A malignant neoplasm made up of epithelial cells tending to infiltrate the surrounding tissues and give rise to metastases. It is a histological type of neoplasm but is often wrongly used as a synonym for "cancer." (From Dorland, 27th ed)
A thermogenic form of adipose tissue composed of BROWN ADIPOCYTES. It is found in newborns of many species including humans, and in hibernating mammals. Brown fat is richly vascularized, innervated, and densely packed with MITOCHONDRIA which can generate heat directly from the stored lipids.
A carcinoma derived from stratified SQUAMOUS EPITHELIAL CELLS. It may also occur in sites where glandular or columnar epithelium is normally present. (From Stedman, 25th ed)
A primary malignant neoplasm of epithelial liver cells. It ranges from a well-differentiated tumor with EPITHELIAL CELLS indistinguishable from normal HEPATOCYTES to a poorly differentiated neoplasm. The cells may be uniform or markedly pleomorphic, or form GIANT CELLS. Several classification schemes have been suggested.
Fat cells with dark coloration due to the densely packed MITOCHONDRIA. They contain numerous small lipid droplets or vacuoles. Their stored lipids can be converted directly to energy as heat by the mitochondria.
A lesion with cytological characteristics associated with invasive carcinoma but the tumor cells are confined to the epithelium of origin, without invasion of the basement membrane.
A malignant neoplasm characterized by the formation of numerous, irregular, finger-like projections of fibrous stroma that is covered with a surface layer of neoplastic epithelial cells. (Stedman, 25th ed)
Tumors or cancer of the LIVER.
An invasive (infiltrating) CARCINOMA of the mammary ductal system (MAMMARY GLANDS) in the human BREAST.
A malignant skin neoplasm that seldom metastasizes but has potentialities for local invasion and destruction. Clinically it is divided into types: nodular, cicatricial, morphaic, and erythematoid (pagetoid). They develop on hair-bearing skin, most commonly on sun-exposed areas. Approximately 85% are found on the head and neck area and the remaining 15% on the trunk and limbs. (From DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p1471)
Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.
A malignant neoplasm derived from TRANSITIONAL EPITHELIAL CELLS, occurring chiefly in the URINARY BLADDER; URETERS; or RENAL PELVIS.
Malignant neoplasm arising from the epithelium of the BRONCHI. It represents a large group of epithelial lung malignancies which can be divided into two clinical groups: SMALL CELL LUNG CANCER and NON-SMALL-CELL LUNG CARCINOMA.
A noninvasive (noninfiltrating) carcinoma of the breast characterized by a proliferation of malignant epithelial cells confined to the mammary ducts or lobules, without light-microscopy evidence of invasion through the basement membrane into the surrounding stroma.
Carcinoma characterized by bands or cylinders of hyalinized or mucinous stroma separating or surrounded by nests or cords of small epithelial cells. When the cylinders occur within masses of epithelial cells, they give the tissue a perforated, sievelike, or cribriform appearance. Such tumors occur in the mammary glands, the mucous glands of the upper and lower respiratory tract, and the salivary glands. They are malignant but slow-growing, and tend to spread locally via the nerves. (Dorland, 27th ed)
An anaplastic, highly malignant, and usually bronchogenic carcinoma composed of small ovoid cells with scanty neoplasm. It is characterized by a dominant, deeply basophilic nucleus, and absent or indistinct nucleoli. (From Stedman, 25th ed; Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 3d ed, p1286-7)
A division of predominantly marine EUKARYOTA, commonly known as brown algae, having CHROMATOPHORES containing carotenoid PIGMENTS, BIOLOGICAL. ALGINATES and phlorotannins occur widely in all major orders. They are considered the most highly evolved algae because of their well-developed multicellular organization and structural complexity.
Molecular products metabolized and secreted by neoplastic tissue and characterized biochemically in cells or body fluids. They are indicators of tumor stage and grade as well as useful for monitoring responses to treatment and predicting recurrence. Many chemical groups are represented including hormones, antigens, amino and nucleic acids, enzymes, polyamines, and specific cell membrane proteins and lipids.
A carcinoma composed mainly of epithelial elements with little or no stroma. Medullary carcinomas of the breast constitute 5%-7% of all mammary carcinomas; medullary carcinomas of the thyroid comprise 3%-10% of all thyroid malignancies. (From Dorland, 27th ed; DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p1141; Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)
A malignant epithelial tumor with a glandular organization.
A infiltrating (invasive) breast cancer, relatively uncommon, accounting for only 5%-10% of breast tumors in most series. It is often an area of ill-defined thickening in the breast, in contrast to the dominant lump characteristic of ductal carcinoma. It is typically composed of small cells in a linear arrangement with a tendency to grow around ducts and lobules. There is likelihood of axillary nodal involvement with metastasis to meningeal and serosal surfaces. (DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p1205)
A group of carcinomas which share a characteristic morphology, often being composed of clusters and trabecular sheets of round "blue cells", granular chromatin, and an attenuated rim of poorly demarcated cytoplasm. Neuroendocrine tumors include carcinoids, small ("oat") cell carcinomas, medullary carcinoma of the thyroid, Merkel cell tumor, cutaneous neuroendocrine carcinoma, pancreatic islet cell tumors, and pheochromocytoma. Neurosecretory granules are found within the tumor cells. (Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)
Ability of neoplasms to infiltrate and actively destroy surrounding tissue.
A cell line derived from cultured tumor cells.
Tumors or cancer of the NASOPHARYNX.
A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.
Tumors or cancer of the THYROID GLAND.
Tumors or cancer of the human BREAST.
Methods which attempt to express in replicable terms the extent of the neoplasm in the patient.
Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in neoplastic tissue.
Cells grown in vitro from neoplastic tissue. If they can be established as a TUMOR CELL LINE, they can be propagated in cell culture indefinitely.
Tumors or cancer of the LUNG.
A tumor of both low- and high-grade malignancy. The low-grade grow slowly, appear in any age group, and are readily cured by excision. The high-grade behave aggressively, widely infiltrate the salivary gland and produce lymph node and distant metastases. Mucoepidermoid carcinomas account for about 21% of the malignant tumors of the parotid gland and 10% of the sublingual gland. They are the most common malignant tumor of the parotid. (From DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p575; Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 3d ed, p1240)
A mixed adenocarcinoma and squamous cell or epidermoid carcinoma.
An adenocarcinoma characterized by the presence of cells resembling the glandular cells of the ENDOMETRIUM. It is a common histological type of ovarian CARCINOMA and ENDOMETRIAL CARCINOMA. There is a high frequency of co-occurrence of this form of adenocarcinoma in both tissues.
Soft tissue tumors or cancer arising from the mucosal surfaces of the LIP; oral cavity; PHARYNX; LARYNX; and cervical esophagus. Other sites included are the NOSE and PARANASAL SINUSES; SALIVARY GLANDS; THYROID GLAND and PARATHYROID GLANDS; and MELANOMA and non-melanoma skin cancers of the head and neck. (from Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 4th ed, p1651)
A highly malignant, primitive form of carcinoma, probably of germinal cell or teratomatous derivation, usually arising in a gonad and rarely in other sites. It is rare in the female ovary, but in the male it accounts for 20% of all testicular tumors. (From Dorland, 27th ed & Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 3d ed, p1595)
The generation of heat in order to maintain body temperature. The uncoupled oxidation of fatty acids contained within brown adipose tissue and SHIVERING are examples of thermogenesis in MAMMALS.
Tumors or cancer of the ESOPHAGUS.
Tumors or cancer of the MOUTH.
A carcinoma arising from MERKEL CELLS located in the basal layer of the epidermis and occurring most commonly as a primary neuroendocrine carcinoma of the skin. Merkel cells are tactile cells of neuroectodermal origin and histologically show neurosecretory granules. The skin of the head and neck are a common site of Merkel cell carcinoma, occurring generally in elderly patients. (Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 3d ed, p1245)
Malignant neoplasms involving the ductal systems of any of a number of organs, such as the MAMMARY GLANDS, the PANCREAS, the PROSTATE, or the LACRIMAL GLAND.
Transfer of a neoplasm from its primary site to lymph nodes or to distant parts of the body by way of the lymphatic system.
Tumors or cancer of the OVARY. These neoplasms can be benign or malignant. They are classified according to the tissue of origin, such as the surface EPITHELIUM, the stromal endocrine cells, and the totipotent GERM CELLS.
Tumors or cancer of the COLON.
A malignant neoplasm of the ADRENAL CORTEX. Adrenocortical carcinomas are unencapsulated anaplastic (ANAPLASIA) masses sometimes exceeding 20 cm or 200 g. They are more likely to be functional than nonfunctional, and produce ADRENAL CORTEX HORMONES that may result in hypercortisolism (CUSHING SYNDROME); HYPERALDOSTERONISM; and/or VIRILISM.
A variant of well-differentiated epidermoid carcinoma that is most common in the oral cavity, but also occurs in the larynx, nasal cavity, esophagus, penis, anorectal region, vulva, vagina, uterine cervix, and skin, especially on the sole of the foot. Most intraoral cases occur in elderly male abusers of smokeless tobacco. The treatment is surgical resection. Radiotherapy is not indicated, as up to 30% treated with radiation become highly aggressive within six months. (Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)
RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.
A poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma in which the nucleus is pressed to one side by a cytoplasmic droplet of mucus. It usually arises in the gastrointestinal system.
The transfer of a neoplasm from one organ or part of the body to another remote from the primary site.
Tumors or cancer of the URINARY BLADDER.
Tumors or cancer of the SKIN.
Proteins whose abnormal expression (gain or loss) are associated with the development, growth, or progression of NEOPLASMS. Some neoplasm proteins are tumor antigens (ANTIGENS, NEOPLASM), i.e. they induce an immune reaction to their tumor. Many neoplasm proteins have been characterized and are used as tumor markers (BIOMARKERS, TUMOR) when they are detectable in cells and body fluids as monitors for the presence or growth of tumors. Abnormal expression of ONCOGENE PROTEINS is involved in neoplastic transformation, whereas the loss of expression of TUMOR SUPPRESSOR PROTEINS is involved with the loss of growth control and progression of the neoplasm.
Tumors or cancer of the STOMACH.
The local recurrence of a neoplasm following treatment. It arises from microscopic cells of the original neoplasm that have escaped therapeutic intervention and later become clinically visible at the original site.
Mutant mice homozygous for the recessive gene "nude" which fail to develop a thymus. They are useful in tumor studies and studies on immune responses.
A tumor of undifferentiated (anaplastic) cells of large size. It is usually bronchogenic. (From Dorland, 27th ed)
DNA present in neoplastic tissue.
Substances that inhibit or prevent the proliferation of NEOPLASMS.
Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.
Immunologic techniques based on the use of: (1) enzyme-antibody conjugates; (2) enzyme-antigen conjugates; (3) antienzyme antibody followed by its homologous enzyme; or (4) enzyme-antienzyme complexes. These are used histologically for visualizing or labeling tissue specimens.
Cancers or tumors of the LARYNX or any of its parts: the GLOTTIS; EPIGLOTTIS; LARYNGEAL CARTILAGES; LARYNGEAL MUSCLES; and VOCAL CORDS.
Tumors or cancer of the UTERINE CERVIX.
A variation of the PCR technique in which cDNA is made from RNA via reverse transcription. The resultant cDNA is then amplified using standard PCR protocols.
Experimental transplantation of neoplasms in laboratory animals for research purposes.
Two or more abnormal growths of tissue occurring simultaneously and presumed to be of separate origin. The neoplasms may be histologically the same or different, and may be found in the same or different sites.
The proportion of survivors in a group, e.g., of patients, studied and followed over a period, or the proportion of persons in a specified group alive at the beginning of a time interval who survive to the end of the interval. It is often studied using life table methods.
An adenocarcinoma of the thyroid gland, in which the cells are arranged in the form of follicles. (From Dorland, 27th ed)
A class of statistical procedures for estimating the survival function (function of time, starting with a population 100% well at a given time and providing the percentage of the population still well at later times). The survival analysis is then used for making inferences about the effects of treatments, prognostic factors, exposures, and other covariates on the function.
Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.
Proteins encoded by the mitochondrial genome or proteins encoded by the nuclear genome that are imported to and resident in the MITOCHONDRIA.
An adenocarcinoma producing mucin in significant amounts. (From Dorland, 27th ed)
Proteins, glycoprotein, or lipoprotein moieties on surfaces of tumor cells that are usually identified by monoclonal antibodies. Many of these are of either embryonic or viral origin.
The malignant stem cells of TERATOCARCINOMAS, which resemble pluripotent stem cells of the BLASTOCYST INNER CELL MASS. The EC cells can be grown in vitro, and experimentally induced to differentiate. They are used as a model system for studying early embryonic cell differentiation.
Pathological processes that tend eventually to become malignant. (From Dorland, 27th ed)
A thyroid neoplasm of mixed papillary and follicular arrangement. Its biological behavior and prognosis is the same as that of a papillary adenocarcinoma of the thyroid. (From DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p1271)
Tumors or cancer of the gallbladder.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
A heterogeneous aggregate of at least three distinct histological types of lung cancer, including SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA; ADENOCARCINOMA; and LARGE CELL CARCINOMA. They are dealt with collectively because of their shared treatment strategy.
