An alkylating agent structurally similar to MITOMYCIN and found to be effective in the treatment of leukemia and various other neoplasms in mice. It causes leukemia and thrombocytopenia in almost all human patients.

Essential thrombocythemia transformed to acute myelogenous leukemia with t(3;17)(p24; q12), del(5)(q13q34) after treatment with carboquone and hydroxyurea. (1/12)

In 1991, a 52-year-old woman was diagnosed as having essential thrombocythemia (ET). She was doing well with continuous medication with carboquone (CQ) and subsequently hydroxyurea (HU). However, substantial leukocytosis with leukemic blast cells, anemia and thrombocytopenia developed in 1996. Analysis of peripheral blood showed 4.4 x 10(3)/microl white blood cells with 82% of leukemic blast cells. These blasts showed negative staining with myeloperoxidase by immunostaining, but the myeloperoxidase was positive by electron microscopic analysis. Cytogenetic analysis of bone marrow cells revealed a t(3;17)(p24; q12), del(5)(q13q34). On the basis of these findings, the leukemic blast cells were classified as acute myelogenous leukemia (AML:M0) in the FAB classification. The causative agent, CQ and HU in secondary leukemia from ET and chromosomal abnormality related to ET blastic crisis (BC) are discussed.  (+info)

Essential thrombocythemia developing into refractory anemia and complicated by acute myeloid leukemia. (2/12)

We report a case of essential thrombocythemia (ET) that climaxed in acute myeloid leukemia after developing into refractory anemia. The male patient had ET that was stable for 8 years on carboquone therapy. However, at the age of 72 years he developed an acute terminal illness that was characterized by severe pancytopenia, circulating myeloblasts, extensive bone marrow infiltration by myeloblasts, and an abnormal karyotype [46, XY, t(8q-; 20q+)]. He subsequently died of severe bilateral pneumonia and heart failure. This case suggests that ET may be similar to polycythemia vera; progression to leukemia is unusual except after chemotherapy. Therefore, treatment of patients with asymptomatic ET may not be advisable.  (+info)

Application of a self-organizing map to quantitative structure-activity relationship analysis of carboquinone and benzodiazepine. (3/12)

Self-organizing map (SOM) of Kohonen seems to be a promising approach beyond the standard one to regression for some classification problems encountered in the field of pharmacy. We apply them, therefore, to the quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) in carboquinones and benzodiazepines, and show their usefulness. Most QSAR analysis using neural networks has been made by adopting neural networks with supervised learning. On the contrary, SOM obeys unsupervised learning and originally does not involve the use of desired target data. If we note that an appreciable fraction of data may be missing without making the similarity comparison impossible in SOM if the number of attributes considered is appreciable, QSAR analysis using SOM is found to be possible as if supervised learning. Similar to target data in supervised learning, we can take into account target data (=observed activity) as one of attributes in addition to other attributes (=structural descriptors). Choice of optimal descriptors as input parameters was found to be essential to generate valuable SOM.  (+info)

Comparison of quantitative structure-activity relationship model performances on carboquinone derivatives. (4/12)

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Quenching enhancement of the singlet excited state of pheophorbide-a by DNA in the presence of the quinone carboquone. (5/12)

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Effect of chemotherapy on natural-killer activity and antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity in carcinoma of the lung. (6/12)

The effect of chemotherapy on natural killer (NK) activity and antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) in 15 advanced carcinomas of the lung was examined with regard to the drug, dose, route and timing of administration. The relationship between the effect of chemotherapy on the prognosis for the patients, and the changes in NK activity and ADCC, was also analysed. The NK activity and ADCC in patients with poor prognosis were significantly subnormal, even before treatment. The NK activity and ADCC began to decrease 2 weeks after the initiation of treatment and reached the lowest level during the 3rd or 4th week in all patients. Thereafter, they returned to the pretreatment level in 8 patients with stabilized disease. In contrast, they were not restored in 7 patients with progressive disease and poor prognosis. In 4 patients it was found that the effect of chemotherapy with pepleomycin and carbazilquinone on NK activity and ADCC differed according to the drug used. From this pilot study it is suggested that NK activity and ADCC are valuable prognostic factors in patients with advanced carcinoma of the lung, and that detailed analysis of the effect of each anticancer agent on NK activity and ADCC is desirable for the establishment of better treatment regimens for advanced carcinoma of the lung.  (+info)

Damage of DNA and its recovery in AH-109A cells treated with carboquone in vivo. (7/12)

A single injection of carboquone at a dose of 0.1 mg/kg body weight induced damage of DNA of AH-109A cells as revealed by alkaline and neutral sucrose density gradient centrifugation. A significant decrease in the sedimentation velocity of DNA on alkaline sucrose density gradient centrifugation was observed 15 min after the injection, and it returned to that of control after 60 min. Thereafter, the size of DNA decreased progressively. When the cells were lysed with 2% sodium dodesyl sulfate solution and analyzed on neutral sucrose density gradient centrifugation, a similar change in the sedimentation velocity was observed. The results obtained from the studies of intraperitoneal growth of AH-109A cells pretreated with carboquone in vivo and the survival of host animals well corresponded to the extent of the damage of DNA as revealed by alkaline and neutral sucrose density gradient centrifugation.  (+info)

Combination chemotherapy in advanced ovarian cancer. (8/12)

Among the 95 cases of ovarian cancer treated by us between May, 1975 and August, 1978, only 33 were suitable for complete resection. The remaining 62 cases underwent incomplete resection, followed by F.Q.C. combination chemotherapy (1-(2-tetrahydrofuryl)-5-fluorouracil, carbazilquinone, cytosine arabinoside); 54.8% showed an antitumor response. The median survival time of the responders was 13.2 months, whereas it was 7.4 months for the non-responders. The survival rate after 24 months, however, was 13% and 4%, respectively. Side effects of the drugs, including leucopenia, thrombocytopenia, nausea and vomiting, were found in roughly one half of the cases.  (+info)

Carbamazepine 10,11-epoxide, also known as carbazilquinone, is a metabolite of the anticonvulsant drug carbamazepine. It is an active metabolite that contributes to the therapeutic effect of carbamazepine in the treatment of seizures. However, it can also contribute to some of the side effects associated with carbamazepine therapy, such as liver toxicity and bone marrow suppression.

Carbamazepine is metabolized in the liver by cytochrome P450 enzymes to form carbamazepine 10,11-epoxide. This metabolite can then be further metabolized to other compounds or conjugated with glucuronic acid and excreted in the urine.

It is important to monitor patients taking carbamazepine for signs of toxicity, including liver function tests and complete blood counts, to ensure that the drug is being properly metabolized and eliminated from the body.

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... carbazilquinone MeSH D03.383.097.217.900 - triaziquone MeSH D03.383.097.217.924 - triethylenemelamine MeSH D03.383.097.217.935 ...
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