Carbamate derivative used as an insecticide, acaricide, and nematocide.
Naphthalene derivatives carrying one or more hydroxyl (-OH) groups at any ring position. They are often used in dyes and pigments, as antioxidants for rubber, fats, and oils, as insecticides, in pharmaceuticals, and in numerous other applications.
Pesticides designed to control insects that are harmful to man. The insects may be directly harmful, as those acting as disease vectors, or indirectly harmful, as destroyers of crops, food products, or textile fabrics.
A carbamate insecticide and parasiticide. It is a potent anticholinesterase agent belonging to the carbamate group of reversible cholinesterase inhibitors. It has a particularly low toxicity from dermal absorption and is used for control of head lice in some countries.
A mercaptocholine used as a reagent for the determination of CHOLINESTERASES. It also serves as a highly selective nerve stain.
A very complex, but reproducible mixture of at least 177 C10 polychloro derivatives, having an approximate overall empirical formula of C10-H10-Cl8. It is used as an insecticide and may reasonably be anticipated to be a carcinogen: Fourth Annual Report on Carcinogens (NTP 85-002, 1985). (From Merck Index, 11th ed)
A family of North American freshwater CATFISHES. It consists of four genera (Ameiurus, Ictalurus, Noturus, Pylodictis,) comprising several species, two of which are eyeless.
A carbamate insecticide.
An organochlorine insecticide whose use has been cancelled or suspended in the United States. It has been used to control locusts, tropical disease vectors, in termite control by direct soil injection, and non-food seed and plant treatment. (From HSDB)
An inorganic compound that is used as a source of iodine in thyrotoxic crisis and in the preparation of thyrotoxic patients for thyroidectomy. (From Dorland, 27th ed)
An organothiophosphate cholinesterase inhibitor that is used as an insecticide and as an acaricide.
Drugs that inhibit cholinesterases. The neurotransmitter ACETYLCHOLINE is rapidly hydrolyzed, and thereby inactivated, by cholinesterases. When cholinesterases are inhibited, the action of endogenously released acetylcholine at cholinergic synapses is potentiated. Cholinesterase inhibitors are widely used clinically for their potentiation of cholinergic inputs to the gastrointestinal tract and urinary bladder, the eye, and skeletal muscles; they are also used for their effects on the heart and the central nervous system.
Experiments designed to determine the potential toxic effects of one-time, short-term exposure to a chemical or chemicals.
Chemical compounds which pollute the water of rivers, streams, lakes, the sea, reservoirs, or other bodies of water.
Uptake of substances through the SKIN.
Drugs used to reverse the inactivation of cholinesterase caused by organophosphates or sulfonates. They are an important component of therapy in agricultural, industrial, and military poisonings by organophosphates and sulfonates.
Paired respiratory organs of fishes and some amphibians that are analogous to lungs. They are richly supplied with blood vessels by which oxygen and carbon dioxide are exchanged directly with the environment.
Chemicals used to destroy pests of any sort. The concept includes fungicides (FUNGICIDES, INDUSTRIAL); INSECTICIDES; RODENTICIDES; etc.
Organic compounds that have the general formula R-SO-R. They are obtained by oxidation of mercaptans (analogous to the ketones). (From Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 4th ed)
The dose amount of poisonous or toxic substance or dose of ionizing radiation required to kill 50% of the tested population.
An enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of ACETYLCHOLINE to CHOLINE and acetate. In the CNS, this enzyme plays a role in the function of peripheral neuromuscular junctions. EC 3.1.1.7.
Two-ring crystalline hydrocarbons isolated from coal tar. They are used as intermediates in chemical synthesis, as insect repellents, fungicides, lubricants, preservatives, and, formerly, as topical antiseptics.
Adverse effect upon bodies of water (LAKES; RIVERS; seas; groundwater etc.) caused by CHEMICAL WATER POLLUTANTS.
A large stout-bodied, sometimes anadromous, TROUT found in still and flowing waters of the Pacific coast from southern California to Alaska. It has a greenish back, a whitish belly, and pink, red, or lavender stripes on the sides, with usually a sprinkling of black dots. It is highly regarded as a sport and food fish. Its former name was Salmo gairdneri. The sea-run rainbow trouts are often called steelheads. Redband trouts refer to interior populations of rainbows.
