The making of a continuous circular tear in the anterior capsule during cataract surgery in order to allow expression or phacoemulsification of the nucleus of the lens. (Dorland, 28th ed)
The thin noncellular outer covering of the CRYSTALLINE LENS composed mainly of COLLAGEN TYPE IV and GLYCOSAMINOGLYCANS. It is secreted by the embryonic anterior and posterior epithelium. The embryonic posterior epithelium later disappears.
The induction of local hyperthermia by either short radio waves or high-frequency sound waves.
Substances that display the physical properties of ELASTICITY and VISCOSITY. The dual-nature of these substances causes them to resist applied forces in a time-dependent manner.
Clouding or loss of transparency of the posterior lens capsule, usually following CATARACT extraction.
Insertion of an artificial lens to replace the natural CRYSTALLINE LENS after CATARACT EXTRACTION or to supplement the natural lens which is left in place.
A procedure for removal of the crystalline lens in cataract surgery in which an anterior capsulectomy is performed by means of a needle inserted through a small incision at the temporal limbus, allowing the lens contents to fall through the dilated pupil into the anterior chamber where they are broken up by the use of ultrasound and aspirated out of the eye through the incision. (Cline, et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed & In Focus 1993;1(1):1)
A diazo-naphthalene sulfonate that is widely used as a stain.
Artificial implanted lenses.
The removal of a cataractous CRYSTALLINE LENS from the eye.
Partial or complete opacity on or in the lens or capsule of one or both eyes, impairing vision or causing blindness. The many kinds of cataract are classified by their morphology (size, shape, location) or etiology (cause and time of occurrence). (Dorland, 27th ed)
Removal of the whole or part of the vitreous body in treating endophthalmitis, diabetic retinopathy, retinal detachment, intraocular foreign bodies, and some types of glaucoma.
The washing of a body cavity or surface by flowing water or solution for therapy or diagnosis.
Absence of the crystalline lens resulting from cataract extraction.
The space in the eye, filled with aqueous humor, bounded anteriorly by the cornea and a small portion of the sclera and posteriorly by a small portion of the ciliary body, the iris, and that part of the crystalline lens which presents through the pupil. (Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed, p109)
Sterile solutions that are intended for instillation into the eye. It does not include solutions for cleaning eyeglasses or CONTACT LENS SOLUTIONS.
Complications that affect patients during surgery. They may or may not be associated with the disease for which the surgery is done, or within the same surgical procedure.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Poland" is not a medical term or concept; it is a country located in Central Europe. If you have any questions about medical topics or definitions, I would be happy to help answer those!
Chemicals and substances that impart color including soluble dyes and insoluble pigments. They are used in INKS; PAINTS; and as INDICATORS AND REAGENTS.
Blockage of the RETINAL VEIN. Those at high risk for this condition include patients with HYPERTENSION; DIABETES MELLITUS; ATHEROSCLEROSIS; and other CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES.
The original member of the family of endothelial cell growth factors referred to as VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL GROWTH FACTORS. Vascular endothelial growth factor-A was originally isolated from tumor cells and referred to as "tumor angiogenesis factor" and "vascular permeability factor". Although expressed at high levels in certain tumor-derived cells it is produced by a wide variety of cell types. In addition to stimulating vascular growth and vascular permeability it may play a role in stimulating VASODILATION via NITRIC OXIDE-dependent pathways. Alternative splicing of the mRNA for vascular endothelial growth factor A results in several isoforms of the protein being produced.
The administration of substances into the VITREOUS BODY of the eye with a hypodermic syringe.
Fluid accumulation in the outer layer of the MACULA LUTEA that results from intraocular or systemic insults. It may develop in a diffuse pattern where the macula appears thickened or it may acquire the characteristic petaloid appearance referred to as cystoid macular edema. Although macular edema may be associated with various underlying conditions, it is most commonly seen following intraocular surgery, venous occlusive disease, DIABETIC RETINOPATHY, and posterior segment inflammatory disease. (From Survey of Ophthalmology 2004; 49(5) 470-90)
A surgical specialty concerned with the structure and function of the eye and the medical and surgical treatment of its defects and diseases.
Central retinal vein and its tributaries. It runs a short course within the optic nerve and then leaves and empties into the superior ophthalmic vein or cavernous sinus.
Non-antibody proteins secreted by inflammatory leukocytes and some non-leukocytic cells, that act as intercellular mediators. They differ from classical hormones in that they are produced by a number of tissue or cell types rather than by specialized glands. They generally act locally in a paracrine or autocrine rather than endocrine manner.