Nuclear phosphoprotein encoded by the p53 gene (GENES, P53) whose normal function is to control CELL PROLIFERATION and APOPTOSIS. A mutant or absent p53 protein has been found in LEUKEMIA; OSTEOSARCOMA; LUNG CANCER; and COLORECTAL CANCER.
All of the processes involved in increasing CELL NUMBER including CELL DIVISION.
Tumors or cancer of ENDOMETRIUM, the mucous lining of the UTERUS. These neoplasms can be benign or malignant. Their classification and grading are based on the various cell types and the percent of undifferentiated cells.
One of the mechanisms by which CELL DEATH occurs (compare with NECROSIS and AUTOPHAGOCYTOSIS). Apoptosis is the mechanism responsible for the physiological deletion of cells and appears to be intrinsically programmed. It is characterized by distinctive morphologic changes in the nucleus and cytoplasm, chromatin cleavage at regularly spaced sites, and the endonucleolytic cleavage of genomic DNA; (DNA FRAGMENTATION); at internucleosomal sites. This mode of cell death serves as a balance to mitosis in regulating the size of animal tissues and in mediating pathologic processes associated with tumor growth.
An adenocarcinoma characterized by the presence of varying combinations of clear and hobnail-shaped tumor cells. There are three predominant patterns described as tubulocystic, solid, and papillary. These tumors, usually located in the female reproductive organs, have been seen more frequently in young women since 1970 as a result of the association with intrauterine exposure to diethylstilbestrol. (From Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 3d ed)
The worsening of a disease over time. This concept is most often used for chronic and incurable diseases where the stage of the disease is an important determinant of therapy and prognosis.
Tumors or cancer of the COLON or the RECTUM or both. Risk factors for colorectal cancer include chronic ULCERATIVE COLITIS; FAMILIAL POLYPOSIS COLI; exposure to ASBESTOS; and irradiation of the CERVIX UTERI.
The first alpha-globulins to appear in mammalian sera during FETAL DEVELOPMENT and the dominant serum proteins in early embryonic life.
Tumors or cancer of the TONGUE.
An absence of warmth or heat or a temperature notably below an accustomed norm.
The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.
The fission of a CELL. It includes CYTOKINESIS, when the CYTOPLASM of a cell is divided, and CELL NUCLEUS DIVISION.
Tumors or cancer of the PANCREAS. Depending on the types of ISLET CELLS present in the tumors, various hormones can be secreted: GLUCAGON from PANCREATIC ALPHA CELLS; INSULIN from PANCREATIC BETA CELLS; and SOMATOSTATIN from the SOMATOSTATIN-SECRETING CELLS. Most are malignant except the insulin-producing tumors (INSULINOMA).
A malignant cystic or semicystic neoplasm. It often occurs in the ovary and usually bilaterally. The external surface is usually covered with papillary excrescences. Microscopically, the papillary patterns are predominantly epithelial overgrowths with differentiated and undifferentiated papillary serous cystadenocarcinoma cells. Psammoma bodies may be present. The tumor generally adheres to surrounding structures and produces ascites. (From Hughes, Obstetric-Gynecologic Terminology, 1972, p185)
A carcinoma discovered by Dr. Margaret R. Lewis of the Wistar Institute in 1951. This tumor originated spontaneously as a carcinoma of the lung of a C57BL mouse. The tumor does not appear to be grossly hemorrhagic and the majority of the tumor tissue is a semifirm homogeneous mass. (From Cancer Chemother Rep 2 1972 Nov;(3)1:325) It is also called 3LL and LLC and is used as a transplantable malignancy.
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
The treatment of a disease or condition by several different means simultaneously or sequentially. Chemoimmunotherapy, RADIOIMMUNOTHERAPY, chemoradiotherapy, cryochemotherapy, and SALVAGE THERAPY are seen most frequently, but their combinations with each other and surgery are also used.
Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.
Tumors or cancer of the BRONCHI.
Tumors or cancer of the SALIVARY GLANDS.
The simultaneous analysis of multiple samples of TISSUES or CELLS from BIOPSY or in vitro culture that have been arranged in an array format on slides or microchips.
Identification of proteins or peptides that have been electrophoretically separated by blot transferring from the electrophoresis gel to strips of nitrocellulose paper, followed by labeling with antibody probes.
Period after successful treatment in which there is no appearance of the symptoms or effects of the disease.
A class of fibrous proteins or scleroproteins that represents the principal constituent of EPIDERMIS; HAIR; NAILS; horny tissues, and the organic matrix of tooth ENAMEL. Two major conformational groups have been characterized, alpha-keratin, whose peptide backbone forms a coiled-coil alpha helical structure consisting of TYPE I KERATIN and a TYPE II KERATIN, and beta-keratin, whose backbone forms a zigzag or pleated sheet structure. alpha-Keratins have been classified into at least 20 subtypes. In addition multiple isoforms of subtypes have been found which may be due to GENE DUPLICATION.
An inorganic and water-soluble platinum complex. After undergoing hydrolysis, it reacts with DNA to produce both intra and interstrand crosslinks. These crosslinks appear to impair replication and transcription of DNA. The cytotoxicity of cisplatin correlates with cellular arrest in the G2 phase of the cell cycle.
Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.
Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.
RNA present in neoplastic tissue.
Cell changes manifested by escape from control mechanisms, increased growth potential, alterations in the cell surface, karyotypic abnormalities, morphological and biochemical deviations from the norm, and other attributes conferring the ability to invade, metastasize, and kill.
A spider of the genus Loxosceles, found in the midwestern and other parts of the United States, which carries a hemolytic venom that produces local necrosis or ulceration.
Death resulting from the presence of a disease in an individual, as shown by a single case report or a limited number of patients. This should be differentiated from DEATH, the physiological cessation of life and from MORTALITY, an epidemiological or statistical concept.
Removal and pathologic examination of specimens in the form of small pieces of tissue from the living body.
Antibodies produced by a single clone of cells.
Transplantation between animals of different species.
A CELL CYCLE and tumor growth marker which can be readily detected using IMMUNOCYTOCHEMISTRY methods. Ki-67 is a nuclear antigen present only in the nuclei of cycling cells.
Tumor suppressor genes located on the short arm of human chromosome 17 and coding for the phosphoprotein p53.
Various fish of the family SALMONIDAE, usually smaller than salmon. They are mostly restricted to cool clear freshwater. Some are anadromous. They are highly regarded for their handsome colors, rich well-flavored flesh, and gameness as an angling fish. The genera Salvelinus, Salmo, and ONCORHYNCHUS have been introduced virtually throughout the world.
An adenocarcinoma containing finger-like processes of vascular connective tissue covered by neoplastic epithelium, projecting into cysts or the cavity of glands or follicles. It occurs most frequently in the ovary and thyroid gland. (Stedman, 25th ed)
The phenotypic manifestation of a gene or genes by the processes of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION and GENETIC TRANSLATION.
Fatty tissue composed of WHITE ADIPOCYTES and generally found directly under the skin (SUBCUTANEOUS FAT) and around the internal organs (ABDOMINAL FAT). It has less vascularization and less coloration than the BROWN FAT. White fat provides heat insulation, mechanical cushion, and source of energy.
The determination of the pattern of genes expressed at the level of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION, under specific circumstances or in a specific cell.
The processes of heating and cooling that an organism uses to control its temperature.
Administration of antineoplastic agents together with an embolizing vehicle. This allows slow release of the agent as well as obstruction of the blood supply to the neoplasm.
Gated, ion-selective glycoproteins that traverse membranes. The stimulus for ION CHANNEL GATING can be due to a variety of stimuli such as LIGANDS, a TRANSMEMBRANE POTENTIAL DIFFERENCE, mechanical deformation or through INTRACELLULAR SIGNALING PEPTIDES AND PROTEINS.
The loss of one allele at a specific locus, caused by a deletion mutation; or loss of a chromosome from a chromosome pair, resulting in abnormal HEMIZYGOSITY. It is detected when heterozygous markers for a locus appear monomorphic because one of the ALLELES was deleted.
Experimentally induced mammary neoplasms in animals to provide a model for studying human BREAST NEOPLASMS.
A nonparametric method of compiling LIFE TABLES or survival tables. It combines calculated probabilities of survival and estimates to allow for observations occurring beyond a measurement threshold, which are assumed to occur randomly. Time intervals are defined as ending each time an event occurs and are therefore unequal. (From Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1995)
Transport proteins that carry specific substances in the blood or across cell membranes.
The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.
Proteins which are found in membranes including cellular and intracellular membranes. They consist of two types, peripheral and integral proteins. They include most membrane-associated enzymes, antigenic proteins, transport proteins, and drug, hormone, and lectin receptors.
Fat cells with light coloration and few MITOCHONDRIA. They contain a scant ring of CYTOPLASM surrounding a single large lipid droplet or vacuole.
Progressive restriction of the developmental potential and increasing specialization of function that leads to the formation of specialized cells, tissues, and organs.
A pathologic process consisting of the proliferation of blood vessels in abnormal tissues or in abnormal positions.
A skin carcinoma that histologically exhibits both basal and squamous elements. (From Dorland, 27th ed)
Endogenous substances, usually proteins, which are effective in the initiation, stimulation, or termination of the genetic transcription process.
A cell surface protein-tyrosine kinase receptor that is overexpressed in a variety of ADENOCARCINOMAS. It has extensive homology to and heterodimerizes with the EGF RECEPTOR, the ERBB-3 RECEPTOR, and the ERBB-4 RECEPTOR. Activation of the erbB-2 receptor occurs through heterodimer formation with a ligand-bound erbB receptor family member.
Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)
Surgical removal of the thyroid gland. (Dorland, 28th ed)
A glycoprotein that is secreted into the luminal surface of the epithelia in the gastrointestinal tract. It is found in the feces and pancreaticobiliary secretions and is used to monitor the response to colon cancer treatment.
The use of two or more chemicals simultaneously or sequentially in the drug therapy of neoplasms. The drugs need not be in the same dosage form.
Genes that inhibit expression of the tumorigenic phenotype. They are normally involved in holding cellular growth in check. When tumor suppressor genes are inactivated or lost, a barrier to normal proliferation is removed and unregulated growth is possible.
Experimentally induced new abnormal growth of TISSUES in animals to provide models for studying human neoplasms.
The uptake of naked or purified DNA by CELLS, usually meaning the process as it occurs in eukaryotic cells. It is analogous to bacterial transformation (TRANSFORMATION, BACTERIAL) and both are routinely employed in GENE TRANSFER TECHNIQUES.
In humans, one of the paired regions in the anterior portion of the THORAX. The breasts consist of the MAMMARY GLANDS, the SKIN, the MUSCLES, the ADIPOSE TISSUE, and the CONNECTIVE TISSUES.
Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.
A negative regulatory effect on physiological processes at the molecular, cellular, or systemic level. At the molecular level, the major regulatory sites include membrane receptors, genes (GENE EXPRESSION REGULATION), mRNAs (RNA, MESSENGER), and proteins.
Calcium-dependent cell adhesion proteins. They are important in the formation of ADHERENS JUNCTIONS between cells. Cadherins are classified by their distinct immunological and tissue specificities, either by letters (E- for epithelial, N- for neural, and P- for placental cadherins) or by numbers (cadherin-12 or N-cadherin 2 for brain-cadherin). Cadherins promote cell adhesion via a homophilic mechanism as in the construction of tissues and of the whole animal body.
A family of small, non-enveloped DNA viruses infecting birds and most mammals, especially humans. They are grouped into multiple genera, but the viruses are highly host-species specific and tissue-restricted. They are commonly divided into hundreds of papillomavirus "types", each with specific gene function and gene control regions, despite sequence homology. Human papillomaviruses are found in the genera ALPHAPAPILLOMAVIRUS; BETAPAPILLOMAVIRUS; GAMMAPAPILLOMAVIRUS; and MUPAPILLOMAVIRUS.
Tumors or cancer of the RECTUM.
A carcinoma thought to be derived from epithelium of terminal bronchioles, in which the neoplastic tissue extends along the alveolar walls and grows in small masses within the alveoli. Involvement may be uniformly diffuse and massive, or nodular, or lobular. The neoplastic cells are cuboidal or columnar and form papillary structures. Mucin may be demonstrated in some of the cells and in the material in the alveoli, which also includes denuded cells. Metastases in regional lymph nodes, and in even more distant sites, are known to occur, but are infrequent. (From Stedman, 25th ed)
One of the largest genera of BROWN ALGAE, comprised of more than 150 species found in tropical, subtropical, and temperate zones of both hemispheres. Some species are attached (benthic) but most float in the open sea (pelagic). Sargassum provides a critical habitat for hundreds of species of FISHES; TURTLES; and INVERTEBRATES.
An increase in the number of cells in a tissue or organ without tumor formation. It differs from HYPERTROPHY, which is an increase in bulk without an increase in the number of cells.
Proteins that are normally involved in holding cellular growth in check. Deficiencies or abnormalities in these proteins may lead to unregulated cell growth and tumor development.
A positive regulatory effect on physiological processes at the molecular, cellular, or systemic level. At the molecular level, the major regulatory sites include membrane receptors, genes (GENE EXPRESSION REGULATION), mRNAs (RNA, MESSENGER), and proteins.