Common name for FISHES belonging to the order Perciformes and occurring in three different families.
Elimination of ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTANTS; PESTICIDES and other waste using living organisms, usually involving intervention of environmental or sanitation engineers.
The application of suitable drug dosage forms to the skin for either local or systemic effects.
Places for cultivation and harvesting of fish, particularly in sea waters. (from McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
Fish-eating carnivores of the family MUSTELIDAE, found on both hemispheres.
Failure of a professional person, a physician or lawyer, to render proper services through reprehensible ignorance or negligence or through criminal intent, especially when injury or loss follows. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)
Herbicides that remove leaves from trees and growing plants. They may be either organic or inorganic. Several of the more persistent types have been used in military operations and many are toxic. (From Hawley's Condensed Chemical Dictionary, 11th ed)
The practice of medicine concerned with conditions affecting the health of individuals associated with the marine environment.
Naturally occurring complex liquid hydrocarbons which, after distillation, yield combustible fuels, petrochemicals, and lubricants.
A highly toxic gas that has been used as a chemical warfare agent. It is an insidious poison as it is not irritating immediately, even when fatal concentrations are inhaled. (From The Merck Index, 11th ed, p7304)
Pulmonary injury following the breathing in of toxic smoke from burning materials such as plastics, synthetics, building materials, etc. This injury is the most frequent cause of death in burn patients.
Burns of the respiratory tract caused by heat or inhaled chemicals.
The administration of drugs by the respiratory route. It includes insufflation into the respiratory tract.
Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)
Drugs that act locally on cutaneous or mucosal surfaces to produce inflammation; those that cause redness due to hyperemia are rubefacients; those that raise blisters are vesicants and those that penetrate sebaceous glands and cause abscesses are pustulants; tear gases and mustard gases are also irritants.
Pesticides or their breakdown products remaining in the environment following their normal use or accidental contamination.
Lists of words, usually in alphabetical order, giving information about form, pronunciation, etymology, grammar, and meaning.
The addition of descriptive information about the function or structure of a molecular sequence to its MOLECULAR SEQUENCE DATA record.
An organochlorine insecticide that has been used as a pediculicide and a scabicide. It has been shown to cause cancer.
Organic compounds that contain the -NCO radical.
A trace element that plays a role in glucose metabolism. It has the atomic symbol Cr, atomic number 24, and atomic weight 52. According to the Fourth Annual Report on Carcinogens (NTP85-002,1985), chromium and some of its compounds have been listed as known carcinogens.
The unconsolidated mineral or organic matter on the surface of the earth that serves as a natural medium for the growth of land plants.
A silver metallic element that exists as a liquid at room temperature. It has the atomic symbol Hg (from hydrargyrum, liquid silver), atomic number 80, and atomic weight 200.59. Mercury is used in many industrial applications and its salts have been employed therapeutically as purgatives, antisyphilitics, disinfectants, and astringents. It can be absorbed through the skin and mucous membranes which leads to MERCURY POISONING. Because of its toxicity, the clinical use of mercury and mercurials is diminishing.
Included in this group are aldicarb (Temik), carbofuran (Furadan), carbaryl (Sevin), ethienocarb, fenobucarb, oxamyl, and ... the most potent compounds such as aldicarb and carbofuran are still capable of inhibiting mammalian acetylcholinesterase ...
Methyl isocyanate is an intermediate chemical in the production of carbamate pesticides (such as carbaryl, carbofuran, methomyl ... and aldicarb). It has also been used in the production of rubbers and adhesives. As a highly toxic and irritating material, it ...
... aldicarb MeSH D02.241.081.251.125 - benomyl MeSH D02.241.081.251.140 - carbadox MeSH D02.241.081.251.145 - carbamyl phosphate ... MeSH D02.241.081.251.150 - carbaryl MeSH D02.241.081.251.165 - carisoprodol MeSH D02.241.081.251.240 - diethylcarbamazine MeSH ...
Sarin Soman Tabun VX VE VG VM Diazinon Malathion Parathion Carbamates Aldicarb Bendiocarb Bufencarb Carbaryl Carbendazim ...