Randomised clinical trial of lensectomy versus lens aspiration and primary capsulotomy for children with bilateral cataract in south India. (1/51)

AIMS: The primary objective was to determine which surgical technique gave the best long term visual outcome for infants and young children with bilateral symmetrical cataract in south India. Secondary objectives were to assess complications and the need for further surgical intervention. METHODS: A randomised controlled clinical trial was undertaken. 65 children under 10 years old with bilateral cataract had one eye treated by lensectomy and the other by aspiration with primary capsulotomy. RESULTS: 56 children (86%) with a mean age at surgery of 53 months were reviewed 3 years after surgery. The overall binocular acuity was 6/18 or better in 57.1% and 6/60 or better in 94.6%. There was no difference in visual acuity between the matched pairs of eyes undergoing aspiration or lensectomy at the third year of follow up (p=0.57). Aspiration eyes were more likely to require a secondary procedure to restore vision than lensectomy eyes (66.1% v 1.8%). CONCLUSION: Aspiration with primary capsulotomy gives an acceptable visual outcome in this part of India providing that there is good follow up to manage capsule opacification. If secondary intervention is not possible owing to poor compliance with follow up, then lensectomy is likely to give better long term visual rehabilitation providing there is good maintenance and technical support for the lensectomy equipment.  (+info)

Two cases of late postoperative capsular block syndrome. (2/51)

Two cases of late postoperative capsular block syndrome that occurred 4 and 8.5 years, respectively, were encountered. One case underwent phacoemulsification after continuous curvilinear capsulorhexis in his left eye. The other case had a can opener type capsulorhexis and underwent extracapsular cataract extraction with trabeculectomy. One-piece posterior chamber lenses were implanted in both cases. Upon slit-lamp examination, the posterior capsules were found distorted posteriorly; the capsular openings were apparently sealed by the lens optic. A whitish material existed between the intraocular lens optic and posterior capsule, with thick aggregation in a lower fifth space in case 1. After Nd:YAG laser anterior capsulotomy in case 1, the thick aggregate spread diffusely on the posterior capsule which was sunken completely for 4 weeks. After Nd:YAG capsulotomy, the distorted posterior capsule disappeared and the best corrected visual acuity was restored to 20/20 in both cases.  (+info)

Quantitative measurement of the PCCC area in the postoperative period. (3/51)

BACKGROUND/AIMS: The major complication of extracapsular cataract extraction (ECCE) is posterior capsule opacification (PCO). Posterior continuous circular capsulorhexis (PCCC) seems to be very promising in preventing PCO. This study was aimed at determining if the PCCC area changes as a function of time and if pearl formation could influence it. METHODS: 24 eyes of 23 patients underwent ECCE with PCCC. Retroillumination photographs were taken at 6 months and then yearly. To measure the PCCC area, the computerised program EPCO (evaluation of posterior capsule opacification) was used. The ratio of the PCCC area in relation to the IOL surface was calculated for the different time stages and the presence of pearl formation was noted. Firstly, proportional changes in diameter were compared in PCCC areas measured after 6 months and after 1 year (group I, n=13) and after 1 year and 2 years (group II, n=14). Secondly, PCCC areas were compared between two time stages in patients with (group III, n=19) and without pearl formation (group IV, n=8). RESULTS: No statistically significant difference was found in diameter change in either group. The PCCC area remains stabile between 6 months to 1 year and 1 year to 2 years. No differences are found between eyes with or without pearl formation. CONCLUSIONS: The PCCC area remains stable as a function of time and is not influenced by pearl formation.  (+info)

Towards achieving small-incision cataract surgery 99.8% of the time. (4/51)

A surgical approach designed to reliably attain the modern goal of small incision cataract surgery 99.8% of the time is described. Phacoemulsification as well as a manual small incision technique is utilised to achieve the desired outcome as often as possible and for all types of cataracts. The logic, and required surgical steps are described and illustrated. This surgical technique allows the advantages of small incision surgery to be reliably achieved. The method is flexible and allows decisions and steps to be modified depending on the skill and comfort zone of the individual surgeon.  (+info)