Experimentally induced tumors of the LIVER.
Carcinoma that arises from the PANCREATIC DUCTS. It accounts for the majority of cancers derived from the PANCREAS.
Liver disease in which the normal microcirculation, the gross vascular anatomy, and the hepatic architecture have been variably destroyed and altered with fibrous septa surrounding regenerated or regenerating parenchymal nodules.
The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.
Tumors or cancers of the ADRENAL CORTEX.
The epithelial lining of the URINARY TRACT.
Tumors or cancer of the VULVA.
Multicellular marine macroalgae including some members of red (RHODOPHYTA), green (CHLOROPHYTA), and brown (PHAEOPHYTA) algae. They are widely distributed in the ocean, occurring from the tide level to considerable depths, free-floating (planktonic) or anchored to the substratum (benthic). They lack a specialized vascular system but take up fluids, nutrients, and gases directly from the water. They contain CHLOROPHYLL and are photosynthetic, but some also contain other light-absorbing pigments. Many are of economic importance as FOOD, fertilizer, AGAR, potash, or source of IODINE.
Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.
A genus of BROWN ALGAE in the family Fucaceae. It is found in temperate, marine intertidal areas along rocky coasts and is a source of ALGINATES. Some species of Fucus are referred to as KELP.
The genus Lepus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Hares are born above ground, fully furred, and with their eyes and ears open. In contrast with RABBITS, hares have 24 chromosome pairs.
Tumors or cancer of the OROPHARYNX.
A cell surface receptor involved in regulation of cell growth and differentiation. It is specific for EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR and EGF-related peptides including TRANSFORMING GROWTH FACTOR ALPHA; AMPHIREGULIN; and HEPARIN-BINDING EGF-LIKE GROWTH FACTOR. The binding of ligand to the receptor causes activation of its intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity and rapid internalization of the receptor-ligand complex into the cell.
Cytoplasmic proteins that bind estrogens and migrate to the nucleus where they regulate DNA transcription. Evaluation of the state of estrogen receptors in breast cancer patients has become clinically important.
A circumscribed benign epithelial tumor projecting from the surrounding surface; more precisely, a benign epithelial neoplasm consisting of villous or arborescent outgrowths of fibrovascular stroma covered by neoplastic cells. (Stedman, 25th ed)
An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.
The total amount (cell number, weight, size or volume) of tumor cells or tissue in the body.
A pyrimidine analog that is an antineoplastic antimetabolite. It interferes with DNA synthesis by blocking the THYMIDYLATE SYNTHETASE conversion of deoxyuridylic acid to thymidylic acid.
A variety of simple repeat sequences that are distributed throughout the GENOME. They are characterized by a short repeat unit of 2-8 basepairs that is repeated up to 100 times. They are also known as short tandem repeats (STRs).
DNA sequences which are recognized (directly or indirectly) and bound by a DNA-dependent RNA polymerase during the initiation of transcription. Highly conserved sequences within the promoter include the Pribnow box in bacteria and the TATA BOX in eukaryotes.
Proteins which bind to DNA. The family includes proteins which bind to both double- and single-stranded DNA and also includes specific DNA binding proteins in serum which can be used as markers for malignant diseases.
They are oval or bean shaped bodies (1 - 30 mm in diameter) located along the lymphatic system.
The span of viability of a cell characterized by the capacity to perform certain functions such as metabolism, growth, reproduction, some form of responsiveness, and adaptability.
Compounds that include the amino-N-phenylamide structure.
A large lobed glandular organ in the abdomen of vertebrates that is responsible for detoxification, metabolism, synthesis and storage of various substances.
In vivo methods of screening investigative anticancer drugs, biologic response modifiers or radiotherapies. Human tumor tissue or cells are transplanted into mice or rats followed by tumor treatment regimens. A variety of outcomes are monitored to assess antitumor effectiveness.
A type of IN SITU HYBRIDIZATION in which target sequences are stained with fluorescent dye so their location and size can be determined using fluorescence microscopy. This staining is sufficiently distinct that the hybridization signal can be seen both in metaphase spreads and in interphase nuclei.
Methods which attempt to express in replicable terms the level of CELL DIFFERENTIATION in neoplasms as increasing ANAPLASIA correlates with the aggressiveness of the neoplasm.
Tumors or cancer of the BILE DUCTS.
An epithelial neoplasm characterized by unusually large anaplastic cells. It is highly malignant with fulminant clinical course, bizarre histologic appearance and poor prognosis. It is most common in the lung and thyroid. (From Stedman, 25th ed & Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)
Tumors or cancer of the URINARY TRACT in either the male or the female.
The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.
An important compound functioning as a component of the coenzyme NAD. Its primary significance is in the prevention and/or cure of blacktongue and PELLAGRA. Most animals cannot manufacture this compound in amounts sufficient to prevent nutritional deficiency and it therefore must be supplemented through dietary intake.
Products of proto-oncogenes. Normally they do not have oncogenic or transforming properties, but are involved in the regulation or differentiation of cell growth. They often have protein kinase activity.
A selective increase in the number of copies of a gene coding for a specific protein without a proportional increase in other genes. It occurs naturally via the excision of a copy of the repeating sequence from the chromosome and its extrachromosomal replication in a plasmid, or via the production of an RNA transcript of the entire repeating sequence of ribosomal RNA followed by the reverse transcription of the molecule to produce an additional copy of the original DNA sequence. Laboratory techniques have been introduced for inducing disproportional replication by unequal crossing over, uptake of DNA from lysed cells, or generation of extrachromosomal sequences from rolling circle replication.
Biochemical identification of mutational changes in a nucleotide sequence.
Hybridization of a nucleic acid sample to a very large set of OLIGONUCLEOTIDE PROBES, which have been attached individually in columns and rows to a solid support, to determine a BASE SEQUENCE, or to detect variations in a gene sequence, GENE EXPRESSION, or for GENE MAPPING.
A type II keratin found associated with KERATIN-19 in ductal epithelia and gastrointestinal epithelia.
Short sequences (generally about 10 base pairs) of DNA that are complementary to sequences of messenger RNA and allow reverse transcriptases to start copying the adjacent sequences of mRNA. Primers are used extensively in genetic and molecular biology techniques.
Organic salts and esters of benzenesulfonic acid.
Cancer or tumors of the URETER which may cause obstruction leading to hydroureter, HYDRONEPHROSIS, and PYELONEPHRITIS. HEMATURIA is a common symptom.
A technique that localizes specific nucleic acid sequences within intact chromosomes, eukaryotic cells, or bacterial cells through the use of specific nucleic acid-labeled probes.
Excision of all or part of the liver. (Dorland, 28th ed)
New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.
A transplantable, poorly differentiated malignant tumor which appeared originally as a spontaneous breast carcinoma in a mouse. It grows in both solid and ascitic forms.
Proteins found in the nucleus of a cell. Do not confuse with NUCLEOPROTEINS which are proteins conjugated with nucleic acids, that are not necessarily present in the nucleus.
Excision of kidney.

Experimental intraocular malignancy: the effect of intracameral perfusion. (1/4)

Transplantable Brown-Pearce carcinoma was adapted successfully in the rabbit anterior chamber. Regression of tumor growth was attained on tri-weekly perfusion of the AC with 10 micromolar of methotrexate. Tumor cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase (PDE) and protein activator were found to be markedly depressed during the course of chemotherapy and the PDE cAMP/cGMP ratio was similarly altered. Corroborative light and electron-microscopic studies showed specific alterations of intracellular organelles in relation to MTX and tumor cell death. These findings suggest that metabolic pathways of cyclic nucleotides are important biochemical modulators of neoplastic cells. The method of intraocular perfusion precludes systemic toxic effects and avoids compromising the animals' immunocompetence.  (+info)

Sustained release of BCNU for the treatment of intraocular malignancies in animal models. (2/4)

Sustained release of 1,3-bis(2)chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (BCNU) via an episcleral implanted silicone device was used to treat Brown-Pearce epithelioma in the anterior chamber of rabbit eyes. One group of test eyes received BCNU dissolved in sesame oil; a second group received BCNU in pure ethanol. Control eyes received only the diluent, sesame oil or pure ethanol. The effectiveness of the various dosages and diluents was compared by clinical observation, by weight of the enucleated eyes, and by histopathologic examination. Sustained release of BCNU via an episcleral implanted silicone device delayed the growth of Brown-Pearce epithelioma in rabbit eyes of both test groups. The most effective action resulted from administration of BCNU in pure ethanol.  (+info)

Tumor dormancy in vivo by prevention of neovascularization. (3/4)

Dormant solid tumors were produced in vivo by prevention of neovascularization. When small fragments of anaplastic Brown-Pearce carcinoma were implanted directly on the iris in susceptible rabbits, they always vascularized. A characteristic growth pattern, consisting of prevascular, vascular, and late phases, was observed, which terminated with destruction of the eye within 2 wk. The beginning of exponential volume increase was shown to coincide with vascularization of the implant, as demonstrated by perfusion with intravenous fluorescein and by histologic sections. In contrast, implants placed in the anterior chamber, at a distance from the iris, did not become vascularized. After initial growth into spheroids, they remained arrested at a small size comparable to prevascular iris implants, for periods as long as 6 wk. Although dormant in terms of expansion, these avascular tumors contained a population of viable and mitotically active tumor cells. When reimplanted on the iris, vascularization was followed by rapid, invasive growth. These observations suggest that neovascularization is a necessary condition for malignant growth of a solid tumor. When a small mass of tumor cells is prevented from eliciting new vessel ingrowth from surrounding host tissues, population dormancy results. These data suggest that the specific blockade of tumor-induced angiogenesis may be an effective means of controlling neoplastic growth.  (+info)

Direct delivery of anticancer agents: experimental treatment of intraocular malignancy. (4/4)

Two anticancer agents, one lipophilic, 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (BCNU), and one hydrophilic, 5-(3,3-dimethyl-1-triazeno) imidazol-4-carboxamide (DTIC), were used to treat Brown-Pearce epithelioma in the anterior chamber of rabbit eyes. The BCNU test animals were divided into three groups: one treated by direct injection of the drug into the subconjuntival space or the anterior chamber, the second by both direct injections and intravenous administration, and the third by intravenous injection alone. The DTIC test animals were treated with only local injection into the subconjunctival space or anterior chamber. Dosage, delivery system, and effectiveness were compared following clinical observation and histopathologic examination. Direct delivery of BCNU or DTIC in subconjuntival space or anterior chamber delayed the growth of Brown-Pearce epithelioma in rabbit eye. The effectiveness of this treatment was significnatly enhanced by combining direct injection with systemic administration of a lower dose of BCNU.  (+info)

A detailed study has been made of an antibody which appears in the blood of certain rabbits implanted with the Brown-Pearce carcinoma or injected with extracts of it and which reacts specifically in vitro in mixture with a distinctive sedimentable constituent of the Brown-Pearce tumor cell. The observations as a whole seem to indicate that this constituent of the Brown-Pearce tumor differs notably from certain other sedimentable substances which can be extracted from various rabbit tissues and identified by serological means. The implications of the findings are discussed.. ...
Immediately after inoculation of Brown-Pearce Carcinoma into the abdominal wall of rabbit, various anticancer agents (Nitromin, Carzinophilin, Azan, Tespamin and Mitomycin) were administered locally and their inhibitory effect for growth of tumor in loco with change in peripheral blood picture were observed. Results obtained were as follows: 1. Nitromin; no preventive effect on the inoculated carcinoma, Carzinophilin; most effective in agents tested, and inhibited the tumor growth in five out of ten animals, Azan; inhibited the tumor growth in only one out of ten, Tespamin; no effect like in Nitromin, Mitomycin; inhibited tumor growth in two out of ten. 2. In case of no tumor formation in the abdominal wall, leucemoid reaction, increases in monocytes and neutrophiles were not observed. In case of tumor formation, on the contrary, the reaction and the increases were remarkable ...
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The action of the guanine analog, 5-amino-7-hydroxy-1H-v-triazolo (d) pyrimidine, on a variety of experimental tumors has been reported. Three transplantable adenocarcinomas of the breast in mice (755, RC, and Eo771) were effectively inhibited by the chemical agent, whether therapy was instituted shortly after transplantation or after the tumor had become well established; anterior chamber transplants of an undifferentiated squamous-cell carcinoma (Brown-Pearce) in rabbits eyes were similarly controlled by the triazolopyrimidine. No demonstrable inhibitory effects of the chemical on an undifferentiated sarcoma (Sarcoma 180) could be detected, nor was there any apparent inhibition of an acute leukemia (9417) or lymphosarcoma (6C3HED) in preliminary experiments, with the dosage employed.. Using the changes in body weight during therapy as an over-all index of toxicity of the triazolopyrimidine, it was observed that the therapeutic activity of the drug against the tumors was not associated with ...
24hpf에서 zebrafish otocyst에 직접 morpholinos를 전달하는 방법이 개발되었습니다. 귀의 소포 및 침투력을 효과 electroporation의 루멘에 morpholinos의 microinjection을 사용하여,...