Inhibitors: Reversible: Carbamates: Aldicarb. *Aminocarb. *Bendiocarb. *Bufencarb. *Carbaryl. *Carbendazim. *Carbetamide. * ...
Inhibitors: Reversible: Carbamates: Aldicarb. *Aminocarb. *Bendiocarb. *Bufencarb. *Carbaryl. *Carbendazim. *Carbetamide. * ...
Inhibitors: Reversible: Carbamates: Aldicarb. *Aminocarb. *Bendiocarb. *Bufencarb. *Carbaryl. *Carbendazim. *Carbetamide. * ...
Inhibitors: Reversible: Carbamates: Aldicarb. *Aminocarb. *Bendiocarb. *Bufencarb. *Carbaryl. *Carbendazim. *Carbetamide. * ...
Inhibitors: Reversible: Carbamates: Aldicarb. *Aminocarb. *Bendiocarb. *Bufencarb. *Carbaryl. *Carbendazim. *Carbetamide. * ...
Inhibitors: Reversible: Carbamates: Aldicarb. *Aminocarb. *Bendiocarb. *Bufencarb. *Carbaryl. *Carbendazim. *Carbetamide. * ...
Inhibitors: Reversible: Carbamates: Aldicarb. *Aminocarb. *Bendiocarb. *Bufencarb. *Carbaryl. *Carbendazim. *Carbetamide. * ...
Action level Agent blue Agent Green Agent Orange Agent Pink Agent Purple Agent White Agrochemical Alachlor Aldicarb Algaecide ... Bromine monochloride Bromomethane Bromoxynil Burgundy mixture Cacodylic acid Calcium phosphide Carbendazim Captan Carbaryl ...
Caffeine Cantharidin Captan Carbaryl Carbazole 3-Carbethoxypsoralen Carmoisine Carrageenan Chloral Chloral hydrate Chloramine ... chloride Acrolein Acrylic acid Acrylic fibres Acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene copolymers Actinomycin D Agaritine Aldicarb ...
The biological mechanism for the thinning is not entirely known, but it is believed that p,p'-DDE impairs the shell gland's ability to excrete calcium carbonate onto the developing egg.[7][9][10][11][12] Multiple mechanisms may be at work, or different mechanisms may operate in different species.[7] Some studies have shown that although DDE levels have fallen dramatically, eggshell thickness remains 10-12 percent thinner than before DDT was first used.[13]. Some studies have indicated that DDE is an endocrine disruptor[14] and contributes to breast cancer, but more recent studies provide strong evidence that there is no relationship between DDE exposure and breast cancer.[15] What is more clear is that DDE is a weak androgen receptor antagonist and can produce male genital tract abnormalities.[16][17]. Animal studies show that organochlorine pesticides-such as DDE-are neurotoxic, cause oxidative stress, and damage the brain's dopaminergic system.[18]. ...
... (DDD) is an organochlorine insecticide that is slightly irritating to the skin.[1] DDD is a metabolite of DDT.[2] DDD is colorless and crystalline;[3] it is closely related chemically and is similar in properties to DDT, but it is considered to be less toxic to animals than DDT.[4] The molecular formula for DDD is (ClC6H4)2CHCHCl2 or C14H10Cl4, whereas the formula for DDT is (ClC6H4)2CHCCl3 or C14H9Cl5. DDD is in the "Group B2" classification, meaning that it is a probable human carcinogen. This is based on an increased incidence of lung tumors in male and female mice, liver tumors in male mice, and thyroid tumors in male rats. Further basis is that DDD is so similar to and is a metabolite of DDT, another probable human carcinogen.[2] DDD is no longer registered for agricultural use in the United States, but the general population continues to be exposed to it due to its long persistence time. The primary source of exposure is oral ingestion of food.[5] 1946 is the ...
