Myocarditis: Inflammatory processes of the muscular walls of the heart (MYOCARDIUM) which result in injury to the cardiac muscle cells (MYOCYTES, CARDIAC). Manifestations range from subclinical to sudden death (DEATH, SUDDEN). Myocarditis in association with cardiac dysfunction is classified as inflammatory CARDIOMYOPATHY usually caused by INFECTION, autoimmune diseases, or responses to toxic substances. Myocarditis is also a common cause of DILATED CARDIOMYOPATHY and other cardiomyopathies.Coxsackievirus Infections: A heterogeneous group of infections produced by coxsackieviruses, including HERPANGINA, aseptic meningitis (MENINGITIS, ASEPTIC), a common-cold-like syndrome, a non-paralytic poliomyelitis-like syndrome, epidemic pleurodynia (PLEURODYNIA, EPIDEMIC) and a serious MYOCARDITIS.Enterovirus B, Human: A species of ENTEROVIRUS infecting humans and containing 36 serotypes. It is comprised of all the echoviruses and a few coxsackieviruses, including all of those previously named coxsackievirus B.Myocytes, Cardiac: Striated muscle cells found in the heart. They are derived from cardiac myoblasts (MYOBLASTS, CARDIAC).Myocardium: The muscle tissue of the HEART. It is composed of striated, involuntary muscle cells (MYOCYTES, CARDIAC) connected to form the contractile pump to generate blood flow.Heart: The hollow, muscular organ that maintains the circulation of the blood.Cardiac Output: The volume of BLOOD passing through the HEART per unit of time. It is usually expressed as liters (volume) per minute so as not to be confused with STROKE VOLUME (volume per beat).Autoimmune Diseases: Disorders that are characterized by the production of antibodies that react with host tissues or immune effector cells that are autoreactive to endogenous peptides.Arrhythmias, Cardiac: Any disturbances of the normal rhythmic beating of the heart or MYOCARDIAL CONTRACTION. Cardiac arrhythmias can be classified by the abnormalities in HEART RATE, disorders of electrical impulse generation, or impulse conduction.Cardiomyopathy, Dilated: A form of CARDIAC MUSCLE disease that is characterized by ventricular dilation, VENTRICULAR DYSFUNCTION, and HEART FAILURE. Risk factors include SMOKING; ALCOHOL DRINKING; HYPERTENSION; INFECTION; PREGNANCY; and mutations in the LMNA gene encoding LAMIN TYPE A, a NUCLEAR LAMINA protein.Cardiac Myosins: Myosin type II isoforms found in cardiac muscle.Death, Sudden, Cardiac: Unexpected rapid natural death due to cardiovascular collapse within one hour of initial symptoms. It is usually caused by the worsening of existing heart diseases. The sudden onset of symptoms, such as CHEST PAIN and CARDIAC ARRHYTHMIAS, particularly VENTRICULAR TACHYCARDIA, can lead to the loss of consciousness and cardiac arrest followed by biological death. (from Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine, 7th ed., 2005)Cardiac Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the heart.Enterovirus InfectionsCardiomyopathies: A group of diseases in which the dominant feature is the involvement of the CARDIAC MUSCLE itself. Cardiomyopathies are classified according to their predominant pathophysiological features (DILATED CARDIOMYOPATHY; HYPERTROPHIC CARDIOMYOPATHY; RESTRICTIVE CARDIOMYOPATHY) or their etiological/pathological factors (CARDIOMYOPATHY, ALCOHOLIC; ENDOCARDIAL FIBROELASTOSIS).Chagas Cardiomyopathy: A disease of the CARDIAC MUSCLE developed subsequent to the initial protozoan infection by TRYPANOSOMA CRUZI. After infection, less than 10% develop acute illness such as MYOCARDITIS (mostly in children). The disease then enters a latent phase without clinical symptoms until about 20 years later. Myocardial symptoms of advanced CHAGAS DISEASE include conduction defects (HEART BLOCK) and CARDIOMEGALY.Enterovirus: A genus of the family PICORNAVIRIDAE whose members preferentially inhabit the intestinal tract of a variety of hosts. The genus contains many species. Newly described members of human enteroviruses are assigned continuous numbers with the species designated "human enterovirus".Acute Disease: Disease having a short and relatively severe course.Electrocardiography: Recording of the moment-to-moment electromotive forces of the HEART as projected onto various sites on the body's surface, delineated as a scalar function of time. The recording is monitored by a tracing on slow moving chart paper or by observing it on a cardioscope, which is a CATHODE RAY TUBE DISPLAY.Heart Diseases: Pathological conditions involving the HEART including its structural and functional abnormalities.Rats, Inbred LewCardiomegaly: Enlargement of the HEART, usually indicated by a cardiothoracic ratio above 0.50. Heart enlargement may involve the right, the left, or both HEART VENTRICLES or HEART ATRIA. Cardiomegaly is a nonspecific symptom seen in patients with chronic systolic heart failure (HEART FAILURE) or several forms of CARDIOMYOPATHIES.Endocardium: The innermost layer of the heart, comprised of endothelial cells.Heart Ventricles: The lower right and left chambers of the heart. The right ventricle pumps venous BLOOD into the LUNGS and the