Injuries to the brain and spinal cord have major clinical consequences with high costs for healthcare systems. Neural cell transplantation therapies have significant translational potential to promote regeneration post-injury with clinical trials commencing for various pathologies. However, there are challenges associated with current clinical approaches used for systemic or direct delivery of transplant cells to neural tissue in regenerative applications. These include risks associated with surgical microinjection into neural tissue (e.g. haemorrhage, cell clumping) and high cell loss due to systemic clearance or with cell passage through fine gauge needles into densely packed neural tissue. This article presents lines of evidence supporting the concept that cell spray delivery technology can offer significant translational benefits for neural transplantation therapy, versus current cell delivery methods. Potential benefits include rapid/homogenous cell delivery, release over large surface ...
My group is very interested in how to design new inorganic structures that will seamless integrate with biological systems to address problems that are not feasible by other means. This involves both fundamental work such as to deeply understand how lipid membranes interact with inorganic surfaces, electrokinetic phenomena in biologically relevant solutions, and applying this knowledge into new device designs. Examples of this include nanostraw drug delivery platforms for direct delivery or extraction of material through the cell wall using a biomimetic gap-junction made using nanoscale semiconductor processing techniques. We also engineer materials and structures for neural interfaces and electronics pertinent to highly parallel data acquisition and recording. For instance, we have created inorganic electrodes that mimic the hydrophobic banding of natural transmembrane proteins, allowing them to fuse into the cell wall, providing a tight electrical junction for solid-state patch clamping. ...
My group is very interested in how to design new inorganic structures that will seamless integrate with biological systems to address problems that are not feasible by other means. This involves both fundamental work such as to deeply understand how lipid membranes interact with inorganic surfaces, electrokinetic phenomena in biologically relevant solutions, and applying this knowledge into new device designs. Examples of this include nanostraw drug delivery platforms for direct delivery or extraction of material through the cell wall using a biomimetic gap-junction made using nanoscale semiconductor processing techniques. We also engineer materials and structures for neural interfaces and electronics pertinent to highly parallel data acquisition and recording. For instance, we have created inorganic electrodes that mimic the hydrophobic banding of natural transmembrane proteins, allowing them to fuse into the cell wall, providing a tight electrical junction for solid-state patch clamping. ...
Complete NHT Global product listing online shopping, direct delivery to home. Beauty, Active Lifestyle, Lifestyle & Wellness supporting healthy body functions.
Dr. Christopher Jewell, Assistant Professor, Fischell Department of Bioengineering, University of Maryland. Vaccines and immunotherapies have generated some of the largest impacts on human health in history, but a fundamental challenge now facing the field is how to control specific properties of immune responses elicited by vaccines. This seminar will introduce two strategies being developed to study and exploit the interactions between biomaterials and immune cells and tissues. One approach involves direct delivery of synthetic vaccine carriers to lymph nodes, the command center that coordinate immune response. We have combined direct lymph node injection-which has recently demonstrated great potential in human clinical trials-with biomaterials to establish a platform to directly study the link between material properties and lymph node function. We have also adapted this idea to locally engineer the lymph node environment to generate rapid and potent immune responses. To better control the ...
This summertime treat is so light and fluffy, its the perfect substitute for cake on a hot summer day. Not only does it taste awesome, but your home will smell like a pancake house. (True story: while this was in the oven on Saturday, our Fresh Direct delivery showed up and the two guys would…
Much of the CD4+ T-cell death that occurs during HIV infection may be caused by direct delivery of the virus from neighboring cells, a study shows.. 0 Comments. ...
Much of the CD4+ T-cell death that occurs during HIV infection may be caused by direct delivery of the virus from neighboring cells, a study shows.. 0 Comments. ...
Ren M, Xu G, Zeng J, Lemos-Chiarandini C, Adesnik M, Sabatini DD. Hydrolysis of GTP on rab11 is required for the direct delivery of transferrin from the pericentriolar recycling compartment to the cell surface but not from sorting endosomes. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 1998;95: 6187-6192.DOI: 10.1073/pnas.95.11.6187 ...
Jamie oversees the daily production and distribution of semen and supplies from all three Birchwood sites. He works closely with the Lab Managers, Sire Technician Managers and the Direct Delivery team to optimize labor efficiency, application of technologies, distribution logistics, genetic upgrades, and herd biosecurity, all in an effort to provide customers with the strongest-performing products available, delivered in a timely fashion.. ...
Complete NHT Global product listing online shopping, direct delivery to home. Beauty, Active Lifestyle, Lifestyle & Wellness supporting healthy body functions.
Super Serum is a hydrating antioxidant serum. Its unique new formula combines two of DMKs signature serums - Beta Gel & Direct Delivery Vitamin C. This transdermal serum is packed with potent betaglucan, plus vitamins B and C for maximum performance. Betaglucan stimulates the skins inbuilt immune system and works
An old drug derived from the lilac plant, metformins glucose-lowering effects were first noted in the 1920s. It became available in Canada in 1972 and was approved for use in the U.S. in 1994. Its primary action occurs in the liver where it reduces excess glucose production. This is important in Type 2 diabetes where insulin-resistance in many cells including those in the liver makes it harder to stop the livers production of excess and unwanted glucose.. Metformin comes in handy during the teen years when growth hormone (GH) levels are high. In teens with Type 1 diabetes, the livers glucose production becomes excessive due to higher growth hormone levels but also because the direct delivery of insulin from the pancreas to the liver is lost. In Type 2 diabetes glucose production rises because the liver like other organs has become resistant and insulin production is failing. GH production is highest in the early morning hours and is primarily responsible for the Dawn Phenomenon (high fasting ...
Facilitating customer success is what Birchwood strives to achieve. In addition to featuring PIC genetics, which are the leading swine genetics in the world, great care is taken to process a product utilizing the most accurate evaluation technologies, engage independent laboratories for third-party verification, and manage and deliver the product with optimal care.. From the moment the sires are received, aggressive health testing and monitoring is performed under the watchful direction of the PIC Health Assurance Veterinarian Team.. Collection and processing of boar semen is performed in state-of-the-art facilities, utilizing the latest instruments and technologies, thus providing consistent product quality control.. Delivery of our products is performed with utmost concern with regard to temperature maintenance. Whether the product is delivered with our own same-day courier service called Direct Delivery®, our AirDirect™ airline delivery program, or with commercial overnight delivery ...
Stroke is the second leading cause of death and the leading cause of adult disability worldwide. This investigation will address the safety and feasibility of directed, intra-arterial Magnesium measurement and therapy, through endovascular access, in acute stroke patients. The proposal represents the first study to directly quantify levels of a systemically administered neuroprotectant in the region of cerebral ischemia. It also establishes a novel endovascular platform for direct delivery of neuroprotective agents to ischemic cerebral tissue distal to an occlusive thrombus. This research seeks to improve patient care by establishing a novel delivery mechanism for the rescue of threatened brain parenchyma that can be administered rapidly following acute stroke. If successful, this selective distribution will allow delivery to at risk tissue in a rapid manner. Salvage of viable, but threatened, penumbral tissue could afford stroke patients an increased probability of favorable long term ...
The Potassium (KI) pill:. ATHF3, with cosponsors, Beyond Nuclear beyondnuclear.org, Nuclear Information and Resource Service NIRS.org and Citizens Resistance at Fermi 2, has begun a project of going door to door to every household within a 10 mile radius of Fermi 2 to gather support and signatures for direct delivery of potassium iodide (KI) pills to every household and business within the 10 mile radius. The NRC recognizes the KI pill as part of emergency planning but leaves implementation up to the states with federal government covering cost. Only 5.3 % of those within a 10 mile radius of Fermi 2 have used a voucher to obtain the pill. This is in large part because the NRC and DTE Energy dismiss the risk as small and not needing mitigation.. Pregnant women and children are at the highest risk of thyroid cancer and other thyroid related illnesses from a release of radioactive iodine 131. If immediately informed of such a release and the pill is taken, it will block absorption of radioactive ...
Dendritic cells (DCs) are superior antigen presenting cells (APCs) that are important for the initiation adaptive of immune responses. They are uniquely equipped for the activation and expansion of both naïve and memory T cells. In fact, studies have shown that direct delivery of antigens (Ags) to DCs may augment both T cell responses and humoral immunity. For this purpose, DCs express a unique pattern of cell surface receptors that can be employed as target structures for such targeted delivery of Ags to DCs. Different surface receptors on DCs will, to a varying extent, lead to internalization, processing and presentation of the Ag to T cells. Depending on the intracellular routing of the Ag, antigenic peptides are presented on MHC class I and/ or class II facilitating induction of different T cell responses. A number of different target receptors have been assayed for this purpose, but several other DC surface molecules deserve examination for their usefulness for Agdelivery. Antibodies ...
Sermion tablets with nicergoline 5 mg for brain metabolism acceleration from Japan. buy online at special sale price with direct delivery to your home address.
Direct delivery of therapeutic compounds to cellular targets can enhance drug efficacy and safety, but such techniques require careful monitoring within the body. Now, a research team led by Julius Vancso at the A*STAR Institute of Materials Research and Engineering in Singapore has developed polymer microspheres labeled with fluorescent quantum dots that promise to light up the pathways of critical biological processes1.. Scientists often attach fluorescent markers, such as chemical dyes, to biomolecules to track their movements inside living cells. Quantum dots-semiconductor nanocrystals with extraordinary light-emitting capabilities-promise to radically advance biological imaging by offering a brighter, longer-lived source of fluorescent light than any comparable dye. Incorporating quantum dots (QDs) into living systems is challenging, however, because the long, hydrophobic carbon chains typically present on the surfaces of QDs make the dots insoluble in water.. ...
The paucity of liver donation highlights the use of cell-based strategies for end-stage liver failure. We recently showed that bone marrow-derived aggregates (BMDAs) can completely restore the hematopoietic system in gamma-irradiated mice. These aggregates are stem and progenitor cells in the bone marrow (BM), composed of both hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic lineages. Furthermore, reports showed that resident BM cells migrate to the liver and integrate themselves into the tissue in small numbers. Hence, we hypothesized that direct delivery of BMDAs to the damaged liver might enhance the integration of BM cells in the liver because of its stemness property, intact BM architecture, the physical proximity of these niche-like structures to the damaged sites and the existence of liver paracrine factors ...
Most preclinical and clinical testing of GDNF and its family member NTN has focused on direct delivery of high concentrations of recombinant protein or viral vector-based cDNA overexpression. However, there is evidence suggesting that supraphysiological levels of GDNF maintained long term may not be the best method of providing trophic support for dopaminergic neurons in vivo. For example, chronic putamenal infusion of recombinant GDNF caused reduced food consumption and body weight, as well as Purkinje cell loss in rhesus monkeys (Hovland et al., 2007); overexpression of GDNF cDNA in the substantia nigra led to severe weight loss in rodents (Manfredsson et al., 2009a,b) and monkeys (Su et al., 2009).. Our study demonstrates an alternative means of augmenting GDNF expression that produces more physiologically relevant levels of GDNF. Engineered ZFP TFs drive significant activation of the endogenous GDNF gene in multiple cell types. The relative extent of activation was inversely correlated with ...
Dr. William E. Krauss was a faculty member and became the first Associate Director of the Ohio Agricultural Experiment Station, serving from 1948 to 1969. This award was established by the Krauss family to recognize excellence in research performed by a doctoral student. The award is given to a current or recently graduated Ph.D. student that has produced a peer reviewed publication of the highest quality in the past year.. The 2020 award was given to Joonbum Lee, a Ph. D. candidate in the department of Animal Science, advised by Dr. Kichoon Lee. In his work, he focuses on development of avian genome editing method and discovery the function of novel genetic factors using avian transgenic and knockout models. He is receiving the William E. Krauss Award for his paper titled, Direct delivery of adenoviral CRISPR/Cas9 vector into quail blastoderms for generation of knockout birds which was selected for mention in a front section of the print journal called In This Issue to highlight ...
The Society of independent Brewers (SIBA) has purchased a majority shareholding in Flying Firkin Distribution Ltd (FFD) as part of its commercial strategy to develop routes to market opportunities for its 850 craft brewery members.. FFD has been a specialist distributor of craft cask ale for over 25 years, based in Colne (Lancashire), and has been instrumental in creating and sustaining profitable sales channels for hundreds of British independent craft breweries to the On Trade throughout the UK.. In recent times the national distribution network of the entire UK beer industry has been rationalised and restructured and SIBA has been seeking opportunities to expand routes to market beyond the direct delivery by brewery scheme element of SIBA BeerFlex.. Mike Benner, SIBA Chief Executive, said, This purchase creates an exciting opportunity for SIBA to progress its commercial objectives to fulfil local to national demand for craft beer and firmly establish SIBA as the category leader in British ...
Title:Controlled Gene Delivery Can Enhance Therapeutic Outcome for Cancer Immune Therapy for Melanoma. VOLUME: 15 ISSUE: 1. Author(s):Shawna A. Shirley, Cathryn G. Lundberg, Fanying Li, Niculina Burcus and Richard Heller. Affiliation:Frank Reidy Research Center for Bioelectrics, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA 23508, USA.. Keywords:Cytokine, electrotransfer, gene therapy, immunotherapy, interleukin-12, melanoma.. Abstract:Effective delivery still remains a major hurdle in the development of gene based therapies. While technological advances have occurred that have improved delivery in general, there is still a need for controlled delivery in order to achieve therapeutic effects. Gene electrotransfer (GET) can be utilized to accomplish this. Careful selection of parameters used for delivery such as amplitude, duration and number of pulses as well as plasmid construct can be manipulated in order to achieve appropriate levels of local expression. Previously we have shown that direct delivery ...
