Carcinoma: A malignant neoplasm made up of epithelial cells tending to infiltrate the surrounding tissues and give rise to metastases. It is a histological type of neoplasm but is often wrongly used as a synonym for "cancer." (From Dorland, 27th ed)Carcinoma, Hepatocellular: A primary malignant neoplasm of epithelial liver cells. It ranges from a well-differentiated tumor with EPITHELIAL CELLS indistinguishable from normal HEPATOCYTES to a poorly differentiated neoplasm. The cells may be uniform or markedly pleomorphic, or form GIANT CELLS. Several classification schemes have been suggested.Carcinoma in Situ: A lesion with cytological characteristics associated with invasive carcinoma but the tumor cells are confined to the epithelium of origin, without invasion of the basement membrane.Carcinoma, Papillary: A malignant neoplasm characterized by the formation of numerous, irregular, finger-like projections of fibrous stroma that is covered with a surface layer of neoplastic epithelial cells. (Stedman, 25th ed)Liver Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the LIVER.Carcinoma, Basal Cell: A malignant skin neoplasm that seldom metastasizes but has potentialities for local invasion and destruction. Clinically it is divided into types: nodular, cicatricial, morphaic, and erythematoid (pagetoid). They develop on hair-bearing skin, most commonly on sun-exposed areas. Approximately 85% are found on the head and neck area and the remaining 15% on the trunk and limbs. (From DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p1471)Immunohistochemistry: Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.Carcinoma, Transitional Cell: A malignant neoplasm derived from TRANSITIONAL EPITHELIAL CELLS, occurring chiefly in the URINARY BLADDER; URETERS; or RENAL PELVIS.Carcinoma, Bronchogenic: Malignant neoplasm arising from the epithelium of the BRONCHI. It represents a large group of epithelial lung malignancies which can be divided into two clinical groups: SMALL CELL LUNG CANCER and NON-SMALL-CELL LUNG CARCINOMA.Carcinoma, Intraductal, Noninfiltrating: A noninvasive (noninfiltrating) carcinoma of the breast characterized by a proliferation of malignant epithelial cells confined to the mammary ducts or lobules, without light-microscopy evidence of invasion through the basement membrane into the surrounding stroma.Carcinoma, Adenoid Cystic: Carcinoma characterized by bands or cylinders of hyalinized or mucinous stroma separating or surrounded by nests or cords of small epithelial cells. When the cylinders occur within masses of epithelial cells, they give the tissue a perforated, sievelike, or cribriform appearance. Such tumors occur in the mammary glands, the mucous glands of the upper and lower respiratory tract, and the salivary glands. They are malignant but slow-growing, and tend to spread locally via the nerves. (Dorland, 27th ed)Tumor Markers, Biological: Molecular products metabolized and secreted by neoplastic tissue and characterized biochemically in cells or body fluids. They are indicators of tumor stage and grade as well as useful for monitoring responses to treatment and predicting recurrence. Many chemical groups are represented including hormones, antigens, amino and nucleic acids, enzymes, polyamines, and specific cell membrane proteins and lipids.Adenocarcinoma: A malignant epithelial tumor with a glandular organization.Carcinoma, Neuroendocrine: A group of carcinomas which share a characteristic morphology, often being composed of clusters and trabecular sheets of round "blue cells", granular chromatin, and an attenuated rim of poorly demarcated cytoplasm. Neuroendocrine tumors include carcinoids, small ("oat") cell carcinomas, medullary carcinoma of the thyroid, Merkel cell tumor, cutaneous neuroendocrine carcinoma, pancreatic islet cell tumors, and pheochromocytoma. Neurosecretory granules are found within the tumor cells. (Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)Neoplasm Invasiveness: Ability of neoplasms to infiltrate and actively destroy surrounding tissue.Nasopharyngeal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the NASOPHARYNX.Cell Line, Tumor: A cell line derived from cultured tumor cells.Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Thyroid Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the THYROID GLAND.Neoplasm Staging: Methods which attempt to express in replicable terms the extent of the neoplasm in the patient.Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in neoplastic tissue.Tumor Cells, Cultured: Cells grown in vitro from neoplastic tissue. If they can be established as a TUMOR CELL LINE, they can be propagated in cell culture indefinitely.Lung Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the LUNG.Carcinoma, Mucoepidermoid: A tumor of both low- and high-grade malignancy. The low-grade grow slowly, appear in any age group, and are readily cured by excision. The high-grade behave aggressively, widely infiltrate the salivary gland and produce lymph node and distant metastases. Mucoepidermoid carcinomas account for about 21% of the malignant tumors of the parotid gland and 10% of the sublingual gland. They are the most common malignant tumor of the parotid. (From DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p575; Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 3d ed, p1240)Carcinoma, Adenosquamous: A mixed adenocarcinoma and squamous cell or epidermoid carcinoma.United States Indian Health Service: A division of the UNITED STATES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE that is responsible for the public health and the provision of medical services to NATIVE AMERICANS in the United States, primarily those residing on reservation lands.Carcinoma, Embryonal: A highly malignant, primitive form of carcinoma, probably of germinal cell or teratomatous derivation, usually arising in a gonad and rarely in other sites. It is rare in the female ovary, but in the male it accounts for 20% of all testicular tumors. (From Dorland, 27th ed & Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 3d ed, p1595)Esophageal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the ESOPHAGUS.Mouth Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the MOUTH.Carcinoma, Merkel Cell: A carcinoma arising from MERKEL CELLS located in the basal layer of the epidermis and occurring most commonly as a primary neuroendocrine carcinoma of the skin. Merkel cells are tactile cells of neuroectodermal origin and histologically show neurosecretory granules. The skin of the head and neck are a common site of Merkel cell carcinoma, occurring generally in elderly patients. (Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 3d ed, p1245)Carcinoma, Ductal: Malignant neoplasms involving the ductal systems of any of a number of organs, such as the MAMMARY GLANDS, the PANCREAS, the PROSTATE, or the LACRIMAL GLAND.Lymphatic Metastasis: Transfer of a neoplasm from its primary site to lymph nodes or to distant parts of the body by way of the lymphatic system.Ovarian Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the OVARY. These neoplasms can be benign or malignant. They are classified according to the tissue of origin, such as the surface EPITHELIUM, the stromal endocrine cells, and the totipotent GERM CELLS.Adrenocortical Carcinoma: A malignant neoplasm of the ADRENAL CORTEX. Adrenocortical carcinomas are unencapsulated anaplastic (ANAPLASIA) masses sometimes exceeding 20 cm or 200 g. They are more likely to be functional than nonfunctional, and produce ADRENAL CORTEX HORMONES that may result in hypercortisolism (CUSHING SYNDROME); HYPERALDOSTERONISM; and/or VIRILISM.Colonic Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the COLON.Carcinoma, Verrucous: A variant of well-differentiated epidermoid carcinoma that is most common in the oral cavity, but also occurs in the larynx, nasal cavity, esophagus, penis, anorectal region, vulva, vagina, uterine cervix, and skin, especially on the sole of the foot. Most intraoral cases occur in elderly male abusers of smokeless tobacco. The treatment is surgical resection. Radiotherapy is not indicated, as up to 30% treated with radiation become highly aggressive within six months. (Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)Carcinoma, Signet Ring Cell: A poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma in which the nucleus is pressed to one side by a cytoplasmic droplet of mucus. It usually arises in the gastrointestinal system.Neoplasm Metastasis: The transfer of a neoplasm from one organ or part of the body to another remote from the primary site.Urinary Bladder Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the URINARY BLADDER.Stomach Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the STOMACH.Neoplasm Proteins: Proteins whose abnormal expression (gain or loss) are associated with the development, growth, or progression of NEOPLASMS. Some neoplasm proteins are tumor antigens (ANTIGENS, NEOPLASM), i.e. they induce an immune reaction to their tumor. Many neoplasm proteins have been characterized and are used as tumor markers (BIOMARKERS, TUMOR) when they are detectable in cells and body fluids as monitors for the presence or growth of tumors. Abnormal expression of ONCOGENE PROTEINS is involved in neoplastic transformation, whereas the loss of expression of TUMOR SUPPRESSOR PROTEINS is involved with the loss of growth control and progression of the neoplasm.Skin Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the SKIN.Neoplasm Recurrence, Local: The local recurrence of a neoplasm following treatment. It arises from microscopic cells of the original neoplasm that have escaped therapeutic intervention and later become clinically visible at the original site.Mice, Nude: Mutant mice homozygous for the recessive gene "nude" which fail to develop a thymus. They are useful in tumor studies and studies on immune responses.Carcinoma, Large Cell: A tumor of undifferentiated (anaplastic) cells of large size. It is usually bronchogenic. (From Dorland, 27th ed)DNA, Neoplasm: DNA present in neoplastic tissue.Laryngeal Neoplasms: Cancers or tumors of the LARYNX or any of its parts: the GLOTTIS; EPIGLOTTIS; LARYNGEAL CARTILAGES; LARYNGEAL MUSCLES; and VOCAL CORDS.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Uterine Cervical Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the UTERINE CERVIX.Immunoenzyme Techniques: Immunologic techniques based on the use of: (1) enzyme-antibody conjugates; (2) enzyme-antigen conjugates; (3) antienzyme antibody followed by its homologous enzyme; or (4) enzyme-antienzyme complexes. These are used histologically for visualizing or labeling tissue specimens.RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Neoplasm Transplantation: Experimental transplantation of neoplasms in laboratory animals for research purposes.Neoplasms, Multiple Primary: Two or more abnormal growths of tissue occurring simultaneously and presumed to be of separate origin. The neoplasms may be histologically the same or different, and may be found in the same or different sites.Survival Rate: The proportion of survivors in a group, e.g., of patients, studied and followed over a period, or the proportion of persons in a specified group alive at the beginning of a time interval who survive to the end of the interval. It is often studied using life table methods.Adenocarcinoma, Follicular: An adenocarcinoma of the thyroid gland, in which the cells are arranged in the form of follicles. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Survival Analysis: A class of statistical procedures for estimating the survival function (function of time, starting with a population 100% well at a given time and providing the percentage of the population still well at later times). The survival analysis is then used for making inferences about the effects of treatments, prognostic factors, exposures, and other covariates on the function.Adenocarcinoma, Mucinous: An adenocarcinoma producing mucin in significant amounts. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Antigens, Neoplasm: Proteins, glycoprotein, or lipoprotein moieties on surfaces of tumor cells that are usually identified by monoclonal antibodies. Many of these are of either embryonic or viral origin.Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction: A variation of the PCR technique in which cDNA is made from RNA via reverse transcription. The resultant cDNA is then amplified using standard PCR protocols.Precancerous Conditions: Pathological processes that tend eventually to become malignant. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Medical Illustration: The field which deals with illustrative clarification of biomedical concepts, as in the use of diagrams and drawings. The illustration may be produced by hand, photography, computer, or other electronic or mechanical methods.Gallbladder Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the gallbladder.Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung: A heterogeneous aggregate of at least three distinct histological types of lung cancer, including SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA; ADENOCARCINOMA; and LARGE CELL CARCINOMA. They are dealt with collectively because of their shared treatment strategy.Tumor Suppressor Protein p53: Nuclear phosphoprotein encoded by the p53 gene (GENES, P53) whose normal function is to control CELL PROLIFERATION and APOPTOSIS. A mutant or absent p53 protein has been found in LEUKEMIA; OSTEOSARCOMA; LUNG CANCER; and COLORECTAL CANCER.Endometrial Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of ENDOMETRIUM, the mucous lining of the UTERUS. These neoplasms can be benign or malignant. Their classification and grading are based on the various cell types and the percent of undifferentiated cells.Adenocarcinoma, Clear Cell: An adenocarcinoma characterized by the presence of varying combinations of clear and hobnail-shaped tumor cells. There are three predominant patterns described as tubulocystic, solid, and papillary. These tumors, usually located in the female reproductive organs, have been seen more frequently in young women since 1970 as a result of the association with intrauterine exposure to diethylstilbestrol. (From Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 3d ed)Colorectal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the COLON or the RECTUM or both. Risk factors for colorectal cancer include chronic ULCERATIVE COLITIS; FAMILIAL POLYPOSIS COLI; exposure to ASBESTOS; and irradiation of the CERVIX UTERI.alpha-Fetoproteins: The first alpha-globulins to appear in mammalian sera during FETAL DEVELOPMENT and the dominant serum proteins in early embryonic life.Tongue Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the TONGUE.Apoptosis: One of the mechanisms by which CELL DEATH occurs (compare with NECROSIS and AUTOPHAGOCYTOSIS). Apoptosis is the mechanism responsible for the physiological deletion of cells and appears to be intrinsically programmed. It is characterized by distinctive morphologic changes in the nucleus and cytoplasm, chromatin cleavage at regularly spaced sites, and the endonucleolytic cleavage of genomic DNA; (DNA FRAGMENTATION); at internucleosomal sites. This mode of cell death serves as a balance to mitosis in regulating the size of animal tissues and in mediating pathologic processes associated with tumor growth.Pancreatic Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the PANCREAS. Depending on the types of ISLET CELLS present in the tumors, various hormones can be secreted: GLUCAGON from PANCREATIC ALPHA CELLS; INSULIN from PANCREATIC BETA CELLS; and SOMATOSTATIN from the SOMATOSTATIN-SECRETING CELLS. Most are malignant except the insulin-producing tumors (INSULINOMA).Carcinoma, Lewis Lung: A carcinoma discovered by Dr. Margaret R. Lewis of the Wistar Institute in 1951. This tumor originated spontaneously as a carcinoma of the lung of a C57BL mouse. The tumor does not appear to be grossly hemorrhagic and the majority of the tumor tissue is a semifirm homogeneous mass. (From Cancer Chemother Rep 2 1972 Nov;(3)1:325) It is also called 3LL and LLC and is used as a transplantable malignancy.Combined Modality Therapy: The treatment of a disease or condition by several different means simultaneously or sequentially. Chemoimmunotherapy, RADIOIMMUNOTHERAPY, chemoradiotherapy, cryochemotherapy, and SALVAGE THERAPY are seen most frequently, but their combinations with each other and surgery are also used.Bronchial Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the BRONCHI.Salivary Gland Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the SALIVARY GLANDS.Tissue Array Analysis: The simultaneous analysis of multiple samples of TISSUES or CELLS from BIOPSY or in vitro culture that have been arranged in an array format on slides or microchips.Keratins: A class of fibrous proteins or scleroproteins that represents the principal constituent of EPIDERMIS; HAIR; NAILS; horny tissues, and the organic matrix of tooth ENAMEL. Two major conformational groups have been characterized, alpha-keratin, whose peptide backbone forms a coiled-coil alpha helical structure consisting of TYPE I KERATIN and a TYPE II KERATIN, and beta-keratin, whose backbone forms a zigzag or pleated sheet structure. alpha-Keratins have been classified into at least 20 subtypes. In addition multiple isoforms of subtypes have been found which may be due to GENE DUPLICATION.Cisplatin: An inorganic and water-soluble platinum complex. After undergoing hydrolysis, it reacts with DNA to produce both intra and interstrand crosslinks. These crosslinks appear to impair replication and transcription of DNA. The cytotoxicity of cisplatin correlates with cellular arrest in the G2 phase of the cell cycle.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.RNA, Neoplasm: RNA present in neoplastic tissue.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Cell Transformation, Neoplastic: Cell changes manifested by escape from control mechanisms, increased growth potential, alterations in the cell surface, karyotypic abnormalities, morphological and biochemical deviations from the norm, and other attributes conferring the ability to invade, metastasize, and kill.Transplantation, Heterologous: Transplantation between animals of different species.Biopsy: Removal and pathologic examination of specimens in the form of small pieces of tissue from the living body.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Antibodies, Monoclonal: Antibodies produced by a single clone of cells.Ki-67 Antigen: A CELL CYCLE and tumor growth marker which can be readily detected using IMMUNOCYTOCHEMISTRY methods. Ki-67 is a nuclear antigen present only in the nuclei of cycling cells.Genes, p53: Tumor suppressor genes located on the short arm of human chromosome 17 and coding for the phosphoprotein p53.Adenocarcinoma, Papillary: An adenocarcinoma containing finger-like processes of vascular connective tissue covered by neoplastic epithelium, projecting into cysts or the cavity of glands or follicles. It occurs most frequently in the ovary and thyroid gland. (Stedman, 25th ed)Mouth Mucosa: Lining of the ORAL CAVITY, including mucosa on the GUMS; the PALATE; the LIP; the CHEEK; floor of the mouth; and other structures. The mucosa is generally a nonkeratinized stratified squamous EPITHELIUM covering muscle, bone, or glands but can show varying degree of keratinization at specific locations.Fatal Outcome: Death resulting from the presence of a disease in an individual, as shown by a single case report or a limited number of patients. This should be differentiated from DEATH, the physiological cessation of life and from MORTALITY, an epidemiological or statistical concept.Blotting, Western: Identification of proteins or peptides that have been electrophoretically separated by blot transferring from the electrophoresis gel to strips of nitrocellulose paper, followed by labeling with antibody probes.