left ventricle pumps oxygenated blood into the systemic arterial circulation.Cardiovirus Infections: Infections caused by viruses of the genus CARDIOVIRUS, family PICORNAVIRIDAE.Encephalomyocarditis virus: The type species of CARDIOVIRUS causing encephalomyelitis and myocarditis in rodents, pigs, and monkeys. Infection in man has been reported with CNS involvement but without myocarditis.Cardiac Pacing, Artificial: Regulation of the rate of contraction of the heart muscles by an artificial pacemaker.Echocardiography: Ultrasonic recording of the size, motion, and composition of the heart and surrounding tissues. The standard approach is transthoracic.Heart Failure: A heterogeneous condition in which the heart is unable to pump out sufficient blood to meet the metabolic need of the body. Heart failure can be caused by structural defects, functional abnormalities (VENTRICULAR DYSFUNCTION), or a sudden overload beyond its capacity. Chronic heart failure is more common than acute heart failure which results from sudden insult to cardiac function, such as MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION.Cardiac Catheterization: Procedures in which placement of CARDIAC CATHETERS is performed for therapeutic or diagnostic procedures.Myosins: A diverse superfamily of proteins that function as translocating proteins. They share the common characteristics of being able to bind ACTINS and hydrolyze MgATP. Myosins generally consist of heavy chains which are involved in locomotion, and light chains which are involved in regulation. Within the structure of myosin heavy chain are three domains: the head, the neck and the tail. The head region of the heavy chain contains the actin binding domain and MgATPase domain which provides energy for locomotion. The neck region is involved in binding the light-chains. The tail region provides the anchoring point that maintains the position of the heavy chain. The superfamily of myosins is organized into structural classes based upon the type and arrangement of the subunits they contain.Cardiac Tamponade: Compression of the heart by accumulated fluid (PERICARDIAL EFFUSION) or blood (HEMOPERICARDIUM) in the PERICARDIUM surrounding the heart. The affected cardiac functions and CARDIAC OUTPUT can range from minimal to total hemodynamic collapse.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Pericarditis: Inflammation of the PERICARDIUM from various origins, such as infection, neoplasm, autoimmune process, injuries, or drug-induced. Pericarditis usually leads to PERICARDIAL EFFUSION, or CONSTRICTIVE PERICARDITIS.Myocardial Contraction: Contractile activity of the MYOCARDIUM.Biopsy: Removal and pathologic examination of specimens in the form of small pieces of tissue from the living body.Edema, Cardiac: Abnormal fluid retention by the body due to impaired cardiac function or heart failure. It is usually characterized by increase in venous and capillary pressure, and swollen legs when standing. It is different from the generalized edema caused by renal dysfunction (NEPHROTIC SYNDROME).Heart Transplantation: The transference of a heart from one human or animal to another.Reoviridae Infections: Infections produced by reoviruses, general or unspecified.Ventricular Function, Left: The hemodynamic and electrophysiological action of the left HEART VENTRICLE. Its measurement is an important aspect of the clinical evaluation of patients with heart disease to determine the effects of the disease on cardiac performance.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Heart Arrest: Cessation of heart beat or MYOCARDIAL CONTRACTION. If it is treated within a few minutes, heart arrest can be reversed in most cases to normal cardiac rhythm and effective circulation.Troponin I: One of the three polypeptide chains that make up the TROPONIN complex. It inhibits F-actin-myosin interactions.Virus Diseases: A general term for diseases produced by viruses.Ventricular Remodeling: The geometric and structural changes that the HEART VENTRICLES undergo, usually following MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION. It comprises expansion of the infarct and dilatation of the healthy ventricle segments. While most prevalent in the left ventricle, it can also occur in the right ventricle.Endomyocardial Fibrosis: A condition characterized by the thickening of the ventricular ENDOCARDIUM and subendocardium (MYOCARDIUM), seen mostly in children and young adults in the TROPICAL CLIMATE. The fibrous tissue extends from the apex toward and often involves the HEART VALVES causing restrictive blood flow into the respective ventricles (CARDIOMYOPATHY, RESTRICTIVE).Fibrosis: Any pathological condition where fibrous connective tissue invades any organ, usually as a consequence of inflammation or other injury.Cardiac Output, Low: A state of subnormal or depressed cardiac output at rest or during stress. It is a characteristic of CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES, including congenital, valvular, rheumatic, hypertensive, coronary, and cardiomyopathic. The serious form of low cardiac output is