NBC Internet, Inc. (Nasdaq: NBCI), a leading Internet portal company that brokers information, commercial, and entertainment transactions, yesterday announced a strategic distribution agreement with Dominos Pizza, the recognized world leader in pizza delivery, to offer Dominos pizza-eaters a free nationwide Internet access service through an agreement with myfavoritei.The new co-branded NBCi.com/Dominos free Internet access service will be distributed and marketed by Dominos through a variety of offline and online mechanisms -- including direct delivery of CD-ROMs affixed to Dominos pizza delivery boxes in select markets; in marketing messages that have been printed on Dominos pizza boxtoppers; in Dominos newspaper advertising inserts; and within Dominos doorhanger materials.The co-branded free ISP also is available immediately for download at related to Multichannel,
B) County boards may apply to the department for funds for community services development under the terms and conditions as may be prescribed by the department. The department shall review the applications and, subject to state appropriations to the department or to other funds under the departments control, may fund the programs it considers in the best interest of service delivery to the citizens of the State with intellectual disability, related disabilities, autism spectrum disorder, head injuries, or spinal cord injuries. SECTION 15. Section 44-20-385(5) and (8) of the 1976 Code, as last amended by Act 47 of 2011, is further amended to read: (5) shall employ personnel and expend its budget for the direct delivery of services or contract with those service vendors necessary to carry out the county intellectual disability, related disabilities, autism spectrum disorder, head injuries, and spinal cord injuries services program who meet specifications prescribed by the department; (8) shall ...
Objective: Cardioplegia distribution beyond a stenotic coronary artery may not be adequate. This problem can be overcome by direct delivery of cardioplegia via the vein grafts anastomosed during the operation. The aim of this study is to investigate the results of simultaneous antegrade/vein graft cardioplegia versus antegrade cardioplegia alone in elective CABG patients. ...
Semantic Scholar extracted view of [Epithelioma of the small intestine in a 3 year old child; acute invagination]. by Allen Russell Chauvenet et al.
Several alternative routes are currently being explored. This is a narrative review of data about delivery methods for benzodiazepines alternative to the intravenous and oral routes for the acute treatment of seizures. Unconventional delivery options such as direct delivery to the central nervous system or inhalers are reported. Data show that intranasal diazepam or midazolam and the intramuscular auto-injector for midazolam are as effective as rectal or intravenous diazepam. Head-to-head comparisons with buccal midazolam are urgently needed. In addition, the majority of trials focused on children and adolescents, and further trials in adults are warranted.. Reference:. Mula, M. (2016) New Non-Intravenous Routes for Benzodiazepines in Epilepsy: A Clinician Perspective. CNS Drugs. December 9th. [Epub ahead of print].. DOI: 10.1007/s40263-016-0398-4. Thank you to our partners for supporting IVTEAM ...
Objective:. While medications can temporarily alleviate the symptoms of Parkinson s disease (PD), they do not influence the degenerative process. Progressive loss of nigral dopaminergic (DA) neurons (the pathological hallmark of PD) results in progressive neurologic dysfunction and death. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) was first identified based on its ability to promote the survival of embryonic DA neurons in vitro, and research has demonstrated beneficial effects of GDNF in animal models of PD. Preliminary clinical trials of GDNF infusions have yielded inconclusive results. Observed problems with tolerability and efficacy in these studies may have been related to the methods of delivery. Recent evidence indicates that gene transfer via direct delivery of viral vectors may represent a superior approach for the treatment of PD with GDNF.. Study population:. Twenty-four adult male and female subjects with advanced Parkinson s disease, who are candidates for surgical treatment ...
Retinoblastomas, intraocular malignancies of childhood, can also be directly visualized within the eye during examination. With early detection, the cure rate for this tumor is excellent. More is known about the genetic basis for cancer in retinoblastoma than in any other human tumor. The exact chromosome location and DNA sequence alterations that cause this tumor can now be characterized. This has been immensely helpful in establishing patient prognosis and in genetic counseling of family members ...
Retinoblastoma is the most common primary intraocular malignancy of childhood and accounts for 10 to 15 percent of cancers within the first year of life. Retinoblastoma typically presents as leukocoria () in a child under the age of two years. Untrea
Malignant choroidal melanoma (MCM) is a rare diagnosis, although it is the most commonly reported intraocular malignancy. Furthermore, the choroid is the second most common site that melanomas occur.…Malignant Choroidal Melanoma: Read more about Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment, Complications, Causes and Prognosis.
Definition of epithelioma cuniculatum. Provided by Stedmans medical dictionary and Drugs.com. Includes medical terms and definitions.
Scott McPhee, Ph.D., Vice President of Clinical Development, Asklepios BioPharmaceutical Inc., and Nicholas Boulis, M.D., Assistant Professor, Neurosurgery, Emory University, will be conducting preclinical studies of a Galanin gene delivery for selected patients with uncontrolled Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy (MTLE). Direct delivery of a gene therapy to the temporal lobe offers the significant potential of a less invasive, more effective alternative approach that precludes the trauma and resulting complications of surgical tissue removal, and avoids the side effects of standard pharmacological treatments. The protein galanin has been shown to suppress seizures. Gene delivery of galanin DNA has been shown to have anticonvulsant and neuroprotective effects in models of MTLE. Unlike traditional anti-epileptic medications, galanin gene delivery may be administered in a one-time intervention that provides long-term supplemental galanin in the epileptogenic tissue. The proposed therapeutic approach ...
Cases of extensive epithelioma (left) and rodent ulcer (right), historical medical illustration. Epithelioma is an abnormal growth of the epithelium, a layer of tissue that covers the surfaces of organs and other parts of the body. It may be benign or malignant. A rodent ulcer (basal cell carcinoma) is a common form of skin cancer, and is most often caused by over-exposure to sunlight. From Atlas of Venereal and Skin Diseases by Prince Albert Morrow, published in 1889. - Stock Image C030/8491
Aims: Uveal melanoma is the commonest primary intraocular malignancy in adults, and leads to death in approximately half of patients. The Aim: was to report on trends over time and geographical variation in rates of uveal melanoma in England. Method:s Analysis of admissions for uveal melanoma, using linked English national hospital episode statistics, available from 1999 to 2010, and the Oxford record linkage study (ORLS), before that, from 1979 to 1998. Results: The annual rate of people admitted in England with a new record of uveal melanoma remained stable at approximately 1.0 people per 100 000 population from 1999 to 2010. Annual ORLS incidence rates were also stable from 1979 to 1998. Proportions of new uveal malignancies in adults for 2006-10 were 88% (382 people/year) choroidal and 12% (52) ciliary body/iris. Incidence rates increased with increasing age and were higher in men than women. Geographical analysis showed variation across local authorities (LA) in incidence rates, from 0.1 to 1.9
Squamous-cell epithelioma of the nail bed is a rare, locally malignant lesion mainly affecting the fingers, seldom the toes. It is by far the most common of the malignant tumours of the hand...
Product Name: Mouse mAb anti- human transferrin Receptor (CD71), Clone CY-TFRCollection: AntibodySub Category: Monoclonal AntibodyImmunogen: Purified human
PurposeUveal melanoma is the most common primary intraocular malignancy in adults with no effective systemic treatment option in the metastatic setting. Selumetinib (AZD6244, ARRY-142886) is an oral, potent, and selective MEK1/2 inhibitor with a short half-life, which demonstrated single-agent activity in patients with metastatic uveal melanoma in a randomized phase II trial.Methods: The Selumetinib (AZD6244: ARRY-142886) (Hyd-Sulfate) in Metastatic Uveal Melanoma (SUMIT) study was a phase III, double-blind trial (ClinicalTrial.gov identifier: NCT01974752) in which patients with metastatic uveal melanoma and no prior systemic therapy were randomly assigned (3:1) to selumetinib (75 mg twice daily) plus dacarbazine (1,000 mg/m(2) intravenously on day 1 of every 21-day cycle) or placebo plus dacarbazine. The primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS) by blinded independent central radiologic review. Secondary end points included overall survival and objective response rate.Results: A ...
Uveal melanoma (UM) is the most common primary intraocular malignancy and the leading potentially fatal primary intraocular disease in adults. Melanoma antigen recognized by T-cells (MART-1) has been studied extensively as a clinically important diagnostic marker for melanoma, however, its biological function remains unclear. In the present study, the UM cell line SP6.5, which showed a high level of MART-1 expression, was subjected to small interfering RNA-mediated silencing of MART-1. Silencing of MART-1 expression increased the migration ability of SP6.5 cells and down-regulated the expression of the metastasis suppressor NM23. Our results suggest that MART-1 is a candidate target for the development of therapeutic strategies for UM and in particular for the suppression of metastasis associated with this malignancy.
Looking for odontogenic epithelioma? Find out information about odontogenic epithelioma. An epithelial tumor associated with the enamel organ; cells of basal layers resemble the ameloblast. Also known as adamantinoma Explanation of odontogenic epithelioma
Radiation Carcinogenesis Perhaps the first documented example of the induction of neoplasia by ionizing radiation was that of atypical epithelial hyperplasias and malignant epitheliomas observed on the hands of ra- ...
Basal Cell Carcinoma (Basal Cell Epithelioma) Pipeline and Therapeutics Development H1 2017 provides a comprehensive information on the therapeutics under development for Basal Cell Carcinoma (Basal Cell Epithelioma), complete with analysis by stage of development, drug target, mechanism of action (MoA), route of administration (RoA) and molecule type.
Pilomatricoma, also known as calcifying epithelioma of Malherbe, is an unusual, but not particularly rare tumor. We excised 9 pilomatricomas from 8 patients in the past 11 months. The ages ranged from 6 months to 63 years, most patients were under 30 years old. The male to female ratio was 3:5. Their sizes were smaller than 2㎝, and the duration prior to excision varied from 2 months to 2years. They were more common on the head and upper extremities. Five tumors were normal skin-colored, and th ..................More ...
Pearce and Brown discovered a malignant epithelial tumor of the scrotum, the Brown-Pearce Carcinoma. They studied transmission ... Pearce and Brown studied animal models of the disease in rats, mice, and rabbits, to better understand the course of the ... After Brown's death in 1942, Pearce reduced the size of the colony, narrowed the scope of the investigation, and began to ... Brown and Pearce systematically studied syphilis in rabbits, over a period of about 6 years. Their meticulous investigations ...
Bai M, Quinn S, Trivedi S, Kifor O, Pearce SH, Pollak MR, Krapcho K, Hebert SC, Brown EM (Aug 1996). "Expression and ... "Expression of a calcium-sensing receptor in a human medullary thyroid carcinoma cell line and its contribution to calcitonin ... Pollak MR, Brown EM, Chou YH, Hebert SC, Marx SJ, Steinmann B, Levi T, Seidman CE, Seidman JG (Dec 1993). "Mutations in the ... Pearce SH, Trump D, Wooding C, Besser GM, Chew SL, Grant DB, Heath DA, Hughes IA, Paterson CR, Whyte MP (Dec 1995). "Calcium- ...
Brown M, Cardozo M, et al. (January 2015). "Discovery and in vivo evaluation of (S)-N-(1-(7-fluoro-2-(pyridin-2-yl)quinolin-3- ... Pearce W, Lim EL, et al. (June 2014). "Inactivation of PI(3)K p110δ breaks regulatory T-cell-mediated immune tolerance to ... negative head and neck squamous-cell carcinoma (HNSCC) (prior to resection surgery). Duvelisib Idelalisib Cushing TD, Hao X, ...
Ong PC, McGowan S, Pearce MC, Irving JA, Kan WT, Grigoryev SA, Turk B, Silverman GA, Brix K, Bottomley SP, Whisstock JC, Pike ... Mallya M, Phillips RL, Saldanha SA, Gooptu B, Brown SC, Termine DJ, Shirvani AM, Wu Y, Sifers RN, Abagyan R, Lomas DA (November ... Examples of cross-class inhibitory serpins include serpin B4 a squamous cell carcinoma antigen 1 (SCCA-1) and the avian serpin ... Zhang Q, Buckle AM, Law RH, Pearce MC, Cabrita LD, Lloyd GJ, Irving JA, Smith AI, Ruzyla K, Rossjohn J, Bottomley SP, Whisstock ...
Pearce, EN.; Gerber, AR.; Gootnick, DB.; Kettel Khan, L.; Li, R.; Pino, S.; Braverman, LE. (2002). "Effects of Chronic Iodine ... Brown-Grant, K. (1961). "Extrathyroidal iodide concentrating mechanisms". Physiol. Rev. 41 (1): 189-213. doi:10.1152/physrev. ... Shrivastava, A. (2006). "Molecular Iodine Induces Caspase-independent Apoptosis in Human Breast Carcinoma Cells Involving the ...
