A malignant neoplasm made up of epithelial cells tending to infiltrate the surrounding tissues and give rise to metastases. It is a histological type of neoplasm but is often wrongly used as a synonym for "cancer." (From Dorland, 27th ed)
An invasive (infiltrating) CARCINOMA of the mammary ductal system (MAMMARY GLANDS) in the human BREAST.
A carcinoma derived from stratified SQUAMOUS EPITHELIAL CELLS. It may also occur in sites where glandular or columnar epithelium is normally present. (From Stedman, 25th ed)
A primary malignant neoplasm of epithelial liver cells. It ranges from a well-differentiated tumor with EPITHELIAL CELLS indistinguishable from normal HEPATOCYTES to a poorly differentiated neoplasm. The cells may be uniform or markedly pleomorphic, or form GIANT CELLS. Several classification schemes have been suggested.
A lesion with cytological characteristics associated with invasive carcinoma but the tumor cells are confined to the epithelium of origin, without invasion of the basement membrane.
Malignant neoplasms involving the ductal systems of any of a number of organs, such as the MAMMARY GLANDS, the PANCREAS, the PROSTATE, or the LACRIMAL GLAND.
A noninvasive (noninfiltrating) carcinoma of the breast characterized by a proliferation of malignant epithelial cells confined to the mammary ducts or lobules, without light-microscopy evidence of invasion through the basement membrane into the surrounding stroma.
A malignant neoplasm characterized by the formation of numerous, irregular, finger-like projections of fibrous stroma that is covered with a surface layer of neoplastic epithelial cells. (Stedman, 25th ed)
Tumors or cancer of the human BREAST.
Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.
Tumors or cancer of the LIVER.
A malignant skin neoplasm that seldom metastasizes but has potentialities for local invasion and destruction. Clinically it is divided into types: nodular, cicatricial, morphaic, and erythematoid (pagetoid). They develop on hair-bearing skin, most commonly on sun-exposed areas. Approximately 85% are found on the head and neck area and the remaining 15% on the trunk and limbs. (From DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p1471)
Molecular products metabolized and secreted by neoplastic tissue and characterized biochemically in cells or body fluids. They are indicators of tumor stage and grade as well as useful for monitoring responses to treatment and predicting recurrence. Many chemical groups are represented including hormones, antigens, amino and nucleic acids, enzymes, polyamines, and specific cell membrane proteins and lipids.
Ability of neoplasms to infiltrate and actively destroy surrounding tissue.
Ducts that collect PANCREATIC JUICE from the PANCREAS and supply it to the DUODENUM.
A malignant epithelial tumor with a glandular organization.
A malignant neoplasm derived from TRANSITIONAL EPITHELIAL CELLS, occurring chiefly in the URINARY BLADDER; URETERS; or RENAL PELVIS.
A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.
A cell line derived from cultured tumor cells.
Malignant neoplasm arising from the epithelium of the BRONCHI. It represents a large group of epithelial lung malignancies which can be divided into two clinical groups: SMALL CELL LUNG CANCER and NON-SMALL-CELL LUNG CARCINOMA.
Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in neoplastic tissue.
Methods which attempt to express in replicable terms the extent of the neoplasm in the patient.
A carcinoma composed mainly of epithelial elements with little or no stroma. Medullary carcinomas of the breast constitute 5%-7% of all mammary carcinomas; medullary carcinomas of the thyroid comprise 3%-10% of all thyroid malignancies. (From Dorland, 27th ed; DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p1141; Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)
Carcinoma characterized by bands or cylinders of hyalinized or mucinous stroma separating or surrounded by nests or cords of small epithelial cells. When the cylinders occur within masses of epithelial cells, they give the tissue a perforated, sievelike, or cribriform appearance. Such tumors occur in the mammary glands, the mucous glands of the upper and lower respiratory tract, and the salivary glands. They are malignant but slow-growing, and tend to spread locally via the nerves. (Dorland, 27th ed)
An anaplastic, highly malignant, and usually bronchogenic carcinoma composed of small ovoid cells with scanty neoplasm. It is characterized by a dominant, deeply basophilic nucleus, and absent or indistinct nucleoli. (From Stedman, 25th ed; Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 3d ed, p1286-7)
A infiltrating (invasive) breast cancer, relatively uncommon, accounting for only 5%-10% of breast tumors in most series. It is often an area of ill-defined thickening in the breast, in contrast to the dominant lump characteristic of ductal carcinoma. It is typically composed of small cells in a linear arrangement with a tendency to grow around ducts and lobules. There is likelihood of axillary nodal involvement with metastasis to meningeal and serosal surfaces. (DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p1205)
A group of carcinomas which share a characteristic morphology, often being composed of clusters and trabecular sheets of round "blue cells", granular chromatin, and an attenuated rim of poorly demarcated cytoplasm. Neuroendocrine tumors include carcinoids, small ("oat") cell carcinomas, medullary carcinoma of the thyroid, Merkel cell tumor, cutaneous neuroendocrine carcinoma, pancreatic islet cell tumors, and pheochromocytoma. Neurosecretory granules are found within the tumor cells. (Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)
Cells grown in vitro from neoplastic tissue. If they can be established as a TUMOR CELL LINE, they can be propagated in cell culture indefinitely.
Tumors or cancer of the NASOPHARYNX.
Tumors or cancer of the THYROID GLAND.
In humans, one of the paired regions in the anterior portion of the THORAX. The breasts consist of the MAMMARY GLANDS, the SKIN, the MUSCLES, the ADIPOSE TISSUE, and the CONNECTIVE TISSUES.
Transfer of a neoplasm from its primary site to lymph nodes or to distant parts of the body by way of the lymphatic system.
A mixed adenocarcinoma and squamous cell or epidermoid carcinoma.
Tumors or cancer of the LUNG.
An adenocarcinoma producing mucin in significant amounts. (From Dorland, 27th ed)
A tumor of both low- and high-grade malignancy. The low-grade grow slowly, appear in any age group, and are readily cured by excision. The high-grade behave aggressively, widely infiltrate the salivary gland and produce lymph node and distant metastases. Mucoepidermoid carcinomas account for about 21% of the malignant tumors of the parotid gland and 10% of the sublingual gland. They are the most common malignant tumor of the parotid. (From DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p575; Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 3d ed, p1240)
Pathological processes that tend eventually to become malignant. (From Dorland, 27th ed)
Proteins whose abnormal expression (gain or loss) are associated with the development, growth, or progression of NEOPLASMS. Some neoplasm proteins are tumor antigens (ANTIGENS, NEOPLASM), i.e. they induce an immune reaction to their tumor. Many neoplasm proteins have been characterized and are used as tumor markers (BIOMARKERS, TUMOR) when they are detectable in cells and body fluids as monitors for the presence or growth of tumors. Abnormal expression of ONCOGENE PROTEINS is involved in neoplastic transformation, whereas the loss of expression of TUMOR SUPPRESSOR PROTEINS is involved with the loss of growth control and progression of the neoplasm.
The local recurrence of a neoplasm following treatment. It arises from microscopic cells of the original neoplasm that have escaped therapeutic intervention and later become clinically visible at the original site.
An adenocarcinoma characterized by the presence of cells resembling the glandular cells of the ENDOMETRIUM. It is a common histological type of ovarian CARCINOMA and ENDOMETRIAL CARCINOMA. There is a high frequency of co-occurrence of this form of adenocarcinoma in both tissues.
Soft tissue tumors or cancer arising from the mucosal surfaces of the LIP; oral cavity; PHARYNX; LARYNX; and cervical esophagus. Other sites included are the NOSE and PARANASAL SINUSES; SALIVARY GLANDS; THYROID GLAND and PARATHYROID GLANDS; and MELANOMA and non-melanoma skin cancers of the head and neck. (from Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 4th ed, p1651)
The conic organs which usually give outlet to milk from the mammary glands.
The transfer of a neoplasm from one organ or part of the body to another remote from the primary site.
Immunologic techniques based on the use of: (1) enzyme-antibody conjugates; (2) enzyme-antigen conjugates; (3) antienzyme antibody followed by its homologous enzyme; or (4) enzyme-antienzyme complexes. These are used histologically for visualizing or labeling tissue specimens.
A highly malignant, primitive form of carcinoma, probably of germinal cell or teratomatous derivation, usually arising in a gonad and rarely in other sites. It is rare in the female ovary, but in the male it accounts for 20% of all testicular tumors. (From Dorland, 27th ed & Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 3d ed, p1595)
Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.
Tumors or cancer of the ESOPHAGUS.
Tumors or cancer of the MOUTH.
A carcinoma arising from MERKEL CELLS located in the basal layer of the epidermis and occurring most commonly as a primary neuroendocrine carcinoma of the skin. Merkel cells are tactile cells of neuroectodermal origin and histologically show neurosecretory granules. The skin of the head and neck are a common site of Merkel cell carcinoma, occurring generally in elderly patients. (Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 3d ed, p1245)
Tumors or cancer of the OVARY. These neoplasms can be benign or malignant. They are classified according to the tissue of origin, such as the surface EPITHELIUM, the stromal endocrine cells, and the totipotent GERM CELLS.
Mutant mice homozygous for the recessive gene "nude" which fail to develop a thymus. They are useful in tumor studies and studies on immune responses.
RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.
DNA present in neoplastic tissue.
An increase in the number of cells in a tissue or organ without tumor formation. It differs from HYPERTROPHY, which is an increase in bulk without an increase in the number of cells.
Tumors or cancer of the COLON.
Two or more abnormal growths of tissue occurring simultaneously and presumed to be of separate origin. The neoplasms may be histologically the same or different, and may be found in the same or different sites.
A variant of well-differentiated epidermoid carcinoma that is most common in the oral cavity, but also occurs in the larynx, nasal cavity, esophagus, penis, anorectal region, vulva, vagina, uterine cervix, and skin, especially on the sole of the foot. Most intraoral cases occur in elderly male abusers of smokeless tobacco. The treatment is surgical resection. Radiotherapy is not indicated, as up to 30% treated with radiation become highly aggressive within six months. (Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)
A poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma in which the nucleus is pressed to one side by a cytoplasmic droplet of mucus. It usually arises in the gastrointestinal system.
A variation of the PCR technique in which cDNA is made from RNA via reverse transcription. The resultant cDNA is then amplified using standard PCR protocols.
The worsening of a disease over time. This concept is most often used for chronic and incurable diseases where the stage of the disease is an important determinant of therapy and prognosis.
The proportion of survivors in a group, e.g., of patients, studied and followed over a period, or the proportion of persons in a specified group alive at the beginning of a time interval who survive to the end of the interval. It is often studied using life table methods.
Tumors or cancer of the URINARY BLADDER.
Tumors or cancer of the STOMACH.
Tumors or cancer of the SKIN.
MAMMARY GLANDS in the non-human MAMMALS.
Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.
A class of statistical procedures for estimating the survival function (function of time, starting with a population 100% well at a given time and providing the percentage of the population still well at later times). The survival analysis is then used for making inferences about the effects of treatments, prognostic factors, exposures, and other covariates on the function.
A cell surface protein-tyrosine kinase receptor that is overexpressed in a variety of ADENOCARCINOMAS. It has extensive homology to and heterodimerizes with the EGF RECEPTOR, the ERBB-3 RECEPTOR, and the ERBB-4 RECEPTOR. Activation of the erbB-2 receptor occurs through heterodimer formation with a ligand-bound erbB receptor family member.
Experimental transplantation of neoplasms in laboratory animals for research purposes.
Substances that inhibit or prevent the proliferation of NEOPLASMS.
All of the processes involved in increasing CELL NUMBER including CELL DIVISION.
A nodular organ in the ABDOMEN that contains a mixture of ENDOCRINE GLANDS and EXOCRINE GLANDS. The small endocrine portion consists of the ISLETS OF LANGERHANS secreting a number of hormones into the blood stream. The large exocrine portion (EXOCRINE PANCREAS) is a compound acinar gland that secretes several digestive enzymes into the pancreatic ductal system that empties into the DUODENUM.
The simultaneous analysis of multiple samples of TISSUES or CELLS from BIOPSY or in vitro culture that have been arranged in an array format on slides or microchips.
Nuclear phosphoprotein encoded by the p53 gene (GENES, P53) whose normal function is to control CELL PROLIFERATION and APOPTOSIS. A mutant or absent p53 protein has been found in LEUKEMIA; OSTEOSARCOMA; LUNG CANCER; and COLORECTAL CANCER.
A class of fibrous proteins or scleroproteins that represents the principal constituent of EPIDERMIS; HAIR; NAILS; horny tissues, and the organic matrix of tooth ENAMEL. Two major conformational groups have been characterized, alpha-keratin, whose peptide backbone forms a coiled-coil alpha helical structure consisting of TYPE I KERATIN and a TYPE II KERATIN, and beta-keratin, whose backbone forms a zigzag or pleated sheet structure. alpha-Keratins have been classified into at least 20 subtypes. In addition multiple isoforms of subtypes have been found which may be due to GENE DUPLICATION.
A CELL CYCLE and tumor growth marker which can be readily detected using IMMUNOCYTOCHEMISTRY methods. Ki-67 is a nuclear antigen present only in the nuclei of cycling cells.
A tumor of undifferentiated (anaplastic) cells of large size. It is usually bronchogenic. (From Dorland, 27th ed)
Cytoplasmic proteins that bind estrogens and migrate to the nucleus where they regulate DNA transcription. Evaluation of the state of estrogen receptors in breast cancer patients has become clinically important.
Proteins, glycoprotein, or lipoprotein moieties on surfaces of tumor cells that are usually identified by monoclonal antibodies. Many of these are of either embryonic or viral origin.
Any of the ducts which transport saliva. Salivary ducts include the parotid duct, the major and minor sublingual ducts, and the submandibular duct.
Cancers or tumors of the LARYNX or any of its parts: the GLOTTIS; EPIGLOTTIS; LARYNGEAL CARTILAGES; LARYNGEAL MUSCLES; and VOCAL CORDS.
Tumors or cancer of the UTERINE CERVIX.
A fetal blood vessel connecting the pulmonary artery with the descending aorta.
One of the mechanisms by which CELL DEATH occurs (compare with NECROSIS and AUTOPHAGOCYTOSIS). Apoptosis is the mechanism responsible for the physiological deletion of cells and appears to be intrinsically programmed. It is characterized by distinctive morphologic changes in the nucleus and cytoplasm, chromatin cleavage at regularly spaced sites, and the endonucleolytic cleavage of genomic DNA; (DNA FRAGMENTATION); at internucleosomal sites. This mode of cell death serves as a balance to mitosis in regulating the size of animal tissues and in mediating pathologic processes associated with tumor growth.
An adenocarcinoma of the thyroid gland, in which the cells are arranged in the form of follicles. (From Dorland, 27th ed)
The fission of a CELL. It includes CYTOKINESIS, when the CYTOPLASM of a cell is divided, and CELL NUCLEUS DIVISION.
Experimentally induced mammary neoplasms in animals to provide a model for studying human BREAST NEOPLASMS.
Cell changes manifested by escape from control mechanisms, increased growth potential, alterations in the cell surface, karyotypic abnormalities, morphological and biochemical deviations from the norm, and other attributes conferring the ability to invade, metastasize, and kill.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
Tumors or cancer of the gallbladder.
Pathological processes of the BREAST.
The treatment of a disease or condition by several different means simultaneously or sequentially. Chemoimmunotherapy, RADIOIMMUNOTHERAPY, chemoradiotherapy, cryochemotherapy, and SALVAGE THERAPY are seen most frequently, but their combinations with each other and surgery are also used.
Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.
The malignant stem cells of TERATOCARCINOMAS, which resemble pluripotent stem cells of the BLASTOCYST INNER CELL MASS. The EC cells can be grown in vitro, and experimentally induced to differentiate. They are used as a model system for studying early embryonic cell differentiation.
Tumors or cancer of the SALIVARY GLANDS.
An adenocarcinoma containing finger-like processes of vascular connective tissue covered by neoplastic epithelium, projecting into cysts or the cavity of glands or follicles. It occurs most frequently in the ovary and thyroid gland. (Stedman, 25th ed)
Period after successful treatment in which there is no appearance of the symptoms or effects of the disease.
Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.
A thyroid neoplasm of mixed papillary and follicular arrangement. Its biological behavior and prognosis is the same as that of a papillary adenocarcinoma of the thyroid. (From DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p1271)
Removal and pathologic examination of specimens in the form of small pieces of tissue from the living body.
A malignant tumor arising from secreting cells of a racemose gland, particularly the salivary glands. Racemose (Latin racemosus, full of clusters) refers, as does acinar (Latin acinus, grape), to small saclike dilatations in various glands. Acinar cell carcinomas are usually well differentiated and account for about 13% of the cancers arising in the parotid gland. Lymph node metastasis occurs in about 16% of cases. Local recurrences and distant metastases many years after treatment are common. This tumor appears in all age groups and is most common in women. (Stedman, 25th ed; Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 3d ed, p1240; from DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p575)