characterized by marked reduction in STROKE VOLUME, and systemic vasoconstriction resulting in cold, pale, and sometimes cyanotic extremities.Hemodynamics: The movement and the forces involved in the movement of the blood through the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.Giant Cells: Multinucleated masses produced by the fusion of many cells; often associated with viral infections. In AIDS, they are induced when the envelope glycoprotein of the HIV virus binds to the CD4 antigen of uninfected neighboring T4 cells. The resulting syncytium leads to cell death and thus may account for the cytopathic effect of the virus.Myocardial Infarction: NECROSIS of the MYOCARDIUM caused by an obstruction of the blood supply to the heart (CORONARY CIRCULATION).Ventricular Dysfunction, Left: A condition in which the LEFT VENTRICLE of the heart was functionally impaired. This condition usually leads to HEART FAILURE; MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION; and other cardiovascular complications. Diagnosis is made by measuring the diminished ejection fraction and a depressed level of motility of the left ventricular wall.Ventricular Myosins: Isoforms of MYOSIN TYPE II, specifically found in the ventricular muscle of the HEART. Defects in the genes encoding ventricular myosins result in FAMILIAL HYPERTROPHIC CARDIOMYOPATHY.Heart Rate: The number of times the HEART VENTRICLES contract per unit of time, usually per minute.Myoblasts, Cardiac: Precursor cells destined to differentiate into cardiac myocytes (MYOCYTES, CARDIAC).Troponin T: One of the three polypeptide chains that make up the TROPONIN complex. It is a cardiac-specific protein that binds to TROPOMYOSIN. It is released from damaged or injured heart muscle cells (MYOCYTES, CARDIAC). Defects in the gene encoding troponin T result in FAMILIAL HYPERTROPHIC CARDIOMYOPATHY.Mice, Inbred BALB CFatal Outcome: Death resulting from the presence of a disease in an individual, as shown by a single case report or a limited number of patients. This should be differentiated from DEATH, the physiological cessation of life and from MORTALITY, an epidemiological or statistical concept.Cardiac Imaging Techniques: Visualization of the heart structure and cardiac blood flow for diagnostic evaluation or to guide cardiac procedures via techniques including ENDOSCOPY (cardiac endoscopy, sometimes refered to as cardioscopy), RADIONUCLIDE IMAGING; MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING; TOMOGRAPHY; or ULTRASONOGRAPHY.Stroke Volume: The amount of BLOOD pumped out of the HEART per beat, not to be confused with cardiac output (volume/time). It is calculated as the difference between the end-diastolic volume and the end-systolic volume.Heart Function Tests: Examinations used to diagnose and treat heart conditions.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Cardiac Glycosides: Cyclopentanophenanthrenes with a 5- or 6-membered lactone ring attached at the 17-position and SUGARS attached at the 3-position. Plants they come from have long been used in congestive heart failure. They increase the force of cardiac contraction without significantly affecting other parameters, but are very toxic at larger doses. Their mechanism of action usually involves inhibition of the NA(+)-K(+)-EXCHANGING ATPASE and they are often used in cell biological studies for that purpose.Trypanosoma cruzi: The agent of South American trypanosomiasis or CHAGAS DISEASE. Its vertebrate hosts are man and various domestic and wild animals. Insects of several species are vectors.Shock, Cardiogenic: Shock resulting from diminution of cardiac output in heart disease.Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest: Occurrence of heart arrest in an individual when there is no immediate access to medical personnel or equipment.Mice, Knockout: Strains of mice in which certain GENES of their GENOMES have been disrupted, or "knocked-out". To produce knockouts, using RECOMBINANT DNA technology, the normal DNA sequence of the gene being studied is altered to prevent synthesis of a normal gene product. Cloned cells in which this DNA alteration is successful are then injected into mouse EMBRYOS to produce chimeric mice. The chimeric mice are then bred to yield a strain in which all the cells of the mouse contain the disrupted gene. Knockout mice are used as EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL MODELS for diseases (DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL) and to clarify the functions of the genes.Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Cine: A type of imaging technique used primarily in the field of cardiology. By coordinating the fast gradient-echo MRI sequence with retrospective ECG-gating, numerous short time frames evenly spaced in the cardiac cycle are produced. These images are laced together in a cinematic display so that wall motion of the ventricles, valve motion, and blood flow patterns in the heart and great vessels can be visualized.Mice, Inbred C57BLCardiotonic Agents: Agents that have a strengthening effect on the heart or that can increase cardiac output. They may be CARDIAC GLYCOSIDES; SYMPATHOMIMETICS; or other drugs. They are used after MYOCARDIAL INFARCT; CARDIAC SURGICAL PROCEDURES; in SHOCK; or in congestive heart failure (HEART FAILURE).Cardiac Volume: The volume of the HEART, usually relating to the volume of BLOOD contained within it at various periods of the cardiac cycle. The amount of blood ejected from a ventricle at each beat is STROKE VOLUME.Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: The artificial substitution of heart and lung action as indicated for HEART ARREST resulting from electric shock, DROWNING, respiratory arrest, or other causes. The two major components of cardiopulmonary resuscitation are artificial ventilation (RESPIRATION, ARTIFICIAL) and closed-chest CARDIAC MASSAGE.Heart Conduction System: An impulse-conducting system composed of modified cardiac muscle, having the power of spontaneous rhythmicity and conduction more highly developed than the rest of the heart.Parvovirus B19, Human: The type species of ERYTHROVIRUS and the etiological agent of ERYTHEMA INFECTIOSUM, a disease most commonly seen in school-age children.Heart Block: Impaired conduction of cardiac impulse that can occur anywhere along the conduction pathway, such as between the SINOATRIAL NODE and the right atrium (SA block) or between atria and ventricles (AV block). Heart blocks can be classified by the duration, frequency, or completeness of conduction block. Reversibility depends on the degree of structural or functional defects.Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Dogs: The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)
Blauwet, Lori A.; Cooper, Leslie T. (31 October 2012). "Idiopathic giant cell myocarditis and cardiac sarcoidosis". Heart ... "Mimicry in recognition of cardiac myosin peptides by heart-intralesional T cell clones from rheumatic heart disease". Journal ... "Unresolved issues in theories of autoimmune disease using myocarditis as a framework". Journal of Theoretical Biology. 375: 101 ...
Complications can include cardiac tamponade, myocarditis, and constrictive pericarditis. It is a less common cause of chest ... In such cases of cardiac tamponade, EKG or Holter monitor will then depict electrical alternans indicating wobbling of the ... Chest X-ray usually shows an enlarged cardiac silhouette ("water bottle" appearance) and clear lungs. Pulmonary congestion is ... Imazio, M; Gaita, F (July 2015). "Diagnosis and treatment of pericarditis". Heart (British Cardiac Society). 101 (14): 1159-68 ...
Symptoms can also include cardiac arrhythmias, myocarditis, and cranial and peripheral nerve palsies. Laryngeal diphtheria can ... Abnormal cardiac rhythms can occur early in the course of the illness or weeks later, and can lead to heart failure. Diphtheria ... Myocarditis may result in an abnormal heart rate and inflammation of the nerves may result in paralysis. Diphtheria is usually ... Complications may include myocarditis, inflammation of nerves, kidney problems, and bleeding problems due to low levels of ...
... profiling identifies microRNA-155 as an adverse mediator of cardiac injury and dysfunction during acute viral myocarditis". ...
The venom produces mainly cardiopulmonary abnormalities like circulatory derangements, myocarditis and changes in cardiac ...
Moreover, experimental inoculation of C. burnetii in cattle induced not only respiratory disorders and cardiac failures ( ... myocarditis), but also frequent abortions and irregular repeat breedings. Beare PA, Samuel JE, Howe D, Virtaneva K, Porcella SF ...
Amongst the viruses capable of causing myocarditis, CVB3 is a common agent identified in inducing cardiac damage. ... it can travel and infect the heart and cause myocarditis. Myocarditis is an inflammation of the heart, most commonly cause by ... resulting in severe and rapid cardiac decompensation. With loss of cardiac cells increasing progressively, infected individual ... The role of the immune system in response to the presence of a virus has both beneficial and detrimental effects on the cardiac ...
... myocarditis and cardiac insufficiency, acute adrenal insufficiency, and nephritis. Cancer immunotherapy#Immune checkpoints ...
Cardiac: Heart attack Pericarditis/myocarditis Aortic aneurysm Gastrointestinal:Gastroesophageal reflux disease Gastritis ... Chest pain is considered a medical emergency until life-threatening cardiac issues (such as an acute coronary syndrome) can be ...
When used as a tocolytic, hexoprenaline is contraindicated in: Hyperthyroidism Cardiovascular diseases, e.g. cardiac ... arrhythmias, tachycardia, myocarditis, mitral valve disease and aortic stenosis Ischemic heart disease Hypertension Angle- ...
Left ventricular aneurysm Blunt trauma to the chest resulting in a cardiac contusion Hyperkalemia Acute myocarditis Pulmonary ... generating a vector that points towards the normal cardiac cells (which have positive charges on their surface). This vector ... a ventricle with subepicardial ischemia will exhibit cells with higher amplitude of depolarization in the cardiac endocardium. ...