Brown EJ, Albers MW, Shin TB, Ichikawa K, Keith CT, Lane WS, Schreiber SL (June 1994). "A mammalian protein targeted by G1- ... mTOR inhibitors have found use in the treatment of a variety of malignancies, including renal cell carcinoma (temsirolimus) and ... Pearce et al., 2007; Sarbassov et al., 2004)(Figure 1B). Rictor and mSIN1 are both critical to mTORC2 function. Figure 1: ... Guertin DA, Stevens DM, Thoreen CC, Burds AA, Kalaany NY, Moffat J, Brown M, Fitzgerald KJ, Sabatini DM (December 2006). " ...
Gould, Alfred Pearce. (1902). The International Text-Book of Surgery. Volume 2. Page 973. W. B. Saunders. "Mauser bullet lies ... Her doctors attempted to excise a tumor on her right hand, but this failed to halt the progression of the carcinoma. In January ... Brown, Percy. (1936). American Martyrs to Science through the Roentgen Rays. Charles C. Thomas. Springfield, Illinois. Spirt, ... Brown, P (1995-02-01). "American martyrs to radiology. Elizabeth Fleischman Ascheim (1859-1905). 1936". American Journal of ...
Handley, R. S. (August 1975). "Carcinoma of the breast". Annals of the Royal College of Surgeons of England. 57 (2): 59-66. PMC ... Bedford, D. E.; Muir, D. C. (1959). "James William Brown". Heart. 21 (2): 284-8. doi:10.1136/hrt.21.2.284. PMC 1017581. PMID ... Some Points in Heredity 1910 Alfred Pearce Gould, Cancer 1909 Francis Richardson Cross, The Brain Structures concerned in ... Morgan, C. Naunton (February 1965). "Carcinoma of the Rectum: Bradshaw Lecture delivered at the Royal College of Surgeons of ...
Strojan P, Oblak I, Svetic B, Smid L, Kos J (May 2004). "Cysteine proteinase inhibitor cystatin C in squamous cell carcinoma of ... Eriksson P, Jones KG, Brown LC, Greenhalgh RM, Hamsten A, Powell JT (January 2004). "Genetic approach to the role of cysteine ... "Entrez Gene: CST3 cystatin C (amyloid angiopathy and cerebral hemorrhage)". Hwang SJ, Yang Q, Meigs JB, Pearce EN, Fox CS ( ...
Obituary for Patricia Brown, 81; played in 'girls' pro baseball league [32] [33] "南豐集團創辦人陳廷驊病逝". Ming Pao Daily News. AP. 17 ... Charles E. M. Pearce, 72, New Zealand-born Australian mathematician, traffic collision. Ghassan Tueni, 86, Lebanese journalist ... Chiara Corbella Petrillo, 28, Italian anti-abortion activist, carcinoma. Monte Crockett, 73, American football player. Roger ... Doug Brown, 88, Australian footballer. Don Charlwood, 96, Australian author. Kay Christopher, 86, American actress and model, ...
Rose SR, Brown RS, Foley T, Kaplowitz PB, Kaye CI, Sundararajan S, Varma SK (June 2006). "Update of newborn screening and ... Malignant thyroid cancers are most often carcinomas, although cancer can occur in any tissue that the thyroid consists of, ... ISBN 978-1-284-03445-5. Leung AM, Braverman LE, Pearce EN (November 2012). "History of U.S. iodine fortification and ... Malignant nodules, which only occur in about 5% of nodules, include follicular, papillary, medullary carcinomas and metastases ...
Burt RK, Loh Y, Pearce W, Beohar N, Barr WG, Craig R, et al. (February 2008). "Clinical applications of blood-derived and ... Patients after HSCT are at a higher risk for oral carcinoma. Post-HSCT oral cancer may have more aggressive behavior with ... performed a stem-cell transplant for leukemia patient Timothy Ray Brown, who was also HIV-positive. From 60 matching donors, ...
Malignant nodules, which only occur in about 5% of nodules, include follicular, papillary, medullary carcinomas and metastases ... Pediatrics, American Academy of; Rose, Susan R.; Association, American Thyroid; Brown, Rosalind S.; Society, Lawson Wilkins ... Leung, Angela; Braverman, Lewis; Pearce, Elizabeth (13 November 2012). "History of U.S. Iodine Fortification and ... Malignant thyroid cancers are most often carcinomas, although cancer can occur in any tissue that the thyroid consists of, ...
Byssinosis ("brown lung"). *Chalicosis. *Chimney sweeps' carcinoma. *Chronic solvent-induced encephalopathy (CSE) ... Pearce, J. M. (April 2009). "James Paget's median nerve compression (Putnam's acroparaesthesia)". Pract Neurol. 9 (2): 96-9. ...
Huber C, Dias-Santagata D, Glaser A, O'Sullivan J, Brauner R, Wu K, Xu X, Pearce K, Wang R, Uzielli ML, Dagoneau N, Chemaitilly ... Marin, J.; Battistuzzi, F.U.; Brown, A.C.; Hedges, S.B. (2017). "The Timetree of Prokaryotes: New Insights into Their Evolution ... and are the most common to be altered in human carcinomas, it is expected for cell cycle-regulatory proteins to be under tight ... "Skp2 gene copy number aberrations are common in non-small cell lung carcinoma, and its overexpression in tumors with ras ...
"Hobart Brown, kinetic sculpture race founder, dies at 74". KTEN.com. The Associated Press. November 8, 2007. Archived from the ... Pearce, Jeremy (November 15, 2007). "Salome Gluecksohn-Waelsch, 100, Geneticist, Is Dead". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. ... Takafumi Isomura, 76, Japanese politician, mayor of Osaka (1995-2003), hepatocellular carcinoma. Elaine Lorillard, 93, American ... Hobart Brown, 74, American sculptor, founder of the Kinetic Sculpture Race, pneumonia. Earl Dodge, 74, American presidential ...
Pearce CL, Templeman C, Rossing MA, Lee A, Near AM, Webb PM, Nagle CM, Doherty JA, Cushing-Haugen KL, Wicklund KG, Chang-Claude ... Young VJ, Brown JK, Saunders PT, Horne AW (2013). "The role of the peritoneum in the pathogenesis of endometriosis". Human ... Pinkert TC, Catlow CE, Straus R (April 1979). "Endometriosis of the urinary bladder in a man with prostatic carcinoma". Cancer ... Brown J, Farquhar C (March 2014). "Endometriosis: an overview of Cochrane Reviews". The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews ...
doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(02)60872-4. Pearce, J.M.S. (December 1997). "The life and work of Marshall Hall". QJM. 90 (12): 801-3. ... "Munk's Roll details for Derek Ernest Denny-Brown". Royal College of Physicians. Retrieved 7 April 2014. Burnet, M. (October ... Lazarus-Barlow, W. S. (1909). "The Croonian Lectures on Radioactivity and Carcinoma: An Experimental Inquiry: Delivered before ... doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(00)96665-0. Wilson, G (1979). "The Brown Animal Sanatory Institution". Journal of Hygiene. 83 (1): 171- ...
Adrenal carcinomas are very rare, with an incidence of 1 case per million per year. Pheochromocytomas are tumors of the adrenal ... Pearce, JM (2004). "Thomas Addison (1793-1860)". Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 97 (6): 297-300. doi:10.1258/jrsm. ... The cells contain relatively small quantities of cytoplasm and lipid droplets, and sometimes display brown lipofuscin pigment. ...
Woodruff, Judy; Brown, Jeffrey; Wise, Linday (December 11, 2015). "A little known casualty of the Cold War: U.S. nuclear ... The most common health issue was "radium jaw" (bone necrosis), anemia, epidermoid carcinomas, and sarcomas. The National ... Pearce, M. S.; Richardson, D. B.; Rodriguez-Artalejo, F.; Rogel, A.; Tardy, H.; Telle-Lamberton, M.; Turai, I.; Usel, M.; ... Brown, Valerie (May 9, 2013). "Hanford Nuclear Waste Cleanup Plant May Be Too Dangerous". Scientific American. Retrieved 5 ...
Brown AJ, Brown JY, Burford DC, Burrill W, Burton J, Cahill P, Camire D, Carter NP, Chapman JC, Clark SY, Clarke G, Clee CM, ... Pearce AV, Peck AI, Pelan S, Phillimore B, Porter K, Rice CM, Rogosin A, Ross MT, Sarafidou T, Sehra HK, Shownkeen R, Skuce CD ... multiple endocrine neoplasia and medullary thyroid carcinoma 1, Hirschsprung disease) RPP30: ribonuclease P protein subunit p30 ...
Oral carcinoma[edit]. Patients after HSCT are at a higher risk for oral carcinoma. Post-HSCT oral cancer may have more ... Burt RK, Loh Y, Pearce W, et al. (2008). "Clinical applications of blood-derived and marrow-derived stem cells for nonmalignant ... performed a stem cell transplant for leukemia patient Timothy Ray Brown, who was also HIV-positive.[57] From 60 matching donors ...
Brown, OI; Allgar, V; Wong, K-Y K (2016). "Coffee reduces death after myocardial infarction: a meta-analysis". Coronary Artery ... Pearce, Fred (February 25, 2006). "Earth: The parched planet". New Scientist. Retrieved January 5, 2010. Martin, Deborah L.; ... carcinoma and lung cancer). A 2011 review found that regular coffee consumption of up to 6 cups per day reduced the risk of ... Brown, Alton. "True Brew". Food Network. Archived from the original on April 16, 2003. Retrieved January 11, 2010. New Process ...
Boston: Little, Brown. ISBN 978-0-316-06747-8. Farina, William (2007). Ulysses S. Grant, 1861-1864: His Rise from Obscurity to ... Today, medical historians believed he suffered from a T1N1 carcinoma of the tonsillar fossa. Twain called the Memoirs a " ... Created by sculptor Henry Merwin Shrady and architect Edward Pearce Casey, and dedicated in 1922, it overlooks the Capitol ... Boston: Little, Brown. ISBN 978-0-316-13210-7. Coffey, David (2011). Spencer C. Tucker (ed.). The Encyclopedia of North ...
Strøbæk D, Brown DT, Jenkins DP, Chen YJ, Coleman N, Ando Y, Chiu P, Jørgensen S, Demnitz J, Wulff H, Christophersen P (January ... Jowett SL, Seal CJ, Pearce MS, Phillips E, Gregory W, Barton JR, Welfare MR (October 2004). "Influence of dietary factors on ... People with backwash ileitis might have an increased risk for colorectal carcinoma.[117] Those people with only proctitis ... Vos T, Allen C, Arora M, Barber RM, Bhutta ZA, Brown A, et al. (GBD 2015 Disease and Injury Incidence and Prevalence ...
Brown GR, Jones KT (2015). "Incidence of breast cancer in a cohort of 5,135 transgender veterans". Breast Cancer Res. Treat. ... Pike MC, Wu AH, Spicer DV, Lee S, Pearce CL (2007). "Estrogens, progestins, and risk of breast cancer". Ernst Schering Found ... Green RB, Sethi RS, Lindner HH (July 1964). "Treatment of advanced carcinoma of the breast: Progress in therapy during the past ... ISBN 978-0-08-055309-2. Turo R, Smolski M, Esler R, Kujawa ML, Bromage SJ, Oakley N, Adeyoju A, Brown SC, Brough R, Sinclair A ...
Pearce, Jeremy (January 13, 2009). "Harold Snyder, Generic Drug Pioneer, Is Dead at 86". The New York Times. Retrieved ... Sailor Brown, 93, British footballer and manager. Roque Cordero, 91, Panamanian-born American composer. John Fenton, 87, ... small cell lung carcinoma. Maksym Pashayev, 20, Ukrainian footballer, car accident. Amalia Solórzano, 97, Mexican First Lady ( ... Glanville, Brian (March 24, 2009). "Sailor Brown: Popular inside-forward for Charlton Athletic". The Guardian. Retrieved ...
Pearce, JM (2004). "Thomas Addison (1793-1860)". Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 97 (6): 297-300. doi:10.1258/jrsm. ... They are seen in around 3.4% of CT scans,[7] and in most cases they are benign adenomas.[47] Adrenal carcinomas are very rare, ... The cells contain relatively small quantities of cytoplasm and lipid droplets, and sometimes display brown lipofuscin pigment.[ ...
Merkel-cell carcinoma. RNA virus. HCV Hepatocellular carcinoma. Splenic marginal zone lymphoma. HTLV-I Adult T-cell leukemia/ ... Pearce JM (January 2005). "Poliomyelitis (Heine-Medin disease)". Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Psychiatry. 76 (1): ... such as brown fat, the reticuloendothelial tissues, and muscle.[34] This sustained replication causes a major viremia, and ... Hepatocellular carcinoma. HPV Cervical cancer. Anal cancer. Penile cancer. Vulvar cancer. Vaginal cancer. Oropharyngeal cancer ...
Bai M, Quinn S, Trivedi S, Kifor O, Pearce SH, Pollak MR, Krapcho K, Hebert SC, Brown EM (Aug 1996). "Expression and ... "Expression of a calcium-sensing receptor in a human medullary thyroid carcinoma cell line and its contribution to calcitonin ... Pearce SH, Trump D, Wooding C, Besser GM, Chew SL, Grant DB, Heath DA, Hughes IA, Paterson CR, Whyte MP (Dec 1995). "Calcium- ... Pollak MR, Brown EM, Chou YH, Hebert SC, Marx SJ, Steinmann B, Levi T, Seidman CE, Seidman JG (Dec 1993). "Mutations in the ...