A heterogeneous aggregate of at least three distinct histological types of lung cancer, including SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA; ADENOCARCINOMA; and LARGE CELL CARCINOMA. They are dealt with collectively because of their shared treatment strategy.
Cells that line the inner and outer surfaces of the body by forming cellular layers (EPITHELIUM) or masses. Epithelial cells lining the SKIN; the MOUTH; the NOSE; and the ANAL CANAL derive from ectoderm; those lining the RESPIRATORY SYSTEM and the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM derive from endoderm; others (CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM and LYMPHATIC SYSTEM) derive from mesoderm. Epithelial cells can be classified mainly by cell shape and function into squamous, glandular and transitional epithelial cells.
Calcium-dependent cell adhesion proteins. They are important in the formation of ADHERENS JUNCTIONS between cells. Cadherins are classified by their distinct immunological and tissue specificities, either by letters (E- for epithelial, N- for neural, and P- for placental cadherins) or by numbers (cadherin-12 or N-cadherin 2 for brain-cadherin). Cadherins promote cell adhesion via a homophilic mechanism as in the construction of tissues and of the whole animal body.
RNA present in neoplastic tissue.
One or more layers of EPITHELIAL CELLS, supported by the basal lamina, which covers the inner or outer surfaces of the body.
Tumors or cancer of ENDOMETRIUM, the mucous lining of the UTERUS. These neoplasms can be benign or malignant. Their classification and grading are based on the various cell types and the percent of undifferentiated cells.
Four PYRROLES joined by one-carbon units linking position 2 of one to position 5 of the next. The conjugated bond system results in PIGMENTATION.
Tumors or cancer of the COLON or the RECTUM or both. Risk factors for colorectal cancer include chronic ULCERATIVE COLITIS; FAMILIAL POLYPOSIS COLI; exposure to ASBESTOS; and irradiation of the CERVIX UTERI.
Methods which attempt to express in replicable terms the level of CELL DIFFERENTIATION in neoplasms as increasing ANAPLASIA correlates with the aggressiveness of the neoplasm.
Removal of only enough breast tissue to ensure that the margins of the resected surgical specimen are free of tumor.
A nonparametric method of compiling LIFE TABLES or survival tables. It combines calculated probabilities of survival and estimates to allow for observations occurring beyond a measurement threshold, which are assumed to occur randomly. Time intervals are defined as ending each time an event occurs and are therefore unequal. (From Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1995)
Tumors or cancer of the MAMMARY GLAND in animals (MAMMARY GLANDS, ANIMAL).
The determination of the pattern of genes expressed at the level of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION, under specific circumstances or in a specific cell.
An adenoma containing fibrous tissue. It should be differentiated from ADENOFIBROMA which is a tumor composed of connective tissue (fibroma) containing glandular (adeno-) structures. (From Dorland, 27th ed)
Identification of proteins or peptides that have been electrophoretically separated by blot transferring from the electrophoresis gel to strips of nitrocellulose paper, followed by labeling with antibody probes.
The first alpha-globulins to appear in mammalian sera during FETAL DEVELOPMENT and the dominant serum proteins in early embryonic life.
The loss of one allele at a specific locus, caused by a deletion mutation; or loss of a chromosome from a chromosome pair, resulting in abnormal HEMIZYGOSITY. It is detected when heterozygous markers for a locus appear monomorphic because one of the ALLELES was deleted.
Tumors or cancer of the TONGUE.
Transplantation between animals of different species.
Tumor suppressor genes located on the short arm of human chromosome 17 and coding for the phosphoprotein p53.
Tumors or cancer of the PANCREAS. Depending on the types of ISLET CELLS present in the tumors, various hormones can be secreted: GLUCAGON from PANCREATIC ALPHA CELLS; INSULIN from PANCREATIC BETA CELLS; and SOMATOSTATIN from the SOMATOSTATIN-SECRETING CELLS. Most are malignant except the insulin-producing tumors (INSULINOMA).
A malignant cystic or semicystic neoplasm. It often occurs in the ovary and usually bilaterally. The external surface is usually covered with papillary excrescences. Microscopically, the papillary patterns are predominantly epithelial overgrowths with differentiated and undifferentiated papillary serous cystadenocarcinoma cells. Psammoma bodies may be present. The tumor generally adheres to surrounding structures and produces ascites. (From Hughes, Obstetric-Gynecologic Terminology, 1972, p185)
A carcinoma discovered by Dr. Margaret R. Lewis of the Wistar Institute in 1951. This tumor originated spontaneously as a carcinoma of the lung of a C57BL mouse. The tumor does not appear to be grossly hemorrhagic and the majority of the tumor tissue is a semifirm homogeneous mass. (From Cancer Chemother Rep 2 1972 Nov;(3)1:325) It is also called 3LL and LLC and is used as a transplantable malignancy.
The washing of a body cavity or surface by flowing water or solution for therapy or diagnosis.
Antibodies produced by a single clone of cells.
Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.
Surgical removal of the pancreas. (Dorland, 28th ed)
Radiographic examination of the breast.
The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.
A condition in which there is a change of one adult cell type to another similar adult cell type.
Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)
Death resulting from the presence of a disease in an individual, as shown by a single case report or a limited number of patients. This should be differentiated from DEATH, the physiological cessation of life and from MORTALITY, an epidemiological or statistical concept.
The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.
Tumors or cancer of the BRONCHI.
Genes that inhibit expression of the tumorigenic phenotype. They are normally involved in holding cellular growth in check. When tumor suppressor genes are inactivated or lost, a barrier to normal proliferation is removed and unregulated growth is possible.
A common and benign breast disease characterized by varying degree of fibrocystic changes in the breast tissue. There are three major patterns of morphological changes, including FIBROSIS, formation of CYSTS, and proliferation of glandular tissue (adenosis). The fibrocystic breast has a dense irregular, lumpy, bumpy consistency.
A type II keratin found associated with KERATIN-19 in ductal epithelia and gastrointestinal epithelia.
Large, branched, specialized sweat glands that empty into the upper portion of a HAIR FOLLICLE instead of directly onto the SKIN.
The phenotypic manifestation of a gene or genes by the processes of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION and GENETIC TRANSLATION.
An inorganic and water-soluble platinum complex. After undergoing hydrolysis, it reacts with DNA to produce both intra and interstrand crosslinks. These crosslinks appear to impair replication and transcription of DNA. The cytotoxicity of cisplatin correlates with cellular arrest in the G2 phase of the cell cycle.
A pathologic process consisting of the proliferation of blood vessels in abnormal tissues or in abnormal positions.
Tumors or cancer of the BILE DUCTS.
A type II keratin that is found associated with the KERATIN-14 in the internal stratified EPITHELIUM. Mutations in the gene for keratin-5 are associated with EPIDERMOLYSIS BULLOSA SIMPLEX.
A type of IN SITU HYBRIDIZATION in which target sequences are stained with fluorescent dye so their location and size can be determined using fluorescence microscopy. This staining is sufficiently distinct that the hybridization signal can be seen both in metaphase spreads and in interphase nuclei.
Passages within the liver for the conveyance of bile. Includes right and left hepatic ducts even though these may join outside the liver to form the common hepatic duct.
A cell surface receptor involved in regulation of cell growth and differentiation. It is specific for EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR and EGF-related peptides including TRANSFORMING GROWTH FACTOR ALPHA; AMPHIREGULIN; and HEPARIN-BINDING EGF-LIKE GROWTH FACTOR. The binding of ligand to the receptor causes activation of its intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity and rapid internalization of the receptor-ligand complex into the cell.
Glandular tissue in the BREAST of human that is under the influence of hormones such as ESTROGENS; PROGESTINS; and PROLACTIN. In WOMEN, after PARTURITION, the mammary glands secrete milk (MILK, HUMAN) for the nourishment of the young.
Carbohydrate antigen elevated in patients with tumors of the breast, ovary, lung, and prostate as well as other disorders. The mucin is expressed normally by most glandular epithelia but shows particularly increased expression in the breast at lactation and in malignancy. It is thus an established serum marker for breast cancer.
Surgical procedure to remove one or both breasts.
Proteins that are normally involved in holding cellular growth in check. Deficiencies or abnormalities in these proteins may lead to unregulated cell growth and tumor development.
A small, often impalpable benign papilloma arising in a lactiferous duct and frequently causing bleeding from the nipple. (Stedman, 25th ed)
A glycoprotein that is secreted into the luminal surface of the epithelia in the gastrointestinal tract. It is found in the feces and pancreaticobiliary secretions and is used to monitor the response to colon cancer treatment.
Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.
A type II keratin found associated with KERATIN-16 or KERATIN-17 in rapidly proliferating squamous epithelial tissue. Mutations in gene for keratin-6A and keratin-6B have been associated with PACHYONYCHIA CONGENITA, TYPE 1 and PACHYONYCHIA CONGENITA, TYPE 2 respectively.
The total amount (cell number, weight, size or volume) of tumor cells or tissue in the body.
An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.
Progressive restriction of the developmental potential and increasing specialization of function that leads to the formation of specialized cells, tissues, and organs.
They are oval or bean shaped bodies (1 - 30 mm in diameter) located along the lymphatic system.
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
A dilation of the duodenal papilla that is the opening of the juncture of the COMMON BILE DUCT and the MAIN PANCREATIC DUCT, also known as the hepatopancreatic ampulla.
A technique that localizes specific nucleic acid sequences within intact chromosomes, eukaryotic cells, or bacterial cells through the use of specific nucleic acid-labeled probes.
A selective increase in the number of copies of a gene coding for a specific protein without a proportional increase in other genes. It occurs naturally via the excision of a copy of the repeating sequence from the chromosome and its extrachromosomal replication in a plasmid, or via the production of an RNA transcript of the entire repeating sequence of ribosomal RNA followed by the reverse transcription of the molecule to produce an additional copy of the original DNA sequence. Laboratory techniques have been introduced for inducing disproportional replication by unequal crossing over, uptake of DNA from lysed cells, or generation of extrachromosomal sequences from rolling circle replication.
A congenital heart defect characterized by the persistent opening of fetal DUCTUS ARTERIOSUS that connects the PULMONARY ARTERY to the descending aorta (AORTA, DESCENDING) allowing unoxygenated blood to bypass the lung and flow to the PLACENTA. Normally, the ductus is closed shortly after birth.
A negative regulatory effect on physiological processes at the molecular, cellular, or systemic level. At the molecular level, the major regulatory sites include membrane receptors, genes (GENE EXPRESSION REGULATION), mRNAs (RNA, MESSENGER), and proteins.
Administration of antineoplastic agents together with an embolizing vehicle. This allows slow release of the agent as well as obstruction of the blood supply to the neoplasm.
Experimentally induced new abnormal growth of TISSUES in animals to provide models for studying human neoplasms.
The use of two or more chemicals simultaneously or sequentially in the drug therapy of neoplasms. The drugs need not be in the same dosage form.
In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.
Hybridization of a nucleic acid sample to a very large set of OLIGONUCLEOTIDE PROBES, which have been attached individually in columns and rows to a solid support, to determine a BASE SEQUENCE, or to detect variations in a gene sequence, GENE EXPRESSION, or for GENE MAPPING.
Products of proto-oncogenes. Normally they do not have oncogenic or transforming properties, but are involved in the regulation or differentiation of cell growth. They often have protein kinase activity.
A positive regulatory effect on physiological processes at the molecular, cellular, or systemic level. At the molecular level, the major regulatory sites include membrane receptors, genes (GENE EXPRESSION REGULATION), mRNAs (RNA, MESSENGER), and proteins.
INFLAMMATION of the PANCREAS. Pancreatitis is classified as acute unless there are computed tomographic or endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatographic findings of CHRONIC PANCREATITIS (International Symposium on Acute Pancreatitis, Atlanta, 1992). The two most common forms of acute pancreatitis are ALCOHOLIC PANCREATITIS and gallstone pancreatitis.
Diagnosis of the type and, when feasible, the cause of a pathologic process by means of microscopic study of cells in an exudate or other form of body fluid. (Stedman, 26th ed)
A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.
The uptake of naked or purified DNA by CELLS, usually meaning the process as it occurs in eukaryotic cells. It is analogous to bacterial transformation (TRANSFORMATION, BACTERIAL) and both are routinely employed in GENE TRANSFER TECHNIQUES.
An adenocarcinoma with a hard (Greek skirrhos, hard) structure owing to the formation of dense connective tissue in the stroma. (From Dorland, 27th ed)
Endogenous substances, usually proteins, which are effective in the initiation, stimulation, or termination of the genetic transcription process.
A skin carcinoma that histologically exhibits both basal and squamous elements. (From Dorland, 27th ed)
Specific proteins found in or on cells of progesterone target tissues that specifically combine with progesterone. The cytosol progesterone-receptor complex then associates with the nucleic acids to initiate protein synthesis. There are two kinds of progesterone receptors, A and B. Both are induced by estrogen and have short half-lives.
In vivo methods of screening investigative anticancer drugs, biologic response modifiers or radiotherapies. Human tumor tissue or cells are transplanted into mice or rats followed by tumor treatment regimens. A variety of outcomes are monitored to assess antitumor effectiveness.
Surgical removal of the thyroid gland. (Dorland, 28th ed)
Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.
Tumor or cancer of the COMMON BILE DUCT including the AMPULLA OF VATER and the SPHINCTER OF ODDI.
Radiotherapy given to augment some other form of treatment such as surgery or chemotherapy. Adjuvant radiotherapy is commonly used in the therapy of cancer and can be administered before or after the primary treatment.
DNA sequences which are recognized (directly or indirectly) and bound by a DNA-dependent RNA polymerase during the initiation of transcription. Highly conserved sequences within the promoter include the Pribnow box in bacteria and the TATA BOX in eukaryotes.
Proteins which bind to DNA. The family includes proteins which bind to both double- and single-stranded DNA and also includes specific DNA binding proteins in serum which can be used as markers for malignant diseases.
The performance of dissections with the aid of a microscope.
The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.
Biochemical identification of mutational changes in a nucleotide sequence.
A family of small, non-enveloped DNA viruses infecting birds and most mammals, especially humans. They are grouped into multiple genera, but the viruses are highly host-species specific and tissue-restricted. They are commonly divided into hundreds of papillomavirus "types", each with specific gene function and gene control regions, despite sequence homology. Human papillomaviruses are found in the genera ALPHAPAPILLOMAVIRUS; BETAPAPILLOMAVIRUS; GAMMAPAPILLOMAVIRUS; and MUPAPILLOMAVIRUS.
The movement of cells from one location to another. Distinguish from CYTOKINESIS which is the process of dividing the CYTOPLASM of a cell.
Tumors or cancer of the RECTUM.
A carcinoma thought to be derived from epithelium of terminal bronchioles, in which the neoplastic tissue extends along the alveolar walls and grows in small masses within the alveoli. Involvement may be uniformly diffuse and massive, or nodular, or lobular. The neoplastic cells are cuboidal or columnar and form papillary structures. Mucin may be demonstrated in some of the cells and in the material in the alveoli, which also includes denuded cells. Metastases in regional lymph nodes, and in even more distant sites, are known to occur, but are infrequent. (From Stedman, 25th ed)
Carcinoma that arises from the PANCREATIC DUCTS. It accounts for the majority of cancers derived from the PANCREAS.
A benign neoplasm composed of glandular and fibrous tissues, with a relatively large proportion of glands. (Stedman, 25th ed)
A circumscribed benign epithelial tumor projecting from the surrounding surface; more precisely, a benign epithelial neoplasm consisting of villous or arborescent outgrowths of fibrovascular stroma covered by neoplastic cells. (Stedman, 25th ed)
The span of viability of a cell characterized by the capacity to perform certain functions such as metabolism, growth, reproduction, some form of responsiveness, and adaptability.
Proteins found in the nucleus of a cell. Do not confuse with NUCLEOPROTEINS which are proteins conjugated with nucleic acids, that are not necessarily present in the nucleus.
INFLAMMATION of the PANCREAS that is characterized by recurring or persistent ABDOMINAL PAIN with or without STEATORRHEA or DIABETES MELLITUS. It is characterized by the irregular destruction of the pancreatic parenchyma which may be focal, segmental, or diffuse.
Small double-stranded, non-protein coding RNAs (21-31 nucleotides) involved in GENE SILENCING functions, especially RNA INTERFERENCE (RNAi). Endogenously, siRNAs are generated from dsRNAs (RNA, DOUBLE-STRANDED) by the same ribonuclease, Dicer, that generates miRNAs (MICRORNAS). The perfect match of the siRNAs' antisense strand to their target RNAs mediates RNAi by siRNA-guided RNA cleavage. siRNAs fall into different classes including trans-acting siRNA (tasiRNA), repeat-associated RNA (rasiRNA), small-scan RNA (scnRNA), and Piwi protein-interacting RNA (piRNA) and have different specific gene silencing functions.