... potentially causing inflammation of skeletal and cardiac muscle (myositis and myocarditis), encephalitic signs, and limb edema ...
Eosinophilic myocarditis is a subtype of myocarditis in which cardiac tissue is infiltrated by another type of pro-inflammatory ... myocarditis is the most common cardiac pathological finding at autopsy, with a prevalence of 50% or more. Cases of myocarditis ... Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (cMRI or CMR) has been shown to be very useful in diagnosing myocarditis by visualizing ... Complications may include heart failure due to dilated cardiomyopathy or cardiac arrest. Myocarditis is most often due to a ...
... myocarditis) account for 10% of all SCDs. Examples of these include: cardiomyopathy, cardiac rhythm disturbances, myocarditis, ... Sudden cardiac arrest can result from cardiac and non-cardiac causes including the following: Coronary artery disease (CAD), ... is sudden death from cardiac causes. However, sometimes physicians call cardiac arrest "sudden cardiac death" even if the ... In those with cardiac arrest due to local anesthetic lipid emulsion may be used. Cooling adults after cardiac arrest who have a ...
Cardiac manifestations of eosinophilic myocarditis range from none to life-threatening conditions such as cardiogenic shock or ... Perhaps less commonly, eosinophilic myocarditis, eosinophilic thrombotic myocarditis, and eosinophilic fibrotic myocarditis are ... Eotaxins are also elevated in the cardiac muscle biopsy specimens of individuals with eosinphilic myocarditis compared to their ... However, the only definitive test for eosinophilic myocarditis in cardiac muscle biopsy showing the presence of eosinophilic ...
... myocarditis, dilated cardiomyopathies, Chagas, cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure, as well as in heart transplant rejection ... Altara R, Mallat Z, Booz GW, Zouein FA (2016). "The CXCL10/CXCR3 Axis and Cardiac Inflammation: Implications for Immunotherapy ... acute cardiac allograft rejection and possibly Celiac Disease. Development of agents to block CXCR3-ligand interactions may ... γ-inducible chemokines and the development of adverse cardiac remodeling. Recent reports indicate that there is a significant ...
Dysplasia, dystrophy, or myocarditis?". Circulation. 94 (5): 983-91. doi:10.1161/01.cir.94.5.983. PMID 8790036. Dorfman, TA; ... cardiac remodeling, and dehydration medications that interfere with the cardiac potassium ion channels. Which of these factors ... Cardiac rhythm disturbances could jeopardize mission objectives and, at the most extreme, the life of crewmembers. The worst- ... Systematic studies of cardiac rhythm disturbances have been performed during short-duration space flight. These studies were ...
Chronic: Valve diseases as noted above; Reduced cardiac output; Exercise intolerance. Intensive cardiac care and ... Myocarditis: Here the muscle bulk of the heart gets inflamed. Inflamed muscles have reduced functional capacity. This may be ... Autoimmune heart diseases are the effects of the body's own immune defense system mistaking cardiac antigens as foreign and ... Acutely, it can cause pericardial effusion leading to cardiac tamponade and death. After healing, there may be fibrosis and ...
Nonneurologic complications of WNV infection that may rarely occur include fulminant hepatitis, pancreatitis, myocarditis, ... rhabdomyolysis, orchitis, nephritis, optic neuritis and cardiac dysrhythmias and hemorrhagic fever with coagulopathy. ...
The heart muscle may become inflamed in a condition called myocarditis, most commonly by viruses but sometimes by the body's ... The ease of ion movement along cardiac muscle fibers axes is such that action potentials are able to travel from one cardiac ... Cardiac fibroblasts are vital supporting cells within cardiac muscle. They are unable to provide forceful contractions like ... Most of the wall is taken up by bricks, which in cardiac muscle are individual cardiac muscle cells or cardiomyocytes. The ...
... of patients have not experienced any opportunistic infection before the onset of cardiac symptoms. Myocarditis has been ... Cardiac autoimmunity in HIV related heart muscle disease. Heart 1998;79:599-604. Lipshultz SE, Easley KA, Orav EJ, et al. ... Nutritional status and cardiac mass and function in children infected with the human immunodeficiency virus. Am J Clin Nutr ... Cardiac dysfunction in the HIV-1 transgenic mouse treated with zidovudine. Lab Invest 2000;80:187-97. Lewis W, Simpson JF, ...
Breathlessness Pink frothy sputum Cardiac dysrhythmia Tachycardia or bradycardia Hypotension or hypertension Acute myocarditis ... Kanoo, S.; M. B. Mandal; A. B. Alex & S. B. Deshpande (2009). "Cardiac dysrhythmia produced by Mesobuthus tamulus venom ...