Brown-Pearce" by people in Harvard Catalyst Profiles by year, and whether "Carcinoma, Brown-Pearce" was a major or minor topic ... "Carcinoma, Brown-Pearce" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicines controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH (Medical ... Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase and protein activator in human cancer cell lines and Brown-Pearce carcinoma. J Natl Cancer ... Carcinoma, Brown-Pearce*Carcinoma, Brown-Pearce. *Brown-Pearce Carcinoma. *Carcinoma, Brown Pearce ...
STRUCTURAL CHANGES PRODUCED IN BROWN-PEARCE CARCINOMA CELLS BY MEANS OF A SPECIFIC ANTIBODY AND COMPLEMENT Bernard Kalfayan, ... Bernard Kalfayan, John G. Kidd; STRUCTURAL CHANGES PRODUCED IN BROWN-PEARCE CARCINOMA CELLS BY MEANS OF A SPECIFIC ANTIBODY AND ... Structural changes were regularly observed in Brown-Pearce rabbit carcinoma cells that had been brought into contact, in the ... A DISTINCTIVE SUBSTANCE ASSOCIATED WITH THE BROWN-PEARCE RABBIT CARCINOMA I. PRESENCE AND SPECIFICITY OF THE SUBSTANCE AS ...
Brown Pearce carcinoma. 62 Discoloration is due to deposition of what substance? ...
Pearce and Brown discovered a malignant epithelial tumor of the scrotum, the Brown-Pearce Carcinoma. They studied transmission ... Pearce and Brown studied animal models of the disease in rats, mice, and rabbits, to better understand the course of the ... After Browns death in 1942, Pearce reduced the size of the colony, narrowed the scope of the investigation, and began to ... Brown and Pearce systematically studied syphilis in rabbits, over a period of about 6 years. Their meticulous investigations ...
With the exception of the Brown-Pearce carcinoma, no morphological changes in the tumors of treated animals could be detected. ... anterior chamber transplants of an undifferentiated squamous-cell carcinoma (Brown-Pearce) in rabbits eyes were similarly ... hand suggests that the triazolopyrimidine distinguishes a biochemical difference between normal tissues and certain carcinomas. ...
... study has been made of an antibody which appears in the blood of certain rabbits implanted with the Brown-Pearce carcinoma or ... INCIDENCE AND SPECIFICITY OF THE ANTIBODY FOR A DISTINCTIVE CONSTITUENT OF THE BROWN-PEARCE TUMOR. Ian MacKenzie, John G. Kidd ... The observations as a whole seem to indicate that this constituent of the Brown-Pearce tumor differs notably from certain other ... INCIDENCE AND SPECIFICITY OF THE ANTIBODY FOR A DISTINCTIVE CONSTITUENT OF THE BROWN-PEARCE TUMOR ...
Checkoway H, Pearce NE, Crawford-Brown DJ: Research methods in occupational epidemiology. 1989, Oxford University Press, New ... Doll R, Peto R: Cigarette smoking and bronchial carcinoma: dose and time relationship among regular smokers and life long non- ...
Brown-Pearce carcinoma) tissue in the rabbit, J. Pathol. Bacteriol. 62:313-333.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar ... Effect of osmotic pressure on uptake of chemotherapeutic agents by carcinoma cells, Cancer Res. 50:4704-4708.PubMedGoogle ... ZCE/CHA-indium-111-BLEDTA-IV clinical imaging in colorectal carcinoma, Antibody Immunoconjugates Radiopharm. 2:1-13.Google ... Interstitial hypertension in cervical carcinomas in humans: Possible correlation with tumor oxygenation and radiation response ...
... carcinoma (e.g., Walker, basal cell, basosquamous, Brown-Pearce, ductal, Ehrlich tumor, in situ, Krebs 2, Merkel cell, mucinous ... ovarian carcinoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, sarcoma (e.g., Ewing, experimental, Kaposi, and mast cell), neoplasms (e.g., bone, breast ...
A study of the comparative effectiveness of inoculating rabbits with live or killed Brown-Pearce tumors. ... THE TRANSPLANTATION OF HUMAN EPIDERMOID CARCINOMA (H.Ep. #3) INTO FROGS. MERKER, PHILIP C. ... Changes in the myelogram of mice with the ascitic carcinoma of Ehrlich. ...
... carcinoma (e.g., Walker, basal cell, basosquamous, Brown-Pearce, ductal, Ehrlich tumor, in situ, Krebs 2, merkel cell, mucinous ... 10 is a copy of an autoradiogram showing TRF lengths of ovarian carcinoma and control normal cells. DNA from cells in ascitic ... Characteristics of Ovarian Carcinoma Tumor Cells from Ascitic Fluid Mean TRF Telomerase Patient Description Length (kbp) ... Counter et al., "Telomerase activity in human ovarian carcinoma," Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 91:2900-2904 (1994). Strahl and ...
... and ovarian carcinoma (OC). In EC, prognosis still relies on conventional pathological features such as... ... Brown LA, Kalloger SE, Miller MA, IeM S, McKinney SE, Santos JL, Swenerton K, Spellman PT, Gray J, Gilks CB, Huntsman DG (2008 ... Pearce CL, Schildkraut JM, Menon U, Kjaer SK, Levine DA, Gronwald J, Culver HA, Whittemore AS, Karlan BY, Lambrechts D, ... Endometrial carcinoma Ovarian carcinoma Biomarkers Prognosis This is a preview of subscription content, log in to check access ...
Brown-Pearce carcinoma) tissue in the rabbit. J Pathol Bacteriol 62:313-333PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar ... Karnofsky DA, Abelmann WH, Craver LF et al (1948) The use of the nitrogen mustards in the palliative treatment of carcinoma. ... Sugarbaker PH, Sardi A, Brown G, Dromain C, Rousset P, Jelinek JS (2017) Concerning CT features used to select patients for ... for advanced ovarian carcinoma: a French multicentre retrospective cohort study of 566 patients. Eur J Surg Oncol 22:1570-1575 ...
Effect of human plasmin on the toxic effects and growth of blood‐borne metastasis of the brownpearce carcinoma and the V2 ... Brown 1979. Evidence for acutely hypoxic cells in mouse tumours, and a possible mechanism of reoxygenation. ... carcinoma of rabbit. US5290221A (en) 1994-03-01. Systems for eradicating contaminants using photoactive materials in fluids ...
Effect of human plasmin on the toxic effects and growth of blood borne metastasis of the Brown-Pearce carcinoma and the V2 ... Endogenous receptor-bound urokinase mediates tissue invasion of the human lung carcinoma cell lines A549 and Calu-1. Cancer Res ... Larger and more invasive colorectal carcinoma contains larger amounts of plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 and its ... Interactions between human colon carcinoma cells, fibroblasts and monocytic cells in coculture-regulation of cathepsin B ...
The serum of a rabbit with large cancers resulting from the transplantation of a squamous cell carcinoma that had arisen from a ... The sera of rabbits carrying tar papillomas or the Brown-Pearce carcinoma proved wholly devoid of effect on the virus. The ... A DISTINCTIVE SUBSTANCE ASSOCIATED WITH THE BROWN-PEARCE RABBIT CARCINOMA I. PRESENCE AND SPECIFICITY OF THE SUBSTANCE AS ... A DISTINCTIVE SUBSTANCE ASSOCIATED WITH THE BROWN-PEARCE RABBIT CARCINOMA II. PROPERTIES OF THE SUBSTANCE: DISCUSSION ...
Brown-Pearce Carcinoma Brown-Pearce Epithelioma Carcinoma, Brown Pearce Epithelioma, Brown Pearce Epithelioma, Brown-Pearce ... Brown-Pearce Carcinoma. Brown-Pearce Epithelioma. Carcinoma, Brown Pearce. Epithelioma, Brown Pearce. Epithelioma, Brown-Pearce ... Carcinoma, Brown-Pearce Descriptor Spanish: Carcinoma de Brown-Pearce Descriptor Portuguese: Carcinoma de Brown-Pearce ... Épithélioma de Brown-Pearce Entry term(s):. ... Carcinoma, Brown-Pearce - Preferred Concept UI. M0003435. Scope ...
Brown M, Pearce M, Salotti J, Craft A, Hale J. European Bone Tumour Outcome Study (EBTOS): Overview of health related quality ... Seasonality in the incidence of cervical carcinoma in teenagers and young adults in northern England, 1968-2005. Chronobiology ... Pearce MS, Salotti JA, Howe NL, McHugh K, Kim KP, Lee C, Craft AW, de Gonzalez AB, Parker L. CT Scans in Young People in Great ... Pearce M, Salotti J, McHugh K, Kim KP, Craft A, Lubin J, Ron E, Parker L. Socio-economic variation in the use of CT scans in ...
... and growth of blood borne metastases of the Brown-Pearce carcinoma and the V2 carcinoma of the rabbit Cancer 9,6 1147-1152 ... I. Growth of Brown-Pearce carcinomas in rabbits treated with living or killed haemolytic streptococci Acta Pathol Microbiol ... Ellen Hodgson Brown: Forbidden Medicine... Lee: The war between health foods and death foods National Health Federation ... Brown, Wood, Smith: Sodium cyanide as a cancer chemotherapeutic agent Am J Obstet Gynecol 80,5 907-918 11.1960 Na-Cyanid als ...
Carcinoma, Transitional Cell. *Carcinoma, Verrucous. *Neoplasms, Experimental. *Carcinoma 256, Walker. *Carcinoma, Brown-Pearce ... A carcinoma discovered by Dr. Margaret R. Lewis of the Wistar Institute in 1951. This tumor originated spontaneously as a ... "Carcinoma, Lewis Lung" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicines controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH (Medical ... This graph shows the total number of publications written about "Carcinoma, Lewis Lung" by people in Harvard Catalyst Profiles ...
Brown AJ, Brown JY, Burford D, Burrill W, Burton J, Carder C, Carter NP, Chapman JC, Chen Y, Clarke G, Clark SY, Clee CM, Clegg ... Mhawech-Fauceglia P, Cheney RT, Schwaller J. Genetic alterations in urothelial bladder carcinoma: an updated review. Cancer. ... Pearce AV, Peck AI, Porter KM, Pandian R, Pelan S, Phillimore B, Povey S, Ramsey Y, Rand V, Scharfe M, Sehra HK, Shownkeen R, ... also known as nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome). 9q22.3 microdeletions can also be much larger; the largest reported ...
A DISTINCTIVE SUBSTANCE ASSOCIATED WITH THE BROWN-PEARCE RABBIT CARCINOMA : I. PRESENCE AND SPECIFICITY OF THE SUBSTANCE AS ...
The time sequence of changes in the level of properdin in rabbits with Brown-Pearce carcinoma.. ... The time sequence of changes in the level of properdin in rabbits with Brown-Pearce carcinoma.. ...
Kastl L, Brown I, Schofield AC. miRNA-34a is associated with docetaxel resistance in human breast cancer cells. Breast Cancer ... Naba A, Pearce OMT, Del Rosario A. et al. Characterization of the Extracellular Matrix of Normal and Diseased Tissues Using ... Increased expression of the polycomb group gene, EZH2, in transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. Clin Cancer Res. 2005;11: ... Increased upper and lower tract urothelial carcinoma in patients with end-stage renal disease: a nationwide cohort study in ...
Animals, Carcinoma, Brown-Pearce, Cricetinae, Guinea Pigs, Lymphoma, etiology, pathology, Melanoma, Mice, Neoplasm ...
The significance of the tissue pressure of normal testicular and of neoplastic (Brown-Pearce carcinoma) tissue in the rabbit. J ... for advanced ovarian carcinoma: a French multicentre retrospective cohort study of 566 patients. Eur J Surg Oncol 2013;39:1435- ... peritoneal lavage as a standard prophylactic strategy for peritoneal recurrence in patients with gastric carcinoma. Ann Surg ...
The sera of rabbits carrying tar papillomas or the Brown-Pearce carcinoma proved wholly devoid of effect on the virus. ... Four cases of juvenile-onset recurrent respiratory papillomatosis progressing to carcinoma (no history of smoking or ... Predictive and prognostic value of preoperative serum tumor markers in resectable adenosqamous lung carcinoma. Arsenic for ...
Bai M, Quinn S, Trivedi S, Kifor O, Pearce SH, Pollak MR, Krapcho K, Hebert SC, Brown EM (Aug 1996). "Expression and ... "Expression of a calcium-sensing receptor in a human medullary thyroid carcinoma cell line and its contribution to calcitonin ... Pollak MR, Brown EM, Chou YH, Hebert SC, Marx SJ, Steinmann B, Levi T, Seidman CE, Seidman JG (Dec 1993). "Mutations in the ... Pearce SH, Trump D, Wooding C, Besser GM, Chew SL, Grant DB, Heath DA, Hughes IA, Paterson CR, Whyte MP (Dec 1995). "Calcium- ...