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Loss of Heterozygosity: The loss of one allele at a specific locus, caused by a deletion mutation; or loss of a chromosome from a chromosome pair, resulting in abnormal HEMIZYGOSITY. It is detected when heterozygous markers for a locus appear monomorphic because one of the ALLELES was deleted.Mammary Neoplasms, Experimental: Experimentally induced mammary neoplasms in animals to provide a model for studying human BREAST NEOPLASMS.Kaplan-Meier Estimate: A nonparametric method of compiling LIFE TABLES or survival tables. It combines calculated probabilities of survival and estimates to allow for observations occurring beyond a measurement threshold, which are assumed to occur randomly. Time intervals are defined as ending each time an event occurs and are therefore unequal. (From Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1995)Neovascularization, Pathologic: A pathologic process consisting of the proliferation of blood vessels in abnormal tissues or in abnormal positions.Receptor, erbB-2: A cell surface protein-tyrosine kinase receptor that is overexpressed in a variety of ADENOCARCINOMAS. It has extensive homology to and heterodimerizes with the EGF RECEPTOR, the ERBB-3 RECEPTOR, and the ERBB-4 RECEPTOR. Activation of the erbB-2 receptor occurs through heterodimer formation with a ligand-bound erbB receptor family member.Thyroidectomy: Surgical removal of the thyroid gland. (Dorland, 28th ed)Carcinoembryonic Antigen: A glycoprotein that is secreted into the luminal surface of the epithelia in the gastrointestinal tract. It is found in the feces and pancreaticobiliary secretions and is used to monitor the response to colon cancer treatment.Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols: The use of two or more chemicals simultaneously or sequentially in the drug therapy of neoplasms. The drugs need not be in the same dosage form.Genes, Tumor Suppressor: Genes that inhibit expression of the tumorigenic phenotype. They are normally involved in holding cellular growth in check. When tumor suppressor genes are inactivated or lost, a barrier to normal proliferation is removed and unregulated growth is possible.Neoplasms, Experimental: Experimentally induced new abnormal growth of TISSUES in animals to provide models for studying human neoplasms.Breast: In humans, one of the paired regions in the anterior portion of the THORAX. The breasts consist of the MAMMARY GLANDS, the SKIN, the MUSCLES, the ADIPOSE TISSUE, and the CONNECTIVE TISSUES.Gene Expression Profiling: The determination of the pattern of genes expressed at the level of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION, under specific circumstances or in a specific cell.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Cadherins: Calcium-dependent cell adhesion proteins. They are important in the formation of ADHERENS JUNCTIONS between cells. Cadherins are classified by their distinct immunological and tissue specificities, either by letters (E- for epithelial, N- for neural, and P- for placental cadherins) or by numbers (cadherin-12 or N-cadherin 2 for brain-cadherin). Cadherins promote cell adhesion via a homophilic mechanism as in the construction of tissues and of the whole animal body.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Papillomaviridae: A family of small, non-enveloped DNA viruses infecting birds and most mammals, especially humans. They are grouped into multiple genera, but the viruses are highly host-species specific and tissue-restricted. They are commonly divided into hundreds of papillomavirus "types", each with specific gene function and gene control regions, despite sequence homology. Human papillomaviruses are found in the genera ALPHAPAPILLOMAVIRUS; BETAPAPILLOMAVIRUS; GAMMAPAPILLOMAVIRUS; and MUPAPILLOMAVIRUS.Rectal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the RECTUM.Tumor Suppressor Proteins: Proteins that are normally involved in holding cellular growth in check. Deficiencies or abnormalities in these proteins may lead to unregulated cell growth and tumor development.Liver Neoplasms, Experimental: Experimentally induced tumors of the LIVER.Carcinoma, Pancreatic Ductal: Carcinoma that arises from the PANCREATIC DUCTS. It accounts for the majority of cancers derived from the PANCREAS.Liver Cirrhosis: Liver disease in which the normal microcirculation, the gross vascular anatomy, and the hepatic architecture have been variably destroyed and altered with fibrous septa surrounding regenerated or regenerating parenchymal nodules.Adrenal Cortex Neoplasms: Tumors or cancers of the ADRENAL CORTEX.Urothelium: The epithelial lining of the URINARY TRACT.Vulvar Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the VULVA.Signal Transduction: The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.Transfection: The uptake of naked or purified DNA by CELLS, usually meaning the process as it occurs in eukaryotic cells. It is analogous to bacterial transformation (TRANSFORMATION, BACTERIAL) and both are routinely employed in GENE TRANSFER TECHNIQUES.Oropharyngeal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the OROPHARYNX.Receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor: A cell surface receptor involved in regulation of cell growth and differentiation. It is specific for EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR and EGF-related peptides including TRANSFORMING GROWTH FACTOR ALPHA; AMPHIREGULIN; and HEPARIN-BINDING EGF-LIKE GROWTH FACTOR. The binding of ligand to the receptor causes activation of its intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity and rapid internalization of the receptor-ligand complex into the cell.Gene Expression: The phenotypic manifestation of a gene or genes by the processes of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION and GENETIC TRANSLATION.Tumor Burden: The total amount (cell number, weight, size or volume) of tumor cells or tissue in the body.Fluorouracil: A pyrimidine analog that is an antineoplastic antimetabolite. It interferes with DNA synthesis by blocking the THYMIDYLATE SYNTHETASE conversion of deoxyuridylic acid to thymidylic acid.Down-Regulation: A negative regulatory effect on physiological processes at the molecular, cellular, or systemic level. At the molecular level, the major regulatory sites include membrane receptors, genes (GENE EXPRESSION REGULATION), mRNAs (RNA, MESSENGER), and proteins.Hyperplasia: An increase in the number of cells in a tissue or organ without tumor formation. It differs from HYPERTROPHY, which is an increase in bulk without an increase in the number of cells.Receptors, Estrogen: Cytoplasmic proteins that bind estrogens and migrate to the nucleus where they regulate DNA transcription. Evaluation of the state of estrogen receptors in breast cancer patients has become clinically important.Phenylurea Compounds: Compounds that include the amino-N-phenylamide structure.Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays: In vivo methods of screening investigative anticancer drugs, biologic response modifiers or radiotherapies. Human tumor tissue or cells are transplanted into mice or rats followed by tumor treatment regimens. A variety of outcomes are monitored to assess antitumor effectiveness.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Neoplasm Grading: Methods which attempt to express in replicable terms the level of CELL DIFFERENTIATION in neoplasms as increasing ANAPLASIA correlates with the aggressiveness of the neoplasm.Bile Duct Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the BILE DUCTS.Carcinoma, Giant Cell: An epithelial neoplasm characterized by unusually large anaplastic cells. It is highly malignant with fulminant clinical course, bizarre histologic appearance and poor prognosis. It is most common in the lung and thyroid. (From Stedman, 25th ed & Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)Urologic Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the URINARY TRACT in either the male or the female.Niacinamide: An important compound functioning as a component of the coenzyme NAD. Its primary significance is in the prevention and/or cure of blacktongue and PELLAGRA. Most animals cannot manufacture this compound in amounts sufficient to prevent nutritional deficiency and it therefore must be supplemented through dietary intake.Gene Amplification: A selective increase in the number of copies of a gene coding for a specific protein without a proportional increase in other genes. It occurs naturally via the excision of a copy of the repeating sequence from the chromosome and its extrachromosomal replication in a plasmid, or via the production of an RNA transcript of the entire repeating sequence of ribosomal RNA followed by the reverse transcription of the molecule to produce an additional copy of the original DNA sequence. Laboratory techniques have been introduced for inducing disproportional replication by unequal crossing over, uptake of DNA from lysed cells, or generation of extrachromosomal sequences from rolling circle replication.Papilloma: A circumscribed benign epithelial tumor projecting from the surrounding surface; more precisely, a benign epithelial neoplasm consisting of villous or arborescent outgrowths of fibrovascular stroma covered by neoplastic cells. (Stedman, 25th ed)Keratin-7: A type II keratin found associated with KERATIN-19 in ductal epithelia and gastrointestinal epithelia.Cell Line: Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.In Situ Hybridization, Fluorescence: A type of IN SITU HYBRIDIZATION in which target sequences are stained with fluorescent dye so their location and size can be determined using fluorescence microscopy. This staining is sufficiently distinct that the hybridization signal can be seen both in metaphase spreads and in interphase nuclei.Benzenesulfonates: Organic salts and esters of benzenesulfonic acid.Ureteral Neoplasms: Cancer or tumors of the URETER which may cause obstruction leading to hydroureter, HYDRONEPHROSIS, and PYELONEPHRITIS. HEMATURIA is a common symptom.Lymph Nodes: They are oval or bean shaped bodies (1 - 30 mm in diameter) located along the lymphatic system.DNA Mutational Analysis: Biochemical identification of mutational changes in a nucleotide sequence.Hepatectomy: Excision of all or part of the liver. (Dorland, 28th ed)Mice, Inbred BALB CUp-Regulation: A positive regulatory effect on physiological processes at the molecular, cellular, or systemic level. At the molecular level, the major regulatory sites include membrane receptors, genes (GENE EXPRESSION REGULATION), mRNAs (RNA, MESSENGER), and proteins.Cell Survival: The span of viability of a cell characterized by the capacity to perform certain functions such as metabolism, growth, reproduction, some form of responsiveness, and adaptability.Nephrectomy: Excision of kidney.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Proto-Oncogene Proteins: Products of proto-oncogenes. Normally they do not have oncogenic or transforming properties, but are involved in the regulation or differentiation of cell growth. They often have protein kinase activity.Promoter Regions, Genetic: DNA sequences which are recognized (directly or indirectly) and bound by a DNA-dependent RNA polymerase during the initiation of transcription. Highly conserved sequences within the promoter include the Pribnow box in bacteria and the TATA BOX in eukaryotes.Adenoma, Oxyphilic: A usually benign glandular tumor composed of oxyphil cells, large cells with small irregular nuclei and dense acidophilic granules due to the presence of abundant MITOCHONDRIA. Oxyphil cells, also known as oncocytes, are found in oncocytomas of the kidney, salivary glands, and endocrine glands. In the thyroid gland, oxyphil cells are known as Hurthle cells and Askanazy cells.Carcinosarcoma: A malignant neoplasm that contains elements of carcinoma and sarcoma so extensively intermixed as to indicate neoplasia of epithelial and mesenchymal tissue. (Stedman, 25th ed)Neoplasms: New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.Microsatellite Repeats: A variety of simple repeat sequences that are distributed throughout the GENOME. They are characterized by a short repeat unit of 2-8 basepairs that is repeated up to 100 times. They are also known as short tandem repeats (STRs).Adenocarcinoma, Scirrhous: An adenocarcinoma with a hard (Greek skirrhos, hard) structure owing to the formation of dense connective tissue in the stroma. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Eyelid Neoplasms: Tumors of cancer of the EYELIDS.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 3: A specific pair of human chromosomes in group A (CHROMOSOMES, HUMAN, 1-3) of the human chromosome classification.Papillomavirus Infections: Neoplasms of the skin and mucous membranes caused by papillomaviruses. They are usually benign but some have a high risk for malignant progression.Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.Carcinoma, Ehrlich Tumor: A transplantable, poorly differentiated malignant tumor which appeared originally as a spontaneous breast carcinoma in a mouse. It grows in both solid and ascitic forms.Mucin-1: Carbohydrate antigen elevated in patients with tumors of the breast, ovary, lung, and prostate as well as other disorders. The mucin is expressed normally by most glandular epithelia but shows particularly increased expression in the breast at lactation and in malignancy. It is thus an established serum marker for breast cancer.Cell Movement: The movement of cells from one location to another. Distinguish from CYTOKINESIS which is the process of dividing the CYTOPLASM of a cell.Transcription Factors: Endogenous substances, usually proteins, which are effective in the initiation, stimulation, or termination of the genetic transcription process.In Situ Hybridization: A technique that localizes specific nucleic acid sequences within intact chromosomes, eukaryotic cells, or bacterial cells through the use of specific nucleic acid-labeled probes.DNA-Binding Proteins: Proteins which bind to DNA. The family includes proteins which bind to both double- and single-stranded DNA and also includes specific DNA binding proteins in serum which can be used as markers for malignant diseases.Teratoma: A true neoplasm composed of a number of different types of tissue, none of which is native to the area in which it occurs. It is composed of tissues that are derived from three germinal layers, the endoderm, mesoderm, and ectoderm. They are classified histologically as mature (benign) or immature (malignant). (From DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p1642)Cystadenocarcinoma, Papillary: An adenocarcinoma in which the tumor elements are arranged as finger-like processes or as a solid spherical nodule projecting from an epithelial surface.Ampulla of Vater: A dilation of the duodenal papilla that is the opening of the juncture of the COMMON BILE DUCT and the MAIN PANCREATIC DUCT, also known as the hepatopancreatic ampulla.Nuclear Proteins: Proteins found in the nucleus of a cell. Do not confuse with NUCLEOPROTEINS which are proteins conjugated with nucleic acids, that are not necessarily present in the nucleus.Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis: Hybridization of a nucleic acid sample to a very large set of OLIGONUCLEOTIDE PROBES, which have been attached individually in columns and rows to a solid support, to determine a BASE SEQUENCE, or to detect variations in a gene sequence, GENE EXPRESSION, or for GENE MAPPING.Neoplasms, Squamous Cell: Neoplasms of the SQUAMOUS EPITHELIAL CELLS. The concept does not refer to neoplasms located in tissue composed of squamous elements.Carcinoma, Skin Appendage: A malignant tumor of the skin appendages, which include the hair, nails, sebaceous glands, sweat glands, and the mammary glands. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Mammary Neoplasms, Animal: Tumors or cancer of the MAMMARY GLAND in animals (MAMMARY GLANDS, ANIMAL).RNA, Small Interfering: Small double-stranded, non-protein coding RNAs (21-31 nucleotides) involved in GENE SILENCING functions, especially RNA INTERFERENCE (RNAi). Endogenously, siRNAs are generated from dsRNAs (RNA, DOUBLE-STRANDED) by the same ribonuclease, Dicer, that generates miRNAs (MICRORNAS). The perfect match of the siRNAs' antisense strand to their target RNAs mediates RNAi by siRNA-guided RNA cleavage. siRNAs fall into different classes including trans-acting siRNA (tasiRNA), repeat-associated RNA (rasiRNA), small-scan RNA (scnRNA), and Piwi protein-interacting RNA (piRNA) and have different specific gene silencing functions.Polymorphism, Single-Stranded Conformational: Variation in a population's DNA sequence that is detected by determining alterations in the conformation of denatured DNA fragments. Denatured DNA fragments are allowed to renature under conditions that prevent the formation of double-stranded DNA and allow secondary structure to form in single stranded fragments. These fragments are then run through polyacrylamide gels to detect variations in the secondary structure that is manifested as an alteration in migration through the gels.Pharyngeal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the PHARYNX.Iodine Radioisotopes: Unstable isotopes of iodine that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. I atoms with atomic weights 117-139, except I 127, are radioactive iodine isotopes.Hypopharyngeal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the HYPOPHARYNX.Cell Differentiation: Progressive restriction of the developmental potential and increasing specialization of function that leads to the formation of specialized cells, tissues, and organs.Viremia: The presence of viruses in the blood.Neoplasms, Unknown Primary: Metastases in which the tissue of origin is unknown.Flow Cytometry: Technique using an instrument system for making, processing, and displaying one or more measurements on individual cells obtained from a cell suspension. Cells are usually stained with one or more fluorescent dyes specific to cell components of interest, e.g., DNA, and fluorescence of each cell is measured as it rapidly transverses the excitation beam (laser or mercury arc lamp). Fluorescence provides a quantitative measure of various biochemical and biophysical properties of the cell, as well as a basis for cell sorting. Other measurable optical parameters include light absorption and light scattering, the latter being applicable to the measurement of cell size, shape, density, granularity, and stain uptake.Metaplasia: A condition in which there is a change of one adult cell type to another similar adult cell type.Drug Resistance, Neoplasm: Resistance or diminished response of a neoplasm to an antineoplastic agent in humans, animals, or cell or tissue cultures.Dose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor p16: A product of the p16 tumor suppressor gene (GENES, P16). It is also called INK4 or INK4A because it is the prototype member of the INK4 CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASE INHIBITORS. This protein is produced from the alpha mRNA transcript of the p16 gene. The other gene product, produced from the alternatively spliced beta transcript, is TUMOR SUPPRESSOR PROTEIN P14ARF. Both p16 gene products have tumor suppressor functions.Epithelium: One or more layers of EPITHELIAL CELLS, supported by the basal lamina, which covers the inner or outer surfaces of the body.Cell Cycle: The complex series of phenomena, occurring between the end of one CELL DIVISION and the end of the next, by which cellular material is duplicated and then divided between two daughter cells. The cell cycle includes INTERPHASE, which includes G0 PHASE; G1 PHASE; S PHASE; and G2 PHASE, and CELL DIVISION PHASE.Tonsillar Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the PALATINE TONSIL.DNA Primers: Short sequences (generally about 10 base pairs) of DNA that are complementary to sequences of messenger RNA and allow reverse transcriptases to start copying the adjacent sequences of mRNA. Primers are used extensively in genetic and molecular biology techniques.Apocrine Glands: Large, branched, specialized sweat glands that empty into the upper portion of a HAIR FOLLICLE instead of directly onto the SKIN.Carcinogens: Substances that increase the risk of NEOPLASMS in humans or animals. Both genotoxic chemicals, which affect DNA directly, and nongenotoxic chemicals, which induce neoplasms by other mechanism, are included.Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic: Agents obtained from higher plants that have demonstrable cytostatic or antineoplastic activity.Neck Dissection: Dissection in the neck to remove all disease tissues including cervical LYMPH NODES and to leave an adequate margin of normal tissue. This type of surgery is usually used in tumors or cervical metastases in the head and neck. The prototype of neck dissection is the radical neck dissection described by Crile in 1906.Parotid Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the PAROTID GLAND.Drug Screening Assays, Antitumor: Methods of investigating the effectiveness of anticancer cytotoxic drugs and biologic inhibitors. These include in vitro cell-kill models and cytostatic dye exclusion tests as well as in vivo measurement of tumor growth parameters in laboratory animals.Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.

