Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Angiography: Radiography of blood vessels after injection of a contrast medium.Coronary Angiography: Radiography of the vascular system of the heart muscle after injection of a contrast medium.Multidetector Computed Tomography: Types of spiral computed tomography technology in which multiple slices of data are acquired simultaneously improving the resolution over single slice acquisition technology.Cerebral Angiography: Radiography of the vascular system of the brain after injection of a contrast medium.Magnetic Resonance Angiography: Non-invasive method of vascular imaging and determination of internal anatomy without injection of contrast media or radiation exposure. The technique is used especially in CEREBRAL ANGIOGRAPHY as well as for studies of other vascular structures.Angiography, Digital Subtraction: A method of delineating blood vessels by subtracting a tissue background image from an image of tissue plus intravascular contrast material that attenuates the X-ray photons. The background image is determined from a digitized image taken a few moments before injection of the contrast material. The resulting angiogram is a high-contrast image of the vessel. This subtraction technique allows extraction of a high-intensity signal from the superimposed background information. The image is thus the result of the differential absorption of X-rays by different tissues.Tomography, Spiral Computed: Computed tomography where there is continuous X-ray exposure to the patient while being transported in a spiral or helical pattern through the beam of irradiation. This provides improved three-dimensional contrast and spatial resolution compared to conventional computed tomography, where data is obtained and computed from individual sequential exposures.Radiographic Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted: Computer systems or networks designed to provide radiographic interpretive information.Coronary Stenosis: Narrowing or constriction of a coronary artery.Coronary Artery Disease: Pathological processes of CORONARY ARTERIES that may derive from a congenital abnormality, atherosclerotic, or non-atherosclerotic cause.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Iopamidol: A non-ionic, water-soluble contrast agent which is used in myelography, arthrography, nephroangiography, arteriography, and other radiological procedures.Aortography: Radiographic visualization of the aorta and its branches by injection of contrast media, using percutaneous puncture or catheterization procedures.Contrast Media: Substances used to allow enhanced visualization of tissues.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Tomography: Imaging methods that result in sharp images of objects located on a chosen plane and blurred images located above or below the plane.Imaging, Three-Dimensional: The process of generating three-dimensional images by electronic, photographic, or other methods. For example, three-dimensional images can be generated by assembling multiple tomographic images with the aid of a computer, while photographic 3-D images (HOLOGRAPHY) can be made by exposing film to the interference pattern created when two laser light sources shine on an object.Cardiac-Gated Imaging Techniques: Timing the acquisition of imaging data to specific points in the cardiac cycle to minimize image blurring and other motion artifacts.Radiographic Image Enhancement: Improvement in the quality of an x-ray image by use of an intensifying screen, tube, or filter and by optimum exposure techniques. Digital processing methods are often employed.Positron-Emission Tomography: An imaging technique using compounds labelled with short-lived positron-emitting radionuclides (such as carbon-11, nitrogen-13, oxygen-15 and fluorine-18) to measure cell metabolism. It has been useful in study of soft tissues such as CANCER; CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM; and brain. SINGLE-PHOTON EMISSION-COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY is closely related to positron emission tomography, but uses isotopes with longer half-lives and resolution is lower.Myocytes, Cardiac: Striated muscle cells found in the heart. They are derived from cardiac myoblasts (MYOBLASTS, CARDIAC).Tomography, Optical Coherence: An imaging method using LASERS that is used for mapping subsurface structure. When a reflective site in the sample is at the same optical path length (coherence) as the reference mirror, the detector observes interference fringes.Radiation Dosage: The amount of radiation energy that is deposited in a unit mass of material, such as tissues of plants or animal. In RADIOTHERAPY, radiation dosage is expressed in gray units (Gy). In RADIOLOGIC HEALTH, the dosage is expressed by the product of absorbed dose (Gy) and quality factor (a function of linear energy transfer), and is called radiation dose equivalent in sievert units (Sv).Fluorescein Angiography: Visualization of a vascular system after intravenous injection of a fluorescein solution. The images may be photographed or televised. It is used especially in studying the retinal and uveal vasculature.Tomography, Emission-Computed, Single-Photon: A method of computed tomography that uses radionuclides which emit a single photon of a given energy. The camera is rotated 180 or 360 degrees around the patient to capture images at multiple positions along the arc. The computer is then used to reconstruct the transaxial, sagittal, and coronal images from the 3-dimensional distribution of radionuclides in the organ. The advantages of SPECT are that it can be used to observe biochemical and physiological processes as well as size and volume of the organ. The disadvantage is that, unlike positron-emission tomography where the positron-electron annihilation results in the emission of 2 photons at 180 degrees from each other, SPECT requires physical collimation to line up the photons, which results in the loss of many available photons and hence degrades the image.Observer Variation: The failure by the observer to measure or identify a phenomenon accurately, which results in an error. Sources for this may be due to the observer's missing an abnormality, or to faulty technique resulting in incorrect test measurement, or to misinterpretation of the data. Two varieties are inter-observer variation (the amount observers vary from one another when reporting on the same material) and intra-observer variation (the amount one observer varies between observations when reporting more than once on the same material).Cerebral Arterial Diseases: Pathological conditions of intracranial ARTERIES supplying the CEREBRUM. These diseases often are due to abnormalities or pathological processes in the ANTERIOR CEREBRAL ARTERY; MIDDLE CEREBRAL ARTERY; and POSTERIOR CEREBRAL ARTERY.Vascular Calcification: Deposition of calcium into the blood vessel structures. Excessive calcification of the vessels are associated with ATHEROSCLEROTIC PLAQUES formation particularly after MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION (see MONCKEBERG MEDIAL CALCIFIC SCLEROSIS) and chronic kidney diseases which in turn increase VASCULAR STIFFNESS.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Plaque, Atherosclerotic: Lesions formed within the walls of ARTERIES.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Endoleak: Postoperative hemorrhage from an endovascular AORTIC ANEURYSM repaired with endoluminal placement of stent grafts (BLOOD VESSEL PROSTHESIS IMPLANTATION). It is associated with pressurization, expansion, and eventual rupture of the aneurysm.Radiography, Dual-Energy Scanned Projection: A method of producing a high-quality scan by digitizing and subtracting the images produced by high- and low-energy x-rays.Putaminal Hemorrhage: Intracranial bleeding into the PUTAMEN, a BASAL GANGLIA nucleus. This is associated with HYPERTENSION and lipohyalinosis of small blood vessels in the putamen. Clinical manifestations vary with the size of hemorrhage, but include HEMIPARESIS; HEADACHE; and alterations of consciousness.Intracranial Aneurysm: Abnormal outpouching in the wall of intracranial blood vessels. Most common are the saccular (berry) aneurysms located at branch points in CIRCLE OF WILLIS at the base of the brain. Vessel rupture results in SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE or INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES. Giant aneurysms (>2.5 cm in diameter) may compress adjacent structures, including the OCULOMOTOR NERVE. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p841)Tomography, Emission-Computed: Tomography using radioactive emissions from injected RADIONUCLIDES and computer ALGORITHMS to reconstruct an image.