Carcinoma, Transitional Cell. *Carcinoma, Verrucous. *Neoplasms, Experimental. *Carcinoma 256, Walker. *Carcinoma, Brown-Pearce ... "Carcinoma, Krebs 2" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicines controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH (Medical ... This graph shows the total number of publications written about "Carcinoma, Krebs 2" by people in this website by year, and ... Below are the most recent publications written about "Carcinoma, Krebs 2" by people in Profiles. ...
  • Donor interleukin 6 gene polymorphisms predict the recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma after liver transplantation. (cdc.gov)
  • Interleukin-6-174 Promoter Polymorphism and Susceptibility to Hepatitis B Virus Infection as a Risk Factor for Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Iran. (cdc.gov)
  • Impact of cytokine gene variants on the prediction and prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma in patients with cirrhosis. (cdc.gov)
  • Relationship between IL6 -572G/C polymorphism and hepatocellular carcinoma in men]. (cdc.gov)
  • Investigation of ICOS, CD28 and CD80 polymorphisms with the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma: a case-control study in eastern Chinese population. (cdc.gov)
  • 4. Fang T, Hou J, He M, Wang L, Zheng M, Wang X, Xia J. Actinidia chinensis Planch root extract (acRoots) inhibits hepatocellular carcinoma progression by inhibiting EP3 expression. (molcelltherapies.com)
  • 8. He M, Hou J, Wang L, Zheng M, Fang T, Wang X, Xia J. Actinidia chinensis Planch root extract inhibits cholesterol metabolism in hepatocellular carcinoma through upregulation of PCSK9. (molcelltherapies.com)
  • We show that the ATP-competitive inhibitor PP242, but not rapamycin, significantly down-regulates cholesterol biosynthesis genes in a 4E-BP1-dependent manner in NIH 3T3 cells, whereas S6 kinase 1 is the dominant regulator in hepatocellular carcinoma cells. (pnas.org)
  • Men have a much higher incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the predominant form of liver cancer , than women, suggesting that estrogens play a protective role in liver cancer development and progression. (hindawi.com)
  • Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), a common type of primary liver cancer, is one of the most malignant cancers, with increasing incidence and mortality rate worldwide [ 1 - 3 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • anterior chamber transplants of an undifferentiated squamous-cell carcinoma (Brown-Pearce) in rabbits' eyes were similarly controlled by the triazolopyrimidine. (aacrjournals.org)
  • The serum of a rabbit with large cancers resulting from the transplantation of a squamous cell carcinoma that had arisen from a virusinduced papilloma, possessed the power to neutralize the virus, and so too in less degree did that of an animal of the same transplantation series in which a small nodule had developed. (rupress.org)
  • The tion and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) in a Brazilian variables marital status, occupation, alcoholism and smoking population. (bvsalud.org)
  • Workers with low professional qualification are at greater risk ranked the sixth most prevalent cancer in various countries in for developing squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the orophar- the world1. (bvsalud.org)
  • Associations of IL6 rs1800795, BLK rs13277113, TIMP3 rs9621532, IL1RL1 rs1041973 and IL1RAP rs4624606 single gene polymorphisms with laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma. (cdc.gov)
  • Phase II clinical and exploratory biomarker study of dacomitinib in patients with recurrent and/or metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck. (cdc.gov)
  • Association of programmed death-1 polymorphisms with the risk and prognosis of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. (cdc.gov)
  • Association of T-cell regulatory gene polymorphisms with oral squamous cell carcinoma. (cdc.gov)
  • Influence of CTLA-4/CD28/ICOS gene polymorphisms on the susceptibility to cervical squamous cell carcinoma and stage of differentiation in the Polish population. (cdc.gov)
  • A number of dermatologic diseases can be present as an oral mass such as bacillary hemangioma, lymphoma and squamous cell carcinoma ( 11 ). (medsci.org)
  • Mutations of the TERT promoter are common in basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. (rochester.edu)
  • Telomerase activity in human ovarian carcinoma," Proc. (freepatentsonline.com)
  • This article reviews the main prognostic and predictive biomarkers of endometrial (EC) and ovarian carcinoma (OC). (springer.com)
  • BD performed the search and analysis of prognostic and predictive factors in ovarian carcinoma. (springer.com)
  • BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations account for a large proportion of ovarian carcinoma cases. (medscape.com)
  • Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase and protein activator in human cancer cell lines and Brown-Pearce carcinoma. (harvard.edu)
  • Tennant PWG, Parker L, Thomas JE, Craft AW, Pearce MS. Childhood infectious disease and premature death from cancer: a prospective cohort study . (ncl.ac.uk)
  • Upper tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC) is a relatively uncommon cancer worldwide, however it accounts for approximately 30% of urothelial cancer in the Taiwanese population. (medsci.org)
  • Urothelial carcinoma (UC), arising from the urothelium of the urinary tract, including bladder, ureter and renal pelvis, is the most common cancer among genitourinary tract cancer types. (medsci.org)
  • In GWAS of differentiated thyroid cancer, associations at FOXE1 , MAP3K12 binding inhibitory protein 1 ( MBIP )-NK2 homeobox 1 ( NKX2-1 ), disrupted in renal carcinoma 3 ( DIRC3 ), neuregulin 1 ( NRG1 ), and pecanex-like 2 ( PCNXL2 ) have been commonly identified in people of European and Korean ancestry, and many other susceptibility loci have been found in specific populations. (e-enm.org)
  • A detailed study has been made of an antibody which appears in the blood of certain rabbits implanted with the Brown-Pearce carcinoma or injected with extracts of it and which reacts specifically in vitro in mixture with a distinctive sedimentable constituent of the Brown-Pearce tumor cell. (rupress.org)
  • The observations as a whole seem to indicate that this constituent of the Brown-Pearce tumor differs notably from certain other sedimentable substances which can be extracted from various rabbit tissues and identified by serological means. (rupress.org)
  • The implantation of Brown-Pearce tumor material mixed with virus did not lead to an enduring establishment of the latter in the resulting growths, nor to any immediate changes in their morphological character. (rupress.org)
  • This tumor originated spontaneously as a carcinoma of the lung of a C57BL mouse. (harvard.edu)
  • Immediately after inoculation of Brown-Pearce Carcinoma into the abdominal wall of rabbit, various anticancer agents (Nitromin, Carzinophilin, Azan, Tespamin and Mitomycin) were administered locally and their inhibitory effect for growth of tumor in loco with change in peripheral blood picture were observed. (okayama-u.ac.jp)
  • In 2017, an ATA task force recommended that encapsulated follicular variant papillary thyroid carcinoma (eFVPTC) without capsular or vascular invasion be reclassified as noninvasive follicular thyroid neoplasm with papillary-like nuclear features (NIFTP), given its excellent prognosis. (medscape.com)
  • CTLA-4 and CD28 genes' polymorphisms and renal cell carcinoma susceptibility in the Polish population--a prospective study. (cdc.gov)
  • Is Tubulocystic Renal Cell Carcinoma Real? (rochester.edu)
  • Budhu AS, Noy N: Direct channeling of retinoic acid between cellular retinoic acid-binding protein II and retinoic acid receptor sensitizes mammary carcinoma cells to retinoic acid-induced growth arrest. (hmdb.ca)
  • Pearce and Brown studied animal models of the disease in rats, mice, and rabbits, to better understand the course of the disease, and tested all the potential treatments to initially assess effectiveness. (wikipedia.org)
  • The sera of rabbits carrying tar papillomas or the Brown-Pearce carcinoma proved wholly devoid of effect on the virus. (rupress.org)
  • The time sequence of changes in the level of properdin in rabbits with Brown-Pearce carcinoma. (neoplasma.sk)
  • SNP-SNP interactions of immunity related genes involved in the CD28/B7 pathway with susceptibility to invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast. (cdc.gov)
  • Hamilton CA, Cheung MK, Osann K, Chen L, Teng NN, Longacre TA, Powell MA, Hendrickson MR, Kapp DS, Chan JK (2006) Uterine papillary serous and clear cell carcinomas predict for poorer survival compared to grade 3 endometrioid corpus cancers. (springer.com)
  • [ 1 ] . No radionuclide scan is needed for a reading of "suspicious for papillary carcinoma" or "Hürthle cell neoplasm", as either lobectomy or total thyroidectomy is recommended depending on the nodule size and risk factors. (medscape.com)
  • The association between single-nucleotide polymorphisms in IL6, IL10 genes and the susceptibility to primary hepatic carcinoma in Shunde District of Foshan City]. (cdc.gov)
  • Treatment of hypercalcemia secondary to parathyroid carcinoma with a novel calcimimetic agent. (medecinesciences.org)
  • Functional polymorphism of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 and nasopharyngeal carcinoma susceptibility in a Chinese population. (cdc.gov)
  • Pancreatic Grade 3 Neuroendocrine Tumors Behave Similarly to Neuroendocrine Carcinomas Following Resection: A Multi-Center, International Appraisal of the WHO 2010 and WHO 2017 Staging Schema for Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Lesions. (waitematadhb.govt.nz)
  • Editors: Anne Blanchard & Roger Strand (Megaloceros Press, 2017) Det er ellers i prosjektet avsluttet to PhD-prosjekt i 2017 (Aziz og Krüger) og ytterligere en PhD avsluttes februar 2018 (Klingen). (ihelse.net)
  • Diagnostic laparoscopy demonstrated a 3 cm exofitic dark brown splenunculus attached to the diaphragm and indenting the surface of segment 7 of the liver. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Excluding a diagnosis of Hepato cellular carcinoma (HCC) has proven difficult despite different suggested radiological investigation methods [ 5 , 6 ], particularly in patients with chronic liver disease [ 7 - 11 ], when HCC is an expected development and a more likely underlying pathology than is intrahepatic splenosis. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Carcinoma, Lewis Lung" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicine's controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH (Medical Subject Headings) . (harvard.edu)
  • Cuccarese MF, Dubach JM, Pfirschke C, Engblom C, Garris C, Miller MA, Pittet MJ, Weissleder R. Heterogeneity of macrophage infiltration and therapeutic response in lung carcinoma revealed by 3D organ imaging. (harvard.edu)
  • Lung carcinoma in African Americans and whites. (cdc.gov)
  • Structural changes were regularly observed in Brown-Pearce rabbit carcinoma cells that had been brought into contact, in the presence of complement, with rabbit serum containing an antibody that reacts specifically with a distinctive sedimentable constituent of the carcinoma cells. (rupress.org)
  • Functional variants of IL4 and IL6 genes and risk of tobacco-related oral carcinoma in high-risk Asian Indians. (cdc.gov)
  • Tomasetto C, Regnier C, Moog-Lutz C, Mattei MG, Chenard MP, Lidereau R, Basset P, Rio MC: Identification of four novel human genes amplified and overexpressed in breast carcinoma and localized to the q11-q21.3 region of chromosome 17. (drugbank.ca)
  • Llobet D, Pallares J, Yeramian A, Santacana M, Eritja N, Velasco A, Dolcet X, Matias-Guiu X (2009) Molecular pathology of endometrial carcinoma: practical aspects from the diagnostic and therapeutic viewpoints. (springer.com)
  • Defining a New Prognostic Index for Stage I Nonseminomatous Germ Cell Tumors Using CXCL12 Expression and Proportion of Embryonal Carcinoma. (icr.ac.uk)
  • However, the evidence at hand suggests that the triazolopyrimidine distinguishes a biochemical difference between normal tissues and certain carcinomas. (aacrjournals.org)
  • Lax SF (2004) Molecular genetic pathways in various types of endometrial carcinoma: from a phenotypical to a molecular-based classification. (springer.com)
  • J:47692 Altomare DA, Lyons GE, Mitsuuchi Y, Cheng JQ, Testa JR, Akt2 mRNA is highly expressed in embryonic brown fat and the AKT2 kinase is activated by insulin. (jax.org)
  • In 1920, Louise Pearce traveled to the Belgian Congo where she designed and carried out a drug testing protocol for human trials to establish tryparsamide's safety, effectiveness, and optimum dosage. (wikipedia.org)
  • This graph shows the total number of publications written about "Carcinoma, Brown-Pearce" by people in Harvard Catalyst Profiles by year, and whether "Carcinoma, Brown-Pearce" was a major or minor topic of these publication. (harvard.edu)
  • Below are the most recent publications written about "Carcinoma, Brown-Pearce" by people in Profiles. (harvard.edu)
  • These signs and symptoms include delayed development, intellectual disability, certain physical abnormalities, and the characteristic features of a genetic condition called Gorlin syndrome (also known as nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome). (medlineplus.gov)
  • With chemists Walter Abraham Jacobs and Michael Heidelberger and pathologist Wade Hampton Brown, Pearce worked to develop and test arsenic-based drugs for its treatment. (wikipedia.org)
  • Louise Pearce (March 5, 1885 - August 10, 1959) was an American pathologist at the Rockefeller Institute who helped develop a treatment for African sleeping sickness (trypanosomiasis). (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1953, Belgium further honored her, appointing Pearce and her co-workers as Officers of the Royal Order of the Lion Pearce also successfully developed treatment protocols to apply tryparsamide to syphilis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Karnofsky DA, Abelmann WH, Craver LF et al (1948) The use of the nitrogen mustards in the palliative treatment of carcinoma. (springer.com)