Breast carcinoma developing in patients on hormone replacement therapy: a histological and immunohistological study. (1/806)

AIM: To study the histopathological features of breast carcinoma developing in postmenopausal patients on hormone replacement therapy (HRT). METHODS: The sample comprised 60 patients with invasive breast carcinoma including 31 who had received HRT at or shortly before presentation, and 29 who had not. Details concerning their tumour size, histological type and grade, lymph node status, and oestrogen and progesterone receptor status were compared. Immunoperoxidase staining for Bcl-2, p53, and E-cadherin was carried out on paraffin sections of all 60 patients. The results were then statistically analysed. RESULTS: Tumours detected in HRT patients were significantly smaller (mean 17 mm v 25 mm; p = 0.0156) and of a lower histological grade (p = 0.0414) than those detected in non-HRT patients. The incidence of invasive lobular carcinoma was slightly higher in HRT patients (19% v 14%). Immunohistologically, 87% of HRT tumours were Bcl-2 positive (compared with 79% in the control group), 29% were p53 positive (45% in the control), and 48% were E-cadherin positive (72% in the control group). Although the differences were not statistically significant there was a trend towards higher incidence of p53 negative and E-cadherin negative tumours in HRT patients. CONCLUSIONS: Breast carcinomas detected in patients on HRT have a significantly higher incidence of two favourable prognostic features (small size and a low histological grade). They also show a trend, statistically not significant, of being p53 negative and E-cadherin negative; this may be related to the slightly higher incidence of invasive lobular tumours in these patients.  (+info)

Spectral morphometric characterization of breast carcinoma cells. (2/806)

The spectral morphometric characteristics of standard haematoxylin and eosin breast carcinoma specimens were evaluated by light microscopy combined with a spectral imaging system. Light intensity at each wavelength in the range of 450-800 nm was recorded for 10(4) pixels from each field and represented as transmitted light spectra. A library of six characteristic spectra served to scan the cells and reconstruct new images depicting the nuclear area occupied by each spectrum. Fifteen cases of infiltrating ductal carcinoma and six cases of lobular carcinoma were examined; nine of the infiltrating ductal carcinoma and three of the lobular carcinoma showed an in situ component. The spectral morphometric analysis revealed a correlation between specific patterns of spectra and different groups of breast carcinoma cells. The most consistent result was that lobular carcinoma cells of in situ and infiltrating components from all patients showed a similar spectral pattern, whereas ductal carcinoma cells displayed spectral variety. Comparison of the in situ and the infiltrating ductal solid, cribriform and comedo carcinoma cells from the same patient revealed a strong similarity of the spectral elements and their relative distribution in the nucleus. The spectrum designated as number 5 in the library incorporated more than 40% of the nuclear area in 74.08% of the infiltrating lobular cells and in 13.64% of the infiltrating ductal carcinoma cells (P < 0.001). Spectrum number 2 appeared in all infiltrating ductal cells examined and in none of the lobular cells. These results indicate that spectrum number 5 is related to infiltrating lobular carcinoma, whereas spectrum number 2 is characteristic for infiltrating ductal carcinoma cells. Spectral similarity mapping of central necrotic regions of comedo type in situ carcinoma revealed nuclear fragmentation into defined segments composed of highly condensed chromatin. We conclude that the spectral morphometric features found for lobular and ductal cell populations may serve future automated histological diagnostics.  (+info)

Vascular stroma formation in carcinoma in situ, invasive carcinoma, and metastatic carcinoma of the breast. (3/806)

The generation of vascular stroma is essential for solid tumor growth and involves stimulatory and inhibiting factors as well as stromal components that regulate functions such as cellular adhesion, migration, and gene expression. In an effort to obtain a more integrated understanding of vascular stroma formation in breast carcinoma, we examined expression of the angiogenic factor vascular permeability factor (VPF)/vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF); the VPF/VEGF receptors flt-1 and KDR; thrombospondin-1, which has been reported to inhibit angiogenesis; and the stromal components collagen type I, total fibronectin, ED-A+ fibronectin, versican, and decorin by mRNA in situ hybridization on frozen sections of 113 blocks of breast tissue from 68 patients including 28 sections of breast tissue without malignancy, 18 with in situ carcinomas, 56 with invasive carcinomas, and 8 with metastatic carcinomas. A characteristic expression profile emerged that was remarkably similar in invasive carcinoma, carcinoma in situ, and metastatic carcinoma, with the following characteristics: strong tumor cell expression of VPF/VEGF; strong endothelial cell expression of VPF/VEGF receptors; strong expression of thrombospondin-1 by stromal cells and occasionally by tumor cells; and strong stromal cell expression of collagen type I, total fibronectin, ED-A+ fibronectin, versican, and decorin. The formation of vascular stroma preceded invasion, raising the possibility that tumor cells invade not into normal breast stroma but rather into a richly vascular stroma that they have induced. Similarly, tumor cells at sites of metastasis appear to induce the vascular stroma in which they grow. We conclude that a distinct pattern of mRNA expression characterizes the generation of vascular stroma in breast cancer and that the formation of vascular stroma may play a role not only in growth of the primary tumor but also in invasion and metastasis.  (+info)

Diffuse type gastric and lobular breast carcinoma in a familial gastric cancer patient with an E-cadherin germline mutation. (4/806)

E-Cadherin alterations have been reported frequently in sporadic diffuse type gastric and lobular breast carcinomas. Germline mutations of this gene have been identified recently in several gastric cancer families. We analyzed seven patients with a family history of the disease who had diffuse type gastric cancer diagnosed before the age of 45 for germline mutations in CDH1, the gene encoding the E-cadherin protein. We identified a frameshift mutation in exon 3 in one patient with a strong family history of gastric cancer. The same germline mutation was found in the patient's mother, who had metachronous development of lobular breast and diffuse type gastric carcinomas. Immunohistochemistry for E-cadherin protein expression revealed an abnormal staining pattern in both of these tumors, suggesting complete inactivation of the cell adhesion molecule. Thus, our finding suggests that besides diffuse type gastric cancer, lobular breast carcinomas may be associated with germline CDH1 mutations.  (+info)

Comparison of dual-head coincidence gamma camera FDG imaging with FDG PET in detection of breast cancer and axillary lymph node metastasis. (5/806)

Dual-head coincidence gamma camera 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) imaging was compared with FDG PET in the detection of breast cancer and axillary lymph node metastasis. METHODS: Both coincidence gamma camera FDG imaging and FDG PET were performed in a cylindrical phantom containing spheres of different sizes and activity ratios (5:1, 10:1 and 15:1) and in 30 women (age range 32-78 y) with suspected breast cancer. Biopsies or mastectomies were performed in all patients. Images were visually assessed, and the count ratio between tumor and normal tissue (T/N ratio) was calculated. RESULTS: In the phantom studies, coincidence gamma camera imaging visualized the smallest sphere (1.0 cm) at a ratio of 15:1 but not at ratios of 5:1 and 10:1. Coincidence gamma camera imaging visualized the other spheres (> or =1.3 cm) at all ratios. PET visualized all spheres at all ratios. In the clinical studies, 22 of 26 breast carcinomas detected by PET were also detected by coincidence gamma camera imaging.. Coincidence gamma camera imaging detected all of the carcinomas > or =2 cm in diameter (n = 10) and 12 of 16 carcinomas <2 cm. In breast carcinomas detected by both PET and coincidence gamma camera imaging, the T/N ratio in non-attenuation-corrected PET (7.12 +/- 7.13) was significantly higher than in coincidence gamma camera imaging (2.90 +/- 1.47, P < 0.005). Four of 8 axillary lymph node metastases detected by PET were detected by coincidence gamma camera imaging. Of 9 axillary lymph node metastases <1.0 cm in diameter, 7 and 3 were detected by PET and coincidence gamma camera imaging, respectively. CONCLUSION: Coincidence gamma camera imaging is useful in detecting breast carcinoma > or =2 cm in diameter but is not reliable for breast carcinoma <2 cm in diameter. Coincidence gamma camera imaging may be useless or even dangerous in the detection of axillary lymph node metastasis.  (+info)

Expression of a novel factor in human breast cancer cells with metastatic potential. (6/806)

Clinical and experimental evidence suggests that tumor cells shed into the circulation from solid cancers are ineffective in forming distant metastasis unless the cells are able to respond to growth conditions offered by the secondary organs. To identify the phenotypic properties that are specific for such growth response, we injected carcinoma cells, which had been recovered from bone marrow micrometastases in a breast cancer patient who was clinically devoid of overt metastatic disease and established in culture, into the systemic circulation of immunodeficient rats. The animals developed metastases in the central nervous system, and metastatic tumor cells were isolated with immunomagnetic beads coated with an antibody that was reactive with human cells. The segregated cell population was compared with the injected cells by means of differential display analysis, and two candidate fragments were identified as up-regulated in the fully metastatic cells. The first was an intracellular effector molecule involved in tyrosine kinase signaling, known to mediate nerve growth factor-dependent promotion of cell survival. The second was a novel gene product (termed candidate of metastasis-1), presumably encoding a DNA-binding protein of helix-turn-helix type. Constitutive expression of candidate of metastasis-1 seemed to distinguish breast cancer cells with metastatic potential from cells without metastatic potential. Hence, our experimental approach identified factors that may mediate the growth response of tumor cells upon establishment in a secondary organ and, thereby, contribute to the metastatic phenotype.  (+info)

Lobular carcinoma-in-situ within a fibroadenoma of the breast. (7/806)

We present a case of an in-situ lobular carcinoma within an otherwise benign fibroadenoma in a 45-year-old woman.  (+info)

Epidemiology of contralateral breast cancer. (8/806)

Two to 11% of women diagnosed with breast cancer will develop contralateral breast cancer in their lifetime. Women with a first primary are at a 2-6-fold increased risk of developing contralateral breast cancer compared with the risk in the general population of women developing a first primary cancer. The incidence rate of contralateral breast cancer varies from four to eight per 1000 person-years. To assess the risk factors associated with the development of contralateral breast cancer among women with a first primary breast cancer, the epidemiological literature concerning these factors was reviewed and summarized. Studies have shown that a family history of breast cancer, an early age at initial diagnosis, and a lobular histology of the first primary breast cancer increase the risk of developing contralateral breast cancer. Although chemotherapy and tamoxifen therapy may reduce this risk, there are inconsistent results regarding the effects of radiotherapy and the effects of reproductive, environmental and other factors. Additional analytical studies addressing all potential risk factors associated with the development of contralateral breast cancer are necessary in view of the increasing incidence and survival of women with a first primary.  (+info)

*Breast cancer classification

Invasive ductal carcinoma - 55% of breast cancers Ductal carcinoma in situ - 13% Invasive lobular carcinoma - 5% The overall 5- ... Stage 0 is a pre-cancerous or marker condition, either ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) or lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS). ... year survival rate for both invasive ductal carcinoma and invasive lobular carcinoma was approximately 85% in 2003. Ductal ... Arpino G, Bardou VJ, Clark GM, Elledge RM (2004). "Infiltrating lobular carcinoma of the breast: tumor characteristics and ...

*Adenocarcinoma

Invasive ductal carcinoma: 55% of breast cancers Ductal carcinoma in situ: 13% Invasive lobular carcinoma: 5% The vast majority ... "The changing incidence of in situ and invasive ductal and lobular breast carcinomas: United States, 1999-2004". Cancer ... Thus invasive ductal carcinoma, the most common form of breast cancer, is adenocarcinoma but does not use the term in its name- ... The adenoma, lacking the "carcinoma" attached to the end of it, suggests that it is a benign version of the malignant ...

*Lobular carcinoma

Examples include: Lobular carcinoma in situ Invasive lobular carcinoma "lobular carcinoma" at Dorland's Medical Dictionary. ... Lobular carcinoma is a form of tumor which primarily affects the lobules of a gland. It is sometimes considered equivalent to " ... "terminal duct carcinoma". If not otherwise specified, it generally refers to breast cancer. ...

*Invasive lobular carcinoma

... accounts for 5-10% of invasive breast cancer. The histologic patterns include: Overall, the five- ... year survival rate of invasive lobular carcinoma was approximately 85% in 2003. Loss of E-cadherin is common in lobular ... Arpino G, Bardou VJ, Clark GM, Elledge RM (2004). "Infiltrating lobular carcinoma of the breast: tumor characteristics and ... Pointon KS, Cunningham DA (August 1999). "Ultrasound findings in pure invasive lobular carcinoma of the breast: comparison with ...

*Lobular carcinoma in situ

Breast cancer Carcinoma in situ "Lobular Carcinoma in situ (LCIS)". Breast Cancer. Stanford Cancer Center. "Lobular carcinoma ... as the adjacent area of invasive carcinoma. Like the cells of atypical lobular hyperplasia and invasive lobular carcinoma, the ... Most of the risk relates to subsequent invasive ductal carcinoma rather than to invasive lobular carcinoma. While older studies ... Lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) is a condition caused by unusual cells in the lobules of the breast. Many do not consider it ...