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Image Processing, Computer-Assisted: A technique of inputting two-dimensional images into a computer and then enhancing or analyzing the imagery into a form that is more useful to the human observer.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Calcinosis: Pathologic deposition of calcium salts in tissues.Cardiac Output: The volume of BLOOD passing through the HEART per unit of time. It is usually expressed as liters (volume) per minute so as not to be confused with STROKE VOLUME (volume per beat).Heart: The hollow, muscular organ that maintains the circulation of the blood.Fractional Flow Reserve, Myocardial: The ratio of maximum blood flow to the MYOCARDIUM with CORONARY STENOSIS present, to the maximum equivalent blood flow without stenosis. The measurement is commonly used to verify borderline stenosis of CORONARY ARTERIES.Stents: Devices that provide support for tubular structures that are being anastomosed or for body cavities during skin grafting.Coronary Vessels: The veins and arteries of the HEART.Chest Pain: Pressure, burning, or numbness in the chest.Constriction, Pathologic: The condition of an anatomical structure's being constricted beyond normal dimensions.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Endovascular Procedures: Minimally invasive procedures, diagnostic or therapeutic, performed within the BLOOD VESSELS. They may be perfomed via ANGIOSCOPY; INTERVENTIONAL MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING; INTERVENTIONAL RADIOGRAPHY; or INTERVENTIONAL ULTRASONOGRAPHY.Electrocardiography: Recording of the moment-to-moment electromotive forces of the HEART as projected onto various sites on the body's surface, delineated as a scalar function of time. The recording is monitored by a tracing on slow moving chart paper or by observing it on a cardioscope, which is a CATHODE RAY TUBE DISPLAY.Blood Vessel Prosthesis Implantation: Surgical insertion of BLOOD VESSEL PROSTHESES to repair injured or diseased blood vessels.Embolization, Therapeutic: A method of hemostasis utilizing various agents such as Gelfoam, silastic, metal, glass, or plastic pellets, autologous clot, fat, and muscle as emboli. It has been used in the treatment of spinal cord and INTRACRANIAL ARTERIOVENOUS MALFORMATIONS, renal arteriovenous fistulas, gastrointestinal bleeding, epistaxis, hypersplenism, certain highly vascular tumors, traumatic rupture of blood vessels, and control of operative hemorrhage.Myocardial Perfusion Imaging: The creation and display of functional images showing where the blood is flowing into the MYOCARDIUM by following over time the distribution of tracers injected into the blood stream.Celiac Artery: The arterial trunk that arises from the abdominal aorta and after a short course divides into the left gastric, common hepatic and splenic arteries.Arterial Occlusive Diseases: Pathological processes which result in the partial or complete obstruction of ARTERIES. They are characterized by greatly reduced or absence of blood flow through these vessels. They are also known as arterial insufficiency.Aneurysm, False: Not an aneurysm but a well-defined collection of blood and CONNECTIVE TISSUE outside the wall of a blood vessel or the heart. It is the containment of a ruptured blood vessel or heart, such as sealing a rupture of the left ventricle. False aneurysm is formed by organized THROMBUS and HEMATOMA in surrounding tissue.Hematoma: A collection of blood outside the BLOOD VESSELS. Hematoma can be localized in an organ, space, or tissue.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Tomography, Optical: Projection of near-IR light (INFRARED RAYS), in the 700-1000 nm region, across an object in parallel beams to an array of sensitive photodetectors. This is repeated at various angles and a mathematical reconstruction provides three dimensional MEDICAL IMAGING of tissues. Based on the relative transparency of tissues to this spectra, it has been used to monitor local oxygenation, brain and joints.Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal: An abnormal balloon- or sac-like dilatation in the wall of the ABDOMINAL AORTA which gives rise to the visceral, the parietal, and the terminal (iliac) branches below the aortic hiatus at the diaphragm.Blood Vessel Prosthesis: Device constructed of either synthetic or biological material that is used for the repair of injured or diseased blood vessels.Aneurysm, Ruptured: The tearing or bursting of the weakened wall of the aneurysmal sac, usually heralded by sudden worsening pain. The great danger of a ruptured aneurysm is the large amount of blood spilling into the surrounding tissues and cavities, causing HEMORRHAGIC SHOCK.Cardiac Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the heart.Prosthesis Design: The plan and delineation of prostheses in general or a specific prosthesis.Vascular Patency: The degree to which BLOOD VESSELS are not blocked or obstructed.ROC Curve: A graphic means for assessing the ability of a screening test to discriminate between healthy and diseased persons; may also be used in other studies, e.g., distinguishing stimuli responses as to a faint stimuli or nonstimuli.Arrhythmias, Cardiac: Any disturbances of the normal rhythmic beating of the heart or MYOCARDIAL CONTRACTION. Cardiac arrhythmias can be classified by the abnormalities in HEART RATE, disorders of electrical impulse generation, or impulse conduction.Graft Occlusion, Vascular: Obstruction of flow in biological or prosthetic vascular grafts.Artifacts: Any visible result of a procedure which is caused by the procedure itself and not by the entity being analyzed. Common examples include histological structures introduced by tissue processing, radiographic images of structures that are not naturally present in living tissue, and products of chemical reactions that occur during analysis.Myocardial Infarction: NECROSIS of the MYOCARDIUM caused by an obstruction of the blood supply to the heart (CORONARY CIRCULATION).Carotid Artery, Internal: Branch of the common carotid artery which supplies the anterior part of the brain, the eye and its appendages, the forehead and nose.Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Bleeding into the intracranial or spinal SUBARACHNOID SPACE, most resulting from INTRACRANIAL ANEURYSM rupture. It can occur after traumatic injuries (SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE, TRAUMATIC). Clinical features include HEADACHE; NAUSEA; VOMITING, nuchal rigidity, variable neurological deficits and reduced mental status.Cone-Beam Computed Tomography: Computed tomography modalities which use a cone or pyramid-shaped beam of radiation.Cerebral Arteries: The arterial blood vessels supplying the CEREBRUM.Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Death, Sudden, Cardiac: Unexpected rapid natural death due to cardiovascular collapse within one hour of initial symptoms. It is usually caused by the worsening of existing heart diseases. The sudden onset of symptoms, such as CHEST PAIN and CARDIAC ARRHYTHMIAS, particularly VENTRICULAR TACHYCARDIA, can lead to the loss of consciousness and cardiac arrest followed by biological death. (from Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine, 7th ed., 2005)Radionuclide Angiography: The measurement of visualization by radiation of any organ after a radionuclide has been injected into its blood supply. It is used to diagnose heart, liver, lung, and other diseases and to measure the function of those organs, except renography, for which RADIOISOTOPE RENOGRAPHY is available.