Induced abortion, miscarriage, and breast cancer risk of young women. (1/223)

Early studies of breast cancer raised substantial concern regarding risk associated with induced abortion and miscarriage. Literature reviews suggest that study findings depend heavily on the comparison group and that the use of parous women as a reference group for nulliparous women may artificially inflate risk. To examine the individual effects of induced abortion and miscarriage on breast cancer risk of parous and nulliparous women, 744 patients < or =40 years of age and diagnosed from 1983-1988 were matched by parity, age, and race with controls living in the same neighborhood in Los Angeles County. In-person interviews were conducted to obtain a detailed reproductive history. Risk estimates were obtained by conditional logistic regression using nulligravid women as the reference group for nulliparous women with a history of incomplete pregnancy and parous women with no incomplete pregnancies as the reference group for parous women with a history of incomplete pregnancy. Breast cancer risk of parous women was unrelated to a history of miscarriage or induced abortion. Breast cancer risk was reduced among nulliparous women with a history of induced abortion relative to nulligravid women, although the risk estimate was imprecise. Risk declined as the number of induced abortions increased (P = 0.04). Our results do not support the hypothesis that induced abortion or miscarriage increase the breast cancer risk of young women.  (+info)

Pregnancy- and lactation-associated breast cancer: mammographic and sonographic findings. (2/223)

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the mammographic and sonographic findings of pregnancy-associated breast cancer. METHODS: A total of 22 consecutive patients with breast cancer pathologically diagnosed during pregnancy (n = 10) or lactation (n = 12) were included in this study. The ages of the patients ranged from 26 to 49 years. Both mammography and sonography were performed on 12 patients; sonography only was performed on 7 patients; and mammography only was performed on 3 patients. Mammographic and sonographic findings were evaluated retrospectively. RESULTS: Mammography revealed positive findings in 13 (86.7%) of 15 patients, even though all 15 patients had dense breasts. Mammographic findings included masses (n = 5), masses with calcifications (n = 2), calcifications with axillary lymphadenopathy (n = 2), a mass with axillary lymphadenopathy (n = 1), calcifications alone (n = 1), asymmetric density alone (n = 1), and diffuse skin and trabecular thickening alone (n = 1). Sonographic findings were positive and showed masses for all 19 patients (100%). The common sonographic findings of masses were irregular shapes (n = 15), irregular margins (n = 16), parallel orientation (n = 11), complex echo patterns (n = 14, including marked cystic [anechoic] components [n = 4]), and posterior acoustic enhancement (n = 12). Surrounding tissue effects could be seen in 5 patients, including ductal changes (n = 2), Cooper ligament thickening (n = 1), edema (n = 3), and skin thickening (n = 3). Calcifications within or outside a mass (n = 7) and axillary lymphadenopathy (n = 8) were also detected. CONCLUSIONS: Although a mass could not be discernible by mammography because of increased radiodensity during pregnancy or lactation, calcification, asymmetric density, axillary lymphadenopathy, and skin and trabecular thickening were helpful for diagnosis of pregnancy-associated breast cancer. Sonographic findings of a solid mass with posterior acoustic enhancement and a marked cystic component were somewhat different from the appearance of breast cancer in nonpregnant women, possibly because of the physiologic changes of pregnancy and lactation.  (+info)

Notch mediates TGF alpha-induced changes in epithelial differentiation during pancreatic tumorigenesis. (3/223)

Notch signaling regulates cell fate decisions in a wide variety of adult and embryonic tissues. Here we show that Notch pathway components and Notch target genes are upregulated in invasive pancreatic cancer, as well as in pancreatic cancer precursors from both mouse and human. In mouse pancreas, ectopic Notch activation results in accumulation of nestin-positive precursor cells and expansion of metaplastic ductal epithelium, previously identified as a precursor lesion for pancreatic cancer. Notch is also activated as a direct consequence of EGF receptor activation in exocrine pancreas and is required for TGF alpha-induced changes in epithelial differentiation. These findings suggest that Notch mediates the tumor-initiating effects of TG alpha by expanding a population of undifferentiated precursor cells.  (+info)

Is Nottingham prognostic index useful after induction chemotherapy in operable breast cancer? (4/223)

The Nottingham prognostic index (NPI), based on tumour size in breast, node involvement and Scarff-Bloom-Richardson (SBR) grading, has been shown to constitute a definitive prognostic factor of primary operable breast cancer in the adjuvant setting. We performed a retrospective study to evaluate the prognostic value of this index in 163 patients after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Secondly, we examined the influence on survival of a revised NPI, only based on residual tumour size in breast and SBR grading in 228 patients, and consequently called breast grading index (BGI). The prognostic value of these two indices was also evaluated by replacing the SBR grade with the MSBR grade, a French modified SBR grading; the modified NPI (MNPI) and modified BGI (MBGI) were, respectively, obtained in 153 and 222 patients. At a median follow-up of 9.3 years, survival was significantly related to these four indices (P<0.001). Multivariate analysis revealed that MBGI was the only one which retained a prognostic influence on disease-free survival (P<0.02). In conclusion, the 'amount' of residual tumour in breast and/or nodes, as defined by NPI and revised indices, confers a determinant prognosis after neoadjuvant chemotherapy, inviting an alternative postsurgical treatment for a subgroup of patients with a decreased survival.  (+info)

Dihydropyrimidinase deficiency and severe 5-fluorouracil toxicity. (5/223)

Dihydropyrimidinase (DHP) is the second enzyme in the catabolism of 5-fluorouracil (5FU), and it has been suggested that patients with a deficiency of this enzyme are at risk from developing severe 5FU-associated toxicity. In this study, we demonstrated for the first time that in one patient the severe toxicity, after a treatment with 5FU, was attributable to a partial deficiency of DHP. Analysis of the DHP gene showed that the patient was heterozygous for the missense mutation 833G>A (G278D) in exon 5. Heterologous expression of the mutant enzyme in Escherichia coli showed that the G278D mutation leads to a mutant DHP enzyme without residual activity. An analysis for the presence of this mutation in 96 unrelated Dutch Caucasians indicates that the allele frequency in the normal population is <0.5%. Our results show that a partial DHP deficiency is a novel pharmacogenetic disorder associated with severe 5FU toxicity.  (+info)

BRCA2 mutations and androgen receptor expression as independent predictors of outcome of male breast cancer patients. (6/223)

PURPOSE: Germline mutations of the BRCA2 gene are involved in the development of a considerable number of male breast cancer cases. Although phenotypic differences have been observed between sporadic and BRCA-related breast carcinomas, conflicting data exist on the differences in prognosis of women with hereditary and sporadic breast cancer. The purpose of the study was to investigate the prognostic value of BRCA2 status in male breast carcinoma (MBC). EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: We studied 43 male breast cancer patients, including 12 with BRCA2 mutations. Tumor samples were characterized immunohistochemically using antibodies to estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and androgen receptor (AR). RESULTS: BRCA2-related tumors presented at the earlier age compared with sporadic tumors (P = 0.005). Patients positive and negative for BRCA2 mutations did not differ with respect to tumor size, lymph node involvement, histological grade, and sex hormone receptor status. Five-year disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were significantly decreased in BRCA2-positive patients (67% versus 28% for BRCA2-negative versus positive patients, respectively, P = 0.017 for DFS; 86% versus 25%, P = 0.006 for OS). Shorter survival was also correlated with expression of AR in tumor tissue (74% versus 33% for patients with tumors staining negatively and positively for AR, P = 0.029 for DFS; 71% versus 57%, P = 0.05 for OS). CONCLUSIONS: The BRCA2 mutations and AR expression in tumor tissue are independent adverse factors for MBC prognosis. BRCA2-related MBC presents at the earlier age compared with non-BRCA2-related cancer, but do not differ with respect to other clinicopathological features.  (+info)

HLA-G is a potential tumor marker in malignant ascites. (7/223)

PURPOSE: Molecular approaches as supplements to cytological examination of malignant ascites may play an important role in the clinical management of cancer patients. HLA-G is a potential tumor-associated marker and that one of its isoforms, HLA-G5, produces a secretory protein. This study is to assess the clinical utility of secreted HLA-G levels in differential diagnosis of malignant ascites. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: We used ELISA to assess whether secretory HLA-G (sHLA-G) could serve as a marker of malignant ascites in ovarian and breast carcinomas, which represent the most common malignant tumors causing ascites in women. RESULTS: On the basis of immunohistochemistry, 45 (61%) of 74 ovarian serous carcinomas and 22 (25%) invasive ductal carcinomas of the breast demonstrated HLA-G immunoreactivity ranging from 2 to 100% of the tumor cells. HLA-G staining was not detected in a wide variety of normal tissues, including ovarian surface epithelium and normal breast tissue. Revese transcription-PCR demonstrated the presence of HLA-G5 isoform in all of the tumor samples expressing HLA-G. ELISA was performed to measure the sHLA-G in 42 malignant and 18 benign ascites supernatants. sHLA-G levels were significantly higher in malignant ascites than in benign controls (P < 0.001). We found that the area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve for sHLA-G was 0.95 for malignant versus benign ascites specimens. At 100% specificity, the highest sensitivity to detect malignant ascites was 78% (95% confidence interval, 68-88%) at a cutoff of 13 ng/ml. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that measurement of sHLA-G is a useful molecular adjunct to cytology in the differential diagnosis of malignant versus benign ascites.  (+info)

Cell clusters overlying focally disrupted mammary myoepithelial cell layers and adjacent cells within the same duct display different immunohistochemical and genetic features: implications for tumor progression and invasion. (8/223)

INTRODUCTION: Our previous studies detected focal disruptions in myoepithelial cell layers of several ducts with carcinoma in situ. The cell cluster overlying each of the myoepithelial disruptions showed a marked reduction in or a total loss of immunoreactivity for the estrogen receptor (ER). This is in contrast to the adjacent cells within the same duct, which were strongly immunoreactive for the ER. The current study attempts to confirm and expand previous observations on a larger scale. METHODS: Paraffin sections from 220 patients with ER-positive intraductal breast tumors were double immunostained with the same protocol previously used. Cross-sections of ducts lined by > or = 40 epithelial cells were examined for myoepithelial cell layer disruptions and for ER expression. In five selected cases, ER-negative cells overlying the disrupted myoepithelial cell layer and adjacent ER-positive cells within the same duct were separately microdissected and assessed for loss of heterozygosity and microsatellite instability. RESULTS: Of the 220 cases with 5698 duct cross-sections examined, 94 showed disrupted myoepithelial cell layers with 405 focal disruptions. Of the 94 cases, 79 (84%) contained only ER-negative cell clusters, nine (9.6%) contained both ER-negative and ER-positive cell clusters, and six (6.4%) contained only ER-positive cell clusters overlying disrupted myoepithelial cell layers. Of the 405 disruptions, 350 (86.4%) were overlain by ER-negative cell clusters and 55 (13.6%) were overlain by ER-positive cell clusters (P < 0.01). Microdissected ER-negative and ER-positive cells within the same duct from all five selected cases displayed a different frequency or pattern of loss of heterozygosity and/or microsatellite instability at 10 of the 15 DNA markers. CONCLUSIONS: Cells overlying focally disrupted myoepithelial layers and their adjacent counterparts within the same duct displayed different immunohistochemical and molecular features. These features potentially represent an early sign of the formation of a biologically more aggressive cell clone and the myoepithelial cell layer breakdown possibly associated with tumor progression or invasion.  (+info)