*John Birkett (surgeon)

Hajdu, Steven I.; Tang, Ping (Autumn 2009). "Lobular Carcinoma in Situ". Annals of Clinical and Laboratory Science. 39 (4): 413 ... In plates vii and viii, for examples, one can find seven well-executed microscopic illustrations of two cases of lobular ...

*Preventive mastectomy

Presence of lobular carcinoma in situ. Having dense breasts or breasts with diffuse microcalcification, as the screening for ...

*Dynamic angiothermography

... to diagnose invasive ductal carcinoma and infiltrating lobular carcinoma with the same accuracy. DATG can be strategic for ... Choi BB, Kim SH, Park CS, Cha ES, Lee AW (February 2011). "Radiologic findings of lobular carcinoma in situ: mammography and ...

*Fred W. Stewart

"Lobular carcinoma in situ: a rare form of mammary cancer." The American Journal of Pathology, 1941 The Fundamental Pathology of ...

*34βE12

... lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) exhibits perinuclear staining with 34βE12. Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) does not stain for ...

*SULF1

Breast cancer samples show loss of Sulf1 expression in invasive lobular carcinomas. These carcinomas are predominantly, ... Arpino G, Bardou VJ, Clark GM, Elledge RM (2004). "Infiltrating lobular carcinoma of the breast: tumor characteristics and ... may make lobular carcinomas more aggressive than expected. The mechanism by which Sulf1 is downregulated in breast cancer (and ... Sulf1 transcript expression was highly upregulated in invasive ductal carcinoma with respect to confined ductal carcinoma in ...

*CDH1 (gene)

December 1997). "Simultaneous loss of E-cadherin and catenins in invasive lobular breast cancer and lobular carcinoma in situ ... of lobular breast carcinomas. Inactivation of CDH1 in 50% of diffuse gastric carcinomas. Complete loss of E-cadherin protein ... December 1995). "E-cadherin inactivation in lobular carcinoma in situ of the breast: an early event in tumorigenesis". EMBO J. ... of lobular breast carcinomas. Several proteins such as SNAI1/SNAIL, ZFHX1B/SIP1, SNAI2/SLUG, TWIST1 and DeltaEF1 have been ...

*PLEKHA7

In a more recent study, the expression of PLEKHA7 protein in high grade ductal breast carcinomas, and lobular breast carcinomas ... "Genetic up-regulation and overexpression of PLEKHA7 differentiates invasive lobular carcinomas from invasive ductal carcinomas ... "The Expression of the Zonula Adhaerens Protein PLEKHA7 Is Strongly Decreased in High Grade Ductal and Lobular Breast Carcinomas ... PLEKHA7 was identified by mass spectrometry in lysates of human intestinal carcinoma (Caco-2) cells in a GST-pull down using N- ...

*Keratin 8

Antibodies to CK8 (e.g. CAM 5.2) can be used to differentiate lobular carcinoma of the breast from ductal carcinoma of the ... such as spindle cell carcinoma. It is considered useful in identifying microscopic metastases of breast carcinoma in lymph ... October 2004). "Tumor Cells Circulate in the Peripheral Blood of All Major Carcinomas but not in Healthy Subjects or Patients ... 1997). "A two-dimensional gel database of human colon carcinoma proteins". Electrophoresis. 18 (3-4): 605-13. doi:10.1002/elps. ...

*Breast cancer

... and these cancers are classified as ductal or lobular carcinoma. Carcinoma in situ is growth of low-grade cancerous or ... The main stages are: Stage 0 is a pre-cancerous or marker condition, either ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) or lobular ... Cancers developing from the ducts are known as ductal carcinomas, while those developing from lobules are known as lobular ... Breast changes like atypical ductal hyperplasia and lobular carcinoma in situ, found in benign breast conditions such as ...

*Male breast cancer

While intraductal cancer, inflammatory carcinoma, and Paget's disease of the nipple have been described, lobular carcinoma in ... As in females, infiltrating ductal carcinoma is the most common type. ...

*Carcinoma in situ

... ductal carcinoma in situ or lobular carcinoma in situ). Many forms of CIS have a high probability of progression into cancer, ... The term carcinoma in situ may be used interchangeably with high-grade SIL. Ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast is the most ... High-grade dysplasia may also be referred to as carcinoma in situ. Invasive carcinoma, usually simply called cancer, has the ... Carcinoma in situ (CIS), also known as in situ neoplasm, is a group of abnormal cells. While they are a form of neoplasm there ...

*List of MeSH codes (C04)

... carcinoma, lobular MeSH C04.557.470.200.025.340 --- carcinoma, mucoepidermoid MeSH C04.557.470.200.025.370 --- carcinoma, ... lobular, and medullary MeSH C04.557.470.615.132 --- carcinoma, ductal MeSH C04.557.470.615.132.500 --- carcinoma, ductal, ... carcinoma, lobular MeSH C04.557.470.615.315 --- carcinoma, medullary MeSH C04.557.470.615.660 --- paget's disease, extramammary ... carcinoma, ehrlich tumor MeSH C04.557.470.200.220 --- carcinoma, giant cell MeSH C04.557.470.200.240 --- carcinoma in situ MeSH ...

*Resection margin

... atypical ductal hyperplasia or lobular carcinoma in situ in breast tissue, may not prevent a margin being graded as R0. The ... melanoma of the face or squamous cell carcinoma of the penis). The desired size of margin around the tumor can vary. In ...

*Immunohistochemistry

... ductal carcinoma in situ: stains positive) and LCIS (lobular carcinoma in situ: does not stain positive)). More recently, ... Cytokeratins: used for identification of carcinomas but may also be expressed in some sarcomas. CD15 and CD30 : used for ... Results of a study of 203 sarcomas, 50 carcinomas and 28 malignant melanomas". Histopathology. 10 (12): 1315-24. doi:10.1111/j. ... September 2006). "Assessment of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression in primary colorectal carcinomas and their ...

*BRCA1

... and Invasive lobular carcinoma (about 5%-10% of invasive breast cancer). All four types of breast cancer were found to have an ... In both serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma (the precursor lesion to high grade serous ovarian carcinoma (HG-SOC)), and in ... In serous ovarian carcinomas, a sub-category constituting about 2/3 of EOCs, low BRCA1 expression occurs in more than 50% of ... BRCA1 promoter hypermethylation was present in only 13% of unselected primary breast carcinomas. Similarly, BRCA1 promoter ...

*Index of oncology articles

... lobular carcinoma in situ - lobule - local cancer - local therapy - localized gallbladder cancer - locally advanced cancer - ... ductal carcinoma - ductal carcinoma in situ - ductal lavage - Dukes' classification - dumping syndrome - duodenitis - DX-52-1 ... carcinoma - carcinoma in situ - carcinomatosis - carcinosarcoma - carcinosis - carcinostatic - cardin (oncology) - carmustine ... basal cell carcinoma - basal cell nevus syndrome - basophil - batimastat - BAY 12-9566 - BAY 43-9006 - BAY 56-3722 - BAY 59- ...

*Breast cancer awareness

... non-cancerous conditions like lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) and pre-cancerous or "stage 0" conditions like ductal carcinoma ... in situ (DCIS). Despite the now-regretted decision to use the word carcinoma in these relatively common conditions (almost a ...

*ILC

Inversiones la Construccion Innate lymphoid cell, part of the immune system Invasive lobular carcinoma, a form of breast cancer ...

*Pre-cancer of the breast

There are two types: Ductal carcinoma in situ, the most common type of breast pre-cancer Lobular carcinoma in situ, pre-cancer ...