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Ultrasonography, Interventional: The use of ultrasound to guide minimally invasive surgical procedures such as needle ASPIRATION BIOPSY; DRAINAGE; etc. Its widest application is intravascular ultrasound imaging but it is useful also in urology and intra-abdominal conditions.Electron Microscope Tomography: A tomographic technique for obtaining 3-dimensional images with transmission electron microscopy.Cardiac Catheterization: Procedures in which placement of CARDIAC CATHETERS is performed for therapeutic or diagnostic procedures.Myocardial Ischemia: A disorder of cardiac function caused by insufficient blood flow to the muscle tissue of the heart. The decreased blood flow may be due to narrowing of the coronary arteries (CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE), to obstruction by a thrombus (CORONARY THROMBOSIS), or less commonly, to diffuse narrowing of arterioles and other small vessels within the heart. Severe interruption of the blood supply to the myocardial tissue may result in necrosis of cardiac muscle (MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION).Aortic Aneurysm: An abnormal balloon- or sac-like dilatation in the wall of AORTA.Feasibility Studies: Studies to determine the advantages or disadvantages, practicability, or capability of accomplishing a projected plan, study, or project.Aortic Aneurysm, Thoracic: An abnormal balloon- or sac-like dilatation in the wall of the THORACIC AORTA. This proximal descending portion of aorta gives rise to the visceral and the parietal branches above the aortic hiatus at the diaphragm.Aneurysm, Dissecting: Aneurysm caused by a tear in the TUNICA INTIMA of a blood vessel leading to interstitial HEMORRHAGE, and splitting (dissecting) of the vessel wall, often involving the AORTA. Dissection between the intima and media causes luminal occlusion. Dissection at the media, or between the media and the outer adventitia causes aneurismal dilation.Ultrasonography, Doppler, Duplex: Ultrasonography applying the Doppler effect combined with real-time imaging. The real-time image is created by rapid movement of the ultrasound beam. A powerful advantage of this technique is the ability to estimate the velocity of flow from the Doppler shift frequency.Takayasu Arteritis: A chronic inflammatory process that affects the AORTA and its primary branches, such as the brachiocephalic artery (BRACHIOCEPHALIC TRUNK) and CAROTID ARTERIES. It results in progressive arterial stenosis, occlusion, and aneurysm formation. The pulse in the arm is hard to detect. Patients with aortitis syndrome often exhibit retinopathy.Coronary Vessel Anomalies: Malformations of CORONARY VESSELS, either arteries or veins. Included are anomalous origins of coronary arteries; ARTERIOVENOUS FISTULA; CORONARY ANEURYSM; MYOCARDIAL BRIDGING; and others.Preoperative Care: Care given during the period prior to undergoing surgery when psychological and physical preparations are made according to the special needs of the individual patient. This period spans the time between admission to the hospital to the time the surgery begins. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Myocardial Revascularization: The restoration of blood supply to the myocardium. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Carotid Stenosis: Narrowing or stricture of any part of the CAROTID ARTERIES, most often due to atherosclerotic plaque formation. Ulcerations may form in atherosclerotic plaques and induce THROMBUS formation. Platelet or cholesterol emboli may arise from stenotic carotid lesions and induce a TRANSIENT ISCHEMIC ATTACK; CEREBROVASCULAR ACCIDENT; or temporary blindness (AMAUROSIS FUGAX). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp 822-3)Acute Disease: Disease having a short and relatively severe course.Coronary Artery Bypass: Surgical therapy of ischemic coronary artery disease achieved by grafting a section of saphenous vein, internal mammary artery, or other substitute between the aorta and the obstructed coronary artery distal to the obstructive lesion.Carotid Artery Diseases: Pathological conditions involving the CAROTID ARTERIES, including the common, internal, and external carotid arteries. ATHEROSCLEROSIS and TRAUMA are relatively frequent causes of carotid artery pathology.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Vascular Surgical Procedures: Operative procedures for the treatment of vascular disorders.Aortic Diseases: Pathological processes involving any part of the AORTA.Neurosurgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the nervous system or its parts.Heart Diseases: Pathological conditions involving the HEART including its structural and functional abnormalities.Tomography, X-Ray: Tomography using x-ray transmission.Coronary Disease: An imbalance between myocardial functional requirements and the capacity of the CORONARY VESSELS to supply sufficient blood flow. It is a form of MYOCARDIAL ISCHEMIA (insufficient blood supply to the heart muscle) caused by a decreased capacity of the coronary vessels.Aorta, Thoracic: The portion of the descending aorta proceeding from the arch of the aorta and extending to the DIAPHRAGM, eventually connecting to the ABDOMINAL AORTA.Carotid Arteries: Either of the two principal arteries on both sides of the neck that supply blood to the head and neck; each divides into two branches, the internal carotid artery and the external carotid artery.Tomography Scanners, X-Ray Computed: X-ray image-detecting devices that make a focused image of body structures lying in a predetermined plane from which more complex images are computed.Pulmonary Artery: The short wide vessel arising from the conus arteriosus of the right ventricle and conveying unaerated blood to the lungs.Chi-Square Distribution: A distribution in which a variable is distributed like the sum of the squares of any given independent random variable, each of which has a normal distribution with mean of zero and variance of one. The chi-square test is a statistical test based on comparison of a test statistic to a chi-square distribution. The oldest of these tests are used to detect whether two or more population distributions differ from one another.Echocardiography: Ultrasonic recording of the size, motion, and composition of the heart and surrounding tissues. The standard approach is transthoracic.Cardiac Tamponade: Compression of the heart by accumulated fluid (PERICARDIAL EFFUSION) or blood (HEMOPERICARDIUM) in the PERICARDIUM surrounding the heart. The affected cardiac functions and CARDIAC OUTPUT can range from minimal to total hemodynamic collapse.Fluorodeoxyglucose F18: The compound is given by intravenous injection to do POSITRON-EMISSION TOMOGRAPHY for the assessment of cerebral and myocardial glucose metabolism in various physiological or pathological states including stroke and myocardial ischemia. It is also employed for the detection of malignant tumors including those of the brain, liver, and thyroid gland. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1162)Myocardium: The muscle tissue of the HEART. It is composed of striated, involuntary muscle cells (MYOCYTES, CARDIAC) connected to form the contractile pump to generate blood flow.Heart Ventricles: The lower right and left chambers of the heart. The right ventricle pumps venous BLOOD into the LUNGS and the left ventricle pumps oxygenated blood into the systemic arterial circulation.Cardiac Pacing, Artificial: Regulation of the rate of contraction of the heart muscles by an artificial pacemaker.Intracranial Arteriovenous Malformations: Congenital vascular anomalies in the brain characterized by direct communication between an artery and a vein without passing through the CAPILLARIES. The locations and size of the shunts determine the symptoms including HEADACHES; SEIZURES; STROKE; INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES; mass effect; and vascular steal effect.Algorithms: A procedure consisting of a sequence of algebraic formulas and/or logical steps to calculate or determine a given task.Cardiac Imaging Techniques: Visualization of the heart structure and cardiac blood flow for diagnostic evaluation or to guide cardiac procedures via techniques including ENDOSCOPY (cardiac endoscopy, sometimes refered to as cardioscopy), RADIONUCLIDE IMAGING; MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING; TOMOGRAPHY; or ULTRASONOGRAPHY.Cardiomegaly: Enlargement of the HEART, usually indicated by a cardiothoracic ratio above 0.50. Heart enlargement may involve the right, the left, or both HEART VENTRICLES or HEART ATRIA. Cardiomegaly is a nonspecific symptom seen in patients with chronic systolic heart failure (HEART FAILURE) or several forms of CARDIOMYOPATHIES.Myocardial Contraction: Contractile activity of the MYOCARDIUM.Iohexol: An effective non-ionic, water-soluble contrast agent which is used in myelography, arthrography, nephroangiography, arteriography, and other radiographic procedures. Its low systemic toxicity is the combined result of low chemotoxicity and low osmolality.Image Enhancement: Improvement of the quality of a picture by various techniques, including computer processing, digital filtering, echocardiographic techniques, light and ultrastructural MICROSCOPY, fluorescence spectrometry and microscopy, scintigraphy, and in vitro image processing at the molecular level.Hemodynamics: The movement and the forces involved in the movement of the blood through the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.Coronary Circulation: The circulation of blood through the CORONARY VESSELS of the HEART.Thrombosis: Formation and