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We have lot of studies regarding Ductal Carcinoma in Situ (DCIS) succeeding into Invasive Ductal Carcinoma (IDC) of the breast. Still, there is hardly any study on the coexistence of both and its clinical significance.
Invasive ductal carcinoma is the most commonly diagnosed breast cancer and has a tendency to metastasize via lymphatics. This lesion, which accounts for 75% of breast cancers, has no specific histolog... more
IDC. A reproduction print of my original watercolor painting depicting invasive ductal carcinoma, the most common type of breast cancer. Healthy duct cells are shown progressing into cancerous cells as you move around the painting. The cancerous cells spill out as they become invasive, but encounter chemotherapeutic drugs which attack the cells inducing apoptosis ...
Symptoms, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis for invasive ductal carcinoma-from the Johns Hopkins Breast Center in Baltimore, MD. Also get info for medullary, mucinous, papillary and tubular ductal carcinomas.
Invasive (infiltrating) ductal carcinoma of the breast is a malignant epithelial tumor resulted from proliferation of ductal epithelium of breast - Atlas of Pathology
荊 雪楓 , 覚道 健一 , 村上 真紀 , 中村 靖司 , 中村 美砂 , 横井 豊治 , 尾浦 正二 , 桜井 武男 ホルモンと臨牀 46, 157-166, 1998-09-30 医中誌Web 参考文献23件 ...
Invasive Ductal Carcinoma of the Pancreas, Measuring 2cm or Less in Greatest Dimension : A Clinicopathologic Study with an Analysis of Aberrant Chromosomal Regions Using CGH (2009 ...
1. El-Naggar AK, Chan JKC, Grandis JR, Takata T, Slootweg PJ. WHO Classification of Head and Neck Tumours. 4th ed. Lyon, France: IARC Press. 2017 (WHO Classification of Tumors; vol. 9) 2. Jayaprakash V, Merzianu M, Warren GW. et al. Survival rates and prognostic factors for infiltrating salivary duct carcinoma: Analysis of 228 cases from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database. Head Neck. 2014;36:694-701 3. Boon E, Boxtel W van, Buter J. et al. Androgen deprivation therapy for androgen receptor-positive advanced salivary duct carcinoma: A nationwide case series of 35 patients in The Netherlands. Head & Neck. 2018;40:605-13 4. Limaye SA, Posner MR, Krane JF. et al. Trastuzumab for the treatment of salivary duct carcinoma. Oncologist. 2013;18:294-300 5. Dalin MG, Desrichard A, Katabi N. et al. Comprehensive Molecular Characterization of Salivary Duct Carcinoma Reveals Actionable Targets and Similarity to Apocrine Breast Cancer. Clin Cancer Res. 2016;22:4623-33 6. Luk PP, Weston ...
There is accumulating evidence to suggest that different histological grades of invasive ductal breast carcinomas may have distinct molecular origins and pathogenesis and do not typically progress from one grade group to another (28, 29, 30, 31) . The different grades have different clinical behaviors, and within-grade studies to identify the more aggressive subgroups of these classes of breast tumors would be of great assistance in clinical management. The expression of basal/myoepithelial markers has been observed in a proportion of grade III invasive breast tumors, and the spectrum of basal-like tumors, also recognized by morphology (15 , 32) , molecular cytogenetics (16 , 33) , and expression profiling (18 , 19) , has been associated with poor prognosis (17) . CGH has the advantage of being applied to archival pathology specimens with long-term follow-up as well as being amenable to microdissection strategies to profile the molecular genetic change occurring in a pure population of tumor ...
This information is intended for physicians and related personnel, who understand that medical information is often imperfect, and must be interpreted in the context of a patients clinical data using reasonable medical judgment. This website should not be used as a substitute for the advice of a licensed physician ...
ConferenceSeries organizes Invasive Ductal Carcinoma national symposiums, conferences across the globe in association with popular Invasive Ductal Carcinoma associations and companies. OMICS group planned its conferences, and events in america, europe, middle east and asia pacific. locations which are popular with international conferences, symposiums and events are china, canada, dubai, uae, france, spain, india, australia, italy, germany, singapore, malaysia, brazil, south korea, san francisco, las vegas, san antonio, omaha, orlando, raleigh, santa clara, chicago, philadelphia, baltimore, united kingdom, valencia, dubai, beijing, hyderabad, bengaluru and mumbai
TY - JOUR. T1 - Treatment of low-risk ductal carcinoma in situ. T2 - is nothing better than something?. AU - Benson, John R.. AU - Jatoi, Ismail. AU - Toi, Masakazu. PY - 2016/10/1. Y1 - 2016/10/1. N2 - The heterogeneous nature of ductal carcinoma in situ has been emphasised by data for breast-cancer screening that show substantial increases in the detection of early-stage non-invasive breast cancer but no noteworthy change in the incidence of invasive and distant metastatic disease. Indolent non-progressive forms of ductal carcinoma in situ are managed according to similar surgical strategies as high-risk disease, with extent of resection dictated by radiological and pathological estimates of tumour dimensions. Although adjuvant treatments might be withheld for low-risk lesions, surgical treatments incur potential morbidity, especially when mastectomy and breast reconstruction are done for widespread low-grade or intermediate-grade ductal carcinoma in situ. Low rates of deaths from breast ...
Invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) is the most common form of breast cancer. Find out about IDC symptoms, diagnosis and treatment at Breast Cancer Care.
Mai, K. T., Perkins, D. G. and Mirsky, D. (2003), Location and Extent of Positive Resection Margins and Ductal Carcinoma in Situ in Lumpectomy Specimens of Ductal Breast Carcinoma Examined with a Microscopic Three-Dimensional View. The Breast Journal, 9: 33-38. doi: 10.1046/j.1524-4741.2003.09108.x ...
Hello, I was recently diagnozed with Invasive Ductal Carcinoma. I am 26 years old and this was such a shock to me and my husband. There are really no support groups in my area and I would love to hear from anyone going through this. ------------------------------------------------------------------------ This is an automatically-generated notice. If youd like to be removed from the mailing list, please visit the Medicine-On-Line Discussion Forum at ,http://www.meds.com/con_faq.html,, or send an email message to: [email protected] with the subject line blank and the body of the message containing the line: unsubscribe mol-cancer your-email-address where the phrase your-email-address is replaced with your actual email address ...
Hollie Quinn suffered from the typical health complaints of an adult female; these included heartburn and acid reflux, along with painful cysts, vertigo and migraines.. Hollie says that she ate the typically American diet which was low in vegetables, high in sugar, and drank soda daily. She never questioned the health directives given to her by her doctors, and was never told that there might be a connection between her health issues and the diet that she was eating.. In 2002, when Hollie was just 27 years old and in her 38th week of pregnancy, she was diagnosed with an infiltrating ductal carcinoma. This is the most common type of breast cancer which affects some 80% of patients, and as its name suggests, the cancer had broken through the milk duct and was invading the surrounding tissues of the breast. Over time, invasive ductal carcinomas can spread to the lymph nodes and to other areas of the body. Hollies main tumor was 2.3 cm, with a second tumor measuring 0.6 cm. The larger tumor was a ...
Hi. I did a search for Ductal Carcinoma and one of the hits was a letter from Jayna. I dont see anything else. Is there a web site I can go to? I would really like to find a lot more information about surgery, therapy and all alternatives. I know I am at the beginning of a long hard journey but I would like to give a little background which may help you point me in the right direction. I am 31 years old and back in August I found a lump. I spoke to my sister and a friend about it and both said wait a week or two to see if it would go away. I was a week away from my period so I waited. It did not go away. I called the OB/GYN and got an appointment for October 12th. I did not tell them about the lump, I guess I still figured it would go away. After I made the appointment I spoke to my mother, a breast cancer survivor twice. I told her the position of the lump and we both agreed that it was strange and would probably be nothing. Let me explain. My mother had breast cancer on the left side 11 years ...
Rita - Patient: Breast Cancer > Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) Patient Info: Currently in active treatment (initial surgery, receiving chemo rounds/radiation), Diagnosed: almost 7 years ago, Female, Age: 50, Stage 0
Queenie - Patient: Breast Cancer > Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) Patient Info: Currently in active treatment (initial surgery, receiving chemo rounds/radiation), Diagnosed: over 7 years ago, Female, Age: 74, Stage I
djmandy - Patient: Breast Cancer > Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) Patient Info: Prefer not to answer/not applicable/unsure, Diagnosed: almost 10 years ago, Female, Age: 50, Stage 0
niborflamingo - Patient: Breast Cancer > Invasive (Infiltrating) Ductal Carcinoma Patient Info: Currently in active treatment (initial surgery, receiving chemo rounds/radiation), Diagnosed: about 8 years ago, Female, Age: 70
hanife - Patient: Breast Cancer > Invasive (Infiltrating) Ductal Carcinoma Patient Info: Finished active treatment less than 5 years ago, Diagnosed: over 10 years ago, Female, Age: 61
Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) Tissue would not expand due to radiation Side Effects DragonMom - WhatNext.com - Did two months of Hyperbaric Therapy to try and soften the radiated tissue, plus had a capsulectomy to cut away developing scar tissue
Introduction Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is a common pre-invasive malignancy of the breast, representing approximately 20% of all breast cancer diagnoses...
We review relevant publications on ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast in the past three years and we discuss pattern of outcome lightened by new molecular approach and techniques of radiotherapy.
TY - JOUR. T1 - Ductal Carcinoma in Situ of the Breast. AU - Erickson, Lori A.. PY - 2017/12/1. Y1 - 2017/12/1. UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85034619834&partnerID=8YFLogxK. UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85034619834&partnerID=8YFLogxK. U2 - 10.1016/j.mayocp.2017.10.012. DO - 10.1016/j.mayocp.2017.10.012. M3 - Comment/debate. AN - SCOPUS:85034619834. VL - 92. SP - 1873. EP - 1874. JO - Mayo Clinic Proceedings. JF - Mayo Clinic Proceedings. SN - 0025-6196. IS - 12. ER - ...
Breast: Secretory Ductal Carcinoma with t(12;15) ETV6/NTRK3, Authors: Stevan Knezevich. Published in: Atlas Genet Cytogenet Oncol Haematol.
To review the ultrasound (US) patterns of pure ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) using a non-mass-like (NML) versus mass-like (ML) classification and to investigate histopathological associations....
RATIONALE: Diagnostic procedures, such as MRI, may help find ductal carcinoma in situ and find out how far the disease has spread.PURPOSE: This
Zamecnik, M. Atypical cystic lobules: an advancing edge of low-grade ductal carcinoma in situ?. Virchows Archiv 437, 469 (2000). https://doi.org/10.1007/s004280000253. Download ...
Invasive (Infiltrating) Ductal Carcinoma Pain Side Effects wildbill4809 - WhatNext.com - All over body pain, top of her head hurts in the hair folicals, tiredness, loss of appetite, sleepless nights, low grade fever of 99.1.
The above parameters are from one study. For further information on this cell line and other parameters, including different strains, vendors, implant type and location and/or standards of care, please contact us.). ***Please note that cell lines are not for sale and unavailable for purchase.***. Fill out our tumor models contact form to get started setting up your next preclinical study with us.. Histotype: Mammary/Breast. Tumor Line: Human. REF# 3846. ...
Cutaneous adnexal tumour showing features of eccrine ductal differentiation that are characterized by a prominent squamoid component.. The tumours usually presents as solitary dermal nodules on the head and neck areas and the extremities in elderly patients.. Microscopic features: The tumour is characterized by a prominent squamous proliferation with atypia, keratinous cyst formation and squamous eddies which seem to merge with areas showing eccrine ductal differentiation, including ductular formations in continuity with eccrine ductal epithelium.. ...
Kit Component:- KN224821G1, ITIH6 gRNA vector 1 in pCas-Guide vector- KN224821G2, ITIH6 gRNA vector 2 in pCas-Guide vector- KN224821D, donor vector…
When I was diagnosed with Invasive Ductal Carcinoma in 2015, I wanted my experience to have a purpose. I later celebrated my survivorship with a glamorous photo shoot, and felt other survivors could benefit from its psychological healing. PWCG helps patients wrap their heads around breast cancer, navigating them through treatment, side effects, and a new normal. We celebrate survivorship, aiming to provide FREE glamorous photo shoots for up to 13 survivors a year. Your business with PWCG helps fund our mission. ...
Buy our Recombinant Human ITIH3 protein. Ab194042 is a full length protein produced in HEK 293 cells and has been validated in SDS-PAGE, HPLC. Abcam provides…
A rare case of salivary duct carcinoma of the hypo pharynx - International journal of Otolaryngology and Head and Neck surgery,2012
New research from Amsterdam shows that women over the age of 50 who have been diagnosed with ductal carcinoma in situ have a higher chance of being alive ten years after their diagnosis than women in the general population, according to Science Daily. Ductal carcinoma in situ is considered a disease separate from breast cancer because it is at stage 0 and does not spread around the body. However, ductal carcinoma in situ can progress into full-blown breast cancer, which is why it is still treated with surgery or surgery in combination with radiation therapy.. The researcher Dr. Lotte Elshof presented findings at the European Cancer Congress 2017. Women who have been diagnosed with ductal carcinoma in situ should feel better about their future because of these findings, which show their longevity will not be impacted by this condition.. Dr. Jelle Wesseling and her team at the Netherlands Cancer Institute followed approximately 10,000 Dutch women with ductal carcinoma in situ between the years ...
approximately three-quarters of breast cancers Invasive ductal carcinoma - 55% of breast cancers Ductal carcinoma in situ - 13% Invasive lobular carcinoma - 5% The overall 5-year survival rate for both ... Ductal carcinoma in situ, on the other hand, is in itself harmless, although if untreated approximately 60% of these low grade DCIS lesions will become invasive over the course of 40 years in follow-up ...
BACKGROUND: To investigate markers for predicting breast cancer progression, we performed a candidate gene-based study that assessed expression change of three genes, cyclin D1, β-catenin, and metastasis-associated protein-1 (MTA1), involving in aggressive phenotypes of cancerous cells, namely hyperproliferation, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and global transcriptional regulation.. METHODS: Specimens were from 150 enrolled female patients, with invasive ductal carcinoma, followed up for more than 10 years. mRNA expression of cyclin D1, β-catenin, and MTA1 in cancerous and noncancerous cells microdissected from the primary tumor site was determined by quantitative real-time PCR. The relationship between mRNA expression levels of the genes and clinicopathologic features was assessed by statistical analysis. Disease-free and overall survival (DFS and OS) were analyzed by Kaplan-Meier analysis with log-rank test and a multivariate Cox regression model.. RESULTS: Cyclin D1 was shown to be ...
Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is an early form of a non-invasive breast cancer that begins as abnormal cells inside the milk ducts in the breast. It typically doesnt show signs or symptoms and its estimated that up to 40% of cases eventually become invasive if not treated.. The current standard treatment is to perform a lumpectomy or a mastectomy in more extreme cases. Clinical trials are underway to determine if some patients with ductal carcinoma in situ might be able to avoid surgery. In addition to considering proton therapy to target the cancer, Mayo Clinic is conducting a clinical trial that involves a vaccine that could boost immunity against the HER2 receptor, says Dr. Amy Degnim, a surgeon with the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center. HER2 is a protein that in some cases is on the outside of cancer cells and for women with ductal carcinoma in situ, these receptors are present in about 50% to 60% of the cases. In this Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast Dr. Degnim, and one of her patients, Helen ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Tumor antigens as proteogenomic biomarkers in invasive ductal carcinomas. AU - Olsen, Lars Rønn. AU - Campos, Benito. AU - Winther, Ole. AU - Sgroi, Dennis C.. AU - Karger, Barry L.. AU - Brusic, Vladimir. PY - 2014/12/8. Y1 - 2014/12/8. N2 - Background: The majority of genetic biomarkers for human cancers are defined by statistical screening of high-throughput genomics data. While a large number of genetic biomarkers have been proposed for diagnostic and prognostic applications, only a small number have been applied in the clinic. Similarly, the use of proteomics methods for the discovery of cancer biomarkers is increasing. The emerging field of proteogenomics seeks to enrich the value of genomics and proteomics approaches by studying the intersection of genomics and proteomics data. This task is challenging due to the complex nature of transcriptional and translation regulatory mechanisms and the disparities between genomic and proteomic data from the same samples. In this ...
Intraductal carcinoma of the prostate (IDCP) has been described as a lesion associated with poor prognostic features in prostate cancer. Its recognition and reporting in prostate specimens, particularly in needle biopsies, is critical as it carries significant implications for patient management. Recent histological definitions have been proposed to assist in the recognition of IDCP and to help distinguish it from lesions with similar appearance, but different clinical behaviour. In this review, a historical overview of the description of IDCP will be presented followed by a summary of the current histological diagnostic criteria and the recommendations for management and reporting of IDCP. ...
RATIONALE: Gefitinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking the enzymes necessary for their growth. It is not yet known whether surgery is more effective with or without gefitinib in treating ductal carcinoma in situ.. PURPOSE: This randomized phase II trial is studying how well gefitinib together with surgery works compared to surgery alone for the treatment of women with ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast. ...
Different Names  Ductal carcinoma in-situ  Intraductal carcinoma  Non-invasive  Pre-cancer  Stage 0 Resource: Wikipedia.org
This report presents data that show that women who are diagnosed with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) are at significantly increased risk of being diagnosed with invasive breast cancer later on in...
Since the introduction of the National Health Service Breast Screening Programme (NHSBSP), the number of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) cases has increased considerably. Despite its increased incidence, some NHS leaflets and reports do not mention it, and the general public seems largely unaware of its existence. There are numerous biological studies dealing with this condition, but its psychosocial aspects seem to have been neglected. We have only been able to locate two British studies (Farmer, A. 1996. Unpublished PhD thesis, University of Southampton; Webb, C. and Koch, T. 1997. J. Adv. Nurs., 25, 154-525) that address some of the psychosocial issues associated with DCIS. This paper starts by defining DCIS and explaining its usual presentation, natural history and epidemiology. The treatment options for DCIS are described, together with the great deal of confusion and lack of agreement that accompanies them. The psychological issues that women with screen-detected DCIS have to deal with are ...
The distribution of ductal carcinoma in situ DCIS grade in 4232 women and its impact on overdiagnosis in breast cancer screening. . Biblioteca virtual para leer y descargar libros, documentos, trabajos y tesis universitarias en PDF. Material universiario, documentación y tareas realizadas por universitarios en nuestra biblioteca. Para descargar gratis y para leer online.