*Esthesioneuroblastoma

... consists of lobular sheets with neurofibrullar fibers and rosettes. Hyam's classifications are an ... sinonasal undifferentiated carcinoma, extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma, nasal type, rhabdomyosarcoma, Ewing/PNET, mucosal ... Successful treatment of esthesioneuroblastoma and neuroendocrine carcinoma with combined chemotherapy and proton radiation. ... malignant melanoma and neuroendocrine carcinomas (NEC) that occur in the intranasal tract. Compared to other tumors in the ...
Invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC), sometimes called infiltrating lobular carcinoma, is the second most common type of breast cancer after invasive ductal carcinoma. About 10% of all invasive breast cancers are invasive lobular carcinomas. Learn about the diagnosis and treatment of invasive lobular carcinoma.
The Genomic Data Commons (GDC) Data Portal is an interactive data system for researchers to search, download, upload, and analyze harmonized cancer genomic data sets, including TCGA.. ...
Description of disease Breast, infiltrating lobular carcinoma of the. Treatment Breast, infiltrating lobular carcinoma of the. Symptoms and causes Breast, infiltrating lobular carcinoma of the Prophylaxis Breast, infiltrating lobular carcinoma of the
Breastfeeding and Immunohistochemical Expression of ki-67, p53 and BCL2 in Infiltrating Lobular Breast Carcinoma. . Biblioteca virtual para leer y descargar libros, documentos, trabajos y tesis universitarias en PDF. Material universiario, documentación y tareas realizadas por universitarios en nuestra biblioteca. Para descargar gratis y para leer online.
Abstract. Lobular carcinoma in situ is a form of in situ neoplasia that develops within the terminal lobules of the breast. It is an extremely rare finding in males due to the lack of lobular development in the male breast. The authors herein report an unusual case of incidentally discovered lobular carcinoma in situ in a male patient with recurrent bilateral gynecomastia who was subsequently diagnosed with invasive ductal carcinoma of the left breast. The pathology of lobular carcinoma in situ in a male as well as screening MRI surveillance of male patients at high risk for breast cancer are discussed, emphasizing the importance of screening and imaging follow up in men who are at high risk for breast cancer.. Keywords: Lobular carcinoma in situ, male, breast cancer, MRI, screening and imaging ...
Lobular breast cancer, or invasive lobular carcinoma, starts out in the lobules, the glands that produce milk. Learn about symptoms, treatments, and more.
Characteristics of lobular carcinoma and LCIS. Pictures showing the difference, and mentioning possible symptoms, mammogram findings and treatment.
Invasive lobular carcinoma has a much lower incidence than infiltrating ductal carcinoma, constituting less than 15% of cases of invasive breast cancer. It is characterized histologically by the &ldqu... more
A cancer that arises in the milk-producing glands of the breast and then breaks through the walls to involve the adjacent fatty tissue. From this site, it may then spread elsewhere in the breast. About 15% of invasive breast cancers are invasive lobular carcinomas. It is often difficult to detect by physical examination or even by mammography.. Tags: Cancer Dictionary, I, Uncategorized. ...
jeannief - Patient: Breast Cancer > Invasive Lobular Carcinoma Patient Info: Newly diagnosed (has not begun treatment), Diagnosed: about 2 years ago, Female, Age: 71, Stage I, HER2 Positive: No, ER Positive: Yes, PR Positive: Yes
Details of the image Incidental invasive lobular carcinoma and incidental mature ovarian teratoma Modality: Annotated image (rotated)
Get natural cures for Invasive Lobular Carcinoma that can make a difference in your life or the life of someone you love with alternative treatments.
Malignant tumor of the breast , also called mammary carcinoma. Most common cancer in women: One in eight women gets sick during their lifetime (lifetime risk). Rarely do men get breast cancer: In the course of life, it affects only one of 790 men.. Forms of breast cancer: invasive ductal breast cancer (cancerous tumor originating from milk ducts), invasive lobular breast cancer (cancerous tumor originating from the glandular lobes), more rare forms (such as inflammatory breast cancer). Risk factors: female sex, older age, genetic predisposition, hormonal factors (such as early first menstrual bleeding plus late menopause, taking hormone supplements, late first pregnancy, childlessness), alcohol, smoking, physical inactivity, overweight , high fat diet; in men also undescended testicles as well as earlier testicular inflammation or epididymitis. Possible symptoms: knots or indurations in the breast, changes in shape or size of a breast, change in color or sensitivity of the breast or nipple , ...
Histologically confirmed HER2-negative primary invasive ductal or invasive lobular breast carcinoma. For patients enrolling for neoadjuvant treatment, diagnosis must be clinical stage II or III; for patients enrolling for adjuvant treatment, diagnosis must be pathologic stage IIA to IIIC. Standard HER2 testing will be performed in the surgical specimen at Washington University according to the standard of care in the Department of Pathology. A HER2-negative primary breast cancer sample from a patient eligible for randomization should have a HER2 IHC score of 0 or 1+ Those patients with IHC score of 2+ should be HER2 FISH-negative in standard testing. Patient will have undergone staging studies including a CT of the chest/abdomen/pelvis and bone scan and/or PET scan either prior to the initiation of treatment or prior to entry into the trial. In addition, patients with non-metastatic, HER2-negative, recurrent tumors who need chemotherapy are eligible ...
Conducted in the three-county Seattle-Puget Sound metropolitan area, the population-based study included women ages 55 to 74 years: 880 of the women had invasive ductal breast cancer, 1,027 had invasive lobular breast cancer, and 856 of them had no cancer and served as the control group. Interviewing participants in person, researchers gathered in-depth histories of hypertension and heart disease, as well as risk factors for cancer, including family history, obesity, smoking, and alcohol use. Through a series of structured questions, the research also included detailed data regarding use of antihypertensive drugs, such as beginning and end dates of use, drug names, dose, route of administration, pattern of use, and indication ...
Sirolimus in Preventing Invasive Breast Cancer in Patients with Ductal Carcinoma In Situ, Lobular Carcinoma In Situ, Atypical Lobular Hyperplasia, or Atypical Ductal Hyperplasia - NCT02642094
Hi Olga, We are a rare breed! I had infiltrating lobular carcinoma. Stage 1, grade 1. I had a lumpectomy. My margins were clear and so was my sentinal lobe. I had six weeks of radiation therapy and I just finished my first month on Tamoxifin. From what I understand, bc in the lobes is not as common as that found in the ducts. So far, I feel blessed. My recovery from surgery went well and radiation just wore me out a little. Starting to feel a few side effects from tamoxifen, but if it is beneficial to take it, I will suffer through the side effects! Good luck to you and Nancy! Make your list of questions for the surgeon, Radiation Oncologist, Oncologist, Gynocoloist...and anyone else you can think of! Keep in touch and I will be thinking of you both ...
Invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) comprises approximately 10% of breast cancers and appears to have a distinct biology. Because it is less common than infiltrating ductal carcinoma (IDC), few data have been reported that address the biologic features of ILC in the context of their clinical outcome. In the present study we undertook an extensive comparison of ILC and IDC using a large database to provide a more complete and reliable assessment of their biologic phenotypes and clinical behaviors. The clinical and biological features of 4140 patients with ILC were compared with those of 45,169 patients with IDC (not otherwise specified). The median follow-up period was 87 months. In comparison with IDC, ILC was significantly more likely to occur in older patients, to be larger in size, to be estrogen and progesterone receptor positive, to have lower S-phase fraction, to be diploid, and to be HER-2, p53, and epidermal growth factor receptor negative. It was more common for ILC than for IDC to metastasize to
In rare cases, breast cancer can start in other areas of the breast. It can be invasive or noninvasive. Invasive means it has spread from the milk duct or lobule to other tissues in the breast. Noninvasive means it has not yet invaded other breast tissue. Noninvasive breast cancer is also called "in situ". Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), or intra-ductal carcinoma, is breast cancer in the lining of the milk ducts that has not yet invaded nearby tissues. It may progress to invasive cancer if untreated. Lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) is a marker for an increased risk of invasive cancer in the same or both breasts. Once a woman has been diagnosed with breast cancer, a series of tests will be done to ensure that the stage and classification of the cancer is accurate. Today, breast cancer can be treated in several ways, which will depend on the type and how far it has spread.. ...
By Brian Wojciechowski, M.D. on May 13th, 2015 Categories: Symptoms & Diagnosis On April 14, 2015, actress Rita Wilson announced that she had been diagnosed with breast cancer and had undergone a double mastectomy and reconstruction. In addition to invasive cancer, one of her diagnoses was pleomorphic lobular carcinoma in situ (PLCIS).. PLCIS isnt well-known, and many of my patients wondered what it is and how its treated.. PLCIS is a type of lobular carcinoma in situ …. ...
We started our conversation with Susans story…. Susan shared that she had mammograms done every year. Also, her mother was a volunteer for the American Cancer Society for many years. However, despite her knowledge and her yearly checkups she was diagnosed at 45 years old, in August of 2008.. Susan told us that it started with a sharp pain in her right breast. She explained that it was a pain that was not normal. She shared this with her husband and he encouraged her to get it checked out. So three days later she went in to get it looked at.. Her mammogram was clear but they saw a faint shadow during the ultrasound so they sent her for a biopsy. The biopsy showed that she did in fact have Breast Cancer. However, this wasnt the "typical" breast cancer that you hear about, she had Lobular Breast Cancer. This is a different kind of cancer, it doesnt look like the typical breast cancer so it is harder to diagnose. Lobular Breast Cancer is called the "sneaky cancer" because it grows in strands ...
Lobular carcinoma in situ isnt cancer. LCIS means that some cells lining the lobules of the breast tissue have started to turn into cancer cells.
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Lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) is an uncommon condition where benign (non-cancer) change is seen within the lobules of the breast.
Melissas Rap: When I was 21, I discovered a lump in my breast. After multiple doctors appointments, mammograms and ultrasounds, my doctor decided I should have it surgically removed. Before the surgery, doctors found another lump in my other breast. So, I had bilateral biopsies. Thankfully, both were benign. Ever since that year, I have…
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Objective: To analyze the type of cancers and high risk lesions diagnosed in women with normal mammograms with dense breasts with the addition of bilateral breast ultrasound and determine whether these lesions make an impact on clinical outcomes.. Methods: Four years of ultrasound data from two sites with five offices in Connecticut was analyzed. The type of lesion including size, nuclear and histologic grade, ER/PR/Her2 status, node status, patient age and risk factors was reviewed.. Results: A total of 532 Ultrasounds with Birads 4 or 5 were reported with 46 cancers or high risk lesions. There were 14 Invasive Ductal Carcinoma, 10 Invasive Lobular Carcinoma, 8 Mixed type, 1 Mucinous, 1 Tubular, 6 Ductal carcinoma in situ, 3 Atypical Ductal Hyperplasia with papilloma and 3 Lobular Carcinoma in situ. Of the invasive cancers and DCIS, 9 were nuclear grade 1, 25 nuclear grade 2 and 7 nuclear grade 3. They ranged in size from .3 to 8 .0 cm and the patient age was 45-77 years. Four patients had ...
There two principal types of breast cancer that appear as lumps in the breast. They are ductal carcinoma and lobular carcinoma. Ductal carcinoma, as suggested by the name, is found in the ducts of the breast, while lobular carcinoma is found in the lobules.Ductal CarcinomaCancerous lumps in the breast identified as ductal carcinoma are in the ducts of the breast that carry milk.Lobular CarcinomaA lobular carcinoma breast lump originates in the lobules or the glands in the breast that produce milk.What is it?Cancer is an abnormality in the genes that are responsible for growing healthy cells. Unchecked, these abnormal cells will continue to...
It is generally believed that atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH) is a direct precursor of breast cancer and therefore portends breast cancer in the same breast, while atypical lobular hyperplasia (ALH) has an equal risk of cancer in both breasts and may not be a direct precursor of breast cancer. In the study, however, published in Cancer Prevention Research (2014;7;211-217) and led by Lynn C. Hartmann, MD, Professor of Oncology, cancer was twice as likely to occur in the breast having the biopsy, and this was true for both ADH and ALH.. Moreover, the findings run counter to current understanding that ALH primarily leads to lobular cancer. Instead, the researchers discovered that ALH was associated predominantly with later ductal cancers of the breast-also similar to cancers after ADH.. Both types resulted in invasive ductal cancers, and 69 percent were of intermediate or high grade. Further, about 25 percent had spread to the lymph nodes. Although the numbers were not statistically significant, ...
Mucinous breast carcinoma with a lobular neoplasia component : a subset with aberrant expression of cell adhesion and polarity molecules and lack of neuroendocrine differentiation(審査報告)Mucinous breast carcinoma with a lobular neoplasia component : a subset with aberrant expression of cell adhesion and polarity molecules and lack of neuroendocrine differentiation(審査報告) ...
Breast cancer affects a large number of females in the Western world, accounting for half a million deaths worldwide on an annual basis. Carcinoma of the breast is a heterogeneous disease based on pathological criteria, which is probably due to the multiplicity of genetic lesions that have accumulated during tumor development, resulting in distinct tumor types. The most frequently observed subtypes, invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) and invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC), are very distinct phenotypically as well as biochemically (Coradini et al., 2002; Korkola et al., 2003; Mathieu et al., 2004; Zhao et al., 2004; Stange et al., 2006). ILC is a subtype of breast cancer that accounts for 10-15% of all cases and has a greater tendency for multifocal development and bilateral presentation than other primary breast tumors (Newstead et al., 1992; Krecke and Gisvold, 1993; Helvie et al., 1993). Classical ILC is characterized by non-cohesive invasive cells that are arranged in trabecules without mass ...
For Treatment of Lobular Carcinoma In Situ (LCIS) in New Delhi Gurgaon Noida Faridabad NCR or Online Treatment of Lobular Carcinoma In Situ (LCIS) Contact Us or…. ...
Introduction. Invasive lobular carcinoma is associated with a higher rate of multifocality than other types of breast cancer. Breast MRI is commonly performed in patients diagnosed with ILC to assess for additional disease prior to formulating a management plan. MRI may be both time consuming and costly and can delay treatment.. Recently tomosynthesis has become an adjunct in the assessment and diagnosis of breast cancer. It is readily available at the time of mammography therefore providing information at the one stop clinic. We proposed that it may be possible to use tomosynthesis to assess for multifocality in ILC in place of MRI.. Method. A retrospective review of all cases of ILC diagnosed at a single regional screening unit over a 3-year period was performed. Patients having surgery as primary treatment were included. Ninety-eight patients were identified, 29 having both MRI and tomosynthesis in addition to mammography and ultrasound scan as part of their assessment. Histological data was ...
Posted by Medivizor on Nov 6, 2015 in Breast cancer , 0 comments. In a nutshell The authors aimed to determine whether or not there is a link between tumor budding, the environment of a tumor and prognosis (outlook) and survival from breast cancer. Some background Tumor budding refers to the clustering of up to 5 cancer cells together to create a tumor bud. Tumor budding is thought to be an.... Read More ...
Diagnosed with Stage III Invasive Lobular Carcinoma ("ILC") on July 8, 2009. Husband says he distinctively remembers Stage IV as the initial diagnosis. I am the one with the notebook. I get to be the writer of my history. Stage III diagnosis gave me some wiggle room. The universe, however, is not so generous with its allotment of "wiggle room." Diagnosed with metastatic invasive carcinoma in the lymph nodes on July 11, 2011. Ive always been a bit of an over-achiever. Third battle started in September 2015 - ongoing. My struggle to define survival has taken on an interesting dimension. I am now in my Fabulous Fifties and full on post-menopausal (finally and WTF - this sucks!!!). Have a kiddo working on her PsyD.; planning a wedding with my eldest; and a snarky10th grader; and have been on an one-night stand with the same guy for over 30 years. Still standing. Im not ready to embrace the alternative! This is my cancer auto-blogography. DISCLAIMER ... It is not my intent to provide medical ...
It seems like every year, a new recommendation is coming down the pipeline about the best ways to prevent and diagnose breast cancer. Navigating all of the confusion can be difficult, so Ive got a …. Continue Reading about New Annual Mammogram Guidelines-Some Things Every Woman Should Know → ...
Diagnosed with Stage III Invasive Lobular Carcinoma ("ILC") on July 8, 2009. Husband says he distinctively remembers Stage IV as the initial diagnosis. I am the one with the notebook. I get to be the writer of my history. Stage III diagnosis gave me some wiggle room. The universe, however, is not so generous with its allotment of "wiggle room." Diagnosed with metastatic invasive carcinoma in the lymph nodes on July 11, 2011. Ive always been a bit of an over-achiever. Third battle started in September 2015 - ongoing. My struggle to define survival has taken on an interesting dimension. I am now in my Fabulous Fifties and full on post-menopausal (finally and WTF - this sucks!!!). Have a kiddo working on her PsyD.; planning a wedding with my eldest; and a snarky10th grader; and have been on an one-night stand with the same guy for over 30 years. Still standing. Im not ready to embrace the alternative! This is my cancer auto-blogography. DISCLAIMER ... It is not my intent to provide medical ...
Click here to view and interact with the DICOM images for Figure 2 in the Exa-PACS zero foot print viewer provided by Viztek. CASE SUMMARY A 69-year-old fema...
The value of using previous studies for comparison. Its quite exceptional to be able to biopsy a 4 mm lesion. Review what overdiagnosis is. Reading of screening studies should be done in isolated reading areas. If your reading environment is a ...
Devine, Catriona and Courtney, Carol-Ann and Deb, Rahul and Agrawal, Amit (2013) Invasive lobular carcinoma arising in accessory breast tissue. World Journal of Surgical Oncology, 11 (47). 47/1-47/2. ISSN 1477-7819 ...
Breast cancer is a disease in which certain cells in the breast become abnormal and multiply uncontrollably to form a tumor. Although breast cancer is much more common in women, this form of cancer can also develop in men. In both women and men, the most common form of breast cancer begins in cells lining the milk ducts (ductal cancer). In women, cancer can also develop in the glands that produce milk (lobular cancer). Most men have little or no lobular tissue, so lobular cancer in men is very rare.In its early stages, breast cancer usually does not cause pain and may exhibit no noticeable symptoms. As the cancer progresses, signs and symptoms can include a lump or thickening in or near the breast; a change in the size or shape of the breast; nipple discharge, tenderness, or retraction (turning inward); and skin irritation, dimpling, or scaliness. However, these changes can occur as part of many different conditions. Having one or more of these symptoms does not mean that a person definitely has ...
Habib F, Syriac S, Wang D, Liu S, Karabakhtsian R, Tan D, Khoury T. High Grade Lobular Carcinoma In Situ in Breast Excision: Potential for Misdiagnosis as Solid Type DCIS or Classical LCIS. Laboratory investigation 2012; 92(Suppl. 1): ...