"String of pearls" following Nd:YAG laser posterior capsulotomy. (5/51)

Posterior capsular re-opacification can occur following Nd-YAG capsulotomy. This necessitates multiple capsulotomies with its potential complications. We report one such case and discuss possible predisposing factors and preventive measures for this condition.  (+info)

In vitro study on the closure of posterior capsulorrhexis in the human eye. (6/51)

PURPOSE: An unexplained clinical observation is the development of posterior capsular opacification (PCO), even when the central part of the posterior capsule has been removed. The purpose of this study was to investigate in vitro the mechanisms involved in the closure of the posterior capsulorrhexis in a capsular bag model. METHODS: A sham extracapsular cataract extraction was performed in 71 human donor eyes, followed by a central posterior capsulorrhexis 3 to 4 mm in diameter. Each capsular bag was pinned to a PMMA ring with a central hole of 5 mm and placed in a Petri dish. The capsular bags were cultured and monitored for 3 to 7 weeks by phase-contrast microscopy, after which they were prepared for light, transmission, and scanning electron microscopy. RESULTS: Proliferation of lens epithelial cells (LECs) within the posterior rhexis area was found in 22 cases (31%) of which 3 had a complete closure. In the absence of the posterior capsule, a monolayer of LECs was observed growing on a basal lamina, consisting of loosely arranged fibers. Further observations on noncultured capsular bags revealed that this basal lamina corresponds to the anterior hyaloid membrane. CONCLUSIONS: This study corroborates the clinical observation that LECs that remain after cataract extraction have the potential to proliferate, in the absence of their natural substrate, on a basal lamina of vitreous origin and are able to close the posterior capsulorrhexis partially or totally in approximately one third of cases.  (+info)

A new model of posterior capsule opacification in rodents. (7/51)

PURPOSE: To describe a new model of posterior capsule opacification (PCO) in rodents METHODS: An extracapsular lens extraction (ECLE), by continuous curvilinear capsulorrhexis and hydrodissection, was performed in 42 consecutive Brown Norway rats. Animals were killed at 0, 6, and 24 hours and 3, 7, and 14 days after surgery. Eyes were enucleated and processed for light microscopy and immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: In 34 (81%) of the animals the operated eye appeared well healed before death, with a clear cornea and a well-formed anterior chamber. In eight (19%) there was no view of anterior segment structures because of hyphema, fibrin, or corneal opacification. PCO was clinically evident 3 days after ECLE and was present in all animals at 2 weeks. Immediately after ECLE, lens epithelial cells (LECs) were present in the inner surface of the anterior capsule and lens bow. Twenty-four hours after surgery, LECs started to migrate toward the center of the posterior capsule. At 3 days, multilayered LECs, some spindle shaped, were present throughout the lens capsule. Capsular wrinkling was apparent. Lens fibers and Soemmering's ring were observed in all animals 14 days after surgery, indicating some degree of cellular differentiation. Activated macrophages were present in greater numbers at 3 and 14 days after surgery (P < 0.05), when proliferation and migration of LECs appeared to be greatest, and lens fiber differentiation was evident, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: In rodents PCO occurs after ECLE and is associated with low-grade inflammation, mostly of mononuclear macrophages. Although no intraocular lens implantation was performed, this model appears to be valuable for studying the sequence of events that leads to PCO after cataract surgery and the extracellular matrix cues that promote lens fiber differentiation.  (+info)

Cost analysis of cataract surgery with intraocular lens implantation: a single blind randomised clinical trial comparing extracapsular cataract extraction and phacoemulsification. (8/51)

A randomised single blinded clinical trial to compare the cost of cataract surgery between extracapsular cataract extraction (ECCE) and phacoemulsification (PEA) was conducted at Hospital Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (HUKM) between March and December 2000. A total of 60 patients were included in this study. The cost of a cataract surgery incurred by hospital, patients and households up to two months after discharge were included. The costs of training, loss of patients' income after discharge and intangible costs were excluded. Results showed that the average cost for one ECCE operation is RM1,664.46 (RM1,233.04-RM2,377.64) and for PEA is RM1,978.00 (RM1,557.87-RM3,334.50). During this short period of follow up, it can be concluded that ECCE is significantly cheaper than PEA by an average difference of RM 313.54 per patient (p < 0.001). Cost of equipment and low frequency of PEA technique done in HUKM were the two main reasons for the high unit cost of PEA as compared to ECCE.  (+info)