fortysomething - Survivor: Breast Cancer > Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) Patient Info: Finished active treatment less than 5 years ago, Diagnosed: over 11 years ago, Female, Age: 50
Dr Oz did a segment called Breast Cancer Alert: Could Early Diagnosis Be Dangerous? in which he discussed Ductal Carcinoma In Situ or DCIS. Some of the
MarcieB - Patient: Breast Cancer > Invasive (Infiltrating) Ductal Carcinoma Patient Info: Currently in active treatment (initial surgery, receiving chemo rounds/radiation), Diagnosed: almost 3 years ago, Female, Age: 73, Stage II, HER2 Positive: Yes, ER Positive: Yes, PR Positive: Yes
Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) occurs when some of the cells that line a group of milk ducts within your breast have started to become cancer cells.
Dr. Ansanellis laser surgery serves as a tremendous benefit to a Ductal Carcinoma In Situ patient as it greatly reduces the chance of cancer cell spread.
After having a lumpectomy, chemo and radiation my wife is 2 1/2 years out from treatment and has a recurrence. She is scheduled for a mastectomy. What type of follow up treatment is availible? Her 1...
Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of Pathological classification of ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast correlates with surgical treatment and may be predicted by mammography. Together they form a unique fingerprint. ...
https://doi.org/10.18632/oncotarget.23626 Tushar H. More, Sourav RoyChoudhury, Joel Christie, Khushman Taunk, Anupama Mane, Manas K. Santra, Koel Chaudhury, Srikanth Rapole
Background:I was reading something about PawPaw versus Soursop, for cancer, (looked up Soursop to see its constituents),and came across a factoid about a population in Guadaloupe, who ate Soursop often, and had elevated instances of supranuclear palsy and Parkinsons disease…I know that Soursop is high in Potassium, which lowers blood pressure…I know that traumatic brain ...
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7% vs. 1.5%, p < 0.001) patients compared with negative-margin patients; however, no differences in TR/MM Buparlisib concentration were noted. Univariate analysis of IBTR was performed for patients with negative and close/positive margins and is presented in Table 5. For close/positive margins, age was associated with a trend for IBTR (p = 0.07), whereas in the DCIS subset a trend was noted for age (p = 0.07), grade (p = 0.07), and hormonal therapy (p = 0.07).. For negative-margin patients, ER negativity (p < 0.001) and extensive intraductal component (p = 0.05) were significantly associated with IBTR. The results of this analysis confirm previous publications highlighting the efficacy of APBI using intracavitary brachytherapy in women who are appropriately selected. The first conclusion drawn from our analysis is that although no significant differences in IBTR were found between patients treated with APBI with negative vs. close or positive margins, a trend (p = 0.07) was noted when close and ...
classification and prognostic scoring along with quantification of immune cells/mm [2] was performed. Data were entered and analyzed using SPSS version 16. Correlation of immune cell densities with various tumour sub-types was investigated using paired t-test and ANOVA. A p-value of ...
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On February 19th, Becky was diagnosed with invasive ductal carcinoma breast cance… Joei Newland Gill needs your support for Rebecca Dodds-Crabtree Cancer Fund
This is a case-based activity that includes discussion of a 36-year-old woman who originally presented at 18 weeks gestation with clinical T2N0, grade 3 invasive ductal carcinoma of the right breast. The tumor was ER+, PR+, and HER2 negative ...
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Gene target information for Itih4 - inter alpha-trypsin inhibitor, heavy chain 4 (house mouse). Find diseases associated with this biological target and compounds tested against it in bioassay experiments.
I have been delving into the vast amount of knowledge and information online concerning the condition of my breasts, being fine calcification. The concern is DCIS (Ductal Carcinoma In-Situ) a condition that is considered stage 0/or pre-cancer, which can become invasive cancer at any given time, they just dont know. Uh-oh, I am a typical addict, I tend to overdo/over think things, fall into extreme thought patterns, assume the worst,…
Ductal carcinoma in situ is the fourth most common cancer diagnosis in women. Some say its not really cancer. But you wouldnt know that based on how it is treated.. by Sue Rochman ...
U savremenoj restaurativnoj stomatologiji dentalni kompoziti su materijal izbora za rekonstrukciju izgubljenog čvrstog zubnog tkiva. Kako je u kliničkoj praksi primećeno, pozitivna svojstva svetlosno-aktiviranih dentalnih kompozita su ugrožena pojavom polimerizacione kontrakcije kompozitnih ispuna tokom polimerizacije. Naime, tokom svetlosne polimerizacije usled konverzije molekula monomera u dugačke izukrštane lance polimera, razvija se napon na adhezivnom spoju kompozitnog ispuna i zida kaviteta. Kada vrednost napona nadmaši jačinu adhezivne veze kompozita i zida kaviteta, formira se marginalna mikropukotina praćena kliničkim manifestacijama u vidu postoperativne osetljivosti, marginalne diskoloracije ispuna, razvoja sekundarnog karijesa i sledstvenih ireverzibilnih promena pulpe zuba. Cilj istraživanja je bio da se uporedi uticaj primene različitih tehnika postavljanja i svetlosne polimerizacije na marginalnu adaptaciju kompozitnih ispuna. Materijal i metode: Ispitivanje ...
Epiteliul simplu pavimentos scuamos este alctuit din celule turtite papilar al dermului, n hipoderm, n corionul mucoaselor, n jurul organelor mobile dup hipertrofia i hiperplazia organului,in lunile la bovine si ecvine,cand splina.
... lumpectomy may be performed for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), invasive ductal carcinoma, or other conditions. DCIS, or ... "Ductal Carcinoma In Situ (DCIS)". PubMed Health Glossary. DeSantis C, Siegel R, Bandi P, Jemal A (2011). "Breast cancer ... "Ductal carcinoma in situ". Getglue.com. Retrieved 19 March 2013. "About 20% of Women Need More Surgery After Lumpectomy". ... Zujewski J, Eng-Wong J (August 2005). "Sentinel lymph node biopsy in the management of ductal carcinoma in situ". Clinical ...
According to the migratory theory, ductal carcinoma in situ cells migrate into the lactiferous sinuses and the nipple skin. ... Invasive cancer or extensive ductal carcinoma in situ is primarily treated with modified radical mastectomies. The procedure ... even in patients after ductal carcinoma in situ surgery. Eczema tends to affect the areola first, and then the nipple, whereas ... There is some controversy as to whether these cells arise from the ductal system of the breast, or whether these cells are a ...
The eventual diagnosis was "ductal carcinoma with medullary features".[failed verification] Due to somewhat early detection and ...
Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) breast cancerEdit. "DCIS patients and control subjects did not differ with respect to oral ... Mastectomy specimen containing a very large cancer of the breast (in this case, an invasive ductal carcinoma). ... Nasopharynageal cancer / Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC)Edit. Main article: Nasopharyngeal carcinoma. A systematic review found ... Kidney cancer (Renal cell carcinoma) (RCC)Edit. Main article: Renal cell carcinoma ...
Pancreatic ductal carcinoma is a common form of pancreatic cancer. The pancreatic duct is also called the duct of Wirsung. This ... "Aberrant pancreatic ductal organisation: a case report". Surgical and Radiologic Anatomy. 37 (5): 543-6. doi:10.1007/s00276-015 ...
"Infiltrating Ductal Carcinoma of the Breast (Carcinoma of No Special Type)". Stanford University School of Medicine. Archived ...
As in females, infiltrating ductal carcinoma is the most common type. While intraductal cancer, inflammatory carcinoma, and ... Paget's disease of the nipple have been described, lobular carcinoma in situ has not been seen in males. Breast cancer in males ...
... Protein Presence in cells of a Ductal Carcinoma of the Mammary Gland. PRP36 has no known paralogs in humans, but a number ... PRP36 appears to be over-expressed in cell samples taken from patients with ductal carcinomas of the mammary gland, suggesting ... CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link) "Ductal carcinoma in situ: mammary gland". GEO Profiles. National Center for ...
"The influence of margin width on local control of ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast". The New England Journal of Medicine ... "A prognostic index for ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast". Cancer. John Wiley & Sons. 77 (11): 2267-2274. doi:10.1002/( ...
... lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) exhibits perinuclear staining with 34βE12. Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) does not stain for ...
... either ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) or lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS). Stages 1-3 are within the breast or regional lymph ... and these cancers are classified as ductal or lobular carcinoma. Carcinoma in situ is growth of low-grade cancerous or ... Some, such as ductal carcinoma in situ, develop from pre-invasive lesions. The diagnosis of breast cancer is confirmed by ... For example, Ductal Carcinoma In Situ (DCIS) involving the entire breast will still be stage zero and consequently an excellent ...
His mother died from ductal carcinoma a few months before the trip. The majority of his route included major highways (it's ...
Ductal, lobular, and medullary. Ductal. *Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS): Paget's disease of the breast ...
"Effects of menopausal hormone therapy on ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast". Breast Cancer Research and Treatment. 137 (3 ... A decrease in invasive and ductal breast cancer incidences with decreasing estrogen/progestin combination therapy usage among ...
Jan 2002). "Sclerosing polycystic adenosis of parotid gland with dysplasia and ductal carcinoma in situ. Report of three cases ... Apocrine change is quite common in the ductal cells. The ducts range from small ductules to cystically dilated spaces (more ... Canas Marques R, Felix A (May 2014). "Invasive carcinoma arising from sclerosing polycystic adenosis of the salivary gland". ...
Ductal carcinoma Endocrine gland Overview at uwa.edu.au Overview at siumed.edu. ...
Zhou, Ming (2018). "High-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, PIN-like carcinoma, ductal carcinoma, and intraductal ... Intraductal carcinoma of the prostate gland (IDCP), which is now categorised as a distinct entity by WHO 2016, includes two ... Intraductal carcinoma of the prostate with an infiltrative growth pattern may be morphologically difficult to distinguish from ... Liu T, Wang Y, Zhou R, Li H, Cheng H, Zhang J (February 2016). "The update of prostatic ductal adenocarcinoma". Chin. J. Cancer ...
"Biomarker Expression and Risk of Subsequent Tumors After Initial Ductal Carcinoma In Situ Diagnosis". Journal of the National ...
Ductal carcinoma in situ: 99% - Kerlikowske, K (2010). "Epidemiology of ductal carcinoma in situ". Journal of the National ... Invasive ductal carcinoma with moderate nuclear pleomorphism. Invasive ductal carcinoma with marked nuclear pleomorphism. This ... of invasive carcinomas. In the US, 55% of breast cancers are invasive ductal carcinoma. Invasive lobular carcinoma represent ... "Infiltrating Ductal Carcinoma of the Breast (Carcinoma of No Special Type)". Stanford University School of Medicine. Retrieved ...
2011). "Role of RNA binding protein HuR in ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast". The Journal of Pathology. 224: 529-539. doi ...
"An intraductal human-in-mouse transplantation model mimics the subtypes of ductal carcinoma in situ". Breast Cancer Research. ... Various mouse mammary carcinoma cell lines, like 4T1 and TS/A, are metastatic in syngeneic immunocompetent mice and can be used ... The genetic profiles of primary and metastatic lesions in breast carcinomas show a large extent of clonal pertinence between ... Inoculating cells through intra ductal transplantations, by cleared mammary fat pad injections or by transplantations into the ...
In 2009, Bell Calloway was diagnosed with ductal carcinoma, an early stage of breast cancer. She underwent two lumpectomies, ...
Cartilage, cell nuclei (blue-purple), extracellular material (pink). Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) in breast tissue, cell ... Basal cell carcinoma of the skin, cell nuclei (blue-purple), extracellular material (pink). Titford, M. (2005). "The long ...
... medullary cancers and grade 3 invasive ductal carcinomas with no specific subtype; and highly aggressive metastatic cancers. ... Rare forms of triple-negative breast cancer are apocrine and squamous carcinoma. Inflammatory breast cancer is also frequently ... triple-negative breast tumors mostly fall into the categories of secretory cell carcinoma or adenoid cystic types (both ... "Comparison of triple-negative and estrogen receptor-positive/progesterone receptor-positive/HER2-negative breast carcinoma ...
"IL-6 triggers malignant features in mammospheres from human ductal breast carcinoma and normal mammary gland". Journal of ... produced by carcinoma cells, acts through paracrine signaling on endothelial cells and through autocrine signaling on carcinoma ... Evidence shows that autocrine VEGF is involved in two major aspects of invasive carcinoma: survival and migration. Moreover, it ... In addition, expression of PDGFRα and -β correlated with invasive behavior in human mammary carcinomas. This indicates the ...
"Mucinous carcinoma of the breast is genomically distinct from invasive ductal carcinomas of no special type". The Journal of ... C11orf86 is down-regulated from non-neoplastic mucosa to adenomas and carcinomas, down-regulated in renal cell carcinoma, and ... and carcinomas". Experimental and Molecular Pathology. 90 (2): 201-9. doi:10.1016/j.yexmp.2010.12.004. PMID 21185829. Hidaka H ... aberrant expression and functional significance in renal cell carcinoma". Oncotarget. 3 (1): 44-57. doi:10.18632/oncotarget.417 ...
In 2015, Steckloff was diagnosed with invasive ductal carcinoma, the most common form of breast cancer. Due to the diagnosis, ...
"Secretion of N-ERC/mesothelin and expression of C-ERC/mesothelin in human pancreatic ductal carcinoma". Oncol. Rep. 20 (6): ... Hellstrom I, Hellstrom KE (2008). "SMRP and HE4 as biomarkers for ovarian carcinoma when used alone and in combination with ... squamous cell carcinoma, and malignant mesothelioma in effusions" (PDF). Diagn. Cytopathol. 36 (1): 20-5. doi:10.1002/dc.20747 ... of the mesothelin/megakaryocyte potentiating factor family are detectable in sera from patients with ovarian carcinoma". ...
ISBN 978-0-397-51624-7. Liong, Yee; Hong, Ga; Teo, Jennifer Gek; Lim, Geok (2013). "Breast ductal carcinoma in situ presenting ... Often minor ductal and periductal inflammation is present. The lesion is in some cases very difficult to distinguish from ... Because it is so rare it may be sometimes confused with comedo carcinoma of the breast although the conditions appear to be ...
Breast cancer (invasive ductal). Over-expression. -. Immunohistochemistry. [12]. Breast cancer (BRCA1 deficient). Over- ... Renal cell carcinoma. Under-expression. 100%. Western (protein) blotting and mRNA. [25]. ... Klopfleisch R, Schütze M, Gruber AD (Jan 2010). "RAD51 protein expression is increased in canine mammary carcinomas". ... "Over-expression of wild-type Rad51 correlates with histological grading of invasive ductal breast cancer". Int. J. Cancer. 88 ( ...
"IL-6 triggers malignant features in mammospheres from human ductal breast carcinoma and normal mammary gland". Journal of ... produced by carcinoma cells, acts through paracrine signaling on endothelial cells and through autocrine signaling on carcinoma ... Evidence shows that autocrine VEGF is involved in two major aspects of invasive carcinoma: survival and migration. Moreover, it ... In addition, expression of PDGFRα and -β correlated with invasive behavior in human mammary carcinomas. This indicates the ...
There is no entirely specific immunohistochemical stain that can distinguish malignant from benign biliary ductal tissue, ... Henson DE, Albores-Saavedra J, Corle D (September 1992). "Carcinoma of the extrahepatic bile ducts. Histologic types, stage of ... Sugiyama M, Hagi H, Atomi Y, Saito M (1997). "Diagnosis of portal venous invasion by pancreatobiliary carcinoma: value of ... Rajagopalan V, Daines WP, Grossbard ML, Kozuch P (June 2004). "Gallbladder and biliary tract carcinoma: A comprehensive update ...
"Contradictory mRNA and protein misexpression of EEF1A1 in ductal breast carcinoma due to cell cycle regulation and cellular ...
Ductal, lobular,. and medullary (8500-8549). Ductal carcinoma. *Mammary ductal carcinoma. *Pancreatic ductal carcinoma ... The term 'crypt cell carcinoma' has been used for them, and though perhaps more accurate than considering them carcinoids, has ... "carcinoma-like", to describe the unique feature of behaving like a benign tumor despite having a malignant appearance ...
ဤသည် အချစ် နမူနာရင်သားကင်ဆာတစ်ခုစိမျ့ ductal carcinoma ပါရှိသည်။ ဤလူနာအတွက်အကောင်းဆုံးဓာတုကုထုံးကိုဆုံးဖြတ်သည့်အမှတ်အသားမျ ...
Oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC)[edit]. SCC can present as erythematous or white patches, ulcers, or exophytic masses. The ... Li TJ, Cui J (August 2013). "COX-2, MMP-7 expression in oral lichen planus and oral squamous cell carcinoma". Asian Pacific ... It has also been hypothesized that it is a precursor to squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus.[12][33] ... It is found that patients with erythematous or erosive oral Lichen planus have a higher risk of oral squamous cell carcinoma ...
Breast: Nearly all breast cancers are ductal carcinoma.. *Prostate: The most common form of carcinoma of the prostate is ... In some types of carcinomas, Stage 0 carcinoma has been used to describe carcinoma in situ, and occult carcinomas detectable ... Some carcinomas are named for their or the putative cell of origin, (e.g.hepatocellular carcinoma, renal cell carcinoma). ... Carcinoma In situ[edit]. The term carcinoma in situ (or CIS) is a term for cells that are significantly abnormal but not cancer ...
For example, the most common type of breast cancer is called ductal carcinoma of the breast. Here, the adjective ductal refers ... An invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast (pale area at the center) surrounded by spikes of whitish scar tissue and yellow ... Cancers are usually named using -carcinoma, -sarcoma or -blastoma as a suffix, with the Latin or Greek word for the organ or ... Carcinoma: Cancers derived from epithelial cells. This group includes many of the most common cancers and include nearly all ...
Tissue biopsy is not usually required, unless to rule out other suspected conditions such as oral squamous cell carcinoma.[18] ... Ductal papilloma. *Monomorphic adenoma. *Myoepithelioma. *Oncocytoma. *Papillary cystadenoma lymphomatosum. *Pleomorphic ...
When compared with invasive ductal carcinoma, E-cadherin expression is markedly reduced or absent in the great majority of ... Inactivation of CDH1 (accompany with loss of the wild-type allele) in 56% of lobular breast carcinomas.[54][55] ... Inactivation of CDH1 in 50% of diffuse gastric carcinomas.[56]. *Complete loss of E-cadherin protein expression in 84% of ... Wang HD, Ren J, Zhang L (November 2004). "CDH1 germline mutation in hereditary gastric carcinoma". World Journal of ...
Pancreatic ductal carcinoma. *cystic neoplasms: Serous microcystic adenoma. *Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm ...
This mastectomy specimen contains an infiltrating ductal carcinoma of the breast. A pathologist will use immunohistochemistry ...
A large invasive ductal carcinoma in a mastectomy specimen ପ୍ରତିଷେଧସମ୍ପାଦନ କରନ୍ତୁ. କର୍କଟ ସଙ୍କଟ କମ୍ କରିବା ନିମନ୍ତେ ନିଆଯାଉଥିବା ... A squamous-cell carcinoma (the whitish tumor) near the bronchi in a lung specimen ... cervical carcinoma), ଏବସଟେନ ବାର ଭୂତାଣୁ (Epstein-Barr virus) - (ବି ସେଲ ଲିମ୍ଫୋପ୍ରୋଲିଫରେଟିଭ ରୋଗ) (B-cell lymphoproliferative ... hepatocellular carcinoma), ଏବଂ ହ୍ୟୁମ୍ୟାନଟି ସେଲ ଲିଉକେମିଆ ଭୂତାଣୁ - ୧ - (ଟି ସେଲ ଲିଉକେମିଆ) । ଜୀବାଣୁ ସଂକ୍ରମଣର ଉଦାହରଣ - ...
"Induction of mammary gland ductal hyperplasias and carcinoma in situ following fetal bisphenol A exposure". Reprod. Toxicol. 23 ...
c) Ductal: Chlorpromazine, flucloxacillin. Steatosis[edit]. Hepatotoxicity may manifest as triglyceride accumulation, which ... Hepatocellular carcinoma, angiosarcoma, and liver adenomas are the ones usually reported. Causes:. Vinyl chloride, combined ...