OUTLINE: This is a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, multicenter study. Patients are stratified according to risk category (lobular carcinoma in situ or ductal carcinoma in situ vs BRCA1/2 mutation AND any Gail risk vs Gail risk ≥1.7% but , 5% vs Gail risk ≥ 5%) and prior tamoxifen use (yes vs no). Patients are randomized to 1 of 2 treatment arms.. ...
Answers from trusted physicians on what are the treatment options for lcis. First: Lcis is somewhat of a misnomer in that it is not a cancer, but a "pre-malignant" condition in which there are abnormal cells present in the glands (lobules) of the breast. Therefore patients with a diagnosis of lcis are at a higher risk of developing breast cancer than the general population and require closer observation and screening. Hormonal therapy may be used in those with very high risk.
Although innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) functionally analogous to T helper type 1 (Th1), Th2, and Th17 cells are well characterized, an ILC subset strictly equivalent to IL-10-secreting regulatory T cells has only recently been proposed. Here, we report the absence of an intestinal regulatory ILC population distinct from group 1 ILCs (ILC1s), ILC2s, and ILC3s in (1) mice bred in our animal facility; (2) mice from The Jackson Laboratory, Taconic Biosciences, and Charles River Laboratories; and (3) mice subjected to intestinal inflammation. Instead, a low percentage of intestinal ILC2s produced IL-10 at steady state. A screen for putative IL-10 elicitors revealed that IL-2, IL-4, IL-27, IL-10, and neuromedin U (NMU) increased IL-10 production in activated intestinal ILC2s, while TL1A suppressed IL-10 production. Secreted IL-10 further induced IL-10 production in ILC2s through a positive feedback loop. In summary, ILC2s provide an inducible source of IL-10 in the gastrointestinal tract, whereas ...
There are many types of filling materials available, each with their own advantages and disadvantages. You and Dr. Stewart can discuss the best options for restoring your teeth. Composite fillings, along with silver amalgam fillings, are the most widely used today. Because composite fillings are tooth colored, they can be closely matched to the color of existing teeth, and are more aesthetically suited for use in front teeth or the more visible areas of the teeth.. As with most dental restorations, composite fillings are not permanent and may someday have to be replaced. They are very durable, and will last many years, giving you a long lasting, beautiful smile.. Reasons for composite fillings:. ...
Elsheikh TM, Silverman JF. Follow-up surgical excision is indicated when breast core needle biopsies show atypical lobular hyperplasia or lobular carcinoma in situ: a correlative study of 33 patients with review of the literature. Am J Surg Pathol. 2005 Apr;29(4):534-43 ...
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Case Reports in Oncological Medicine is a peer-reviewed, Open Access journal that publishes case reports and case series related to breast cancer, lung cancer, gastrointestinal cancer, skin cancer, head and neck cancer, paediatric oncology, neurooncology as well as genitourinary cancer.
Breast cancer can be invasive or noninvasive.. Invasive means it has spread from the milk duct or lobule to other tissues in the breast. Noninvasive means it has not yet invaded other breast tissue. Noninvasive breast cancer is called "in situ.". Lobular carcinoma in situ Lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) is an area (or areas) of abnormal cell growth that increases a persons risk of developing invasive breast cancer later on in life. Lobular means that the abnormal cells start growing in the lobules, the milk-producing glands at the end of breast ducts. Carcinoma refers to any cancer that begins in the skin or other tissues that cover internal organs - such as breast tissue. In situ or "in its original place" means that the abnormal growth remains inside the lobule and does not spread to surrounding tissues. Despite the fact that its name includes the term "carcinoma," LCIS is not a true breast cancer. Rather, LCIS is an indication that a person is at higher-than-average risk for getting breast ...
CDH1 research is a relatively new area in certain respects. In 1999, a medical researcher in New Zealand named Dr. Parry Guilford and his colleagues discovered the connection between CDH1 mutations and cancers of the stomach and breasts. Despite it being a relatively recent discovery, searching for information about CDH1 research returns a lot of information.. Using publicly available information, I am researching the landscape of research on issues relating to CDH1 mutation carriers. Typically, when doing this kind of work in the past, I have used Google Scholar and the United States Patent Office patent and patent application databases. Those are great resources for learning more about research in many areas of medical research. Using those tools to do some preliminary searching about CDH1 issues, it seems that researchers are searching for ways to improve methods for detecting early signs of diffuse stomach cancer and lobular breast cancer. Also, they are exploring drug development and other ...
In a retrospective study performed in California, U.S.A., ca. 3% of patients with gastric intestinal metaplasia (GIM) developed gastric cancer (GC) within a median time period of 4.6 years after diagnosis of GIM. This observation stresses the importance of targeted surveillance even in regions with a low GC prevalence. Patients with alcoholic liver disease as well as survivors of colorectal and lobular breast cancer were found to be at increased risk of secondary GC. A population-based Chinese study confirmed "serologic biopsy" as a useful screening tool for stratifying the individual risk of developing GC ...
Over the past decade several clinical trials have demonstrated that proper patient selection are important for the success of accelerated partial breast irradiation. Criteria for Stanfords clinical trial are:. Inclusion criteria: age ,= 40. tumor size ,= 2.5 cm;. tumor type: invasive ductal carcinoma or ductal carcinoma in situ. Exclusion criteria:. prior breast radiotherapy. breast implants. multi-focal or multicentric tumors. invasive lobular carcinoma. please call for additional questions. ...
I am a blessed mother of 3 daughters and grandmother to 7 grandchildren. this blog is to document my journey with the diagnosis of Invasive Lobular Carcinoma in my left breast during the summer of 2011. I retired as a public school Speech-Language Pathologist in June of 2010. I love to garden, read, decorate my townhome, facebook, blog, email, shop and go to lunch or dinner with my fun friends, go to the beach, and most of all, enjoy time with my wonderful grandchildren. I am fortunate to have great friends and my 3 daughters to support me in this breast cancer journey. It takes a village to fight this battle - and I have a village of supporters and prayer warriors. I also know I have God with me all the way ...
I am a blessed mother of 3 daughters and grandmother to 7 grandchildren. this blog is to document my journey with the diagnosis of Invasive Lobular Carcinoma in my left breast during the summer of 2011. I retired as a public school Speech-Language Pathologist in June of 2010. I love to garden, read, decorate my townhome, facebook, blog, email, shop and go to lunch or dinner with my fun friends, go to the beach, and most of all, enjoy time with my wonderful grandchildren. I am fortunate to have great friends and my 3 daughters to support me in this breast cancer journey. It takes a village to fight this battle - and I have a village of supporters and prayer warriors. I also know I have God with me all the way ...
Back on December 18, 2009 I received word that I had invasive lobular carcinoma. After getting off the phone with the doctor it really sank in what I had. I was in shock and alone with my 4 and 5 year old students. I prayed and asked God to give me a verse that I could cling to during this time in my life. He gave me Psalm 118:24 that says, "This is the day the Lord has made, I will rejoice and be glad in it." I began a silent discussion with God that no, this verse wouldnt do, not for this situation. I was scared. But the only verse that would come to mind was the same one. Then I was reminded by God of a gift I had received from a student that said, "Every day is a gift from God." As I thought about it later in the day I began to realize that yes, I could rejoice in "this" day if I looked at "this" day as a gift from God. Just taking one day at a time and rejoicing in it. I honestly have to say that as I looked at my cancer in this way God began to work in my heart and life. Every day ...
To compare the lesion distribution and the extent of the disease in ductal and lobular carcinomas of the breast, we studied 586 ductal and 133 lobular consecutive cancers. All cases were documented on large-format histology slides. The invasive component of ductal carcinomas was unifocal in 63.3% (371/586), multifocal in 35.5% (208/586), and diffuse in 1.2% (7/586) of the cases. The corresponding figures in the lobular group were 27.8% (37/133), 45.9% (61/586), and 26.3% (35/133), respectively. When the distribution of the in situ and invasive component in the same tumors was combined to give an aggregate pattern, the ductal carcinomas were unifocal in 41.6% (244/586), multifocal in 31.6% (185/586), and diffuse in 26.8% (157/586) of the cases. The corresponding figures in the lobular category were 15.0% (20/133), 54.2% (72/133), and 30.8% (41/133), respectively. Ductal cancers were extensive in 45.7% (268/586), lobular in 65.4% (87/133) of the cases. All these differences were statistically ...
Dear Users, In order to make these forums more enjoyable, when you ask something about breast cancer, please include the following in your post - Age - Age of diagnosis or time since diagnosis - menopausal or not at diagnosis - Specific type of cancer (adenocarcinoma, ductal carcinoma in situ, lobular carcinoma etc) - Markers such as estrogen and progesterone receptor status (ER/PR), her2neu status. - Stage at diagnosis
Breast cancer (malignant breast neoplasm) is cancer originating from breast tissue, most commonly from the inner lining of milk ducts or the lobules that supply the ducts with milk. Cancers originating from ducts are known as ductal carcinomas; those originating from lobules are known as lobular carcinomas.
E-cadherin (epithelial cadherin, CDH1, OMIM# 192090) is a member of the cadherin family of adhesion molecules, which are transmembrane glycoproteins mediating calcium-dependent cell-cell adhesion1. Germline mutations in the CDH1 gene have been demonstrated to underlie in diffuse gastric cancer (DGC) in various ethnic backgrounds 2, 3, 4. CDH1 germ line mutations have also been identified in a small portion of early onset DGC patients without a family history 5, 6, 12. Associations between CDH1 germ line mutations and both lobular breast cancer and signet ring carcinoma of the colon have been reported in DGC families 7, 8, 9. DGC is a highly penetrant autosomal dominant disorder that has been reported to occur in many ethnicities. The offspring of an affected individual has a 50% risk of also being affected. The estimated cumulative risk of gastric cancer by age 80 years is 67% (95% CI: 39-99) for men and 83% (95% CI: 58-99) for women10. Women also have a 39% risk for lobular breast cancer10. ...
BACKGROUND: Use of preoperative breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) among women with a new breast cancer has increased over the past decade. MRI use is more frequent in younger women and those with lobular carcinoma, but associations with breast density and family history of breast cancer are unknown. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Data for 3075 women ages ,65 years with stage 0-III breast cancer who underwent breast conserving surgery or mastectomy from 2005 to 2010 in the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium were linked to administrative claims data to assess associations of preoperative MRI use with mammographic breast density and first-degree family history of breast cancer ...
Learn more about Lobular Carcinoma in Situ at Atlanta Outpatient Surgery Center DefinitionCausesRisk FactorsSymptomsDiagnosisTreatmentPreventionrevision ...
HCPCS Code: g8946. HCPCS Code Description: Minimally invasive biopsy method attempted but not diagnostic of breast cancer (e.g., high risk lesion of breast such as atypical ductal hyperplasia, lobular neoplasia, atypical lobular hyperplasia, lobular carcinoma in situ, atypical columnar hyperplasia, flat epithelial atypia, radial scar, complex sclerosing lesion, papillary lesion, or any lesion with spindle cells)
approximately three-quarters of breast cancers Invasive ductal carcinoma - 55% of breast cancers Ductal carcinoma in situ - 13% Invasive lobular carcinoma - 5% The overall 5-year survival rate for both ... Ductal carcinoma in situ, on the other hand, is in itself harmless, although if untreated approximately 60% of these low grade DCIS lesions will become invasive over the course of 40 years in follow-up ...
Abnormal O-glycans expressed by cancer cells have functional importance in cell adhesion, invasion, and metastasis [15]. Alterations in mucin-type O-glycans has been associated with malignant transformation, resulting in the formation of less complex structures and leading to an increase of the simple short determinants. Protein O-glycosylation is deregulated in breast cancer cells, leading to the accumulation of simple mucin-type tumor-associated antigens [37]. The expression of GalNAc-T14 mRNA was analyzed in normal and malignant tissue from breast, skin, lung, pancreas, ovary, endometrium, bladder and lymphoid cancers. A subset of tumor samples, ranging from 10% in lobular breast cancer to 30% in lung cancer and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, showed GalNAc-T14 mRNA overexpression [36]. Under thees circumstances, we hypothesize the expression of GalNAc-T14 may be a useful biomarker for breast cancer by immunohistochemistry.. It has been shown that several glycosyltransferases are useful tumor ...
Tubular carcinoma (TC) is an uncommon special type of breast cancer characterized by an indolent clinical course. Although described as part of a spectrum of related lesions named low-grade breast neoplasia family due to immunophenotypical and genetic similarities, TCs, low-grade invasive ductal carcinomas of no special type (IDC-NSTs), and classic invasive lobular carcinomas (ILCs) significantly differ in terms of histological features and clinical outcome. The aim of this study was to investigate whether pure TCs constitute an entity distinct from low-grade IDC-NSTs and from classic ILCs. To define the transcriptomic differences between TCs and IDC-NSTs and ILCs whilst minimizing the impact of histological grade and molecular subtype on their profiles, we subjected a series of grade- and molecular subtype-matched TCs and IDC-NSTs and molecular subtype-matched TCs and classic ILCs to genome-wide gene expression profiling using oligonucleotide microarrays. Unsupervised and supervised analysis ...
Researchers at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center conducted a population-based, case-control study to consider whether the brassieres worn daily by millions of women might be linked to the disease that kills about 40,000 in the U.S. each year. What they found was a resounding no, no matter how many ways they looked at bra-use data from more than 1,000 Seattle-area women diagnosed with invasive breast cancer between 2000 and 2004. "Our study found no evidence that wearing a bra increases a womans risk for breast cancer," said Lu Chen, a researcher in the Public Health Sciences Division at Fred Hutch. "The risk was similar no matter how many hours per day women wore a bra, whether they wore a bra with underwire, or at what age they began wearing a bra." The researchers conducted in-person interviews to determine the bra-wearing habits of 1,044 women aged 55 to 74 diagnosed with the two most common types of breast cancer, invasive ductal carcinoma, or IDC, and invasive lobular carcinoma, ...
Dear Jessah,. In February of this year I finished 18 months of chemo therapy then surgery then radiation and final more chemo for Stage III Invasive Lobular Carcinoma (breast cancer). I am still in remission as far as I know, but for the past two months I have felt awful, no energy, poor sleep, nausea, no appetite or when I do feel hungry, 2 or 3 bites is all I can handle yet I am packing on weight every single week and my abdomen is terribly distended and painful, not horrible pain, just pretty constant. My doctor ordered a CT of my abdomen which showed a partially contracted gallbladder, sent me to a surgeon who ordered an ultrasound of my gallbladder. I just got the report today. The only thing mentioned about my gallbladder is that it is fully distended and there is a comet tail along the gallbladder wall. Will research and find out what in the world that is, but the report said I have fatty liver disease. Now, i am not a drinker. I might have a few glasses of Baileys Irish Creme during the ...
Light micrograph of a section through a breast with lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS). Despite the name, LCIS is not a type of breast cancer. Instead it means there are changes in the cells lining the lobules, or milk glands, that indicate a higher risk of developing breast cancer in the future. There are no symptoms associated with LCIS. Although most women with LCIS will not go on to develop breast cancer, they are more closely monitored than the general population with regular breast exams and mammograms. Magnification: x 150 when printed at 10 centimetres wide. Human tissue - Stock Image F011/5480
Purpose: Well-established risk factors for breast cancer include family history (FH), BRCA mutations and biopsies with atypical hyperplasia (AH) or lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS). Several mathematical models, including the Gail and Tyrer-Cuzick models, have been developed to quantify a patients risk for developing breast cancer. These models all differ in the list of variables and risk factors that are included in risk calculations. As a result, there is no single model that best estimates the risk for all high risk patients. The purpose of this study is to examine the application of the Gail and Tyrer-Cuzick models in a contemporary cohort of women who are enrolled in a comprehensive high-risk breast cancer database.. Methods: The institutional High Risk Breast Cancer Consortium (HRBCC) was established in January 2011. Patients who were at high risk for developing breast cancer based on family history (maternal and paternal), BRCA mutations, AH and LCIS were eligible to enroll in the ...
A disease in which malignant cells form in the tissues of the breast. Types of breast cancer include: ductal carcinoma, which begins in the cells of the ducts; lobular carcinoma, which begins in the lobes or lobules, and inflammatory breast cancer.
Now these days, breast cancer is the most common invasive cancer occur in females which are diagnosed as ductal carcinoma and lobular carcinoma. It also occurs in males, however it is more prevalent in females and quite rare in males but incidence trends are same for both genders. It is one of the leading causes of mortality in many developing countries and has a high incidence rate in developed nations including England, Japan, US and many other European countries. Since, developed nations... ...
The long arm of chromosome 16 is a frequent target for loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in sporadic breast cancer [1]. Detailed mapping of LOH revealed at least two frequently deleted genomic regions on chromosome 16q22.1 and 16q24.3 that could harbour classical tumour suppressor genes (TSGs) [2, 3]. Mutation analysis identified the homophilic epithelial cell adhesion gene CDH1 encoding E-cadherin, located at 16q22.1, as a TSG, but only in the histological subset of lobular breast cancer and not in the more frequent ductal breast cancer [4]. Thus, the TSGs in ductal breast cancer remain elusive. To identify these TSGs, many genes have already been screened and excluded as candidates [5-8]. Although some studies have suggested other genes as potential candidates (e.g. the transcriptional co-repressor CBFA2T3 (MTG16) [9], the zinc finger transcription factor CTCF [10] or the oxidoreductase WWOX [11]), these genes fail to fit the classic two-hit model for a TSG because no inactivating mutations could ...
The Radiology Business Journal (6/27, Walter) reports on a study published in Current Problems in Diagnostic Radiology finding that "management recommendations for high-risk lesions detected by a core needle biopsy of the breast are inconsistent." The study was based on a survey of "breast imagers from 41 academic institutions throughout the United States" of "their own management recommendations when core needle biopsy of the breast detects a high-risk lesion." Overall, "ninety-five percent of respondents recommended surgical excision for atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH) and papilloma with associated atypia." Surgical excision was also recommended by majorities for flat epithelial atypia (76%), radial scar/complex sclerosing lesion (73%), lobular carcinoma in-situ (71%), and atypical lobular hyperplasia (61%) while "39 percent recommended it for intraductal papilloma without atypia." The researchers suggest that developing a consensus response to all of these diagnoses might improve patient ...