Myocarditis Coronary Artery Disease (CAD) Ion Channelopathies - Long QT syndrome (inc. Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome & ... Cardiac Risk in the Young. Retrieved 4 December 2015. "Young sudden death cardiac research". Cardiac Risk in the Young. Cardiac ... Surrey, United Kingdom: Cardiac Risk in the Young. 2015. p. 5. "Bereavement". Cardiac Risk in the Young. Cardiac Risk in the ... Cardiac Risk in the Young Test My Heart CRY Centre for Cardiac Pathology Sudden Arrhythmic Death Syndrome myheart Network. ...
Product indications: as a cardiac stimulant and diuretic in cases of heart failure, myocardial insufficiency, myocarditis, ... auricular flutter and fibrillation, edema due to impaired pectoris, and acute infectious myocarditis. ...
Cardiac traumas such as myocardial infarction (commonly called a heart attack), myocarditis, peripartum cardiomyopathy, ... Acute cardiac unloading is able to functionally uncouple the heart from cardiac output, allowing the heart to rest and recover ... Acute cardiac unloading decreases cardiac MVO2 and has been demonstrated to limit the amount of scar tissue that forms, thus ... Maintaining sufficient cardiac output is the primary objective of therapeutic approaches treating these cardiac conditions. ...
Atrial fibrillation is one of the most common cardiac arrhythmias. In general, it is an irregular, narrow complex rhythm. ... Ventricular tachycardia (VT or V-tach) is a potentially life-threatening cardiac arrhythmia that originates in the ventricles. ... from healthy response to exercise or from cardiac arrhythmia), and that tachyarrhythmia be reserved for the pathologic form ( ... Unstable means that either important organ functions are affected or cardiac arrest is about to occur.[4] ...
Here we tested whether antioxidants/ cardioprotective drugs could improve cardiac function in established Chagas heart disease ... without interfering with vascularization or myocarditis intensity. Resveratrol was even capable of improving heart function of ... improved stroke volume and cardiac output. Resveratrol activated the AMPK-pathway and reduced both ROS production and heart ...
Development of New Cardiac Deformity Indexes for Pectus Excavatum on Computed Tomography: Feasibility for Pre- and Post- ... Trypanosoma cruzi infection in humans and experimental animals causes Chagas disease which is often accompanied by myocarditis ... The present study used magnetic resonance un-aging to assess changes in the cardiac morphology of infected mice after therapy ... Important pathophysiological mechanisms involved in the cardiac lesions include activation of the endothelium and induced ...
... Diana Lindner,1,2 Jia Li,1 ... Significantly different versus cardiac fibroblasts; ; significantly different versus cardiomyocytes; ; (c) significantly ... Myocarditis is an inflammatory disease of the heart muscle often resulting in cardiac dysfunction and death, especially in ... Inflammation during Viral Myocarditis. First, we analyzed the cardiac tissue from B6 mice, which were peritoneally infected ...
... ... The myocarditis, revealed by post-mortem histology, was unexpected. The pathological finding of active lymphocytic myocarditis ... L. T. Cooper, "Myocarditis," New England Journal of Medicine, vol. 360, no. 15, pp. 1526-1538, 2009. View at Publisher · View ... Cardiac enzymes were normal (Table 1). A blood film revealed a heavy P. falciparum parasitaemia of 20%. A chest X-ray was ...
CD117+/CD90+ cardiac cells were detected in all biopsies. The highest expression of CD90 was revealed in the myocarditis group ... CD117+/CD90+ cardiac cells were detected in all biopsies. The highest expression of CD90 was revealed in the myocarditis group ... myocarditis and controls from healthy cardiac patients. High-resolution scanning microscopy of the whole slide enabled a ... myocarditis and controls from healthy cardiac patients. High-resolution scanning microscopy of the whole slide enabled a ...
Cardiotropic Viruses in Cardiac Surgery Patients Without Clinical Evidence of Myocarditis or Myocarditic Sequelae. This study ... myocarditis. parvovirus B19 (PVB19). human herpes virus 6 (HHV6). cardiac magnetic resonance tomography (CMR). ... Prevalence of Cardiotropic Viruses in Cardiac Surgery Patients Without Clinical Evidence of Myocarditis or Myocarditic Sequelae ... Correlation of non-invasive myocarditis screening exams (cardiac magnetic resonance, ecg, history, inflammatory markers) with ...