Ductal. *Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) *Paget's disease of the breast. *Comedocarcinoma ... Alternatives include breast ultrasonography, CT scans, PET scans, scintimammography, elastography, thermography, ductal lavage ... "Hereditary ovarian carcinoma: Heterogeneity, molecular genetics, pathology, and management". Molecular Oncology. 3 (2): 97-137 ...
Malignant: Adenosquamous carcinoma. *Basaloid squamous carcinoma. *Mucosal melanoma. *Spindle cell carcinoma. *Squamous cell ... Ductal papilloma. *Monomorphic adenoma. *Myoepithelioma. *Oncocytoma. *Papillary cystadenoma lymphomatosum. *Pleomorphic ...
Pancreatic ductal carcinoma. *cystic neoplasms: Serous microcystic adenoma. *Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm ...
In both serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma (the precursor lesion to high grade serous ovarian carcinoma (HG-SOC)), and in ... BRCA1 expression is reduced or undetectable in the majority of high grade, ductal breast cancers.[61] It has long been noted ... BRCA1 promoter hypermethylation was present in only 13% of unselected primary breast carcinomas.[69] Similarly, BRCA1 promoter ... and peritoneal carcinomas". Clin. Cancer Res. 20 (3): 764-75. doi:10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-13-2287. PMC 3944197. PMID 24240112.. ...
Ductal, lobular,. and medullary (8500-8549). Ductal carcinoma. *Mammary ductal carcinoma. *Pancreatic ductal carcinoma ...
Ductal, lobular,. and medullary (8500-8549). Ductal carcinoma. *Mammary ductal carcinoma. *Pancreatic ductal carcinoma ...
... specimen containing a very large cancer of the breast (in this case, an invasive ductal carcinoma) ... an invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast, pale area at the center ... that are more likely to have the procedure of a simple or total mastectomy are those that have large areas of ductal carcinoma ... or with mastectomy for the benign disease over the fear of increased cancer development in retained areolar ductal tissue. ...
Manual compression (quasistatic) elastography of invasive ductal carcinoma, a breast cancer.. Quasistatic elastography ( ... of papillary thyroid carcinoma, a malignant cancer. The cancer (red) is much stiffer than the healthy tissue. ...
Ductal carcinoma(英语:Ductal carcinoma). *Mammary ductal carcinoma(英语:Mammary ductal carcinoma) ... Medullary carcinoma(英语:Medullary carcinoma). *Medullary carcinoma of the breast(英语:Medullary carcinoma of the breast) ... Lobular carcinoma(英语:Lobular carcinoma). *Lobular carcinoma in situ(英语:Lobular carcinoma in situ) ... 印戒细胞癌(Signet ring cell carcinoma,SRCC),又称黏液细胞癌(mucinous cell carcinoma,MCC)是
"IL-6 triggers malignant features in mammospheres from human ductal breast carcinoma and normal mammary gland". Journal of ... In addition, expression of PDGFRα and -β correlated with invasive behavior in human mammary carcinomas.[10] This indicates the ... Mercurio, Arthur M; Bachelder, Robin E; Bates, Richard C; Chung, Jun (2004). "Autocrine signaling in carcinoma: VEGF and the ... Another agent involved in autocrine cancer signaling is vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). VEGF, produced by carcinoma ...
For example, the most common type of breast cancer is called ductal carcinoma of the breast. Here, the adjective ductal refers ... spindle cell carcinoma, and small-cell carcinoma.[citation needed] ... Cancers are usually named using -carcinoma, -sarcoma or -blastoma as a suffix, with the Latin or Greek word for the organ or ... Carcinoma: Cancers derived from epithelial cells. This group includes many of the most common cancers, particularly in older ...
Malignant: Adenosquamous carcinoma. *Basaloid squamous carcinoma. *Mucosal melanoma. *Spindle cell carcinoma. *Squamous cell ... Ductal papilloma. *Monomorphic adenoma. *Myoepithelioma. *Oncocytoma. *Papillary cystadenoma lymphomatosum. *Pleomorphic ...
The most common type of oral cancer is squamous cell carcinoma. The main causes are long-term smoking and alcohol consumption ( ... Malignancies in the mouth are usually carcinomas, but lymphomas, sarcomas and others may also be possible. Either the tumor ... Ductal papilloma. *Monomorphic adenoma. *Myoepithelioma. *Oncocytoma. *Papillary cystadenoma lymphomatosum. *Pleomorphic ...
Diseases : Breast Cancer: Ductal Carcinoma In Situ, Ductal Carcinoma: Invasive. Anti Therapeutic Actions : Biopsy: Various ... Diseases : Breast Cancer, Breast Cancer: Ductal Carcinoma In Situ, Breast Cancer: MMTV-Associated, Ductal Carcinoma: Invasive ... Diseases : Breast Cancer, Breast Cancer: Ductal Carcinoma In Situ, Breast Cancer: MMTV-Associated, Ductal Carcinoma: Invasive ... Diseases : Breast Cancer, Breast Cancer: Ductal Carcinoma In Situ, Ductal Carcinoma: Invasive ...
... is the most common type of breast cancer, accounting for about 80% of all breast cancers. See also ,b ... infiltrating ductal carcinoma,/b>.,b> ,/b>A cancer that starts in the milk passages (ducts) of the breast and then breaks ... invasive ductal carcinoma. Phonetic. Description. also called infiltrating ductal carcinoma. A cancer that starts in the milk ... Invasive ductal carcinoma is the most common type of breast cancer, accounting for about 80% of all breast cancers. See also ...
there are two types: * ductal carcinoma in situ, also called intraductal carcinoma * in ... From: Invasive Ductal Carcinoma (IDC) & Ductal Carcinoma In Situ (DCIS) WebMD Medical Reference ... Breastcancer.org: "DCIS - Ductal Carcinoma In Situ," "Invasive ductal carcinoma," "Treatment for DCIS." ... Breastcancer.org: "DCIS - Ductal Carcinoma In Situ," "Invasive ductal carcinoma," "Treatment for DCIS." ...
... are called lobular carcinomas and ductal carcinomas. Because these tissues are glandular, both cancers are called ... The most common type of tumour, called infiltrating ductal carcinoma, is a single, hard, barely movable lump. This type of ... are called lobular carcinomas and ductal carcinomas. Because these tissues are glandular, both cancers are called ... The most common type of tumour, called infiltrating ductal carcinoma, is a single, hard, barely movable lump. This type of ...
Types include: Mammary Ductal carcinoma in situ Invasive ductal carcinoma Pancreatic ductal carcinoma "NCI Dictionary of Cancer ... Ductal carcinoma is a type of tumor that primarily presents in the ducts of a gland. ... Media related to Ductal carcinomas at Wikimedia Commons v t e. ...
Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is noninvasive breast cancer that is limited to the inside of the ducts of the breast. ... encoded search term (What is ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS)?) and What is ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS)? What to Read Next ... Infiltrating ductal carcinoma. Low-grade carcinoma with well-developed glands invading the fibrous stroma. ... What is ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS)?. Updated: May 24, 2018 * Author: Peter Abdelmessieh, DO, MSc; Chief Editor: Marie ...
Nearly all women with ductal carcinoma in situ- an early stage of breast cancer- can be successfully treated. Learn about the 2 ... Invasive ductal carcinoma. Invasive ductal carcinoma is also called infiltrating ductal carcinoma or ductal adenocarcinoma. It ... Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). DCIS may also be called intraductal carcinoma or non-invasive ductal carcinoma. It is the most ... Ductal carcinoma. Ductal carcinoma starts in gland cells in the breast ducts. It is the most common type of breast cancer. It ...
... and answers will help you understand medical language you might find in the pathology report from a breast biopsy for ductal ... What does it mean if my in-situ carcinoma is called ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), intraductal carcinoma, or in-situ ... ductal carcinoma in-situ (DCIS) and lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS). Intraductal carcinoma is another name for ductal ... Nearly all breast cancers are carcinomas.. What is in-situ carcinoma (or carcinoma in situ) of the breast?. This term is used ...
Invasive ductal carcinoma is the most commonly diagnosed breast cancer and has a tendency to metastasize via lymphatics. This ... Infiltrating ductal carcinoma. Low-grade carcinoma with well-developed glands invading the fibrous stroma. View Media Gallery ... Infiltrating ductal carcinoma. Low-grade carcinoma with well-developed glands invading the fibrous stroma. ... Invasive ductal carcinoma is the most commonly diagnosed breast cancer and has a tendency to metastasize via lymphatics. This ...
About 80% of all breast cancers are invasive ductal carcinomas. At first, invasive ductal carcinoma may not cause any symptoms ... Invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) is the most common type of breast cancer. ... Invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC), sometimes called infiltrating ductal carcinoma, is the most common type of breast cancer. ... Most of them are diagnosed with invasive ductal carcinoma.. Although invasive ductal carcinoma can affect women at any age, it ...
recurrence invasive ductal carcinoma tmouse After having a lumpectomy, chemo and radiation my wife is 2 1/2 years out from ...
The invasive ductal carcinoma specialists at Moffitt Cancer Center form a multispecialty team that is dedicated to diagnosing, ... Moffitts invasive ductal carcinoma team includes:. *Medical oncologists, who create chemotherapy and hormone therapy treatment ... Treating invasive ductal carcinoma requires the help of many different specialists, and Moffitt Cancer Center brings together ...
I did a search for Ductal Carcinoma and one of the hits was a letter from Jayna. I dont see anything else. Is there a web site ... I have stage 2 ductal carcinoma (she didnt say invasive). She removed the lump but tried to spare the nipple and wasnt sure ... I have been to the library and have read several articles one of which said "ductal carcinoma is the most frequently diagnosed ... but there were A-Typical and reactive ductal cells. I was told that I should see a surgeon because the A-Typical cells are not ...
The ductal carcinoma in situ specialists at Moffitt Cancer Center are dedicated to diagnosing and treating this common form of ... Since ductal carcinoma in situ is noninvasive, typically a breast-preserving surgery such as a lumpectomy is recommended. In ... If youd like to meet with one of our ductal carcinoma in situ specialists, call 1-888-MOFFITT or fill out a new patient ... Thats why the multispecialty team of ductal carcinoma in situ specialists at Moffitt work together and meet regularly as a ...
... and Ductal Carcinoma In Situ (DCIS) breast cancers are types that start in the milk ducts. Learn more about how they are ... How Is Ductal Carcinoma in Situ Treated? What Is Ductal Carcinoma?. Ductal carcinoma is a common type of breast cancer that ... What is Ductal Carcinoma in Situ (DCIS)?. Ductal Carcinoma in Situ (DCIS), also known as intraductal carcinoma, accounts for ... Invasive Ductal Carcinoma (IDC) & Ductal Carcinoma In Situ (DCIS). In this Article. In this Article In this Article * What Is ...
M. Lippman, "Why study ductal carcinoma in-situ?" in Ductal Carcinoma In-situ of the Breast, M. J. Silverstein, A. Recht, and M ... B. Fowble, "Overview of conservative surgery and radiation therapy: ductal carcinoma in-situ," in Ductal Carcinoma In-situ of ... M. Aubele, A. Mattis, H. Zitzelsberger et al., "Extensive ductal carcinoma in-situ with small foci of invasive ductal carcinoma ... Ductal Carcinoma In Situ: Recent Advances and Future Prospects. Kelly Lambert,1 Neill Patani,2 and Kefah Mokbel2 ...
Ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast.. Burstein HJ1, Polyak K, Wong JS, Lester SC, Kaelin CM. ... Ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast. [N Engl J Med. 2004] ... Ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast. [N Engl J Med. 2004] ... Ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast. [N Engl J Med. 2004] ... Ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast. [N Engl J Med. 2004] ...
Find out about ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), non-invasive breast cancer, from experts at Cleveland Clinic. Learn more about ... What is ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS)?. Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is a type of breast cancer. This is also called non- ... How is ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) diagnosed?. The sooner this type of cancer is found, the sooner it can be treated. The ... How common is ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS)?. The American Cancer Society expects that 63,960 new cases of DCIS will be found ...
Delivered Through the Breast Skin to Control Ductal Carcinoma in Situ (DCIS) of the Breast. *Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ ... 4-Hydroxytamoxifen or Tamoxifen Citrate in Treating Women With Newly Diagnosed Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ. *Ductal Breast ... Studying Blood Samples From Women With Breast Cancer or Ductal Carcinoma In Situ Who Are Receiving Tamoxifen. *Breast Cancer ... Fulvestrant or Tamoxifen in Treating Postmenopausal Women Who Are Undergoing Surgery for Ductal Carcinoma in Situ of the Breast ...
Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS): Diagnosis to first treatment (adult). Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education ... Breast ductal carcinoma in situ: Epidemiology, clinical manifestations, and diagnosis. https://www.uptodate.com/contents/search ...
Also get info for medullary, mucinous, papillary and tubular ductal carcinomas. ... treatment and prognosis for invasive ductal carcinoma-from the Johns Hopkins Breast Center in Baltimore, MD. ... Invasive Ductal Carcinoma (IDC). Invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC), also known as infiltrating ductal carcinoma, is cancer that ... There are four types of invasive ductal carcinoma that are less common:. *Medullary Ductal Carcinoma - This type of cancer is ...
High-grade ductal carcinoma in situ is incredibly rare in male patients. The prognosis for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) in a ... The pathology revealed grade 2-3 invasive ductal carcinoma of the right breast and ductal carcinoma in situ of the left breast ... Case Report: Ductal Carcinoma In Situ in the Male Breast. Joshua Chern, Lydia Liao, Raymond Baraldi, Elizabeth Tinney, Karen ... J. Armstrong, C. Saunders, and C. Metcalf, "Male breast ductal carcinoma in situ," ANZ Journal of Surgery, vol. 73, no. 9, pp. ...
Fill in any or all of the fields below. Click on the label to the left of each search field for more information or read the Help ...
This topic contains 5 study abstracts on Ductal Carcinoma: Invasive indicating that the following substances may be helpful: ... Diseases : Breast Cancer: Ductal Carcinoma In Situ, Ductal Carcinoma: Invasive. Anti Therapeutic Actions : Biopsy: Various ... Diseases : Breast Cancer, Breast Cancer: Ductal Carcinoma In Situ, Breast Cancer: MMTV-Associated, Ductal Carcinoma: Invasive ... Diseases : Breast Cancer, Breast Cancer: Ductal Carcinoma In Situ, Breast Cancer: MMTV-Associated, Ductal Carcinoma: Invasive ...
Vacuum assisted stereotactic needle core biopsy of the right breast 11:00 microcalcifications reveals ductal carcinoma in situ. ... which led to a diagnosis of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). There has been some conflicting information in the literature ...
To model ductal carcinoma in situ MCF10aDCIS.com cells were added to the center of MCF10alined lumens after 24 hours. Volume- ... Microfluidic model of ductal carcinoma in situ with 3D, organotypic structure.. Bischel LL1,2, Beebe DJ3,4, Sung KE5,6. ... Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is a non-invasive form of breast cancer that is thought to be a precursor to most invasive and ...
Learn more about Ductal Carcinomas. Ductal carcinoma forms in the lining of a milk duct within your breast. The ducts carry ... This carcinoma of the breast, also known as colloid carcinoma, is a rare form of invasive ductal carcinoma. Mucinous carcinoma ... Medullary Carcinoma This carcinoma of the breast is a rare subtype of invasive ductal carcinoma, accounting for about 3 to 5 ... Papillary Carcinoma of the Breast Papillary carcinoma is often considered a subtype of ductal carcinoma in situ, and is treated ...
We review relevant publications on ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast in the past three years and we discuss pattern of ... We review relevant publications on ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast in the past three years and we discuss pattern of ... P. Gaye and A. Kassé, "Overview of Ductal Carcinoma in Situ of the Breast," Journal of Cancer Therapy, Vol. 5 No. 2, 2014, pp. ... "Ductal Carcinoma in Situ of the Breast," International Journal of Surgical Oncology, Vol. 2012, 2012, Article ID 123549. http ...
Hello, I was recently diagnozed with Invasive Ductal Carcinoma. I am 26 years old and this was such a shock to me and my ... Re: [MOL] Invasive Ductal Carcinoma/WELCOME REPLY *From: "Lillian" ,[email protected], ... MOL] Just Recently Diagnozed with Invasive Ductal Carcinoma. *To: [email protected] ... Re: [MOL] Just Recently Diagnozed with Invasive Ductal Carcinoma *From: [email protected] ...
Ductal carcinoma in situ is a very early and highly curable form of breast cancer in which abnormal cells are still in the ... Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is an overgrowth of abnormal cells in the milk ducts of the breast. It starts with the ... Understanding ductal carcinoma in situ. Published: October, 2008. Most women diagnosed with this noninvasive breast cancer are ... For the 62,000 women who will be diagnosed with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) this year, the good news is far more important ...
  • Breastcancer.org: "DCIS - Ductal Carcinoma In Situ," "Invasive ductal carcinoma," "Treatment for DCIS. (webmd.com)
  • What is ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS)? (medscape.com)
  • Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is noninvasive breast cancer that is limited to the inside of the ducts of the breast. (medscape.com)
  • Increased use of screening mammography has resulted in a dramatic increase in the detection of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). (medscape.com)
  • DCIS may also be called intraductal carcinoma or non-invasive ductal carcinoma. (cancer.ca)
  • What does it mean if my in-situ carcinoma is called ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), intraductal carcinoma, or in-situ carcinoma with duct and lobular features? (cancer.org)
  • There are 2 main types of in-situ carcinoma of the breast: ductal carcinoma in-situ (DCIS) and lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS). (cancer.org)
  • In-situ carcinoma with duct and lobular features means that the in-situ carcinoma looks like DCIS in some ways and LCIS in some ways (when looked at under the microscope), and so the pathologist can't call it one or the other. (cancer.org)
  • Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is the earliest possible form of breast cancer. (macmillan.org.uk)
  • This booklet explains an early, non-invasive form of breast cancer called ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). (macmillan.org.uk)
  • Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is a type of breast cancer . (clevelandclinic.org)
  • Who is affected by ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS)? (clevelandclinic.org)
  • What are the symptoms of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS)? (clevelandclinic.org)
  • How is ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) diagnosed? (clevelandclinic.org)
  • We present a case of a male with unilateral invasive ductal carcinoma who was diagnosed with DCIS in the contralateral breast. (hindawi.com)
  • Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) in males is exceedingly rare. (hindawi.com)
  • Our case is highly unusual in that the patient presented with invasive carcinoma and was discovered to have coexisting DCIS in the contralateral breast. (hindawi.com)
  • This case demonstrates the benefit of multimodality imaging including digital mammography and breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in this patient, which led to a diagnosis of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). (diagnosticimaging.com)
  • Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is a non-invasive form of breast cancer that is thought to be a precursor to most invasive and metastatic breast cancers. (nih.gov)
  • For the 62,000 women who will be diagnosed with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) this year, the good news is far more important than the bad. (harvard.edu)
  • Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is an overgrowth of abnormal cells in the milk ducts of the breast. (harvard.edu)