Tumor samples and clinical material. The breast tissue samples included benign lesions (five fibroadenomas and two gynecomastias). Malignant tumors were composed of 56% invasive ductal and 44% invasive lobular carcinomas. Among these carcinomas, 45% had positive lymph nodes (N+) and 55% had negative lymph nodes (N−), The histologic grade was evaluated by a certified clinical pathologist (F. Bibeau) according to the Nottingham combined histologic grade: grade 1, 11%; grade 2, 53%; grade 3, 36%. Steroid receptor status was determined using a ligand-binding assay: 74% ER+ (,10 fmol/mg protein), 26% ER−, 77% PR+ (,10 fmol/mg protein), and 23% PR−. Histologic types were determined according to the last WHO classification. Normal breast tissue was obtained, upon written consent, from three donors undergoing reductive mammoplasty and from two commercial sources (Invitrogen, Carlsbad, CA and Stratagene, La Jolla, CA).. RNA extractions and reverse transcription. RNA extraction from tumor samples ...
Breast intraepithelial neoplasia is a term for a group of noninvasive conditions in which abnormal cells are found in the breast, including ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS), and atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH)," said Andrea De Censi, MD, director of the medical oncology unit at the National Hospital E.O. Ospedali Galliera - S.C. Oncologia Medica in Genoa, Italy. "These conditions significantly increase a womans risk for invasive breast cancer. Because they are often driven by the hormone estrogen, treatment commonly includes five years of tamoxifen, given at 20 mg per day, after surgery and, if needed, radiotherapy ...
Patients who have already undergone surgery and lymph node evaluation and know their stage of cancer may select from the options below. In order to learn more about surgery and sentinel lymph node dissection, go to Surgical Management of Breast Cancer.. Carcinoma In Situ: Approximately 15-20% of breast cancers are very early in their development. These are sometimes referred to as carcinoma in situ and consist of two types: ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), which originates in the ducts and lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS), which originates in the lobules. DCIS is the precursor to invasive cancer and LCIS is a risk factor for developing cancer.. Stage I: Cancer is confined to a single site in the breast, is less than 2 centimeters (3/4 inch) in size and has not spread outside the breast.. Stage IIA: Cancer has spread to involve underarm lymph nodes and is less than 2 centimeters (3/4 inch) in size or the primary cancer itself is 2-5 centimeters (3/4-2 inches) and has not spread to the lymph ...
Breast cancer (malignant breast neoplasm) is a cancer that starts in the tissues of the breast either from the inner lining of milk ducts (Ductal carcinoma) or the lobules (Lobular carcinoma) that supply the ducts with milk. there is also rare cases that breast cancer starts in other areas of the breast. In 2010, over 250,000 new cases of breast cancer were expected to be diagnosed in women in the U.S. alone and the risk of getting invasive breast cancer during life time of a women is 1/8 ...
Breast cancer (malignant breast neoplasm) is a cancer that starts in the tissues of the breast either from the inner lining of milk ducts (Ductal carcinoma) or the lobules (Lobular carcinoma) that supply the ducts with milk. there is also rare cases that breast cancer starts in other areas of the breast. In 2010, over 250,000 new cases of breast cancer were expected to be diagnosed in women in the U.S. alone and the risk of getting invasive breast cancer during life time of a women is 1/8 ...
16 NCCN Guidelines for Patients ® Breast Cancer - Carcinoma in Situ (stage 0) , Version 1.2016 2 LCIS Risk-reduction treatment Pathology review All biopsy samples must be viewed by a pathologist. The type and extent of the disease will be confirmed. Among women with LCIS, over half have LCIS in more than one lobule. Sometimes, both LCIS and breast cancer are found. The breast cancer may be confined to or have spread beyond the breast ducts. If an invasive breast cancer is found, read the NCCN patient book related to the cancer stage. The pathology results will be recorded in a report. Its a good idea to get a copy of your pathology report. Its used to plan treatment. Risk-reduction treatment Although LCIS increases your risk for breast cancer, you may not need risk-reduction treatment. There are many other risk factors to consider. One very important risk factor is if any of your blood relatives have had breast or ovarian cancer, especially at a young age. Using your medical and family ...
Question - I was diagnosed with ILC in March 2015 had a hysterectomy - DU. Find the answer to this and other Medical questions on JustAnswer
本期文章:《免疫》:Online/在线发表 美国康奈尔大学David Artis研究团队发现,白介素33(IL33)通过诱导色氨酸羟化酶1的酶活促进炎性2型先天淋巴样细胞(ILC2)介导的免疫。相关论文
ReportsnReports.com adds report Global Breast Cancer Market 2014-2018 to its store. Breast cancer is characterized by the uncontrolled growth of cancerous cells in the breast tissue. It occurs in both males and females; however, male breast cancer is rare. Histologically, breast cancer can be classified into ductal carcinoma, lobular carcinoma, nipple cancer and other undifferentiated carcinoma. Ductal carcinoma is the form of breast cancer which starts in the lining of the milk ducts while lobular carcinoma begins in the milk glands of the breast. When breast cancer spreads from the site of origin to surrounding tissue, it is known as invasive breast cancer. Invasive ductal carcinoma is the most common subtype accounting for 70 to 80 percent of all the breast cases. In women, breast cancer is the second most common form of cancer. GLOBOCAN reported that in the year 2012, breast cancer accounted for 11.9 percent of the total cancer cases and lead to 5,22,000 deaths worldwide.. Analysts forecast ...
TRAINEE POSTER SYMPOSIUM. ISSP MEETING 17/18th OCTOBER 2014. Terminal digit bias in histopathology is an under-reported source of error in breast cancer staging. Dr J Houghton , Dr B Kevin, Dr F Houghton , Dr M Stevenson, Dr R Middleton , Dr A Gavin.. Institute of Pathology, Royal Victoria Hospital, Belfast. Somatostatinoma, GIST and pheochromocytoma occurring in a patient with Type 1 Neurofibromatosis.. Dr A Brady, Dr M Loughrey. Department: Royal Victoria hospital, Belfast.. Audit of LLETZ Specimens "negative for dysplasia", Galway University Hospital, 2013.. Dr. D. Catargiu, Dr. S.Phelan, Department of Histopathology, Galway University Hospital. Pitfall in a Polyp: An unusual cause of a PET-positive colonic polyp in association with gastric cancer. Dr J L Taylor, Dr DM ORourke, Me Jack lee, Dr O McNally. Royal Victoria Hospital and Belfast City Hospital, Belfast Health and Social Care Trust. An audit of screen detected invasive lobular carcinoma of breast. Dr.H.Jawad, Dr.M. Sheehan,. Breast ...
Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among women in the UK, accounting for a third of all female cancer cases, and the second most common cause of cancer death: in England in 2010, the age-standardised rate per 100,000 women-years was 125.7 for incidence and 24.3 for mortality; in addition, in situ breast cancer, that is Ductal Carcinoma In Situ (DCIS) and Lobular Carcinoma In Situ (LCIS), was diagnosed at a rate of 18 per 100,000 women in 2010 (CRUK, Accessed 28 March 2013 [1]).. In the early nineties, meta-analyses of the randomised controlled trials (RCTs) confirmed the efficacy of mammographic screening for reducing primary breast cancer mortality, and led to the implementation of breast screening programmes in several regions of Europe. One of the most mature and comprehensive of those is the English National Breast Screening Programme (NHSBSP) which has been in place in England since 1988. A major issue to be addressed by the Department of Healths (England) Policy Research ...
We report a comprehensive analysis of breast cancer metastases by analyzing the full spectrum of metastatic lesions derived from 10 patients who died of metastatic breast cancer and underwent rapid autopsy. By comparing the primary neoplasms from these patients with their metastases and by comparing metastases from one site to another, we identified marked heterogeneity among breast cancer metastases, as well as markers which remained consistent among these lesions. Our results expand the existing body of knowledge regarding breast cancer metastases and have both biological and therapeutic implications.. With regard to distribution of metastases, we confirm the liver, bone, and lung as the most frequent sites of hematogenous dissemination. We also confirm the striking tendency of lobular carcinoma to metastasize to the gastrointestinal tract, as illustrated by cases MBC1 and MBC5. Case MBC5 is particularly instructive, as the invasive ductal carcinoma primary lost E-cadherin expression in most ...
Most DCIS arises in the larger ducts and LCIS arises within the lobules of the breast. However, the ducts and lobules are connected which means that DCIS may travel into the lobules and LCIS may travel up the ducts. For this reason, pathologists rely on the type of cells and pattern of growth to determine the diagnosis of DCIS vs. LCIS. Only a pathologist can make this distinction. In some cases, both DCIS and LCIS are present in the same biopsy.. DCIS and LCIS both increase a patients relative risk for developing invasive breast cancer and that risk applies to both breasts. However, DCIS is also thought to be a "precursor" to invasive carcinoma based upon numerous research studies. This is why your surgeon tries to remove all areas of DCIS from your breast and why many patients subsequently receive radiation therapy to that breast.. LCIS, on the other hand, has not traditionally been considered to be a "precursor" to invasive carcinoma, therefore complete removal of LCIS and radiation therapy ...
In my 20s, I was an endless evidence gatherer. In fact, that even was true with women who I never dated. I recall one in particular who demonstrated a bit of interest a few times, but then didnt really respond to my "lets get together sometime" kind of comments. I sat around for weeks, rethinking the conversations we had had. Did that look mean she was interested? She really liked the poems I had written. That must be a sign. But she didnt want to get a drink with me? Is she a recovering alcoholic? Should I ask her about that? The questions were endless, as was the tallying. All for a woman who probably thought of me as some nice guy she had a few conversations with, and thats about it ...
Case history: PD is a 57-year-old female teacher who presented to her GP in October 2017 with lethargy, dyspnoea and anaemia. Bone marrow biopsy followed by a CT scan of her chest and abdomen confirmed lobular breast cancer with peritoneal and bone metastases (ER+/HER2−). The patient also had an MRI scan of her head to assess for intracranial metastatic disease which was negative at the start of December 2017. She was commenced on letrozole, palbociclib and denosumab. A fortnight after commencing treatment for the breast cancer, the patient was admitted by the GP with intractable thirst symptoms began September 2017 (predated breast cancer diagnosis).. Investigations: Other causes of polyuria were excluded (diuretics; thyroid biochemistry, bone profile, renal profile, anterior pituitary hormone profile, glucose all fine). The patient proceeded to have a water deprivation test in December 2017. The results are shown in Table 1.. Following confirmation of partial cranial diabetes insipidus (DI), ...
October 31, 2011 - The Breast journal published new data from a prospective study conducted at the Seoul National University College of Medicine in Korea that shows positron emission mammography (PEM) has a higher sensitivity for tumor detection compared with whole-body positron emission tomography (PET)/ computed tomography (CT) when using both visual as well as quantitative analysis. These results were particularly striking and significant for smaller-sized tumors (less than 2 cm), likely due to the improved spatial resolution offered by PEM. This demonstrates PEMs clinical utility in being able to more effectively diagnosis early stage cancer.. According to recent journal articles, the sensitivity of PET/CT is limited, especially for low-grade and small tumors. Most PET/CT scanners currently provide a spatial resolution at 5 mm or greater, thus limiting PET/CTs ability to depict small-sized tumors such as invasive lobular carcinoma or ductal carcinoma in situ. This study provides a direct ...
BACKGROUND: Male breast cancer (MBC) is rare. The objective of the study is to report clinicopathological characteristics, treatment patterns, and outcomes of MBC. METHODS: This study, which includes two parts (retrospective and prospective), focused on all hospitalized male patients with breast cancer during 17 years (1992 2008) with histological confirmation. RESULTS: The series included 22 patients. The mean age was 52.8 years (range: 28 80 years). MBC represented 5.7% of all breast cancers. Most patients had an advanced disease with skin ulceration and inflammation T3 (31.9%) and T4 (59.1%). The majority of patients came from rural areas (63.6%). The duration of signs ranged from 1 to 7 years. Histology found infiltrating ductal carcinoma in 14 cases (63.6%), sarcoma in 3 cases (13.6%), papillary carcinoma in 2 cases (9%), and lobular carcinoma, medullar carcinoma, and mucinous carcinoma in 4.6% each of the others cases. The treatment had consisted to a radical mastectomy (Halsted or Patey) in 19
Web site. A womans breast is made up of glands that make breast milk (lobules), ducts (small tubes that connect lobules to the nipple), fatty and connective tissue, blood vessels, and lymph (pronounced limf) vessels. Most breast cancers begin in the ducts (ductal carcinoma), some begin in the lobules (lobular carcinoma), and the rest in other tissues.. Lymph vessels are like veins, except that they carry lymph fluid instead of blood. Lymph is a clear fluid that contains immune system cells and waste products. Lymph vessels lead to small, bean-shaped collections of tissue called lymph nodes. Most lymph vessels of the breast lead to lymph nodes under the arm. These are called axillary (AX-uh-lair-ee) nodes. If breast cancer cells reach the underarm lymph nodes and continue to grow, they cause the nodes to swell. Once cancer cells have reached these nodes, they are more likely to spread to other organs of the body.. Aside from being female, age is the most important factor affecting breast cancer ...
Breast cancer survivor Courtney Kapp translates personal passions into advocacy.. By Diana Price. The personal pursuits that led breast cancer survivor Courtney Kapp through treatment-yoga and hiking-continue to inspire her as she brings her passions to other survivors and raises funds for breast cancer research in the process.. "Yoga and hiking both work for me personally, so sort of selfishly I worked within that infrastructure," is the way Courtney describes her desire to work her love for yoga and hiking into advocacy for breast cancer. But selfish is hardly the word for a woman who is clearly dedicated to and obviously passionate about raising money and awareness for breast cancer research.. Forty years old when she was diagnosed with infiltrating lobular carcinoma after discovering a lump in her right breast during a self exam, Courtneys youngest child, Peter was only 18 months old (her elder son Harrison was three, and daughter Natalie was five) when she was delivered the news.. Her ...
Image1: Sputum- Metastatic adenocarcinoma. Image2: Sputum- Metastatic squamous cell carcinoma. 1. A full history is essential.. 2. The background is often clean.. 3. Adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma metastases may be indistinguishable from a new primary lung tumor.. 4. Comparison with the original primary tumor histology or cytology may help.. 5. A few tumors have characteristic morphology. Example: melanoma, lobular carcinoma of breast.. 6. Special stains are helpful in some cases ...
All women who have been diagnosed with LCIS should have ongoing surveillance due to the increased risk of subsequent invasive breast cancer. Subject to specialist clinical judgement (e.g. considering the age of the woman), surveillance includes annual clinical examination and appropriate bilateral imaging. The type of imaging used in surveillance will depend on the womans characteristics and how their LCIS was managed.
Male breast cancer (male breast neoplasm) is a rare cancer in males that originates from the breast. Many males with breast cancer have inherited a BRCA mutation, but there are other causes, including alcohol abuse and exposure to certain hormones and ionizing radiation. As it presents a similar pathology as female breast cancer, assessment and treatment relies on experiences and guidelines that have been developed in female patients. The optimal treatment is currently not known. As in females, infiltrating ductal carcinoma is the most common type. While intraductal cancer, inflammatory carcinoma, and Pagets disease of the nipple have been described, lobular carcinoma in situ has not been seen in males. Breast cancer in males spreads via lymphatics and blood stream like female breast cancer. Accordingly, the TNM staging system for breast cancer is the same for males and females. Size of the lesion and lymph node involvement determine prognosis; thus small lesions without lymph node involvement ...
Tang S, Onuma, K, Deb P, Wang E, Mahe E, Sur M and Daya D. Frequency of Serous Tubal Intraepithelial Carcinoma in Various Gynecological Malignancies-A Study of 300 Consecutive Cases. Int J Gynecol Path, 2012; 31:103-110.. Quinlan -Davidson S, Hodgson N, Elavathil L, Tang S. Borderline Phyllodes Tumor with an Incidental Invasive Ductal Carcinoma and Lobular Carcinoma In-Situ Component: A Case Report". J Breast Cancer. 2011; 14(3):237-240. He SH, Chen X, Song CH, Liu ZQ, Zhou LF, Ma WE, Zhao LD, Li TL, Tang SG, Xing Z, Yang PC. Interferon- λ-mediates oral tolerance and inhibits antigen-specific, T-helper 2 cell-mediated inflammation in mouse intestine. Gastroenterology. 2011; 141:249-258. 2011. Feng BS, Chen X, Li P, Zheng PY, Chong J, Cho DB, He SH, Tang SG and Yang PC. Expression of integrin alphavbeta6 in the intestinal epithelial cells of patients with inflammatory bowel disease. North Am J Med Sci. 2009; 1: 200-204. 2009. Zheng PY, Feng BS, Oluwole C, Solderholm J, Chen X, Li P, Tang SG and ...
Another interesting finding in our study is that women greater than 55 years of age with atypia had increased ER expression compared with younger women with atypia. This differs from the previous report by Shoker and colleagues (7) who found that ER expression was high in atypical ductal hyperplasia, ductal carcinoma in situ and lobular neoplasia regardless of age. The number of samples in that study was somewhat small; 23 cases of atypical hyperplasia, 43 cases of ductal carcinoma in situ, and 32 cases of lobular neoplasia. The authors suggested that in atypia and carcinoma in situ the regulation of ER expression may escape the normal age-related regulatory mechanisms. ER expression and relationship to age has also been studied in hyperplastic enlarged lobular units, a common alteration of the normal TDLU and potential precursor of breast cancer. Lee and colleagues (21) have shown that ER expression in hyperplastic enlarged lobular units is increased in postmenopausal woman compared with ...
Status of 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 (17βHSD2) immunoreactivity was significantly higher in invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) than in invasive duc
Hello, I was recently diagnozed with Invasive Ductal Carcinoma. I am 26 years old and this was such a shock to me and my husband. There are really no support groups in my area and I would love to hear from anyone going through this. ------------------------------------------------------------------------ This is an automatically-generated notice. If youd like to be removed from the mailing list, please visit the Medicine-On-Line Discussion Forum at ,http://www.meds.com/con_faq.html,, or send an email message to: [email protected] with the subject line blank and the body of the message containing the line: unsubscribe mol-cancer your-email-address where the phrase your-email-address is replaced with your actual email address ...
Abstract Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is an intraductal neoplastic proliferation of epithelial cells that is separated from the breast stroma by an intact layer of basement membrane and myoepithelial cells. DCIS is a non-obligate precursor of invasive breast cancer, and up to 40% of these lesions progress to invasive disease if untreated. Currently, it is not possible to predict accurately which DCIS would be more likely to progress to invasive breast cancer as neither the significant drivers of the invasive transition have been identified, nor has the clinical utility of tests predicting the likelihood of progression been demonstrated. Although molecular studies have shown that qualitatively, synchronous DCIS and invasive breast cancers are remarkably similar, there is burgeoning evidence to demonstrate that intra-tumor genetic heterogeneity is observed in a subset of DCIS, and that the process of progression to invasive disease may constitute an evolutionary bottleneck, resulting in the ...

