Advanced Heart Failure". Heart Failure ... "Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy Technique: Approach Considerations, Placement of Pacing Leads, Programming of Device". ... Chest radiographs of cardiac resynchronization therapy with defibrillator (CRT-D) in an individual with dilated cardiomyopathy ...
"Cardiac-resynchronization therapy with or without an implantable defibrillator in advanced chronic heart failure". N Engl J Med ... "The effect of cardiac resynchronization on morbidity and mortality in heart failure". N. Engl. J. Med. 352 (15): 1539-49. doi: ... "The effect of cardiac resynchronization on morbidity and mortality in heart failure". N Engl J Med. 352 (15): 1539-49. doi: ... Halperin, Daniel (2008). Pacemakers and Implantable Cardiac Defibrillators: Software Radio Attacks and Zero-Power Defenses (PDF ...
Treatments & Therapies About Cardiac Resynchronization Devices Questions and Answers - Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy ... If your doctor has advised you that cardiac resynchronization therapy may be the best course of treatment for your poorly ... Here are some common topics of interest to individuals considering an implantable cardiac resynchronization therapy device:. * ... What should I expect during cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) surgery?. Typically, the procedure to implant a heart ...
Heart Failure Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy Echocardiography Device: Empirical group Device: Echocardiography-guided ... Empirical implantation of the left ventricular lead is the prevailing practice in cardiac resynchronization therapy device ... Echocardiography-guided implantation of the left ventricular lead during cardiac resynchronization therapy device implantation ... Echocardiography-guided implantation of the left ventricular lead during cardiac resynchronization therapy device implantation ...
The report, titled Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy Device presents an in-depth study of the Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy ... 5.2.1 China Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy Device Market Overview. 5.2.2 China 2012-2017E Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy ... 5.5.1 Japan Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy Device Market Overview. 5.5.2 Japan 2012-2017E Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy ... 5.6.1 India Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy Device Market Overview. 5.6.2 India 2012-2017E Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy ...
Cardiac resynchronization therapy: an established pacing therapy for heart failure and mechanical dyssynchrony provides basic ... As cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is a new therapy which still undergoes rapid advancement, it is imperative to ... Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy: An Established Pacing Therapy for Heart Failure and Mechanical Dyssynchrony. In recent ... Cardiac resynchronization therapy is an exciting new option for a growing number of heart failure patients, but CRT systems ...
The basic goal of cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is to restore synchrony of the left ventricle in patients with ... encoded search term (Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy) and Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy What to Read Next on Medscape. ... 2013 ESC Guidelines on cardiac pacing and cardiac resynchronization therapy: the Task Force on cardiac pacing and ... Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) has been solidly established as an important advanced heart failure (HF) therapy to ...
For heart failure patients with few options, this cardiac resynchronization therapy could be a lifesaver ...
... Aka: Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy, Cardiac ... Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy, Cardiac Resynchronization Implantable Device. ... These images are a random sampling from a Bing search on the term "Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy." Click on the image (or ... Arterial Cannulation Arterial Puncture Automated External Defibrillator Cardiac Catheter Ablation Cardiac Resynchronization ...
"Cardiac resynchronization therapy" - news · newspapers · books · scholar · JSTOR (August 2016) (Learn how and when to remove ... "Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy and Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator Therapy in Advanced Heart Failure". Heart Failure ... "Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy Technique: Approach Considerations, Placement of Pacing Leads, Programming of Device". ... Chest radiographs of cardiac resynchronization therapy with defibrillator (CRT-D) in an individual with dilated cardiomyopathy ...
... learn about Medtronics Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy, what to expect during CRT surgery, & other heart failure resources. ... Treatments & Therapies About Cardiac Resynchronization Devices Getting a Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy Device Questions and ... If your doctor has advised you that cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) may be the best course of treatment for your heart ... About Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy Devices * Living With a Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy Device ...
An implanted cardiac resynchronization device is a medical device used in cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). It ... Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is an effective therapy in patients with heart failure and dyssynchrony identified as a ... "Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy and Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator Therapy in Advanced Heart Failure". Heart Failure ... "Impact of Diabetes Mellitus on the Clinical Response to Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy in Elderly People". Journal of ...
Known as the MADIT-CHIC study, it was the first of its kind to assess whether cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) could ... But six months after cardiac resynchronization therapy, Dennis and others in the study saw their EFs rise into the normal range ... Cardiac resynchronization therapy benefits cancer survivors with heart failure. University of Rochester Medical Center ... After six months with the implanted CRT devices, the 30 patients who received cardiac resynchronization therapy experienced ...