While diagnostic criteria were elaborated for acute myocarditis using cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) in 2009, studies have ... Cardiac magnetic resonance appearance of myocarditis caused by high dose IL-2: similarities to community-acquired myocarditis. ... Acute myocarditis Cardiac magnetic resonance Lake Louise criteria Parametric mapping Meta-analysis ... Diagnostic and prognostic value of cardiac magnetic resonance in acute myocarditis: a systematic review and meta-analysis. ...
Abstract 1927: Role of Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Patients with Myocarditis: Does late Enhancement have Prognostic ... Abstract 1927: Role of Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Patients with Myocarditis: Does late Enhancement have Prognostic ... Abstract 1927: Role of Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Patients with Myocarditis: Does late Enhancement have Prognostic ... Abstract 1927: Role of Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Patients with Myocarditis: Does late Enhancement have Prognostic ...
The aim of our study was to assess the clinical and economic impact of an early use of cardiac MRI in the management of ... Cardiac MRI directly identifies the presence and exact location of myocardial damage caused by myocarditis. ... OBJECTIVE: Cardiac MRI directly identifies the presence and exact location of myocardial damage caused by myocarditis. The aim ... Early use of cardiac magnetic resonance reduces hospitalization time and costs in patients with acute myocarditis and preserved ...
Kandolin R, Lehtonen J, Kupari M. Cardiac sarcoidosis and giant cell myocarditis as causes of atrioventricular block in young ... Importance of endomyocardial biopsy in distinguishing between cardiac sarcoidosis and giant cell myocarditis. Need to ... Importance of endomyocardial biopsy in distinguishing between cardiac sarcoidosis and giant cell myocarditis. Need to ... Shabetai R. Idiopathic giant-cell myocarditis-natural history and treatment. Multicenter Giant Cell Myocarditis Study Group ...
Figure 2. MRM imaging of mice affected with autoimmune myocarditis reveals cardiac abnormalities. Myocarditis was induced in A/ ... Neu, N., et al. Cardiac myosin-induced myocarditis as a model of postinfectious autoimmunity. Eur Heart J. 12 Suppl D, 117-120 ... Pummerer, C. L., et al. Identification of cardiac myosin peptides capable of inducing autoimmune myocarditis in BALB/c mice. J ... The disease can be induced in myocarditis-susceptible A/J and Balb/c mice by immunizing the animals with cardiac myosin heavy ...
Cardiac MRI Findings Suggest Myocarditis in Severe Ebola Virus Disease. Daniel S. Chertow, Richard W. Childs, Andrew E. Arai, ... Cardiac MRI Findings Suggest Myocarditis in Severe Ebola Virus Disease. Daniel S. Chertow, Richard W. Childs, Andrew E. Arai ... Cardiac MRI Findings Suggest Myocarditis in Severe Ebola Virus Disease Message Subject (Your Name) has forwarded a page to you ... including cardiac death, and may be attributable to inflammatory cytokines (4). The contribution of viral myocarditis to ...
cardiac MR. Myocarditis is a common cardiac disease. It appears to be a major cause of sudden death, and may progress to ... Cardiac magnetic resonance appearance of myocarditis caused by high dose IL-2: similarities to community-acquired myocarditis. ... Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) has recently emerged as a noninvasive tool to diagnose myocarditis (3-6), as well as to follow ... 2002) [Cardiac MRI in suspected myocarditis]. Rofo Fortschr Geb Rontgenstr Neuen Bildgeb Verfahr 174:1530-1536. ...
20192019The Cardiac Microenvironment Instructs Divergent Monocyte Fates and Functions in MyocarditisThe Cardiac ... The Cardiac Microenvironment Instructs Divergent Monocyte Fates and Functions in Myocarditis. Hou, X;Chen, G;Bracamonte-Baran, ... We propose that MHCII+Ly6Clo MDMs are associated with the reduction of cardiac fibrosis and prevention of the myocarditis ... We propose that MHCII+Ly6Clo MDMs are associated with the reduction of cardiac fibrosis and prevention of the myocarditis ...
As reported in Table 4, there were 8 major cardiac events (4 sudden cardiac deaths; 2 resuscitated cardiac arrests, 2 ... acute myocarditis. AS. anteroseptal. CMR. cardiac magnetic resonance. CRP. C-reactive protein. ECG. electrocardiographic. EDV. ... Cardiac magnetic resonance images of a case of acute myocarditis with the inferolateral (IL) pattern of LGE. Abbreviations as ... Cardiac magnetic resonance images of a case of acute myocarditis with the anteroseptal (AS) pattern of late gadolinium ...
Ve esta fotografía de stock de Chagas Disease In Cardiac Muscle Of A Patient With Chronic Myocarditis This Serious Disease Is ... Chagas disease in cardiac muscle of a patient with chronic myocarditis. This serious disease is caused by the Protozoa ...