development of a thrombus or blood clot in the blood vessel.Heart Arrest: Cessation of heart beat or MYOCARDIAL CONTRACTION. If it is treated within a few minutes, heart arrest can be reversed in most cases to normal cardiac rhythm and effective circulation.Indocyanine Green: A tricarbocyanine dye that is used diagnostically in liver function tests and to determine blood volume and cardiac output.Vertebral Artery: The first branch of the SUBCLAVIAN ARTERY with distribution to muscles of the NECK; VERTEBRAE; SPINAL CORD; CEREBELLUM; and interior of the CEREBRUM.Cardiomyopathies: A group of diseases in which the dominant feature is the involvement of the CARDIAC MUSCLE itself. Cardiomyopathies are classified according to their predominant pathophysiological features (DILATED CARDIOMYOPATHY; HYPERTROPHIC CARDIOMYOPATHY; RESTRICTIVE CARDIOMYOPATHY) or their etiological/pathological factors (CARDIOMYOPATHY, ALCOHOLIC; ENDOCARDIAL FIBROELASTOSIS).Phantoms, Imaging: Devices or objects in various imaging techniques used to visualize or enhance visualization by simulating conditions encountered in the procedure. Phantoms are used very often in procedures employing or measuring x-irradiation or radioactive material to evaluate performance. Phantoms often have properties similar to human tissue. Water demonstrates absorbing properties similar to normal tissue, hence water-filled phantoms are used to map radiation levels. Phantoms are used also as teaching aids to simulate real conditions with x-ray or ultrasonic machines. (From Iturralde, Dictionary and Handbook of Nuclear Medicine and Clinical Imaging, 1990)Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary: Dilation of an occluded coronary artery (or arteries) by means of a balloon catheter to restore myocardial blood supply.Ventricular Function, Left: The hemodynamic and electrophysiological action of the left HEART VENTRICLE. Its measurement is an important aspect of the clinical evaluation of patients with heart disease to determine the effects of the disease on cardiac performance.Heart Rate: The number of times the HEART VENTRICLES contract per unit of time, usually per minute.Registries: The systems and processes involved in the establishment, support, management, and operation of registers, e.g., disease registers.Heart Failure: A heterogeneous condition in which the heart is unable to pump out sufficient blood to meet the metabolic need of the body. Heart failure can be caused by structural defects, functional abnormalities (VENTRICULAR DYSFUNCTION), or a sudden overload beyond its capacity. Chronic heart failure is more common than acute heart failure which results from sudden insult to cardiac function, such as MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION.Arteriovenous Fistula: An abnormal direct communication between an artery and a vein without passing through the CAPILLARIES. An A-V fistula usually leads to the formation of a dilated sac-like connection, arteriovenous aneurysm. The locations and size of the shunts determine the degree of effects on the cardiovascular functions such as BLOOD PRESSURE and HEART RATE.Prosthesis Failure: Malfunction of implantation shunts, valves, etc., and prosthesis loosening, migration, and breaking.Kaplan-Meier Estimate: A nonparametric method of compiling LIFE TABLES or survival tables. It combines calculated probabilities of survival and estimates to allow for observations occurring beyond a measurement threshold, which are assumed to occur randomly. Time intervals are defined as ending each time an event occurs and are therefore unequal. (From Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1995)Diagnostic Imaging: Any visual display of structural or functional patterns of organs or tissues for diagnostic evaluation. It includes measuring physiologic and metabolic responses to physical and chemical stimuli, as well as ultramicroscopy.Stroke Volume: The amount of BLOOD pumped out of the HEART per beat, not to be confused with cardiac output (volume/time). It is calculated as the difference between the end-diastolic volume and the end-systolic volume.Fundus Oculi: The concave interior of the eye, consisting of the retina, the choroid, the sclera, the optic disk, and blood vessels, seen by means of the ophthalmoscope. (Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)Angina Pectoris: The symptom of paroxysmal pain consequent to MYOCARDIAL ISCHEMIA usually of distinctive character, location and radiation. It is thought to be provoked by a transient stressful situation during which the oxygen requirements of the MYOCARDIUM exceed that supplied by the CORONARY CIRCULATION.Exercise Test: Controlled physical activity which is performed in order to allow assessment of physiological functions, particularly cardiovascular and pulmonary, but also aerobic capacity. Maximal (most intense) exercise is usually required but submaximal exercise is also used.Blood Flow Velocity: A value equal to the total volume flow divided by the cross-sectional area of the vascular bed.Vertebrobasilar Insufficiency: Localized or diffuse reduction in blood flow through the vertebrobasilar arterial system, which supplies the BRAIN STEM; CEREBELLUM; OCCIPITAL LOBE; medial TEMPORAL LOBE; and THALAMUS. Characteristic clinical features include SYNCOPE; lightheadedness; visual disturbances; and VERTIGO. BRAIN STEM INFARCTIONS or other BRAIN INFARCTION may be associated.Heart Transplantation: The transference of a heart from one human or animal to another.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Equipment Design: Methods of creating machines and devices.Central Nervous System Vascular Malformations: Congenital, inherited, or acquired abnormalities involving ARTERIES; VEINS; or venous sinuses in the BRAIN; SPINAL CORD; and MENINGES.Triiodobenzoic Acids: Triiodo-substituted derivatives of BENZOIC ACID.Myoblasts, Cardiac: Precursor cells destined to differentiate into cardiac myocytes (MYOCYTES, CARDIAC).Cardiac Volume: The volume of the HEART, usually relating to the volume of BLOOD contained within it at various periods of the cardiac cycle. The amount of blood ejected from a ventricle at each beat is STROKE VOLUME.Cerebrovascular Circulation: The circulation of blood through the BLOOD VESSELS of the BRAIN.Cardiac Myosins: Myosin type II isoforms found in cardiac muscle.Gadolinium DTPA: A complex of gadolinium with a chelating agent, diethylenetriamine penta-acetic acid (DTPA see PENTETIC ACID), that is given to enhance the image in cranial and spinal MRIs. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p706)Cerebral Veins: Veins draining the cerebrum.Radiography, Interventional: Diagnostic and therapeutic procedures that are invasive or surgical in nature, and require the expertise of a specially trained radiologist. In general, they are more invasive than diagnostic imaging but less invasive than major surgery. They often involve catheterization, fluoroscopy, or computed tomography. Some examples include percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography, percutaneous transthoracic biopsy, balloon angioplasty, and arterial embolization.Dogs: The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)Heart Defects, Congenital: Developmental abnormalities involving structures of the heart. These defects are present at birth but may be discovered later in life.Cardiac Glycosides: Cyclopentanophenanthrenes with a 5- or 6-membered lactone ring attached at the 17-position and SUGARS attached at the 3-position. Plants they come from have long been used in congestive heart failure. They increase the force of cardiac contraction without significantly affecting other parameters, but are very toxic at larger doses. Their mechanism of action usually involves inhibition of the NA(+)-K(+)-EXCHANGING ATPASE and they are often used in cell biological studies for that purpose.Ventricular Dysfunction, Left: A condition in which the LEFT VENTRICLE of the heart was functionally impaired. This condition usually leads to HEART FAILURE; MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION; and other cardiovascular complications. Diagnosis is made by measuring the diminished ejection fraction and a depressed level of motility of the left ventricular wall.Collateral Circulation: Maintenance of blood flow to an organ despite obstruction of a principal vessel. Blood flow is maintained through small vessels.Heart Function Tests: Examinations used to diagnose and treat heart conditions.Blood Pressure: PRESSURE of the BLOOD on the ARTERIES and other BLOOD VESSELS.Models, Cardiovascular: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of the cardiovascular system, processes, or phenomena; includes the use of mathematical equations, computers and other electronic equipment.Arteriovenous Malformations: Abnormal formation of blood vessels that shunt arterial blood directly into veins without passing through the CAPILLARIES. They usually are crooked, dilated, and with thick vessel walls. A common type is the congenital arteriovenous fistula. The lack of blood flow and oxygen in the capillaries can lead to tissue damage in the affected areas.