Polymorphous Low Grade Adenocarcinoma of the Parotid in a TeenagerPolymorphous Low Grade Adenocarcinoma of the Parotid in a Teenager

2.Freedman PD, Lumerman H. Lobular carcinoma of intraoral minor salivary gland origin: report of twelve cases. Oral Surg Oral ... Adenocarcinomas of the oral cavity: A clinicopathologic study of terminal duct carcinomas. J LaryngolOtol 1983;97:825‑35. ...
more infohttp://ijorl.mums.ac.ir/article_9249.html

Primary Signet-Ring Carcinoma (Linitus Plastica) of the Colorectum presenting as Subacute Intestinal Obstruction  - CogprintsPrimary Signet-Ring Carcinoma (Linitus Plastica) of the Colorectum presenting as Subacute Intestinal Obstruction - Cogprints

Tot T. The role of cytokeratins 20 and 7 and estrogen receptor analysis in separation of metastatic lobular carcinoma of the ... Signet ring carcinoma of the stomach. Cancer. 1992;69:1645-1650. 6. Tendon M, Sostek M, Klein MA. Focus of signet ring-cell ... Jagtap, SV and Nikumbh, DB and Khirsagar, AY and Jagtap, SS and S, Khan (2012) Primary Signet-Ring Carcinoma (Linitus Plastica ... Signet ring cell carcinoma; Colorectal neoplasm; Linitus plastica. Subjects:. JOURNALS , Online Journal of Health and Allied ...
more infohttp://cogprints.org/8879/

Lobular carcinoma - WikipediaLobular carcinoma - Wikipedia

Examples include: Lobular carcinoma in situ Invasive lobular carcinoma "lobular carcinoma" at Dorlands Medical Dictionary. ... Lobular carcinoma is a form of tumor which primarily affects the lobules of a gland. It is sometimes considered equivalent to " ... "terminal duct carcinoma". If not otherwise specified, it generally refers to breast cancer. ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lobular_carcinoma

Invasive lobular carcinoma - WikipediaInvasive lobular carcinoma - Wikipedia

Invasive lobular carcinoma accounts for 5-10% of invasive breast cancer. The histologic patterns include: Overall, the five- ... year survival rate of invasive lobular carcinoma was approximately 85% in 2003. Loss of E-cadherin is common in lobular ... Arpino G, Bardou VJ, Clark GM, Elledge RM (2004). "Infiltrating lobular carcinoma of the breast: tumor characteristics and ... Pointon KS, Cunningham DA (August 1999). "Ultrasound findings in pure invasive lobular carcinoma of the breast: comparison with ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Invasive_lobular_carcinoma

Lobular Carcinoma in Situ | LCIS | American Cancer SocietyLobular Carcinoma in Situ | LCIS | American Cancer Society

Lobular carcinoma in situ means abnormal cells are in the breast. LCIS is not cancer but can signal a higher risk of breast ... Lobular Carcinoma in Situ (LCIS). Lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) may also be called lobular neoplasia. In this breast change ... Chapter 22: Lobular carcinoma in situ: Biology and management. In: Harris JR, Lippman ME, Morrow M, Osborne CK, eds. Diseases ... Long term clinical follow-up of atypical ductal hyperplasia and lobular carcinoma in situ in breast core needle biopsies. ...
more infohttps://www.cancer.org/cancer/breast-cancer/non-cancerous-breast-conditions/lobular-carcinoma-in-situ.html

Invasive Lobular Carcinoma: Symptoms, Diagnosis, and MoreInvasive Lobular Carcinoma: Symptoms, Diagnosis, and More

... of all invasive breast cancers are invasive lobular carcinomas. Learn about the diagnosis and treatment of invasive lobular ... sometimes called infiltrating lobular carcinoma, is the second most common type of breast cancer after invasive ductal ... Invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC), sometimes called infiltrating lobular carcinoma, is the second most common type of breast ... About 10% of all invasive breast cancers are invasive lobular carcinomas. (About 80% are invasive ductal carcinomas.) ...
more infohttps://www.breastcancer.org/symptoms/types/ilc

Lobular Carcinoma in Situ - Cancer Council VictoriaLobular Carcinoma in Situ - Cancer Council Victoria

Lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) is an uncommon condition where benign (non-cancer) change is seen within the lobules of the ... On this page: What is lobular carcinoma in situ? , Finding lobular carcinoma in situ , Lobular carcinoma in situ and the risk ... What is lobular carcinoma in situ?. Lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) is an uncommon condition where benign (non-cancer) change ... Finding lobular carcinoma in situ. LCIS doesnt usually form a lump or show up on a mammogram. Its found by chance when a ...
more infohttp://www.cancervic.org.au/preventing-cancer/attend-screening/breasts-health/lobular-carcinoma-in-situ

What are the histologic characteristics of invasive lobular carcinoma?What are the histologic characteristics of invasive lobular carcinoma?

Invasive lobular carcinoma has a much lower incidence than infiltrating ductal carcinoma, constituting less than 15% of cases ... Invasive lobular carcinoma has a much lower incidence than infiltrating ductal carcinoma, constituting less than 15% of cases ... Lobular carcinoma in situ at high power view showing orderly cells uniformly arranged with very few or no mitoses. ... Lobular carcinoma in situ. Enlargement and expansion of lobule with monotonous population of neoplastic cells. ...
more infohttps://www.medscape.com/answers/1954658-187841/1954658-overview

Lobular Carcinoma in Situ (LCIS) - Cedars-SinaiLobular Carcinoma in Situ (LCIS) - Cedars-Sinai

... also known as lobular neoplasia, is a rare condition in which abnormal cells develop in the milk glands, known as lobules, in ... Lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS), also known as lobular neoplasia, is a rare condition in which abnormal cells develop in the ...
more infohttps://www.cedars-sinai.edu/Patients/Health-Conditions/Lobular-Carcinoma-in-Situ-LCIS.aspx

Invasive Lobular Carcinoma in Breast & Lymph Nodes - Cancer - MedHelpInvasive Lobular Carcinoma in Breast & Lymph Nodes - Cancer - MedHelp

Invasive Lobular Carcinoma in Breast & Lymph Nodes Carelen I just had a masectomy, without the need of chemo. Two of twenty ... Invasive Lobular Carcinoma in Breast & Lymph Nodes. I just had a masectomy, without the need of chemo. Two of twenty lymph ... Create an account to receive updates on: Invasive Lobular Carcinoma in Breast & Lymph Nodes ...
more infohttps://www.medhelp.org/posts/Cancer/Invasive-Lobular-Carcinoma-in-Breast--Lymph-Nodes/show/1178163

Lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) | Breast conditions | Cancer Research UKLobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) | Breast conditions | Cancer Research UK

Lobular carcinoma in situ isnt cancer. LCIS means that some cells lining the lobules of the breast tissue have started to turn ... Lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS). Find out what lobular carcinoma in situ is, how it is diagnosed and treated, and about follow ... The diagnosis and management of pre-invasive breast disease: Pathology of atypical lobular hyperplasia and lobular carcinoma in ... Lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) means that cells inside some of the breast lobules have started to become abnormal. The ...
more infohttps://www.cancerresearchuk.org/about-cancer/breast-cancer/stages-types-grades/types/lobular-carcinoma-in-situ-lcis

Unusual Metastatic Patterns of Invasive Lobular  Carcinoma of the BreastUnusual Metastatic Patterns of Invasive Lobular Carcinoma of the Breast

Invasive lobular carcinoma of the breast has similar patterns of metastatic disease when compared to invasive ductal carcinoma ... "A comparison of the metastatic pattern of infiltrating lobular carcinoma and infiltrating duct carcinoma of the breast," ... J. Lamovec and M. Bracko, "Metastatic pattern of infiltrating lobular carcinoma of the breast: an autopsy study," Journal of ... Unusual Metastatic Patterns of Invasive Lobular Carcinoma of the Breast. Justin D. Sobinsky, Thomas D. Willson, Francis J. ...
more infohttps://www.hindawi.com/journals/crionm/2013/986517/

Infiltrating lobular carcinoma of the left breastInfiltrating lobular carcinoma of the left breast

Metastatic lobular carcinoma of the breast: patterns of spread in the chest, abdomen, and pelvis on CT. AJR Am J Roentgenol. ... Invasive lobular carcinoma of the breast: mammographic findings and extent of disease at diagnosis in 184 patients. AJR Am J ... Infiltrating lobular carcinoma of the left breast. By Megha Madhukar Kapoor, MD and Phan T. Huynh, MD ... Infiltrating lobular carcinoma of the left breast, with metastases to the left axilla and gastric wall. ...
more infohttp://appliedradiology.com/articles/infiltrating-lobular-carcinoma-of-the-left-breast

Metástasis de carcinoma lobular de mama diagnosticado por macrobiopsias rectalesMetástasis de carcinoma lobular de mama diagnosticado por macrobiopsias rectales

Metastasis of lobular breast carcinoma diagnosed by rectal macrobiopsies. Metástasis de carcinoma lobular de mama diagnosticado ... Rectal metastasis of lobular breast carcinoma. Rev Esp Enferm Dig 2008; 100(7): 440-2. [ Links ]. 4. Martínez Lesquereux L, ... Rectal metastases from lobular carcinoma of the breast: Report of a case and literature review. Ann Oncol 2001; 12: 715-8. [ ... We present the case of a 72-year-old woman with invasive lobular breast carcinoma, stage IV (vertebral metastasis), and with ...
more infohttp://scielo.isciii.es/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1130-01082010001100008&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=en

Lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) - Pre-cancerous conditions - Macmillan Cancer SupportLobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) - Pre-cancerous conditions - Macmillan Cancer Support

Women with Lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) should have regular breast screening. LCIS is not a cancer, but indicates a risk of ... What is lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS)?. The breast contains lobes where milk is made. Lobular carcinoma in situ is a ... Lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS, also called lobular neoplasia) is not a cancer. It is a condition where there are changes in ... Lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) is not a cancer. It means there are changes to the cells lining the lobes that make milk in ...
more infohttps://www.macmillan.org.uk/information-and-support/diagnosing/causes-and-risk-factors/pre-cancerous-conditions/lcis.html

Invasive Lobular Carcinoma - UNM Comprehensive Cancer CenterInvasive Lobular Carcinoma - UNM Comprehensive Cancer Center

Invasive Lobular Carcinoma. By A cancer that arises in the milk-producing glands of the breast and then breaks through the ... About 15% of invasive breast cancers are invasive lobular carcinomas. It is often difficult to detect by physical examination ...
more infohttp://cancer.unm.edu/2001/12/05/invasive-lobular-carcinoma/

Signs of Invasive lobular carcinoma - RightDiagnosis.comSigns of Invasive lobular carcinoma - RightDiagnosis.com

... and the correct diagnosis for Invasive lobular carcinoma signs or Invasive lobular carcinoma symptoms. ... Signs of Invasive lobular carcinoma including medical signs and symptoms of Invasive lobular carcinoma, symptoms, misdiagnosis ... Invasive lobular carcinoma: Introduction. *Symptoms of Invasive lobular carcinoma *Tests to Confirm Diagnosis *Home Diagnostic ... Complications of Invasive lobular carcinoma *Hidden causes of Invasive lobular carcinoma *Associated conditions for Invasive ...
more infohttps://www.rightdiagnosis.com/i/invasive_lobular_carcinoma/signs.htm

Infiltrating lobular carcinoma of the breast: tumor characteristics and clinical outcome.  - PubMed - NCBIInfiltrating lobular carcinoma of the breast: tumor characteristics and clinical outcome. - PubMed - NCBI

... for invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) versus 83.5% (95% CI 83.1-84.0%) for invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC; P = 0.13). (b) The 5- ... for invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) and 26.7% (95% CI 25.3-28.0) for invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC). The median survival ... Infiltrating lobular carcinoma of the breast: tumor characteristics and clinical outcome.. Arpino G1, Bardou VJ, Clark GM, ... Invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) comprises approximately 10% of breast cancers and appears to have a distinct biology. Because ...
more infohttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15084238?dopt=Abstract

Chemo /Treatments Board: Metastatic lobular carcinoma of breastChemo /Treatments Board: Metastatic lobular carcinoma of breast

Re: Metastatic lobular carcinoma of breast - JanetA 4/28/2013, 6:37 pm *Re: Metastatic lobular carcinoma of breast - Patty 4/30 ... Metastatic lobular carcinoma of breast. Posted by Kiran on 4/28/2013, 3:57 am ... My mother is 57 years old and has recently been diagnosed with Metastatic lobular carcinoma of breast. This has a very ... Metastatic lobular carcinoma of breast. its ER 90% and PR 30% I have been trying to go through the internet to understand more ...
more infohttp://members3.boardhost.com/coping/msg/1367135847.html

Lobular Carcinoma in Situ Breast Cancer | Texas OncologyLobular Carcinoma in Situ Breast Cancer | Texas Oncology

The treatment of lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) is somewhat controversial. LCIS is thought to be an indicator for an ... Lobular Carcinoma in Situ Breast Cancer. Charlet Tidwell. Charlet wasnt about to let her treatment slow her down. She ran her ... The treatment of lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) is somewhat controversial. LCIS is thought to be an indicator for an ... This option is only considered if the patient insists that the risk of developing carcinoma must be totally excluded. ...
more infohttps://www.texasoncology.com/types-of-cancer/breast-cancer/carcinoma-in-situ/lobular-carcinoma-in-situ/

Related Specialties | Lobular Carcinoma In Situ | Main Line Health | Philadelphia, PennsylvaniaRelated Specialties | Lobular Carcinoma In Situ | Main Line Health | Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Get information about more than 750 specific types of illness, injury and disease to help you understand the different kinds of treatment options and find the right doctor or service for your needs.. ...
more infohttps://www.mainlinehealth.org/conditions-and-treatments/conditions/lobular-carcinoma-in-situ/specialties

Improved mouse model of invasive lobular carcinoma | Disease Models & MechanismsImproved mouse model of invasive lobular carcinoma | Disease Models & Mechanisms

Improved mouse model of invasive lobular carcinoma Message Subject (Your Name) has sent you a message from Disease Models & ... Similar to other metastatic cancers, loss of E-cadherin is a feature of invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC), a common form of ...
more infohttp://dmm.biologists.org/content/4/3/277.6

Screening mammogram - lobular carcinoma | Radiology Case | Radiopaedia.orgScreening mammogram - lobular carcinoma | Radiology Case | Radiopaedia.org

The value of using previous studies for comparison. Its quite exceptional to be able to biopsy a 4 mm lesion. Review what overdiagnosis is. Reading of screening studies should be done in isolated reading areas. If your reading environment is a ...
more infohttps://radiopaedia.org/cases/screening-mammogram-lobular-carcinoma

Lobular carcinoma left breast | Radiology Case | Radiopaedia.orgLobular carcinoma left breast | Radiology Case | Radiopaedia.org

This lesion on biopsy turned out to be an infiltrating lobular carcinoma of the left breast. Previous screening on this lady 2 ... This lesion on biopsy turned out to be an infiltrating lobular carcinoma of the left breast. Previous screening on this lady 2 ...
more infohttps://radiopaedia.org/cases/lobular-carcinoma-left-breast-2

Lower genital tract metastases at time of first diagnosis of mammary invasive lobular carcinoma.  - PubMed - NCBILower genital tract metastases at time of first diagnosis of mammary invasive lobular carcinoma. - PubMed - NCBI

Lower genital tract metastases at time of first diagnosis of mammary invasive lobular carcinoma.. Engelstaedter V1, Mylonas I. ... In the differential diagnosis of peritoneal carcinosis, metastases of an invasive-lobular carcinoma should be considered. ... this is the first report about metastasis to the lower genital tract on initial presentation of an invasive-lobular carcinoma. ... Histology showed a moderately differentiated invasive-lobular breast cancer.. CONCLUSION: To our knowledge, ...
more infohttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21293870?dopt=Abstract
  • The expression of basal cytokeratin markers CK5/6 in breast carcinomas has been associated with high histological grade and poor clinical outcome. (rti.org)
  • Numeric values of CAD marks at sites of carcinoma showed median score of 171 (range 0 - 1121). (springer.com)
  • This type of carcinoma was previously reported only in three cases, and rare but important, because the treatment and prognosis might change by histological subtypes. (intechopen.com)