By 1974, a team of Rothamsted Research scientists had discovered three pyrethroids suitable for use in agriculture, namely permethrin, cypermethrin and deltamethrin.[10] These compounds were subsequently licensed by the NRDC, as NRDC 143, 149 and 161 respectively, to companies which could then develop them for sale in defined territories. Imperial Chemical Industries (ICI) obtained licenses to permethrin and cypermethrin but their agreement with the NRDC did not allow worldwide sales. Also, it was clear to ICI's own researchers at Jealott's Hill that future competition in the marketplace might be difficult owing to the greater potency of deltamethrin compared to the other compounds. For that reason, chemists there sought patentable analogues which might have advantages compared to the Rothamsted insecticides by having wider spectrum or greater cost-benefit . The first breakthrough was made when a trifluoromethyl group was used to replace one of the chlorines in cypermethrin, especially when the ...
... has little systemic absorption, and is considered safe for topical use in adults and children over the age of 2 months. The FDA has assigned it as pregnancy category B. Animal studies have shown no effects on fertility or teratogenicity, but studies in humans have not been performed. The excretion of permethrin in breastmilk is unknown, and breastfeeding is recommended to be temporarily discontinued during treatment.[11] According to the Connecticut Department of Public Health, permethrin "has low mammalian toxicity, is poorly absorbed through the skin, and is rapidly inactivated by the body. Skin reactions have been uncommon."[14] Excessive exposure to permethrin can cause nausea, headache, muscle weakness, excessive salivation, shortness of breath, and seizures. Worker exposure to the chemical can be monitored by measurement of the urinary metabolites, while severe overdose may be confirmed by measurement of permethrin in serum or blood plasma.[15] Permethrin does not present any ...
Human exposure to methoxychlor occurs via air, soil, and water,[7] primarily in people who work with the substance or who are exposed to air, soil, or water that has been contaminated. It is unknown how quickly and efficiently the substance is absorbed by humans who have been exposed to contaminated air or via skin contact.[7] In animal models, high doses can lead to neurotoxicity.[7] Some methoxychlor's metabolites have estrogenic effects in adult and developing animals before and after birth.[7] One studied metabolite is 2,2-bis(p-hydroxyphenyl)-1,1,1-trichloroethane (HPTE) which shows reproductive toxicity in an animal model by reducing testosterone biosynthesis.[8][9] Such effects adversely affect both the male and female reproductive systems. It is expected that this "could occur in humans" but has not been proven.[7] While one study has linked methoxychlor to the development of leukemia in humans, most studies in animals and humans have been negative, thus the EPA has determined that it is ...
... is a poisonous diterpenoid found in the South American plant Ryania speciosa (Salicaceae). It was originally used as an insecticide.. The compound has extremely high affinity to the open-form ryanodine receptor, a group of calcium channels found in skeletal muscle, smooth muscle, and heart muscle cells.[1] It binds with such high affinity to the receptor that it was used as a label for the first purification of that class of ion channels and gave its name to it.. At nanomolar concentrations, ryanodine locks the receptor in a half-open state, whereas it fully closes them at micromolar concentration. The effect of the nanomolar-level binding is that ryanodine causes release of calcium from calcium stores as the sarcoplasmic reticulum in the cytoplasm, leading to massive muscular contractions. The effect of micromolar-level binding is paralysis. This is true for both mammals and insects.. ...
... is very toxic to cats which cannot tolerate the therapeutic doses for dogs.[7] This is associated with UGT1A6 deficiency in cats, the enzyme responsible for metabolizing cypermethrin. As a consequence, cypermethrin remains much longer in the cat's organs than in dogs or other mammals and can be fatal in large doses. In male rats cypermethrin was shown to exhibit a toxic effect on the reproductive system. After 15 days of continual dosing, both androgen receptor levels and serum testosterone levels were significantly reduced. These data suggested that cypermethrin can induce impairments of the structure of seminiferous tubules and spermatogenesis in male rats at high doses.[8] Long-term exposure to cypermethrin during adulthood is found to induce dopaminergic neurodegeneration in rats, and postnatal exposure enhances the susceptibility of animals to dopaminergic neurodegeneration if rechallenged during adulthood.[9] If exposed to cypermethrin during pregnancy, rats give birth to ...