Capsulorhexis is a surgical procedure that is commonly performed during cataract surgery. It involves creating a circular opening in the front part of the lens capsule, which is a clear membrane that surrounds and holds the lens in place inside the eye. This opening allows the cloudy lens material (cataract) to be removed and replaced with an artificial intraocular lens (IOL).

The procedure is typically performed using a specialized instrument called a cystotome or a femtosecond laser, which creates a small tear in the capsule that can be carefully enlarged to the desired size. The capsulorhexis is crucial for the successful removal of the cataract and the proper placement of the IOL. If the capsulorhexis is not performed correctly, it can lead to complications such as posterior capsular opacification (PCO), which is a thickening and clouding of the back part of the lens capsule that can cause visual symptoms similar to those of a cataract.

The crystalline lens of the eye is covered by a transparent, elastic capsule known as the lens capsule. This capsule is made up of collagen and forms the continuous outer layer of the lens. It is highly resistant to both physical and chemical insults, which allows it to protect the lens fibers within. The lens capsule is important for maintaining the shape and transparency of the lens, which are essential for proper focusing of light onto the retina.

Diathermy is a medical term that refers to the use of high-frequency electrical currents to heat body tissues. The term "diathermy" comes from the Greek words "dia," meaning "through," and "therme," meaning "heat." There are several types of diathermy, including shortwave, microwave, and ultrasound diathermy.

Shortwave diathermy uses electromagnetic waves with frequencies between 10 MHz and 27 MHz to generate heat in deep tissues. This type of diathermy is often used to treat muscle or joint pain, increase blood flow, or promote healing after surgery or injury.

Microwave diathermy uses high-frequency electromagnetic waves with frequencies between 915 MHz and 2450 MHz to generate heat in superficial tissues. This type of diathermy is often used to treat skin conditions such as dermatitis or psoriasis.

Ultrasound diathermy uses high-frequency sound waves with frequencies above 1 MHz to generate heat in soft tissues. This type of diathermy is often used to treat muscle or tendon injuries, promote healing, or relieve pain.

Diathermy should be administered by a trained healthcare professional, as there are potential risks and complications associated with its use, including burns, discomfort, or damage to implanted medical devices such as pacemakers.

Viscoelastic substances are materials that exhibit both viscous and elastic properties when undergoing deformation. In the context of medicine, viscoelastic substances are often used to describe certain biological fluids, such as synovial fluid found in joints, or the vitreous humor in the eye. These fluids have a complex structure that allows them to behave as a liquid and a solid simultaneously, providing resistance to sudden force while also allowing for smooth movement over time.

Artificial viscoelastic substances are also used in medical applications, such as in surgical sealants and hemostatic agents, which are designed to control bleeding by forming a gel-like substance that fills wounds and helps to promote clotting. These materials have unique properties that allow them to conform to the shape of the wound and provide sustained pressure to help stop bleeding.

Capsule opacification, also known as posterior capsular opacification (PCO) or "after-cataract," is a condition that can occur after cataract surgery. During cataract surgery, the cloudy natural lens of the eye is removed and replaced with an artificial intraocular lens (IOL). However, over time, the remaining capsule that holds the IOL in place can become cloudy, leading to blurry or distorted vision. This clouding of the capsule is called capsule opacification. It is not a true reformation of the cataract but a separate condition that can occur after cataract surgery.

Capsule opacification can be treated with a simple laser procedure called YAG capsulotomy, which creates an opening in the cloudy capsule to restore clear vision. This procedure is typically quick, painless, and performed on an outpatient basis.

Intraocular lens (IOL) implantation is a surgical procedure that involves placing a small artificial lens inside the eye to replace the natural lens that has been removed. This procedure is typically performed during cataract surgery, where the cloudy natural lens is removed and replaced with an IOL to restore clear vision.