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Pulmonary Embolism: Blocking of the PULMONARY ARTERY or one of its branches by an EMBOLUS.Troponin I: One of the three polypeptide chains that make up the TROPONIN complex. It inhibits F-actin-myosin interactions.Cardiac Output, Low: A state of subnormal or depressed cardiac output at rest or during stress. It is a characteristic of CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES, including congenital, valvular, rheumatic, hypertensive, coronary, and cardiomyopathic. The serious form of low cardiac output is characterized by marked reduction in STROKE VOLUME, and systemic vasoconstriction resulting in cold, pale, and sometimes cyanotic extremities.Heart Neoplasms: Tumors in any part of the heart. They include primary cardiac tumors and metastatic tumors to the heart. Their interference with normal cardiac functions can cause a wide variety of symptoms including HEART FAILURE; CARDIAC ARRHYTHMIAS; or EMBOLISM.Cerebrovascular Disorders: A spectrum of pathological conditions of impaired blood flow in the brain. They can involve vessels (ARTERIES or VEINS) in the CEREBRUM, the CEREBELLUM, and the BRAIN STEM. Major categories include INTRACRANIAL ARTERIOVENOUS MALFORMATIONS; BRAIN ISCHEMIA; CEREBRAL HEMORRHAGE; and others.Recurrence: The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.Thallium Radioisotopes: Unstable isotopes of thallium that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. Tl atoms with atomic weights 198-202, 204, and 206-210 are thallium radioisotopes.Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest: Occurrence of heart arrest in an individual when there is no immediate access to medical personnel or equipment.Ventricular Remodeling: The geometric and structural changes that the HEART VENTRICLES undergo, usually following MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION. It comprises expansion of the infarct and dilatation of the healthy ventricle segments. While most prevalent in the left ventricle, it can also occur in the right ventricle.X-Ray Microtomography: X-RAY COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY with resolution in the micrometer range.Circle of Willis: A polygonal anastomosis at the base of the brain formed by the internal carotid (CAROTID ARTERY, INTERNAL), proximal parts of the anterior, middle, and posterior cerebral arteries (ANTERIOR CEREBRAL ARTERY; MIDDLE CEREBRAL ARTERY; POSTERIOR CEREBRAL ARTERY), the anterior communicating artery and the posterior communicating arteries.Subtraction Technique: Combination or superimposition of two images for demonstrating differences between them (e.g., radiograph with contrast vs. one without, radionuclide images using different radionuclides, radiograph vs. radionuclide image) and in the preparation of audiovisual materials (e.g., offsetting identical images, coloring of vessels in angiograms).Multimodal Imaging: The use of combination of imaging techniques or platforms (e.g., MRI SCAN and PET SCAN) encompassing aspects of anatomical, functional, or molecular imaging methods.Ultrasonography: The visualization of deep structures of the body by recording the reflections or echoes of ultrasonic pulses directed into the tissues. Use of ultrasound for imaging or diagnostic purposes employs frequencies ranging from 1.6 to 10 megahertz.Cardiac Care Facilities: Institutions specializing in the care of patients with heart disorders.Incidental Findings: Unanticipated information discovered in the course of testing or medical care. Used in discussions of information that may have social or psychological consequences, such as when it is learned that a child's biological father is someone other than the putative father, or that a person tested for one disease or disorder has, or is at risk for, something else.Cineangiography: Motion pictures of the passage of contrast medium through blood vessels.Troponin T: One of the three polypeptide chains that make up the TROPONIN complex. It is a cardiac-specific protein that binds to TROPOMYOSIN. It is released from damaged or injured heart muscle cells (MYOCYTES, CARDIAC). Defects in the gene encoding troponin T result in FAMILIAL HYPERTROPHIC CARDIOMYOPATHY.Biological Markers: Measurable and quantifiable biological parameters (e.g., specific enzyme concentration, specific hormone concentration, specific gene phenotype distribution in a population, presence of biological substances) which serve as indices for health- and physiology-related assessments, such as disease risk, psychiatric disorders, environmental exposure and its effects, disease diagnosis, metabolic processes, substance abuse, pregnancy, cell line development, epidemiologic studies, etc.Macula Lutea: An oval area in the retina, 3 to 5 mm in diameter, usually located temporal to the posterior pole of the eye and slightly below the level of the optic disk. It is characterized by the presence of a yellow pigment diffusely permeating the inner layers, contains the fovea centralis in its center, and provides the best phototropic visual acuity. It is devoid of retinal blood vessels, except in its periphery, and receives nourishment from the choriocapillaris of the choroid. (From Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)Cardiotonic Agents: Agents that have a strengthening effect on the heart or that can increase cardiac output. They may be CARDIAC GLYCOSIDES; SYMPATHOMIMETICS; or other drugs. They are used after MYOCARDIAL INFARCT; CARDIAC SURGICAL PROCEDURES; in SHOCK; or in congestive heart failure (HEART FAILURE).Technetium Tc 99m Sestamibi: A technetium imaging agent used to reveal blood-starved cardiac tissue during a heart attack.Technetium: The first artificially produced element and a radioactive fission product of URANIUM. Technetium has the atomic symbol Tc, atomic number 43, and atomic weight 98.91. All technetium isotopes are radioactive. Technetium 99m (m=metastable) which is the decay product of Molybdenum 99, has a half-life of about 6 hours and is used diagnostically as a radioactive imaging agent. Technetium 99 which is a decay product of technetium 99m, has a half-life of 210,000 years.Angiocardiography: Radiography of the heart and great vessels after injection of a contrast medium.Cardiomyopathy, Dilated: A form of CARDIAC MUSCLE disease that is characterized by ventricular dilation, VENTRICULAR DYSFUNCTION, and HEART FAILURE. Risk factors include SMOKING; ALCOHOL DRINKING; HYPERTENSION; INFECTION; PREGNANCY; and mutations in the LMNA gene encoding LAMIN TYPE A, a NUCLEAR LAMINA protein.Heart Atria: The chambers of the heart, to which the BLOOD returns from the circulation.Fluorine Radioisotopes: Unstable isotopes of fluorine that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. F atoms with atomic weights 17, 18, and 20-22 are radioactive fluorine isotopes.Cerebral Infarction: The formation of an area of NECROSIS in the CEREBRUM caused by an insufficiency of arterial or venous blood flow. Infarcts of the cerebrum are generally classified by hemisphere (i.e., left vs. right), lobe (e.g., frontal lobe infarction), arterial distribution (e.g., INFARCTION, ANTERIOR CEREBRAL ARTERY), and etiology (e.g., embolic infarction).Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography: Three-dimensional computed tomographic imaging with the added dimension of time, to follow motion during imaging.Pericardium: A conical fibro-serous sac surrounding the HEART and the roots of the great vessels (AORTA; VENAE CAVAE; PULMONARY ARTERY). Pericardium consists of two sacs: the outer fibrous pericardium and the inner serous pericardium. The latter consists of an outer parietal layer facing the fibrous pericardium, and an inner visceral layer (epicardium) resting next to the heart, and a pericardial cavity between these two layers.Aneurysm: Pathological outpouching or sac-like dilatation in the wall of any blood vessel (ARTERIES or VEINS) or the heart (HEART ANEURYSM). It indicates a thin and weakened area in the wall which may later rupture. Aneurysms are classified by location, etiology, or other characteristics.Regional Blood Flow: The flow of BLOOD through or around an organ or region of the body.