  • The widespread use of mammography in breast screening has also led to increased detection of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), due to the frequent presence of microcalcifications within the lesions. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • DCIS ( ductal carcinoma in situ ) very rarely shortens your life. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • And the only patients with positive lymph nodes had microinvasive tumors that were associated with relatively large non-invasive tumors ( ductal carcinoma in situ or DCIS). (thefreedictionary.com)
  • invasive ductal carcinoma ( IDC ), an infiltrating, malignant and abnormal proliferation of neoplastic cells in the breast tissue, or ductal carcinoma in situ ( DCIS ), a noninvasive, potentially malignant, neoplasm that is still confined to the milk ducts (lactiferous ducts), where breast cancer most often originates. (primidi.com)
  • A common type of carcinoma in situ called DCIS (ductal carcinoma in situ or intraductal carcinoma). (imaginis.com)
  • Ductal carcinoma in situ (or DCIS) refers to the most common type of noninvasive breast cancer in women. (imaginis.com)
  • The term, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), refers to a family of cancers that occur in the breast ducts. (imaginis.com)
  • Unlike ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) , which is non-invasive cancer, IDC is not well-contained cancer. (verywell.com)
  • Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast is the most common precursor to invasive carcinoma (IC), the second-leading cause of death in women in USA. (springer.com)
  • A new genetic-based model may explain how a common form of early-stage breast cancer known as ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) progresses to a more invasive form of cancer say researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. (news-medical.net)
  • The study provides new insight into how DCIS leads to invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC), and provides a clearer understanding of why some of these cancers go undetected. (news-medical.net)
  • PHILADELPHIA - Six factors were associated with invasive recurrence of breast cancer after a diagnosis of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), according to data from a meta-analysis published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention , a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. (aacr.org)
  • The ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) Score quantifies the risk of ipsil. (bio-medicine.org)
  • The ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) Score quantifies the risk of ipsilateral breast event (IBE) and invasive IBE risk, complements both traditional clinical and pathologic factors, and helps provide a new clinical tool to improve the process of selecting individualized treatment for women with DCIS who meet the criteria, according to a study published May 2 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute . (bio-medicine.org)
  • However, findings on an association between hormone use and ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast (DCIS), a possible precursor lesion of invasive breast cancer, are sparse and inconsistent. (healthpartners.com)
  • Estrogens have important roles in ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast. (nature.com)
  • These findings indicate the importance of oestrogen actions in DCIS, and aromatase inhibitors might be effective for postmenopausal women with ER-positive DCIS as well as invasive carcinoma. (nature.com)
  • Although epidemiological studies propose aggressive and non-aggressive forms of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), they cannot be identified with conventional histopathology. (nature.com)
  • BRIM identified subpopulations of DCIS lesions with ratiometric properties resembling either benign fibroadenoma or invasive carcinoma samples. (nature.com)
  • Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast is the most common type of non-invasive breast cancer. (nature.com)
  • Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) occurs when some of the cells that line a group of milk ducts within your breast have started to become cancer cells. (bci.org.au)
  • Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), once a rare entity, now comprises up to 30% of newly diagnosed breast cancers detected on mammography. (cancernetwork.com)
  • Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) was once an uncommon breast lesion, but now comprises 20% to 30% of new breast cancer diagnoses detected on mammography. (cancernetwork.com)
  • This is a slim but meaty monograph on ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and microinvasive breast cancer. (waterstones.com)
  • The increasing incidence and biological heterogeneity of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast have made the management of this entity challenging and controversial. (annals.org)
  • AstraZeneca announced recently that the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved use of its breast cancer drug tamoxifen (Nolvadex) to reduce the risk of invasive breast cancer in women with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) following breast surgery and radiation. (cancernetwork.com)
  • Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is not breast cancer as we commonly understand it, because it has not spread outside the milk ducts into other parts of the breast, or to other parts of the body.Without treatment, DCIS may develop into invasive breast cancer, which can spread outside the ducts and possibly to other parts of the body. (canceraustralia.gov.au)
  • Un nuevo modelo genético-basado puede explicar cómo una forma común del cáncer de pecho del temprano-escenario conocido como in situ de carcinoma ductal (DCIS) progresa a una forma más invasor del cáncer dice a investigadores en El Doctor en Medicina centro de la Universidad de Texas del cáncer de Anderson. (news-medical.net)
  • El estudio ofrece nuevo discernimiento en cómo DCIS lleva al carcinoma ductal invasor (IDC), y ofrece una comprensión más sin obstrucción de porqué algunos de estos cánceres van desapercibidos. (news-medical.net)
  • Cómo ocurre la invasión de DCIS genomically sigue siendo exactamente mal entendido debido a varios retos técnicos en análisis del tejido. (news-medical.net)
  • Provides a summary on Ductal Carcinoma In Situ (DCIS) derived from the State and Territory cancer registries and the BreastScreen Australia Program. (aihw.gov.au)
  • Your doctor may call it ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) because the cancer cells remain in place, or in situ, inside the duct. (dignityhealth.org)
  • Management of Ductal Carcinoma in Situ (DCIS) or Pure Micro-invasive (DCIS-MI) Extended Breast, Axillary Node Sentinel Site (GAS) When the Diagnosis is Made by Biopsy and Treatment by Mastectomy Immediately. (knowcancer.com)
  • Assess the contribution of MRI in accurately determining tumor size in women with ductal breast carcinoma in situ (DCIS). (knowcancer.com)
  • Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is breast cancer, but it is non-invasive (stage 0). (komen.org)
  • AbstractPurpose of ReviewBreast Ductal Carcinoma in Situ (DCIS) is an increasingly common diagnosis and already accounts for ~20% of screen-detected breast cancers. (medworm.com)
  • Mittal Miller The mechanisms that drive ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) progression to invasive cancer are not clear. (medworm.com)
  • Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast is an early, localized cluster of cancer cells that start in the milk passages (ducts) but have not penetrated the duct walls into the surrounding tissue. (medifocus.com)
  • That's why we created the Medifocus Guidebook on Ductal Carcinoma in Situ of the Breast , a comprehensive 188 page patient Guidebook that contains vital information about DCIS that you won't find anywhere in a single source. (medifocus.com)
  • The relationship between DCIS and other adenocarcinomas of the breast, such as lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS). (medifocus.com)
  • I. Reduction of mammary stem/progenitor cells (MaSC) in ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS), atypical lobular hyperplasia (ALH) or atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH) in patients receiving sirolimus (rapamycin). (cancer.gov)
  • I. To demonstrate that 2 mg once daily per breast of 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4-OHT) topical gel results in a reduction in the Ki-67 labeling index of ductal breast carcinoma in situ (DCIS) lesions that is not inferior to that seen with 20 mg daily oral tamoxifen citrate (TAM) for 4-10 weeks, when comparing the base-line diagnostic core biopsy to the therapeutic surgical excision sample. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • What Is Ductal Carcinoma In Situ (DCIS), and How Do I Decide on the Right Treatment? (mskcc.org)
  • Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is a common type of breast cancer , but many patients are confused about their treatment options for the disease. (mskcc.org)
  • Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) makes up approximately 20% of newly diagnosed breast cancers. (mskcc.org)
  • Purpose: To assess the cosmetic impact of breast conserving surgery (BCS), whole breast irradiation (WBI) fractionation and tumour bed boost (TBB) use in a phase III trial for women with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast. (rug.nl)
  • Leveraging the variable natural history of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) to select optimal therapy. (medifocus.com)
  • There is controversy and confusion regarding therapy for patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast. (uni-bonn.de)
  • PURPOSE: Local recurrence is a major concern in patients who have undergone surgery for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). (koreamed.org)
  • Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) the most common non-invasive lesion o. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Despite the connotations associated with the term carcinoma DCIS is a. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), the most common non-invasive lesion of the breast, presents unique challenges for patients and providers largely because the natural course of the untreated disease is not well understood. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Despite the connotations associated with the term carcinoma, DCIS is associated with ten-year survival rates close to 100% when treated with currently available therapies. (bio-medicine.org)
  • In 2016, breast cancer incidence in the United States was of 231,840 cases, and 60,290 (21.7%) were diagnosed as ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). (scielo.br)
  • It is noteworthy that, when left untreated, DCIS poses a risk between 30 and 50% of progressing to invasive carcinoma within 10 years. (scielo.br)
  • There is evidence that the activity mentioned is significantly more marked in DCIS lesions than in invasive carcinoma. (scielo.br)
  • Risk stratification and outcomes can be improved for women with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), according to two studies presented at the 2012 ASCO Annual Meeting. (ascopost.com)
  • Eun-Sil Shelley Hwang, MD, MPH , of Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, who discussed both papers on ductal carcinoma in situ at the ASCO Annual Meeting, noted that better risk stratification and treatments are substantially changing the outlook for DCIS. (ascopost.com)
  • Observed prevalence of occult invasive breast cancer or ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) in which the number of women who were given a diagnosis was the numerator and the number of women examined was the denominator. (annals.org)
  • The S100A7 (psoriasin) gene is highly expressed in ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast and can be downregulated in invasive carcinoma. (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • In order to investigate the relationship between S100A7 and progression from DCIS to invasive carcinoma, we studied S100A7 expression in 136 patients with DCIS (including 46 patients with associated invasive carcinoma) by immunohistochemistry. (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • S100A7 status was no different between DCIS with and DCIS without an invasive component, but higher levels of S100A7 were present in DCIS associated with invasive carcinoma (P (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • The findings reported here suggest that, although S100A7 may not be a marker for recurrence of DCIS, it is associated with poor prognostic markers in DCIS and may influence progression of breast carcinoma through its interaction with and influence on Jab1. (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • According to National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines, lumpectomy may be performed for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), invasive ductal carcinoma, or other conditions. (wikipedia.org)
  • DCIS, or intraductal carcinoma, is by definition a breast cancer that is limited to the lining of the milk ducts, and accounts for about 20% of breast cancer in the US. (wikipedia.org)
  • Intraductal carcinoma, comedo type. (medscape.com)
  • Intraductal carcinoma is another name for ductal carcinoma in-situ. (cancer.org)
  • Our aim was to evaluate and compare lymph node involvement, as well as disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS), between infiltrating ductal carcinoma with (group 1) and without (group 2) intraductal carcinoma component in order to determine the prognostic value of the intraductal component. (springer.com)
  • 99% of thetumor volume) (Figure 9) and minor components of poorly differentiated infiltrating ductal carcinoma, not otherwise specified (Elston Score = 8), and high-grade intraductal carcinoma, cribriform-type with apocrine features (Figure 10). (appliedradiology.com)
  • The successful diagnosis and treatment of ductal carcinoma in situ may involve many different types of medical professionals who specialize in breast cancer. (moffitt.org)
  • Tubular Ductal Carcinoma - This is a rare diagnosis of IDC, making up only two percent of diagnoses of breast cancer. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • The average age of diagnosis for tubular carcinoma ranges from the mid-40s to late 60s. (sentara.com)
  • On clinical and histological grounds, the diagnosis of an infiltrating ductal mamma carcinoma staged T4cN2aM0 with subsequent auto-amputation was made and chemotherapy was initiated. (scielo.org.za)
  • The aim of this study was to evaluate and describe the computed tomography (CT) features of ACC and compare the results with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (DAC) for improving preoperative diagnosis. (dovepress.com)
  • Intracystic papillary carcinoma of the male breast: Dilemmas in diagnosis and management. (medworm.com)
  • Coexisting ductal carcinoma in situ independently predicts lower tumor aggressiveness in node-positive luminal breast cancer. (greenmedinfo.com)
  • In an invasive carcinoma , the tumor cells can spread (metastasize) to other parts of your body. (cancer.org)
  • That's why the multispecialty team of ductal carcinoma in situ specialists at Moffitt work together and meet regularly as a tumor board to create an individualized treatment plan for each patient. (moffitt.org)
  • It is called "medullary" carcinoma because the tumor is a soft, fleshy mass that resembles the medulla (gray matter) of the brain. (sentara.com)
  • In mucinous carcinoma, however, the mucus becomes a main part of the tumor and surrounds the breast cancer cells. (sentara.com)
  • In rare cases, the tumor is invasive, in which case it is treated like invasive ductal carcinoma, although the outlook is likely to be better. (sentara.com)
  • Carcinoma" indicates a tumor arising in the epithelium, or lining, of the ducts. (harvard.edu)
  • This study clearly demonstrated that type 4 invasive ductal carcinomas having fibrotic foci and atypical tumor-stromal fibroblasts within the fibrotic foci are significant outcome predictors for lymph node-negative and lymph node-positive, the pathologic UICC-TNM stage II and III, luminal A-subtype, luminal B-subtype, and equivocal HER2 subtype invasive ductal carcinoma patients. (nih.gov)
  • Lymph vessel tumor embolus grades 2 and 3 were significant outcome predictors for lymph node-positive, UICC pTNM stages II and III, luminal A-subtype, and triple-negative invasive ductal carcinoma patients (except lymph vessel tumor embolus grade 2 in luminal A-subtype patients). (nih.gov)
  • Su maquillaje celular único hace el tratamiento más difícil, mientras que un número inferior de células del tumor en las tuberías de la leche materna hace las células más duras observar debido a su escasez. (news-medical.net)
  • Pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma (ACC) is a rare tumor that is difficult to diagnose preoperatively. (dovepress.com)
  • Colon surgery:tumor size=2cm.Pathologic staging(pt3, n1b, mx).2/17 lymph nodes show metastatic.Margins of resection free of carcinoma.Need chemotherapy? (healthtap.com)
  • Ductal carcinoma is a type of tumor that primarily presents in the ducts of a gland. (wikipedia.org)
  • Lobular carcinoma in situ. (medscape.com)
  • Lobular carcinoma in situ at high power view showing orderly cells uniformly arranged with very few or no mitoses. (medscape.com)
  • also called infiltrating ductal carcinoma . (cancer.org)
  • The most common type of tumour, called infiltrating ductal carcinoma , is a single, hard, barely movable lump. (britannica.com)
  • Infiltrating ductal carcinoma. (medscape.com)
  • Invasive ductal carcinoma is also called infiltrating ductal carcinoma or ductal adenocarcinoma. (cancer.ca)
  • Once the carcinoma cells have grown and broken out of the ducts or lobules, it is called invasive or infiltrating carcinoma. (cancer.org)
  • Invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC), sometimes called infiltrating ductal carcinoma, is the most common type of breast cancer. (breastcancer.org)
  • Invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC), also known as infiltrating ductal carcinoma, is cancer that began growing in a milk duct and has invaded the fibrous or fatty tissue of the breast outside of the duct. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • Data from 389 cases of infiltrating ductal carcinoma of the breast were included in the study by means of reviewing medical charts and pathology slides. (springer.com)
  • The presence of intraductal component in the infiltrating carcinoma seems to increase DFS and may be an independent and favorable prognostic factor for breast cancer. (springer.com)
  • Infiltrating ductal carcinoma (IDC), also known as infiltrating carcinoma or invasive breast cancer , is a very common type of breast cancer . (verywell.com)
  • 1 Infiltrating ductal carcinoma (DC) is the most common form of breast cancer. (scielo.br)
  • 2,3,5,7 This case of infiltrating ductal carcinoma with osseous metaplasia is unusual enough to not be definitely identified in any of these larger series. (appliedradiology.com)
  • 2,3,7 In contrast, the case reported by Evans et al 4 of infiltrating ductal carcinoma with osseous metaplasia is most analogous to ours, as their patient exhibited similar clinical features. (appliedradiology.com)
  • A biopsy of the ulcer base demonstrated an infiltrating ductal carcinoma. (scielo.org.za)
  • Considered to be a subtype of infiltrating ductal carcinoma of the breast, but associated with a better prognosis. (atlasgeneticsoncology.org)
  • The younger population has a 100% survival rate at 5-years, whereas the adult population with SBC has a much poorer prognosis on par with infiltrating ductal carcinoma. (atlasgeneticsoncology.org)
  • Invasive ductal carcinoma is the most common type of breast cancer, accounting for about 80% of all breast cancers. (cancer.org)
  • Nearly all breast cancers are carcinomas. (cancer.org)
  • About 80% of all breast cancers are invasive ductal carcinomas. (breastcancer.org)
  • Invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) accounts for about 80% of all invasive breast cancers in women and 90% in men. (webmd.com)
  • Medullary Ductal Carcinoma - This type of cancer is rare and only three to five percent of breast cancers are diagnosed as medullary ductal carcinoma. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • Most breast cancers are invasive carcinomas - either invasive ductal carcinoma or invasive lobular carcinoma. (sentara.com)
  • Tubular carcinomas account for about 2 percent of all breast cancers. (sentara.com)
  • They are treated like invasive ductal carcinomas but tend to have a better prognosis than most breast cancers. (sentara.com)
  • Invasive ductal breast cancer is the most common type of breast cancer in both women and men and accounts for about 75% of all breast cancers. (breastcancercare.org.uk)