During the procedure, a small incision is made in the eye, and the cloudy lens is broken up and removed using ultrasound waves or laser energy. Then, the folded IOL is inserted through the same incision and positioned in the correct place inside the eye. Once in place, the IOL unfolds and is secured into position.

There are several types of IOLs available, including monofocal, multifocal, toric, and accommodating lenses. Monofocal lenses provide clear vision at one distance, while multifocal lenses offer clear vision at multiple distances. Toric lenses correct astigmatism, and accommodating lenses can change shape to focus on objects at different distances.

Overall, intraocular lens implantation is a safe and effective procedure that can help restore clear vision in patients with cataracts or other eye conditions that require the removal of the natural lens.

Phacoemulsification is a surgical procedure used in cataract removal. It involves using an ultrasonic device to emulsify (break up) the cloudy lens (cataract) into small pieces, which are then aspirated or sucked out through a small incision. This procedure allows for smaller incisions and faster recovery times compared to traditional cataract surgery methods. After the cataract is removed, an artificial intraocular lens (IOL) is typically implanted to replace the natural lens and restore vision.

Trypan Blue is not a medical condition or disease, but rather a medical stain that is used in various medical and laboratory procedures. Here's the medical definition of Trypan Blue:

Trypan Blue is a sterile, non-toxic dye that is commonly used in medical and research settings for staining and visualizing cells and tissues. It has an affinity for staining dead or damaged cells, making it useful for counting viable cells in a sample, as well as identifying and removing damaged cells during certain surgical procedures.

In ophthalmology, Trypan Blue is used as a surgical aid during cataract surgery to stain the lens capsule, providing better visibility and improving the outcome of the procedure. It may also be used in other types of surgeries to help identify and remove damaged or necrotic tissue.

In research settings, Trypan Blue is often used to distinguish live cells from dead cells in cell culture experiments, as well as for staining various tissues and structures during histological examination.

Intraocular lenses (IOLs) are artificial lens implants that are placed inside the eye during ophthalmic surgery, such as cataract removal. These lenses are designed to replace the natural lens of the eye that has become clouded or damaged, thereby restoring vision impairment caused by cataracts or other conditions.

There are several types of intraocular lenses available, including monofocal, multifocal, toric, and accommodative lenses. Monofocal IOLs provide clear vision at a single fixed distance, while multifocal IOLs offer clear vision at multiple distances. Toric IOLs are designed to correct astigmatism, and accommodative IOLs can change shape and position within the eye to allow for a range of vision.

The selection of the appropriate type of intraocular lens depends on various factors, including the patient's individual visual needs, lifestyle, and ocular health. The implantation procedure is typically performed on an outpatient basis and involves minimal discomfort or recovery time. Overall, intraocular lenses have become a safe and effective treatment option for patients with vision impairment due to cataracts or other eye conditions.

Cataract extraction is a surgical procedure that involves removing the cloudy lens (cataract) from the eye. This procedure is typically performed to restore vision impairment caused by cataracts and improve overall quality of life. There are two primary methods for cataract extraction:

1. Phacoemulsification: This is the most common method used today. It involves making a small incision in the front part of the eye (cornea), inserting an ultrasonic probe to break up the cloudy lens into tiny pieces, and then removing those pieces with suction. After removing the cataract, an artificial intraocular lens (IOL) is inserted to replace the natural lens and help focus light onto the retina.

2. Extracapsular Cataract Extraction: In this method, a larger incision is made on the side of the cornea, allowing the surgeon to remove the cloudy lens in one piece without breaking it up. The back part of the lens capsule is left intact to support the IOL. This technique is less common and typically reserved for more advanced cataracts or when phacoemulsification cannot be performed.

Recovery from cataract extraction usually involves using eye drops to prevent infection and inflammation, as well as protecting the eye with a shield or glasses during sleep for a few weeks after surgery. Most people experience improved vision within a few days to a week following the procedure.

A cataract is a clouding of the natural lens in the eye that affects vision. This clouding can cause vision to become blurry, faded, or dim, making it difficult to see clearly. Cataracts are a common age-related condition, but they can also be caused by injury, disease, or medication use. In most cases, cataracts develop gradually over time and can be treated with surgery to remove the cloudy lens and replace it with an artificial one.