Before DDT, malaria was successfully eliminated or curtailed in several tropical areas by removing or poisoning mosquito breeding grounds and larva habitats, for example by eliminating standing water. These methods have seen little application in Africa for more than half a century.[137] According to CDC, such methods are not practical in Africa because "Anopheles gambiae, one of the primary vectors of malaria in Africa, breeds in numerous small pools of water that form due to rainfall ... It is difficult, if not impossible, to predict when and where the breeding sites will form, and to find and treat them before the adults emerge."[138] The relative effectiveness of IRS versus other malaria control techniques (e.g. bednets or prompt access to anti-malarial drugs) varies and is dependent on local conditions.[34] A WHO study released in January 2008 found that mass distribution of insecticide-treated mosquito nets and artemisinin-based drugs cut malaria deaths in half in malaria-burdened Rwanda ...
Aldicarb. *Bendiocarb. *Carbofuran. *Carbaryl. *Dioxacarb. *Fenobucarb. *Fenoxycarb. *Isoprocarb. *Methomyl. *Oxamyl. *Propoxur ...
Butyl benzyl phthalate gamma-Butyrolactone Caffeine Cantharidin Caprolactam Captan Carbaryl Carbazole 3-Carbethoxypsoralen ... chloride Acrolein Acrylic acid Acrylic fibres Acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene copolymers Actinomycin D Agaritine Aldicarb ...
Reversible: Carbamates: Aldicarb. *Bendiocarb. *Bufencarb. *Carbaryl. *Carbendazim. *Carbetamide. *Carbofuran. *Chlorbufam. * ...
Carbaryl[31][citation needed] Sevin, (b) Sevin XLR Carbamate High risk to bees foraging even 10 hours after spraying; 3 - 7 ... Aldicarb Temik Carbamate apply 4 weeks before bloom Relatively nontoxic Bifenthrin[28][29] Agri-Medk, Abamectin, Talstar, ... Bees poisoned with carbaryl can take 2-3 days to die, appearing inactive as if cold. Sevin should never be sprayed on flowering ...
Carbaryl. Aldicarb. y-HCH. Waste and Byproducts. Isomers of HCH. Mercury. Chromium. Groundwater Contamination. Various results ... Produce carbaryl without MIC. Downside: greater manufacturing cost. Report. A few months prior, a report presented to UCC ... Production of insecticide carbaryl (trade name Sevin) required MIC as chemical intermediate. Improper temperature and ... MIC as a Chemical Intermediate for Carbaryl. UCIL plant in Bhopal, India. Methyl Isocyanate. 15,000 dead, 150,000 injured. 500 ...
Comparing aldicarb to carbaryl, for example, shows that there is greater than a 500-fold difference in toxicity even within a ... A study of the western fence lizard, Sceloporus occidentalis, showed that high levels of carbaryl exposure resulted in ...
Aldicarb is the active ingredient in Bayers Temik 15G, and is used on a variety of agricultural crops. This systemic N-methyl ... Aldicarb wont be completely banned from use until 2018, which is a long period of time for such a hazardous pesticide proven ... Aldicarb Voluntarily Canceled by Bayer through Agreement with EPA. (Beyond Pesticides, August 20, 2010) Behind closed doors ... Aldicarb was first registered in 1970, but was placed under Special Review in 1984. EPA is authorized to use the Pesticide ...
Carbamates (aldicarb, carbaryl, carbofuran, isoprocarb, methomyl, metolcarb, propoxur), phenylurea (diuron) [67-103%] at 10 ng/ ... Carbamates (aldicarb, baycarb, carbaryl, ethiofencarb, methiocarb); [88-120%]; OPs (azinphos-methyl, malathion, methidathion, ... carbamates (aldicarb, benfuracarb, carbaryl carbofuran, EPTC, fenobucarb, formetanate HCl, isoprocarb, methiocarb, methomyl, ... Carbamates (aldicarb, asulam, benomyl, benthiocarb, carbaryl, carbendazim, carbofuran, diethocarb, ethiofencarb, fenobucarb, ...
4. Methylcarbamates-target acetylcholinesterase (carbaryl, aldicarb). 5. Neonicotinoids-target nicotinic acetylcholine receptor ...
2. Aldicarb sulphone. 3. Oxamyl. 4. Methomyl. 5. 3-Hydroxycarbofuran. 6. Aldicarb. 7. Propoxur. 8. Carbofuran. 9. Carbaryl. 10 ...