Main article: Computed tomography angiography. Computed tomography angiography (CTA) is contrast CT to visualize arterial and ... The main forms of cardiac CT scanning are: *Coronary CT angiography (CTA): the use of CT to assess the coronary arteries of the ... For non-medical computed tomography, see industrial computed tomography scanning. For non-X-ray tomography, see Tomography. ... X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT), computerized axial tomography scan (CAT scan),[2] computer aided tomography, computed ...
"Prognostic Value of Cardiac Computed Tomography Angiography". Journal of the American College of Cardiology. 57 (10): 1237-1247 ... Furthermore, those with cardiac arrest, and ST elevation at any time, should usually have angiography. Cardiac rehabilitation ... Schinkel AF, Valkema R, Geleijnse ML, Sijbrands EJ, Poldermans D (May 2010). "Single-photon emission computed tomography for ... the cardiac protein troponin or the cardiac enzyme CK-MB). When there is evidence of an MI, it may be classified as an ST ...
... and reporting based on Computed Tomography Angiography (CTA) images Viatronix maintains a set of software applications for ... V3D-Cardiac - a software for assisting physician to detecting, visualizing, quantifying coronary and left venticle structures ...
Cancer Treatment Centers of America Chinese Taipei Chess Association Computed tomography coronary angiography (Cardiac CT scan ...
Other diagnostical tools are duplex ultrasonography, computed tomography angiography (CTA), and magnetic resonance angiography ... while an embolism is usually of cardiac origin. In the United States, ALI is estimated to occur in 14 out of every 100,000 ... Mesenteric ischemia Cerebral ischemia Cardiac ischemia In order to treat acute limb ischaemia there are a series of things that ...
Computed tomography (CT)Edit. Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography (CCTA)Edit. Image of contrast enhanced dual-source ... These cardiac techniques are otherwise referred to as echocardiography, Cardiac MRI, Cardiac CT, Cardiac PET and Cardiac SPECT ... Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)Edit. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), a nuclear medicine ... Computed tomography angiography (CTA), an imaging methodology using a ring-shaped machine with an X-Ray source spinning around ...
... (CTA) is the use of computed tomography (CT) angiography to assess the coronary arteries of the heart. ... Mikolich, JR (May 2012). "Cardiac computed tomographic angiography and the primary care physician". The Journal of the American ... Aug 2011). "Age- and Sex-Related Differences in All-Cause Mortality Risk Based on Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography ... Both coronary CT angiography and invasive angiography via cardiac catheterization yield similar diagnostic accuracy when both ...
Coronary artery bypass graft patency was studied through computed tomography angiography. 92% of patients were free from angina ... Minimally Invasive Cardiac Surgery, also known as MICS CABG (Minimally Invasive Cardiac Surgery/Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting ... The Minimally Invasive Cardiac Surgery was invented by Dr Joseph T McGinn, Jr. The first minimally invasive heart cardiac ... Assessing survival and adverse cardiac events up to 8.0 years (average 2.9±2.0 years), MICS CABG is a safe, reproducible ...
Cardiac stress testing Computed tomography angiography (CTA) and Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) of the heart (ECG is used ... Certain rhythms are known to have good cardiac output and some are known to have bad cardiac output. Ultimately, an ... a cardiac murmur or other findings to suggest structural heart disease Perceived cardiac dysrhythmias either by pulse or ... ECG interpretation is a component of many healthcare fields (nurses and physicians and cardiac surgeons being the most obvious ...
Computed tomography angiography (CTA), an imaging methodology using a ring-shaped machine with an X-Ray source spinning around ... Cardiac PET scan, Cardiac CT scan and Cardiac MRI. A physician may recommend cardiac imaging to support a diagnosis of a heart ... A coronary CT calcium scan is a computed tomography (CT) scan of the heart for the assessment of severity of coronary artery ... Stress cardiac imaging is discouraged in the evaluation of patients without cardiac symptoms or in routine follow-ups. Coronary ...
... can also be measured by computed tomography (CT scan), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ventriculography, ... This ratio allows many variables such as stroke volume (SV) and Cardiac Output (CO). SV describes the volume of blood ejected ... gated SPECT and radionuclide angiography (MUGA) scanning. A MUGA scan involves the injection of a radioisotope into the blood ... Stroke volume (SV) and cardiac output (CO) are absolute measurements, where EF is inherently a relative measurement-as is any ...
... he later ventured into computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and angiography. Following his work in St. ... Since the early 1990s, partnering with interventional cardiologists, he began to apply recently acquired cardiac technology to ... in parallel to the existing procedures for treating patients with cardiac arrest. Upon his arrival at UAB, he created a ...
Coronary angiography Lymphangiography Pulmonary angiography Ventriculography Chest photofluorography Computed tomography ... Lab tests Biopsy test Blood test Stool test Urinalysis Cardiac stress test Electrocardiography Electrocorticography ... Esophageal motility study Evoked potential Magnetoencephalography Medical imaging Angiography Aortography Cerebral angiography ... Echocardiography Electrical impedance tomography Fluoroscopy Magnetic resonance imaging Diffuse optical imaging Diffusion ...
... multi-detector row computed tomography for the non-invasive imaging of the beating heart and breathing lungs. Wood's ... analog subtraction angiography for the assessment of cardiac structures via video fluoroscopy and the earliest predecessor (The ... a predecessor to modern high speed volumetric computed tomography (CT) allowing for the evaluation of the beating heart and ... After his work on the G-Suit, Wood worked on techniques for measuring cardiac blood flow. He was granted a patent for the ear ...
Cardiac stress testing. *Computed tomography angiography (CTA) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) of the heart (ECG is ... Cardiac stress test Bruce protocol. Electrophysiology study. Cardiac imaging. Angiocardiography. Echocardiography TTE. TEE. ... Main article: Cardiac electrophysiology. The formal study of the electrical conduction system of the heart is called cardiac ... Certain rhythms are known to have good cardiac output and some are known to have bad cardiac output. Ultimately, an ...
"ACCF/SCCT/ACR/AHA/ASE/ASNC/NASCI/SCAI/SCMR 2010 Appropriate Use Criteria for Cardiac Computed Tomography". Journal of the ... In difficult cases or in situations where intervention to restore blood flow is appropriate, coronary angiography can be ... ECG and cardiac biomarkers suggest the likelihood of a problem. Cardiac markers or cardiac enzymes are proteins that leak out ... Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography; American College Of, R.; American Heart, A.; American Society of ...
"ACCF/SCCT/ACR/AHA/ASE/ASNC/NASCI/SCAI/SCMR 2010 Appropriate Use Criteria for Cardiac Computed Tomography". Journal of the ... Examples of anatomical methods CT coronary calcium score Coronary CT angiography Intima-media thickness (IMT) Intravascular ... A cardiac stress test (also referred to as a cardiac diagnostic test, cardiopulmonary exercise test, or abbreviated CPX test) ... Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography; American Heart Association; Heart Rhythm Society (2011). "ACCF/ASE/AHA/ASNC/HFSA ...