  • Conclusions: Albeit rare, our results demonstrate that HER2 can be heterogeneously overexpressed and amplified in breast cancers, and this phenomenon appears to be more prevalent in ER-positive breast carcinomas. (aacrjournals.org)
  • Ductal carcinoma in situ represents 10-15% of all new breast cancers diagnosed in the United States and accounts for 30-50% of cancers detected by screening mammography in women less than age 50 and 15-25% in women over age 50. (medifocus.com)
  • What is the prognosis for invasive ductal carcinoma? (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • Pure mucinous ductal carcinoma carries a better prognosis than more common types of IDCs. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • Papillary Carcinoma - This is a very good prognosis breast cancer that primarily occur in women over the age of 60. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • Tubular carcinoma is a type of breast cancer that has a better prognosis. (healthtap.com)
  • I was diagnosed with invasive carcinoma breast cancer stage 2/ what's prognosis? (healthtap.com)
  • Persistent S100A7 expression in invasive carcinoma is associated with a worse prognosis, and this effect may be mediated in part through interaction with the multifunctional cell signaling protein Jab1. (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • Over time, invasive ductal carcinoma can spread to the lymph nodes and possibly to other areas of the body. (breastcancer.org)
  • Medullary carcinoma doesn't grow quickly and usually doesn't spread outside the breast to the lymph nodes. (sentara.com)
  • Mucinous carcinoma is less likely to spread to the lymph nodes than other types of breast cancer making it easier to treat than more common types of invasive breast cancer. (sentara.com)
  • Stage 0 breast cancer is a contained cancer that has not spread beyond the ductal system (to the lymph nodes or other areas of the body). (imaginis.com)
  • Left sentinel lymph node excisional biopsy revealed 2 lymph nodes without evidence of local metastatic carcinoma. (appliedradiology.com)
  • More than 5 mitotic figures in metastatic carcinoma to the lymph nodes was a significant outcome predictor for lymph node-positive, UICC pTNM stage II, and luminal A-subtype invasive ductal carcinoma patients. (nih.gov)
  • Biology and a treatment of ductal carcinoma in situ. (springer.com)
  • Prostatic ductal adenocarcinoma is an unusual and aggressive morphologic subtype of prostate cancer. (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • Though ductal adenocarcinoma most commonly occurs with synchronous usual-type acinar adenocarcinoma, little is known about the molecular phenotype of these mixed tumors. (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • Cholangiocellular carcinoma (CCC) and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) are two highly aggressive cancer types that arise from epithelial cells of the pancreatobiliary system. (mcponline.org)
  • Hepatocellular carcinoma or hepatic metastasis from primaries such as pulmonary adenocarcinoma, colorectal adenocarcinoma, and breast carcinoma are usually easily distinguishable by morphology and means of known immunohistochemical markers. (mcponline.org)
  • For primary cholangiocellular carcinoma (CCC) 1 and metastases of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), however, the distinction in a liver biopsy is basically an unsolvable task because of their high similarity. (mcponline.org)
  • The tissues included ductal carcinomas ( n = 13), adenomas ( n = 3), endocrine tumors ( n = 3), chronic pancreatitis ( n = 5), and normal pancreatic tissues ( n = 12). (aacrjournals.org)
  • Invasive lobular and ductal breast tumors have distinct histologies and clinical presentation. (aacrjournals.org)
  • However, compared with DAC, we found that ACC tumors are likely to be larger and contain more heterogeneous intratumoral necrotic hypovascular regions, and less pancreatic ductal and common biliary dilation. (dovepress.com)
  • Epithelial derived tumors, such as the breast carcinomas , arise from the Ectoderm. (atlasgeneticsoncology.org)
  • Ductal carcinoma starts in gland cells in the breast ducts. (cancer.ca)
  • Invasive ductal carcinoma starts in the breast ducts, grows through the duct wall and grows into nearby breast tissue. (cancer.ca)
  • Cancer starts in the cells lining the ducts or lobules, when a normal cell becomes a carcinoma cell. (cancer.org)
  • As long as the carcinoma cells are still confined to the breast ducts or lobules, and do not break out and grow into surrounding tissue, it is considered in-situ carcinoma (also known as carcinoma in situ, or CIS). (cancer.org)
  • Ductal means that the cancer began in the milk ducts, which are the "pipes" that carry milk from the milk-producing lobules to the nipple. (breastcancer.org)
  • Ductal carcinoma is a common type of breast cancer that starts in cells that line the milk ducts, which carry breast milk to the nipple. (webmd.com)
  • Ductal" refers to the site of origin, the tiny ducts that form a network connecting the milk-producing structures called lobules. (harvard.edu)
  • If so, you are taking the most effective step toward prevention for ductal carcinoma, a breast cancer that starts in the ducts of the breasts. (dignityhealth.org)
  • Ductal carcinoma refers to the type of breast cancer that starts in your milk ducts. (dignityhealth.org)
  • Such stage 0 breast cancer, or noninvasive ductal carcinoma, remains in the lining of the milk ducts. (dignityhealth.org)
  • Ductal" means "related to the milk ducts " and "in situ" means "in place. (komen.org)
  • Telomerase activity was measured in surgically resected tissues of 20 human pancreatic ductal carcinomas, 12 adenomas, 5 pancreatitis tissues, 14 normal pancreatic ducts, and 13 normal pancreatic tissues (primarily made up of acinar cells) using a PCR-based telomerase assay. (aacrjournals.org)
  • Biopsy needle size is a factor associated with upstaging of ductal carcinoma in situ. (greenmedinfo.com)
  • Vacuum assisted stereotactic needle core biopsy of the right breast 11:00 microcalcifications reveals ductal carcinoma in situ. (diagnosticimaging.com)
  • That earlier research revealed that diagnostic errors occurred in about one out of every six women who had ductal carcinoma in situ (a noninvasive type of breast cancer), and that incorrect diagnoses were given in about half of the biopsy cases of breast atypia (abnormal cells that are associated with a higher risk for breast cancer). (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Lobular neoplasia in breast core needle biopsy specimens is associated with a low risk of ductal carcinoma in situ or invasive carcinoma on subsequent excision. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Furthermore, Cchek was also able to detect the early stages of breast cancer (Stage 0) in subjects with biopsy-confirmed ductal carcinoma in situ , a type of pre-cancerous/non-invasive breast lesion that often leads to invasive breast cancer, with 72% sensitivity. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Deobstructive transurethral resection of the prostate was performed and the biopsy revealed ductal carcinoma of the utricle. (isciii.es)
  • Breast tissue fragments obtained by incisional biopsy and surgical procedures of 37 women with ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast were subdivided into two groups: Group A, composed of women with low-grade ductal carcinoma in situ , and Group B, women with high-grade ductal carcinoma in situ . (scielo.br)
  • Sentinel node biopsy in ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast: Never justified? (ovid.com)
  • For patients with invasive ductal carcinoma who have lumpectomies, lymph node biopsy and radiation therapy are usually recommended. (wikipedia.org)
  • These findings suggest that centrosome abnormalities may develop at a relatively early stage of pancreatic ductal carcinogenesis. (aacrjournals.org)
  • Thus, our results indicate that reactivation of telomerase may occur at a late stage of pancreatic ductal carcinogenesis. (aacrjournals.org)
  • Carcinoma refers to any cancer that begins in the skin or other tissues that cover internal organs - such as breast tissue. (breastcancer.org)
  • All together, "invasive ductal carcinoma" refers to cancer that has broken through the wall of the milk duct and begun to invade the tissues of the breast. (breastcancer.org)
  • In contrast, none of normal ductal and stromal tissues showed these abnormalities. (aacrjournals.org)
  • The results demonstrated that almost all pancreatic ductal carcinomas and some adenomas exhibited a striking defect in centrosome profiles, whereas normal pancreatic tissues and ductal cells of chronic pancreatitis tissues did not. (aacrjournals.org)
  • Vibrational signatures of human breast tissue (invasive ductal carcinoma and invasive lobular carcinoma) were used to identify, characterize and discriminate structures in normal (noncancerous) and cancerous tissues by confocal Raman imaging, Raman spectroscopy and IR spectroscopy. (rsc.org)
  • Papillary carcinoma. (medscape.com)
  • Papillary carcinoma is often considered a subtype of ductal carcinoma in situ, and is treated as such. (sentara.com)
  • Symptoms, pathological findings and treatment of this carcinoma have been reviewed. (isciii.es)
  • While there are generally no ductal carcinoma symptoms, some women with invasive ductal carcinoma may notice nipple discharge or a breast lump. (dignityhealth.org)
  • At first, these changes stimulate cell growth, resulting in ductal hyperplasia (an overabundance of normal cells), which may begin to fill the duct. (harvard.edu)
  • At this second stage of change, called atypical ductal hyperplasia, the cells' capacity for growth is further increased. (harvard.edu)
  • An unusual variant ductal intra-epithelial neoplasia that simulates ductal hyperplasia or a myoepithelial proliferation. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Analysis of loss of heterozygosity on chromosome 11q13 in atypical ductal hyperplasia and in situ carcinoma of the breast. (springer.com)
  • Since ductal carcinoma in situ is noninvasive, typically a breast-preserving surgery such as a lumpectomy is recommended. (moffitt.org)
  • Lumpectomy and mastectomy are two types of surgery to treat ductal carcinoma. (dignityhealth.org)
  • All of these different types of invasive ductal carcinoma are treated in the same way. (cancer.ca)
  • Mammary ductal carcinoma is the most common type of breast cancer in women. (primidi.com)
  • Bankhead III A, Magnuson NS, Heckendorn RB (2007) Cellular automaton simulation examining progenitor heirarchy structure effects on mammary ductal carcinoma in situ. (springer.com)
  • 2. Mintz U, Keinan Z. Mammary auto-amputation in inoperable carcinoma of the female breast. (scielo.org.za)
  • Invasive ductal breast cancer occurs when abnormal cells break out of the milk duct. (harvard.edu)
  • Colloid (mucinous) carcinoma. (medscape.com)
  • Mucinous Ductal Carcinoma - This occurs when cancer cells within the breast produce mucous, which also contains breast cancer cells. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • Mucinous carcinoma of the breast accounts for about 2-3 percent of all breast cancer cases. (sentara.com)
  • Mucinous carcinoma tends to affect women after they've gone through menopause. (sentara.com)
  • Impact of Margin Status on Local Recurrence after Mastectomy for Ductal Carcinoma in Situ," International Journal of Radiation Oncology * Biology * Physics, Vol. 85, No. 4, 2013, pp. (scirp.org)
  • The Assisi Think Tank Meeting Survey of post-mastectomy radiation therapy in ductal carcinoma in situ: Suggestions for routine practice. (medifocus.com)
  • 1. McCormick B, Winter K, Hudis C, et al: RTOG 9804: A prospective randomized trial for "good risk" ductal carcinoma in situe, comparing radiation to observation. (ascopost.com)
  • High-grade ductal carcinoma in situ is incredibly rare in male patients. (hindawi.com)
  • Patients were then followed for recurrent disease, ductal carcinoma in situ , or death for a period of five years after randomization in the trial. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • have described a short survival time in patients with schirrous carcinoma, and a positive correlation between desmoplastic reaction and lymph node metastasis. (scielo.br)
  • Oestrogen actions are mediated through oestrogen receptor (ER), and endocrine therapies, such as aromatase inhibitors (i.e., letrozole, anastrozole and exemestane) and tamoxifen, are used in patients with ER-positive invasive carcinoma to block the oestrogen actions. (nature.com)
  • Therefore, we examined centrosomes in human pancreatic tissue sections obtained from patients with ductal carcinoma and other pathological states to evaluate whether centrosome abnormalities are specific for cancer cells in situ , and thus the presence of such abnormalities could be a sensitive diagnostic marker. (aacrjournals.org)
  • 2,3,5,6 As studies of similar cases of metaplastic carcinoma by Gunhan-Bilgen et al 2 (n = 8), Velasco and colleagues 3 (n = 12), and Patterson and coworkers 7 (n = 9) found that patients usually present at approximately the age of 50 with a palpable breast mass. (appliedradiology.com)
  • The purpose of this study was to investigate the histologic factors that accurately predict patient outcome among 1042 patients with invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast. (nih.gov)
  • 8 mm was a significant outcome predictor for UICC pTNM stages I and III invasive ductal carcinoma patients. (nih.gov)
  • These findings strongly suggest that these histologic factors are very useful for accurately predicting the outcomes of patients with invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast. (nih.gov)
  • Should patients with ductal carcinoma in situ be treated with adjuvant whole breast radiotherapy after breast conservation surgery? (bmj.com)
  • The frequency of expression of survivin was significantly higher in the group of patients with high-grade ductal carcinoma in situ compared to those in the low-grade ductal carcinoma in situ group. (scielo.br)
  • The pathology revealed grade 2-3 invasive ductal carcinoma of the right breast and ductal carcinoma in situ of the left breast. (hindawi.com)
  • Axillary lymph node involvement was found in 3 cases (i.e. 5%) which harbored poor histologic features: comedocarcinoma subtype, high nuclear grade, and size of the ductal carcinoma in situ greater than 3 cm, requiring total mastectomy. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Risk of recurrence after ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast. (aacrjournals.org)
  • Detection of Ductal Carcinoma in Situ in Women Undergoing Screening Mammography," Journal of the National Cancer Institute, Vol. 94, No. 20, 2002, pp. 1546-1554. (scirp.org)
  • Often, ductal carcinoma is detected by mammography. (dignityhealth.org)
  • Ductal carcinoma in situ usually appears on mammography as an area of microcalcification (groups of small calcifications clustered together within the breast). (medifocus.com)
  • Using Autopsy Series To Estimate the Disease "Reservoir" for Ductal Carcinoma in Situ of the Breast: How Much More Breast Cancer Can We Find? (annals.org)
  • Compare the efficacy of adjuvant tamoxifen vs anastrozole, in terms of local control and prevention of contralateral disease, in postmenopausal women with locally excised ductal carcinoma in situ. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Bloody nipple discharge is considered as highly suspicious for malignancy or ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast (2). (thefreedictionary.com)
  • This is a rare subtype of invasive ductal breast carcinoma. (sentara.com)
  • This carcinoma of the breast is a rare subtype of invasive ductal carcinoma, accounting for about 3 to 5 percent of all cases of breast cancer. (sentara.com)
  • Long-term statin use is associated with an increased risk of ductal and lobular breast cancer among women 55-74 years of age. (greenmedinfo.com)
  • breast cancer Macroscopic appearence of invasive ductal carcinoma , a common type of breast cancer, showing the tumour at the center. (britannica.com)
  • Invasive ductal carcinoma is the most commonly diagnosed breast cancer and has a tendency to metastasize via lymphatics. (medscape.com)
  • The invasive ductal carcinoma specialists at Moffitt Cancer Center form a multispecialty team that is dedicated to diagnosing, treating and eliminating breast cancer. (moffitt.org)
  • Treating invasive ductal carcinoma requires the help of many different specialists, and Moffitt Cancer Center brings together some of the leading medical professionals in breast cancer to provide comprehensive treatment and supportive care services. (moffitt.org)
  • The ductal carcinoma in situ specialists at Moffitt Cancer Center are dedicated to diagnosing and treating this common form of breast cancer. (moffitt.org)
  • Generally, male breast cancer presents as an invasive carcinoma. (hindawi.com)
  • The biologic potential of ductal carcinoma in situ to progress into invasive cancer is independent of angiogenesis. (greenmedinfo.com)
  • An invasive cancer is one that has already grown beyond the layer of cells where it started (as opposed to carcinoma in situ). (sentara.com)
  • Tubular carcinoma of the breast is less likely to spread outside the breast than other types of breast cancer and is easier to treat. (sentara.com)
  • P. Gaye and A. Kassé, "Overview of Ductal Carcinoma in Situ of the Breast," Journal of Cancer Therapy , Vol. 5 No. 2, 2014, pp. 222-224. (scirp.org)
  • The American Cancer Society estimates that more than 62,000 news cases of carcinoma in situ will be diagnosed this year. (imaginis.com)
  • The molecular journey from ductal carcinoma in situ to invasive breast cancer. (springer.com)
  • If invasive ductal carcinoma has spread to other regions such as your lungs, your bones, or your brain it is considered metastatic breast cancer. (verywell.com)
  • Written by experts in the field, Ductal Carcinoma In Situ and Microinvasive/Borderline Breast Cancer is a comprehensive, state-of-the art review of the field, and serves as a valuable resource for clinicians, surgeons and researchers with an interest in breast cancer. (waterstones.com)
  • Invasive micropapillary carcinoma (IMPC) of the breast and triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) are both aggressive subtypes, but little information is available on their comparison. (nih.gov)
  • It is not yet known whether tamoxifen is more effective than anastrozole in preventing breast cancer after surgery for ductal carcinoma in situ. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Your Dignity Health Central Coast doctor is ready to listen to your concerns about ductal carcinoma and explain the types of this breast cancer. (dignityhealth.org)
  • Being a woman increases your risk for ductal carcinoma, since men rarely develop breast cancer. (dignityhealth.org)
  • Dignity Health's trusted doctors provide personalized treatment for breast cancer, including ductal carcinoma in situ, on the Central Coast of California. (dignityhealth.org)
  • To evaluate the change in endoxifen levels after an increase in tamoxifen citrate dose from 20 mg to 40 mg in women with breast cancer or ductal breast carcinoma in situ with intermediate-metabolizing CYP2D6 genotypes. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • It has the word "carcinoma" in the name, and it is classified as stage 0 cancer. (mskcc.org)
  • When the cutoff value of relative telomerase activity was set at 1.00 and 3.00, the positivity rates of telomerase activity in pancreatic ductal carcinomas were 100 and 80%, respectively. (aacrjournals.org)
  • What is in-situ carcinoma (or carcinoma in situ) of the breast? (cancer.org)
  • Light micrograph (LM) of breast tissue from a patient with invasive ductal carcinoma. (sciencephoto.com)
  • Moinfar F. Flat ductal intraepithelial neoplasia of the breast: evolution of Azzopardi's "clinging" concept. (medscape.com)
  • Tresserra F, Grasses PJ, Garrido M. Lesiones hiperplásicas y preinvasivas precursoras del cáncer de mama: desde la epiteliosis hasta la neoplasia ductal intraepitelial. (springer.com)
  • I did a search for Ductal Carcinoma and one of the hits was a letter from Jayna. (meds.com)
  • Ductal carcinoma forms in the lining of a milk duct within your breast. (sentara.com)
  • Medullary carcinoma cells are usually high grade in their appearance and low grade in their behavior. (sentara.com)
  • Can cyberknife surgery be used for squamous cell carcinoma? (healthtap.com)
  • Estrogens have an important role in the development and progression of invasive breast carcinoma. (nature.com)
  • Progression to invasive carcinoma is not definite, and this process is thought to be the result of biologic interplay between the accumulation of genetic events and a permissive microenvironment. (cancernetwork.com)
  • Telomerase elevation in pancreatic ductal carcinoma compared to nonmalignant pathological states. (aacrjournals.org)