... and elevated cardiac biomarkers as having myocarditis. However, biopsy verification of actual myocarditis was not undertaken in ... Natural History of Myocarditis. The natural history of myocarditis is as varied as its clinical presentations. Myocarditis ... Cardiac troponin T in patients with clinically suspected myocarditis. J Am Coll Cardiol. 1997; 30: 1354-1359. ... Elevations of cardiac troponin I associated with myocarditis: experimental and clinical correlates. Circulation. 1997; 95: 163- ...
Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) has become the primary noninvasive tool for the diagnosis and evaluation of myocarditis. The ... Cardiac morphology and function and myocardial tissue characterization at baseline and follow-up CMR were compared using paired ... aim of our study was to assess the CMR findings at different course of FM and the short-term outcomes of fulminant myocarditis ... Background Fulminant myocarditis (FM) is an inflammatory disease of the myocardium that results in ventricular systolic ...
Hypersensitivity myocarditis is a rare form of myocarditis. Numerous drugs can induce myocarditis, which is typically ... Drug-related myocarditis can be classified into five types: 1) hypersensitivity myocarditis; 2) toxic myocarditis; 3) ... Myocarditis. Lancet 2012;379:738-747PMID : 22185868.. 6. Kindermann I, Barth C, Mahfoud F, et al. Update on myocarditis. J Am ... Here, we report a case of hypersensitivity myocarditis, as confirmed by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) and ...
Cardiac biomarkers such as troponins and creatine kinase lack specificity, but may help to confirm the diagnosis of myocarditis ... Evaluates cardiac chamber size and wall thickness *Assess systolic and diastolic function *Rule out other causes of cardiac ... Acute myocarditis: lymphocytic infiltrates in association with myocyte necrosis *Borderline myocarditis: inflammatory ... The Myocarditis Treatment Trial reported the incidence of biopsy proven myocarditis in patients with unexplained heart failure ...
... and even sudden cardiac death. Diagnosing myocarditis is challenging with no current uniform clinical gold-standard. CMR is a ... CMR Features in Patients With Suspected Myocarditis (CMRMyo). The safety and scientific validity of this study is the ... Major adverse cardiac events [ Time Frame: through study completion, an average of 2 years ]. Heart failure hospitalization; ... Presentation of myocarditis is heterogeneous, often ranges from being asymptomatic, to chest pain, dyspnoea, palpitations, ...
Diagnosis and Treatment and Related Diseases Myocarditis is inflammation of the heart muscle due to tissue injury or infection ... Cardiac CT scan and MRI. Echocardiography. Cardiac catherization. Treatment:. Treatment of myocarditis is dependent on the ... This book describes Myocarditis, Diagnosis and Treatment and Related Diseases. Myocarditis is inflammation of the heart muscle ... Myocarditis is acute or chronic inflammation of the heart muscle due to reaction of living tissue to injury or infection.. The ...
Sudden cardiac death. Certain serious arrhythmias can cause your heart to stop beating (sudden cardiac arrest). Its fatal if ... Myocarditis. Myocarditis. Myocarditis is inflammation of the heart muscle. This illustration shows normal heart muscle compared ... Severe myocarditis can permanently damage your heart muscle, possibly causing:. *Heart failure. Untreated, myocarditis can ... Myocarditis is an inflammation of the heart muscle (myocardium). Myocarditis can affect your heart muscle and your hearts ...
Eosinophilic myocarditis is a subtype of myocarditis in which cardiac tissue is infiltrated by another type of pro-inflammatory ... Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (cMRI or CMR) has been shown to be very useful in diagnosing myocarditis by visualizing ... Among patients with HIV, myocarditis is the most common cardiac pathological finding at autopsy, with a prevalence of 50% or ... Cases of myocarditis have been documented as early as the 1600s,[31] but the term "myocarditis", implying an inflammatory ...
... (pronounced my-oh-car-DIE-tis) is inflammation of the myocardium, the hearts muscle wall. This muscle contracts to ... cardiac intensivists, cardiac surgeons, respiratory therapists, nurses, child life specialists, social workers and others, if ... Myocarditis in children. In children, the most common cause of myocarditis is a viral infection, such as influenza or the ... What is myocarditis? Myocarditis (pronounced my-oh-car-DIE-tis) is inflammation of the myocardium, the hearts muscle wall. ...
  • DESIGN AND SETTINGS: Twenty patients with myocarditis and 7 age-matched and gender-matched control subjects underwent comprehensive MRI. (biomedsearch.com)
  • In this case series, an electronic health record search was performed at our institution (University of Wisconsin) to identify all competitive athletes (a consecutive sample) recovering from COVID-19, who underwent gadolinium-enhanced cardiac MRI between January 1, 2020, and November 29, 2020. (cdc.gov)