"ACCF/SCCT/ACR/AHA/ASE/ASNC/NASCI/SCAI/SCMR 2010 Appropriate Use Criteria for Cardiac Computed Tomography". Journal of the ... Society for Cardiovascular Angiography Interventions; Society of Critical Care Medicine; American Society of Echocardiography; ... Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography; American Heart Association; Heart Rhythm Society (2011). "ACCF/ASE/AHA/ASNC/HFSA ... Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography; American College Of, R.; American Heart, A.; American Society of ...
Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography; American Heart Association; Heart Rhythm Society (2011). "ACCF/ASE/AHA/ASNC/HFSA ... TEE is very useful during many cardiac surgical procedures (e.g., mitral valve repair). It is actually an essential monitoring ... Society for Cardiovascular Angiography Interventions; Society of Critical Care Medicine; American Society of Echocardiography; ... In addition to use by cardiologists in outpatient and inpatient settings, TEE can be performed by a cardiac anesthesiologist to ...
Coronary computed tomography angiography should not be used to screen people who are asymptomatic. Additionally, this test ... "ACCF/SCCT/ACR/AHA/ASE/ASNC/NASCI/SCAI/SCMR 2010 appropriate use criteria for cardiac computed tomography. A report of the ... "Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography as a Screening Tool for the Detection of Occult Coronary Artery Disease in ... "Assessment of coronary artery disease by cardiac computed tomography: a scientific statement from the American Heart ...
Facilities Angiography, Angioplasty, Cardiac Bypass, Heart Valves Replacement and all sorts of Cardiac Operations and ... Echocardiography Spiral Computed Tomography, Color Doppler and Ultrasonography Renal Transplantation and Renal Hemodialysis ... light of hope for cardiac patients, archived from the original on 29 January 2009, retrieved 20 November 2008 Organization of ... Chest Diseases and Chest Surgical Departments Cardiac Surgery Operation Theatre, Inpatient and Coronary Care Unit (CCU) ...
... such as those using computed tomography (CT; led by the electron beam tomography form, given its greater speed) and magnetic ... Angiography and later cardiac stress testing was begun to either visualize or indirectly detect stenosis. Next came bypass ... Angiography, since the 1960s, has been the traditional way of evaluating for atheroma. However, angiography is only motion or ... Since angiography methods can only reveal larger lumens, typically >>200 microns, angiography after a cardiovascular event ...
Many believe that cardiac computed tomography (CT) has great potential in this area, but researchers are still attempting to ... Cardiac imaging is an active area of biomarker research. Coronary angiography, an invasive procedure requiring catheterization ... Positron emission tomography (PET) can be used to measure where in the body cells take up glucose. By tracking glucose, doctors ... Biomarkers of aging Cardiac marker Molecular risk assessment Cancer biomarkers ROCCET "The Biomarkers Consortium". Foundation ...
Brain perfusion (more correctly transit times) can be estimated with contrast-enhanced computed tomography. Perfusion can be ... Application of this process is used to develop radionuclide angiography, a method of diagnosing heart problems. In the 1990s, ... In equations, the symbol Q̇ ("Q dot") often represents perfusion or, relatedly, cardiac output. Microspheres that are labeled ... Cerebral blood flow determination by rapid-sequence computed-tomography: theoretical analysis. Radiology 137: 679-686, December ...
These may include angiography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and/or computed tomography (CT scan). The coronary arteries ... its development was pioneered by Canadian cardiac surgeon William Mustard and it was named for Brazilian cardiac surgeon Adib ... Swedish cardiac surgeon Åke Senning described the first corrective surgery for d-TGA (the Senning procedure) in 1959, which ... Egyptian cardiac surgeon Magdi Yacoub was subsequently successful in treating TGA with intact septum when preceded by pulmonary ...
... computed axial tomography (CT), scintigraphy (nuclear medicine), angiography or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). ...
Coronary computed tomography angiography (c-CTA) is more valuable in the diagnosis of coronary artery and cardiac anomalies, ... Keywords: Computed tomography angiography, coronary artery, anomaly. Ali Mahir G nd z. Coronary Artery Anomalies and Variations ... Coronary Artery Anomalies and Variations Detected in Computed Tomography Angiography. Ali Mahir G nd z. Department of Radiology ... Detected in Computed Tomography Angiography. Eastern J Med. 2019; 24(4): 545-550. Corresponding Author: Ali Mahir G nd z, T ...
A computed tomography (CT) scan is an imaging method that uses x-rays to create pictures of cross-sections of the body. Related ... Cardiac tamponade. Cardiac tamponade. Cardiac tamponade is pressure on the heart that occurs when blood or fluid builds up in ... Coronary angiography. Coronary angiography is a procedure that uses a special dye (contrast material) and x-rays to see how ... Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons ...
Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, and Society for ... ACCF/HRS/AHA/ASE/HFSA/SCAI/SCCT/SCMR 2013 Appropriate Use Criteria for Implantable Cardioverter- Defibrillators and Cardiac ...
Cardiac computed tomography. In: Zipes DP, Libby P, Bonow RO, Mann DL, Tomaselli GF, Braunwald E, eds. Braunwalds Heart ... Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Society for ... CAT scan - heart; Computed axial tomography scan - heart; Computed tomography scan - heart; Calcium scoring; Multi-detector CT ... Electron beam computed tomography - heart; Agatston score; Coronary calcium scan. A computed tomography (CT) scan of the heart ...
Quantitative global plaque characteristics from coronary computed tomography angiography for the prediction of future cardiac ...
... of this work is to improve the diagnostic quality and reduce the radiation dose of computed tomography coronary angiography ( ... Quiescence is detected as periods of minimal velocity from echocardiography, computed tomography (CT), and SCG. Identified ... Lastly, cardiac CT reconstructions from quiescent phases predicted by a commercial CT scanner were compared to the optimal ... Therefore, gating based on a signal derived directly from cardiac motion using either echocardiography or seismocardiography ( ...
... between stress cardiac computed tomography PERfusion versus Fractional flow rEserve measured by Computed Tomography angiography ... Novel Approaches for the Use of Cardiac/Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography. Authors: Hadi Mirhedayati Roudsari, MD1,a, ... Keywords: Coronary computed tomography angiography, fractional flow reserve, computational fluid dynamics, coronary artery ... Coronary computed tomography angiography, fractional flow reserve, computational fluid dynamics, coronary artery disease, ...
Dynamic Computed Tomography To Determine The Delay Time For Cardiac Angiography In Normal Dogs.. ... Introduction/Purpose: In multidetector computed tomography (MOCT) angiography, delay time for cardiac CT scanning is critical ... On the basis of TAC analysis, delay time for cardiac CT angiography was determined at the end of plateau using 800 mgl/kg 3D ... considering that the 16 channel MOCT requires approximately 15 sec for cardiac scanning, especially using 800 mgl/kg 3D and 800 ...
Introduction/Purpose: The appropriate contrast injection protocol is essential for accurate diagnostic CT angiography. This ... Contrast Injection Protocols For Cardiac Computed Tomography Angiography Using A 16-Channel Scanner In Dogs. by Heather Hill , ... 800 mgl/kg 4Dend protocols for cardiac CT angiography to achieve adequate and homogeneous contrast enhancement of each cardiac ... and scan delay time for the cardiac CT angiography with quantitative and visual evaluation methods, focused on the mean ...
Conclusion:CCTA provides added prognostic value beyond cardiac risk factors and CACS for the prediction of MACE in asymptomatic ... Coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) and coronary artery calcium score (CACS) have prognostic value for coronary ... a risk factor with very high weight and little is known regarding the incremental value of CCTA over CAC for predicting cardiac ... Aims:Coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) and coronary artery calcium score (CACS) have prognostic value for ...