Echocardiography Guided Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy (EchoCRT) (EchoCRT). The safety and scientific validity of this study ... Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy activated.. Subject implanted with BIOTRONIK Lumax HF-T CRT-D system with ICD back-up enabled ... Cardiac-resynchronization therapy in heart failure with a narrow QRS complex. N Engl J Med. 2013 Oct 10;369(15):1395-405. doi: ... Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy deactivated.. Subject implanted with BIOTRONIK Lumax HF-T CRT-D system with ICD back-up ...
Echocardiography Guided Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy (EchoCRT). Official Title ICMJE Echocardiography Guided Cardiac ... Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy activated.. Intervention: Device: Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator with Cardiac ... Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy deactivated.. Intervention: Device: Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator with Cardiac ... Resynchronization Therapy (EchoCRT). Brief Summary The EchoCRT trial evaluates the effects of Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy ...
Care guide for Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy (Aftercare Instructions). Includes: possible causes, signs and symptoms, ... Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) treats problems with how your heart beats. CRT is also called biventricular pacing. ...
Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy activated.. Subject implanted with BIOTRONIK Lumax HF-T CRT-D system with ICD back-up enabled ... Cardiac-resynchronization therapy in heart failure with a narrow QRS complex. N Engl J Med. 2013 Oct 10;369(15):1395-405. doi: ... Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy deactivated.. Subject implanted with BIOTRONIK Lumax HF-T CRT-D system with ICD back-up ... Echocardiography Guided Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy (EchoCRT) (EchoCRT). This study has been terminated. ...
A pacing system computes optimal cardiac resynchronization pacing parameters using intrinsic conduction intervals. In various ... 2. Cardiac Resynchronization Pacing Therapy. Cardiac resynchronization therapy is most conveniently delivered in conjunction ... Cardiac Pacemakers, Inc.. Morphology-based optimization of cardiac resynchronization therapy. US20060259086. May 11, 2005. Nov ... Cardiac Pacemakers, Inc.. Method and apparatus for predicting acute response to cardiac resynchronization therapy at a given ...
Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy activated.. Device: Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator with Cardiac Resynchronization ... Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy deactivated.. Device: Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator with Cardiac Resynchronization ... Echocardiography Guided Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy (EchoCRT) (EchoCRT). The safety and scientific validity of this study ... Cardiac-resynchronization therapy in heart failure with a narrow QRS complex. N Engl J Med. 2013 Oct 10;369(15):1395-405. doi: ...
Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy activated.. Device: Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator with Cardiac Resynchronization ... Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy deactivated.. Device: Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator with Cardiac Resynchronization ... Cardiac-resynchronization therapy in heart failure with a narrow QRS complex. N Engl J Med. 2013 Oct 10;369(15):1395-405. doi: ... Device: Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator with Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy (BIOTRONIK Lumax HF-T CRT-D) Phase 2 ...
Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy activated.. Device: Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator with Cardiac Resynchronization ... Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy deactivated.. Device: Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator with Cardiac Resynchronization ... Cardiac-resynchronization therapy in heart failure with a narrow QRS complex. N Engl J Med. 2013 Oct 10;369(15):1395-405. doi: ... Echocardiography Guided Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy (EchoCRT) (EchoCRT). This study has been terminated. ...
Markers and Response to Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy (MARC). The safety and scientific validity of this study is the ... To investigate the relationship between a set of (bio)markers and response to cardiac resynchronization therapy (as measured by ... To investigate the relationship between a set of (bio)markers and response to cardiac resynchronization therapy (as measured by ... Correlation of anatomy and function with response to cardiac resynchronization therapy [ Time Frame: 12 months ]. Secondary ...
Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy in Congenital Heart Defects (CARE-CHD). The safety and scientific validity of this study is ... unstable angina pectoris or cerebral insult within the 6 weeks preceding the planned cardiac resynchronisation therapy ... Optimal drug therapy for heart failure according to the ESC guidelines. *QRS interval ≥ 120 ms (demonstrated in at least two ...
We offer the specialized expertise in cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT), or biventricular pacing, to help relieve heart ... Cardiac resynchronization therapy. Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) treats people with heart failure who have developed ... Our team of specialists collaborates every day to make sure we are combining therapies the right way, for the best results. ... Pacing expertise: CRT is an advanced pacing technique and requires expertise in several areas, including cardiology and cardiac ...
Modelling the economic and health consequences of cardiac resynchronization therapy in the UK.. Caro JJ1, Guo S, Ward A, Chalil ... Clinical evidence supports the use of cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) in advanced heart failure, but its cost- ... All inputs were obtained from the data collected in the CArdiac REsynchronization in Heart Failure (CARE-HF) trial and a ...