Chemical poisoning -- Aldicarb... flaccid paralysis *Chemical poisoning -- Carbaryl... flaccid paralysis *Chemical poisoning ...
Aldicarb was found in three soil samples and Carbaryl in one.. The total pesticide and chlorinated benzene compounds content in ... Carbaryl and Aldicarb fall under carbamate group of insecticides; both are moderately persistent, highly toxic; highly water ... ucil used to manufacture three different kinds of pesticides Carbaryl (trade name Sevin), Aldicarb (trade name Temik), and a ... High Performance Liquid Chromatograph (Method 8318) was used to detect presence of carbamates (carbaryl and aldicarb). Gas ...
Aldicarb sulfoxide. 250-2500 µg/kg. Carbaryl. 250-2500 µg/kg. Carbofuran. 250-2500 µg/kg. ...
Aldicarb sulfoxide. 250-2500 µg/kg. Carbaryl. 250-2500 µg/kg. Carbofuran. 250-2500 µg/kg. ...
Methyl isocyanate is an intermediate chemical in the production of carbamate pesticides (such as carbaryl, carbofuran, methomyl ... and aldicarb). It has also been used in the production of rubbers and adhesives. As a highly toxic and irritating material, it ...
... aldicarb (16.67%) and carbaryl (8.33%). In some samples, two or more active principals were detected, what explains percentages ...
Aldicarb (A, C, GW, W, B). Azinphos-methyl (A, C, W, B). Azoxystrobin (A, SW, GW, W). Captan (A, C, W). Carbaryl (A, C, SW, GW ...
Posted in Aldicarb, Bayer, Carbaryl, Carbofuran, Dow Chemical, Environmental Justice, International, Methomyl, West Virginia , ... Posted in Aldicarb, Bayer, Carbaryl, Carbofuran, Chemicals, Corporations, Environmental Justice, Methomyl, State/Local, West ... Posted in Acephate, Aldicarb, Bensulide, Carbaryl, Chemicals, Chlorpyrifos, Diazinon, Dichlorvos, Disease/Health Effects, ... Bayer also announced it would stop production of two highly toxic pesticides, aldicarb and carbaryl, which are both products in ...
Carbaryl, the first carbamate insecticide, acts on nervous transmissions in insects also through effects on cholinesterase by ... Others, aldicarb, dazomet, and metham sodium, act mainly through contact. All have very high mammalian toxicities and can kill ... Other carbamate insecticides include aldicarb, methiocarb, methomyl, carbofuran, bendiocarb, and oxamyl. In general, although ...
Bayer also announced to quit production of the highly dangerous pesticides Aldicarb and Carbaryl. Both products are part of the ... Aldicarb had been under EPA scrutiny for years, following the poisoning of banana workers in Costa Rica and consumers of ... At the time of the EPA deal, Bayer officials said they would close an aldicarb-Temik formulation plant in Woodbine, Ga., but ... Bayer officials said the moves are a result of the companys agreement last August to phase out the pesticide aldicarb because ...
Simultaneous estimation of aldicarb, carbofuran and carbaryl in water by HPLC. Pesticide Res J 2007, 19(1), 128-30. 014664 ...
Aldicarb was found in three soil samples and Carbaryl in one. The total pesticide and chlorinated benzene compounds content in ... UCIL used to manufacture three different kinds of pesticides: Carbaryl (trade name Sevin), Aldicarb (trade name Temik), and a ... The two main products of UCIL-Carbaryl and Aldicarb-were also tested. Five heavy metals-lead, cadmium, chromium, mercury and ... Carbaryl content in this sample was as high as 9856 ppm. The sample also had 4 out of the 5 heavy metals. Mercury content was ...
Included in this group are aldicarb (Temik), carbofuran (Furadan), carbaryl (Sevin), ethienocarb, fenobucarb, oxamyl, and ... the most potent compounds such as aldicarb and carbofuran are still capable of inhibiting mammalian acetylcholinesterase ...