Computed tomography angiographyAortic stenosisLow dose. Findings. Prospectively ECG-triggered cardiac CT angiography targeted ... The feasibility of cardiac computed tomography angiography (CTA) for aortic valvular evaluation has been established for aortic ... Cardiac computed tomography angiography (CTA) is feasible for aortic valve evaluation, but retrospective gated protocols ... Cardiac computed tomography angiography with automatic tube potential selection: effects on radiation dose and image quality. J ...
Angiography, Biliary Tract and Liver, Brain and Head, Cardiac Scoring, Chest, Colon, Kidneys, Pancreas, Pelvis, Pituitary, ... TY - ELEC T1 - Computed Tomography, Various Sites (Abdomen, Angiography, Biliary Tract and Liver, Brain and Head, Cardiac ... Computed Tomography, Various Sites (Abdomen, Angiography, Biliary Tract and Liver, Brain and Head, Cardiac Scoring, Chest, ... Computed Tomography, Various Sites (Abdomen, Angiography, Biliary Tract and Liver, Brain and Head, Cardiac Scoring, Chest, ...
Objectives To assess long-term prognosis after low-dose 64-slice coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) using ... Prognostic value of cardiac computed tomography angiography: a systematic review and meta-analysis. J Am Coll Cardiol 57:1237- ... of computed tomography coronary angiography and evaluation of stress-only single-photon emission computed tomography/computed ... Coronary angiography Multidetector computed tomography Coronary artery disease Event-free survival Prognosis ...
... Abdullah Al-harbi ... Al-harbi A, Aboulkheir MM, Fathala A (2017) Cardiac Computed Tomography Coronary Angiography Post Non-diagnostic or Equivocal ... Cardiac positron emission tomography/computed tomography imaging accurately detects anatomically and functionally significant ... Computed Tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) represents the most rapidly developed imaging modality in cardiac imaging with ...
Cardiac computed tomography angiography (CCTA). CCTA shows detailed pictures of the blood vessels. ... Cardiac catheterization (cardiac or heart cath). A cardiac catheterization gives detailed information about the structures ... Cardiac magnetic resonance angiography (CMRA). This type of MRI shows blood flow through the arteries of the heart. ... Coronary angiography. This test uses dye and special X-rays to see the arteries of the heart. ...
Cardiac computed tomography angiography (CTA). University Heart is one of only two medical facilities in the state offering ... Cardiac MRI provides anatomic and functional images of the heart without the use of ionizing radiation or iodinated contrast ... Cardiac Imaging. Non-invasive diagnostic scans help identify heart disease by providing fast, detailed images of coronary blood ... Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). University Heart provides more patient exams than any other facility in Mississippi. ...
CCTA, coronary computed tomography angiography; FRP, fat radiomic profile; MACE, major adverse cardiac events. ... Oxford Imaging of Perivascular Adipose tissue using Computed Tomography study; SCOT-HEART, Scottish COmputed Tomography of the ... CCTA, coronary computed tomography angiography; FAI, Fat Attenuation Index; FRP, fat radiomic profile; PVAT, perivascular ... AUC, area under the curve; CI, confidence interval; CCS, coronary calcium score; CCTA, coronary computed tomography angiography ...
Main article: Computed tomography angiography. Computed tomography angiography (CTA) is contrast CT to visualize arterial and ... The main forms of cardiac CT scanning are: *Coronary CT angiography (CTA): the use of CT to assess the coronary arteries of the ... For non-medical computed tomography, see industrial computed tomography scanning. For non-X-ray tomography, see Tomography. ... X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT), computerized axial tomography scan (CAT scan),[2] computer aided tomography, computed ...
Cardiac CT (computed tomography) Massachusetts General Hospital Imaging provides Cardiac CT (computed tomography) imaging ... CTA (computed tomography angiography) Massachusetts General Hospital provides CTA imaging using the latest technology and dose- ... computed tomography) Massachusetts General Hospital Imaging provides PET-CT (positron emission tomography - computed tomography ... CT (computed tomography) Massachusetts General Hospital Imaging provides CT (computed tomography) imaging services in a caring ...
Resource Utilization in Cardiac Disease by Lloyd W. Klein, 9780792385097, available at Book Depository with free delivery ... Atlas of Non-Invasive Coronary Angiography by Multidetector Computed Tomography Guillem Pons-Llado ... To this end, we have selected well-known and widely published experts in cardiac diagnosis and therapy to develop practical and ... The topics include the entire range of cardiac diseases and emphasize the economic impact on decision-making. We develop ...
Computed tomography (CT)Edit. Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography (CCTA)Edit. Image of contrast enhanced dual-source ... These cardiac techniques are otherwise referred to as echocardiography, Cardiac MRI, Cardiac CT, Cardiac PET and Cardiac SPECT ... Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)Edit. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), a nuclear medicine ... Computed tomography angiography (CTA), an imaging methodology using a ring-shaped machine with an X-Ray source spinning around ...
In general, primary cardiac tumors are of mesothelial or epithelial origin. ... Cardiac tumors may be primary or secondary, may be related to the heart muscle or pericardium, or may be direct extensions of ... Angiography. The need for angiography is limited. Tumor vascularity may be seen with selective angiography, as demonstrated in ... magnetic resonance angiography (MRA), and computed tomography (CT) scanning are preferred over echocardiography for cases that ...
... with the exception of the Coronary Evaluation Using Multidetector Spiral Computed Tomography Angiography using 64 Detectors [ ... Coronary computed tomography angiography for the detection of cardiac allograft vasculopathy: a meta-analysis of prospective ... Noninvasive coronary artery imaging: magnetic resonance angiography and multidetector computed tomography angiography: a ... Drugs & Diseases , Clinical Procedures , Coronary CT Angiography Q&A What is the accuracy of coronary computed tomography ...
Coronary computed tomography angiography for the detection of cardiac allograft vasculopathy: a meta-analysis of prospective ... In one report the most common etiologies of diagreement between computed tomography angiography (CTA) and catheter angiography ... Noninvasive coronary artery imaging: magnetic resonance angiography and multidetector computed tomography angiography: a ... Drugs & Diseases , Clinical Procedures , Coronary CT Angiography Q&A How is stenosis graded using coronary computed tomography ...
Cardiac Computed Tomography Angiography. Cardiac Computed Tomography Angiography (CCTA) is a noninvasive imaging test that uses ... Computed Tomography Angiography. Computed Tomography Angiography (CTA) is used to acquire images of the pulmonary vessels and ...
  • A computed tomography angiogram (CT angiogram) is a test that uses X-rays to provide detailed pictures of the heart and the blood vessels that go to the heart, lung, brain, kidneys, head, neck, legs, and arms. (rexhealth.com)
  • The purpose of this study is to evaluate if Computed Tomography Angiogram (CTA) and CTA-derived Fractional Flow Reserve (FFRct) procedure influences decisions about further cardiac testing compared with Standard of Care (SOC) such as consultation by a cardiologist, Echocardiogram (ultrasound of the heart), Electrocardiogram (ECG) and stress tests. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Cardiac computed tomography angiography (CTA) is feasible for aortic valve evaluation, but retrospective gated protocols required high radiation doses for aortic valve assessment. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Prospectively ECG-triggered cardiac CT angiography targeted to end-systole for the evaluation of aortic pathology was feasible at a low radiation dose (2.8 mSv) with 128 dual-source CT. (biomedcentral.com)