A vitrectomy is a surgical procedure that involves the removal of some or all of the vitreous humor, which is the clear gel-like substance filling the center of the eye. This surgery is often performed to treat various retinal disorders such as diabetic retinopathy, retinal detachment, macular hole, and vitreous hemorrhage.

During a vitrectomy, the ophthalmologist makes small incisions in the sclera (the white part of the eye) to access the vitreous cavity. The surgeon then uses specialized instruments to remove the cloudy or damaged vitreous and may also repair any damage to the retina or surrounding tissues. Afterward, a clear saline solution is injected into the eye to maintain its shape and help facilitate healing.

In some cases, a gas bubble or silicone oil may be placed in the eye after the vitrectomy to help hold the retina in place while it heals. These substances will gradually be absorbed or removed during follow-up appointments. The body naturally produces a new, clear vitreous to replace the removed material over time.

Vitrectomy is typically performed under local anesthesia and may require hospitalization or outpatient care depending on the individual case. Potential risks and complications include infection, bleeding, cataract formation, retinal detachment, and increased eye pressure. However, with proper care and follow-up, most patients experience improved vision after a successful vitrectomy procedure.

Therapeutic irrigation, also known as lavage, is a medical procedure that involves the introduction of fluids or other agents into a body cavity or natural passageway for therapeutic purposes. This technique is used to cleanse, flush out, or introduce medication into various parts of the body, such as the bladder, lungs, stomach, or colon.

The fluid used in therapeutic irrigation can be sterile saline solution, distilled water, or a medicated solution, depending on the specific purpose of the procedure. The flow and pressure of the fluid are carefully controlled to ensure that it reaches the desired area without causing damage to surrounding tissues.

Therapeutic irrigation is used to treat a variety of medical conditions, including infections, inflammation, obstructions, and toxic exposures. It can also be used as a diagnostic tool to help identify abnormalities or lesions within body cavities.

Overall, therapeutic irrigation is a valuable technique in modern medicine that allows healthcare providers to deliver targeted treatment directly to specific areas of the body, improving patient outcomes and quality of life.

Aphakia, postcataract is a medical condition that refers to the absence of the lens in the eye after cataract surgery. A cataract is a clouding of the natural lens inside the eye that can cause vision loss. During cataract surgery, the cloudy lens is removed and replaced with an artificial lens implant. However, if there is a complication during the procedure and the artificial lens is not placed in the eye or if it becomes dislocated after surgery, then the patient will develop aphakia, postcataract.

Patients with aphakia, postcataract have poor vision and may experience symptoms such as blurry vision, glare, and halos around lights. They are also at an increased risk of developing glaucoma and retinal detachment. To correct the vision in patients with aphakia, they can wear special contact lenses or glasses with high-powered lenses, or undergo a secondary surgical procedure to implant an artificial lens in the eye.

The anterior chamber is the front portion of the eye, located between the cornea (the clear front "window" of the eye) and the iris (the colored part of the eye). It is filled with a clear fluid called aqueous humor that provides nutrients to the structures inside the eye and helps maintain its shape. The anterior chamber plays an important role in maintaining the overall health and function of the eye.

Ophthalmic solutions are sterile, single-use or multi-dose preparations in a liquid form that are intended for topical administration to the eye. These solutions can contain various types of medications, such as antibiotics, anti-inflammatory agents, antihistamines, or lubricants, which are used to treat or prevent ocular diseases and conditions.

The pH and osmolarity of ophthalmic solutions are carefully controlled to match the physiological environment of the eye and minimize any potential discomfort or irritation. The solutions may be packaged in various forms, including drops, sprays, or irrigations, depending on the intended use and administration route.

It is important to follow the instructions for use provided by a healthcare professional when administering ophthalmic solutions, as improper use can lead to eye injury or reduced effectiveness of the medication.

Intraoperative complications refer to any unforeseen problems or events that occur during the course of a surgical procedure, once it has begun and before it is completed. These complications can range from minor issues, such as bleeding or an adverse reaction to anesthesia, to major complications that can significantly impact the patient's health and prognosis.