Cypermethrin, parathion, dichlorvos, carbaryl, bromoxynil, linuron, methomyl and aldicarb were all indicated as having possible ... FORAN JA, GERMUSKA PJ and DELFINO JJ (1985) Acute toxicity of aldicarb, aldicarb sulfoxide, and aldicarb sulfone to Daphnia ... Carbaryl is a carbamate insecticide that is used on a variety of crops to mainly control sucking insects and is also toxic to ... Analysis of the application patterns of aldicarb (ETR = 1.4; PEC = 13 µg/ℓ); methomyl (ETR = 1.4; PEC = 5.1 µg/ℓ); linuron (ETR ...
The two key products of UCIL - Carbaryl and Aldicarb - were as deadly. Their health impacts include damage to the brain and ... UCIL used to manufacture three different kinds of pesticides: Carbaryl (trade name Sevin), Aldicarb (trade name Temik) and a ... The waste stored within the premises had Carbaryl content of 9,856 parts per million (ppm) and mercury content of 1,065 ppm. ... It had the highest concentration of Carbaryl (0.011 ppm, 110 times the standard); Lindane (0.004 ppm, 40 times the standard); ...
Soil application of aldicarb is effective for psyllid control on mature trees (trees greater than 2 m in height or 5 years of ... Many foliar insecticides are effective for killing psyllids including: carbaryl, chlorpyrifos, dimethoate, fenpropathrin, ... Although aldicarb use under the indicated conditions is regarded as safe, it is desirable to rely on other methods and other ... Often, growers apply aldicarb to mature groves to reduce the numbers of overwintering adult psyllids and avoid build-up on the ...
Aldicarb was detected by both CPCB and CSE in varying quantities. It must be mentioned that the only source of these pesticides ... Pesticides: Presence of carbaryl was detected by CPCB in 75 per cent of the samples. CSE detected it in 25 per cent of the soil ...
Pirimicarb, aldicarb and carbaryl also caused a significant decrease in the percentage of the first foetal brain isoenzyme ( ... aldicarb and 2.5 mg/kg carbaryl.) The acetylcholinesterase (ACLE) isoenzymes from the brain of mothers and their foetuses were ... Other insecticidal carbamates with anticholinesterase properties which were analogously tested were: 50 mg/kg carbaryl, 0.1 mg/ ...
Aldicarb. 2.0. Product. Air, water & soil. 2.. Alpha-napthol. 50.0. Ingredient. Air & soil. 3.. Benzene Hexachloride. 5.0. ... Carbaryl. 50.00. Product. Air, water & soil. 5.. Carbon tetrachloride. 500.00. Solvent. Air & water. 6.. Chemical waste tar. ... aldicarb - used as a molluscicide and soil sterilant. aminocarb - used as an insecticide. maneb -used as an insecticide, ... For example, Carbaryl degrades to alpha naphthol (naphthol, the major degradate, is briefly discussed as a primary contaminant ...
Aldicarb. 0.03 PPM. Aldicarb Sulfone. 0.03 PPM. Aldicarb Sulfoxide. 0.03 PPM. Carbaryl. 0.03 PPM. ...
Aldicarb, Aldicarb sulfone, Aldicarb sulfoxide, Aldrin, Allyl Chloride (3-chloro-1-propene), Alpha Chlordane, Atrazine, ... Carbaryl, Carbofuran, Carbon tetrachloride, Chloramben, Chlordane, Chloroethane, Chloroform, Chloromethane, cis-1,2- ...
Aldicarb, Aldicarb sulfone, Aldicarb sulfoxide, Aldrin, Antimony (total), Arsenic (total), Atrazine, Barium (total), Benzene, ... Benzo[a]pyrene, Beryllium (total), Bromobenzene, Bromochloromethane, Bromomethane, Butachlor, Cadmium (total), Carbaryl, ...