This item: The Nuts and Bolts of Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy. Implantable Cardiac Pacemakers and Defibrillators: All You ... The Nuts and Bolts of Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy. By Tom Kenny, RN. Vice President, Clinical Education and Training, St ... The Nuts and Bolts of Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy concentrates on the practical aspects of how these devices work and how ... Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is an exciting new option for a growing number of heart failure patients, but CRT ...
  • Modelling the economic and health consequences of cardiac resynchronization therapy in the UK. (nih.gov)
  • The article presents abstracts on topics related to cells which include mesenchymal stem cell therapy, genetic modifiers in Betta-Thalassemia, and investigation of matrix metaloproteinase-2 levels as effective factor in acute myocardial infarction. (ebscohost.com)
  • CardioLab: The CardioLab suite for GIMIAS allows to perform an entire workflow from medical images to characterization and quantification of myocardial diseases and Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy (CRT) planning. (wikipedia.org)
  • The initial remodeling phase after a myocardial infarction results in repair of the necrotic area and myocardial scarring that may, to some extent, be considered beneficial since there is an improvement in or maintenance of LV function and cardiac output. (wikipedia.org)
  • After a myocardial infarction (MI), cardiac myocyte death can be triggered by necrosis, apoptosis, or autophagy, leading to thining of the cardiac wall. (wikipedia.org)
  • Once the phlebogram has been obtained, the multi-delivery catheter is used to guide in the lead, from the chosen vein of entry, into the right atrium, through the coronary sinus and into the relevant cardiac vein. (wikipedia.org)
  • To determine whether CRT-D in high-risk coronary subjects will significantly reduce the combined endpoint of all-cause mortality or HF events when compared to ICD-only therapy, whichever comes first. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Three-dimensional electroanatomic mapping of the coronary veins during cardiac resynchronization therapy implant: feasibility and possible applications. (biomedsearch.com)
  • for example, one instance of cardiac catheterization is one intervention performed, and coronary care (noncount) can require a series of interventions (count). (wikipedia.org)
  • A new baseline scoring system may help to predict response to cardiac resynchronization therapy. (biomedsearch.com)
  • BACKGROUND: Haemodynamic and functional effects of cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) have been studied mostly at rest. (biomedsearch.com)
  • 2009). Surface electrocardiogram to predict outcome in candidates for cardiac resynchronization therapy: a sub-analysis of the CARE-HF trial. (springer.com)
  • 2004) Potential candidates for cardiac resynchronization therapy in Japanese patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy a Niigatamulticenter study of DCM. (hanspub.org)
  • His clinical and research interests include health policy (particularly access to care and seniors' care), medical fitness to drive, catheter ablation, atrial fibrillation, sudden death in the young, and cardiac resynchronization therapy. (wikipedia.org)
  • Khaykin was also the first Canadian doctor to use the Medtronic Ablation Frontiers Cardiac Ablation System, radiofrequency ablation method applied to the treatment of atrial fibrillation. (wikipedia.org)
  • When used in combination with optimal medical therapy, cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is associated with a 50% reduction in hospitalization for HF and a 36% reduction in mortality. (ahajournals.org)
  • Methods: 211 patients on optimal medical therapy were included retrospectively (72 ± 10 yrs., 66% LBBB, 48% DCMP, 80% male) and investigated at baseline and 6 months later. (lu.se)
  • Left bundle branch block (LBBB) is a cardiac conduction abnormality seen on the electrocardiogram (ECG). (wikipedia.org)
  • Chronic sildenafil lowers transpulmonary gradient and improves cardiac output allowing successful he. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Accordingly, they can be used in both noncount and count senses (for example, therapy for chronic kidney disease can involve several dialysis treatments per week). (wikipedia.org)
  • Rather, the aim is to enhance the heart's natural contraction (the native cardiac contractility) sustainably over long periods of time. (wikipedia.org)
  • The cost-effectiveness of CRT-D is based on similar benefits with the additional advantage of preventing a high proportion of sudden cardiac deaths. (webwire.com)
  • The incidence of these diseases is rising, with sudden cardiac arrest being the leading cause of death worldwide among people aged above 40. (sbwire.com)
  • An increase in the number of cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) device implantations worldwide has led to a consequent increase in the number of infections associated with the device, making extraction of the CRT device inevitable. (ovid.com)
  • He is a Professor in the Department of Medicine at Queen's University and completed a 10-year term as Chief of Cardiology and Medical Director of the Cardiac Programs at Kingston General Hospital and Hotel Dieu Hospital in 2016. (wikipedia.org)