  • citation needed] While the carbamate acetylcholinesterase inhibitors are commonly referred to as "carbamate insecticides" due to their generally high selectivity for insect acetylcholinesterase enzymes over the mammalian versions, the most potent compounds such as aldicarb and carbofuran are still capable of inhibiting mammalian acetylcholinesterase enzymes at low enough concentrations that they pose a significant risk of poisoning to humans, especially when used in large amounts for agricultural applications. (wikipedia.org)
  • Aldicarb, carbofuran and methomyl were detected in 26, 18 and 12 cases respectively. (scielo.org.za)
  • The same halamine structures were unable to effectively react with carbaryl and carbofuran, which are aromatic carbamates and do not contain any thio bonds. (cdc.gov)
  • The N-methyl carbamate (NMC) pesticides: aldicarb, carbofuran, methomyl, oxamyl, and thiofanox have been identified by EPA as working through a common mechanism. (environmental-expert.com)
  • Bendiocarb was rapidly degraded in all soils displaying enhanced carbofuran degradation, but carbaryl and cloethocarb were most rapidly degraded only in soil with prior exposure to several carbamates or to cloethocarb. (iastate.edu)
  • The persistance of aldicarb and its sulfoxide and sulfone metabolites was not altered in soils with enhanced carbofuran degradation. (iastate.edu)
  • Studies on Long Island have shown widespread groundwater contamination by pesticides, including aldicarb, carbofuran, and oxamyl. (cornell.edu)
  • Three widely used carbamate insecticides, namely carbaryl, carbofuran, and aldicarb [molecular structures are shown in Figure 1], with a concentration range of 0-30 mg/L, were selected for adsorption and biodegradation studies. (purdue.edu)
  • Aldicarb was degraded in a much faster rate than that of methomyl by the halamine fabrics. (cdc.gov)
  • The detoxification was an oxidative reaction on the sulfur atom existing in both aldicarb and methomyl. (cdc.gov)
  • Why we tested ucil used to manufacture three different kinds of pesticides Carbaryl (trade name Sevin), Aldicarb (trade name Temik), and a formulation of Carbaryl and gamma-hexachlorocyclohexane (g- hch ) sold under the trade name Sevidol. (org.in)
  • In the meantime, Bayer intended to finalize modifications to the MIC plant at Institute and restart manufacturing of aldicarb, carbaryl (another carbamate pesticide known commercially as SEVIN), and the interme- diate materials required for their production (including MIC) in mid 2012. (scribd.com)
  • These chemicals were traced to three pesticides UCIL manufactured -- Carbaryl ( brand name Sevin), Aldicarb ( Temik) and a formulation of Carbaryl and gamma- hexachlorocyclohexane ( Sevidol). (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Bayer also announced to quit production of the highly dangerous pesticides Aldicarb and Carbaryl. (cbgnetwork.org)
  • This area is historically known to have a high pesticide usage, with deltamethrin, aldicarb, parathion, cypermethrin and dichlorvos being the main pesticides used. (scielo.org.za)
  • This explorative study suggests an association between the incidence of colorectal cancer and use of certain pesticides, in particularly chlorpyrifos and aldicarb, although some findings could be due to chance. (mdibl.org)
  • Then, in 2011-with the National Research Council study already underway-the Environmental Protection Agency cancelled registration of aldicarb, a carba- mate pesticide known commercially as TEMIK that is produced using MIC. (scribd.com)
  • My findings are that three herbicides (2, 4 D-isopropylamine salt, norflurazon and diuron), three insecticides (diflubenzuron, pyridaben and carbaryl) and four fungicides (mefonoxam, azoxystrobin, thiabendazole and imazalil) induce Alpha-Syn aggregation. (ufl.edu)
  • High percentages of clear effects on insects were also observed for carbaryl, parathion and dichlorvos. (scielo.org.za)
  • Bayer officials said the moves are a result of the company's agreement last August to phase out the pesticide aldicarb because of concerns it posed "unacceptable dietary risks," especially to children. (cbgnetwork.org)
  • Carbaryl, the first carbamate insecticide, acts on nervous transmissions in insects also through effects on cholinesterase by blocking acetylcholine receptors. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Carbaryl is a general purpose carbamate insecticide. (naturalhealthcure.org)
  • The two main products of ucil Carbaryl and Aldicarbwere also tested. (org.in)
  • The two key products of UCIL - Carbaryl and Aldicarb - were as deadly. (cseindia.org)
  • Aldicarb was found in three soil samples and Carbaryl in one. (org.in)
  • The waste stored within the premises had Carbaryl content of 9,856 parts per million (ppm) and mercury content of 1,065 ppm. (cseindia.org)
  • Presence of carbaryl was detected by CPCB in 75 per cent of the samples. (cseindia.org)
  • Carbaryl content in this sample was as high as 9856 ppm. (org.in)