Examples of intraoperative complications include:

1. Bleeding (hemorrhage) - This can occur due to various reasons such as injury to blood vessels or organs during surgery.
2. Infection - Surgical site infections can develop if the surgical area becomes contaminated during the procedure.
3. Anesthesia-related complications - These include adverse reactions to anesthesia, difficulty maintaining the patient's airway, or cardiovascular instability.
4. Organ injury - Accidental damage to surrounding organs can occur during surgery, leading to potential long-term consequences.
5. Equipment failure - Malfunctioning surgical equipment can lead to complications and compromise the safety of the procedure.
6. Allergic reactions - Patients may have allergies to certain medications or materials used during surgery, causing an adverse reaction.
7. Prolonged operative time - Complications may arise if a surgical procedure takes longer than expected, leading to increased risk of infection and other issues.

Intraoperative complications require prompt identification and management by the surgical team to minimize their impact on the patient's health and recovery.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Poland" is not a medical term. It is a country in Central Europe. If you have any questions about medical conditions or terminology, I would be happy to help answer those!

Coloring agents, also known as food dyes or color additives, are substances that are added to foods, medications, and cosmetics to improve their appearance by giving them a specific color. These agents can be made from both synthetic and natural sources. They must be approved by regulatory agencies such as the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) before they can be used in products intended for human consumption.

Coloring agents are used for various reasons, including:

* To replace color lost during food processing or preparation
* To make foods more visually appealing
* To help consumers easily identify certain types of food
* To indicate the flavor of a product (e.g., fruit-flavored candies)

It's important to note that while coloring agents can enhance the appearance of products, they do not affect their taste or nutritional value. Some people may have allergic reactions to certain coloring agents, so it's essential to check product labels if you have any known allergies. Additionally, excessive consumption of some synthetic coloring agents has been linked to health concerns, so moderation is key.

Retinal vein occlusion (RVO) is a medical condition that occurs when one of the retinal veins, which drains blood from the retina, becomes blocked by a blood clot or atherosclerotic plaque. This blockage can cause hemorrhages, fluid accumulation, and damage to the retinal tissue, leading to vision loss.

There are two types of RVO: branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO) and central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO). BRVO affects a smaller branch retinal vein, while CRVO affects the main retinal vein. CRVO is generally associated with more severe vision loss than BRVO.

Risk factors for RVO include hypertension, diabetes, high cholesterol levels, smoking, and glaucoma. Age is also a significant risk factor, as RVO becomes more common with increasing age. Treatment options for RVO may include controlling underlying medical conditions, laser therapy, intravitreal injections of anti-VEGF agents or steroids, and surgery in some cases.

Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A (VEGFA) is a specific isoform of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) family. It is a well-characterized signaling protein that plays a crucial role in angiogenesis, the process of new blood vessel formation from pre-existing vessels. VEGFA stimulates the proliferation and migration of endothelial cells, which line the interior surface of blood vessels, thereby contributing to the growth and development of new vasculature. This protein is essential for physiological processes such as embryonic development and wound healing, but it has also been implicated in various pathological conditions, including cancer, age-related macular degeneration, and diabetic retinopathy. The regulation of VEGFA expression and activity is critical to maintaining proper vascular function and homeostasis.

An intravitreal injection is a medical procedure in which medication is delivered directly into the vitreous cavity of the eye, which is the clear, gel-like substance that fills the space between the lens and the retina. This type of injection is typically used to treat various eye conditions such as age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, retinal vein occlusion, and uveitis. The medication administered in intravitreal injections can help to reduce inflammation, inhibit the growth of new blood vessels, or prevent the formation of abnormal blood vessels in the eye.

Intravitreal injections are usually performed in an outpatient setting, and the procedure typically takes only a few minutes. Before the injection, the eye is numbed with anesthetic drops to minimize discomfort. The medication is then injected into the vitreous cavity using a small needle. After the injection, patients may experience some mild discomfort or a scratchy sensation in the eye, but this usually resolves within a few hours.

While intravitreal injections are generally safe, there are some potential risks and complications associated with the procedure, including infection, bleeding, retinal detachment, and increased intraocular pressure. Patients who undergo intravitreal injections should be closely monitored by their eye care provider to ensure that any complications are promptly identified and treated.

Macular edema is a medical condition characterized by the accumulation of fluid in the macula, a small area in the center of the retina responsible for sharp, detailed vision. This buildup of fluid causes the macula to thicken and swell, which can distort central vision and lead to vision loss if not treated promptly. Macular edema is often a complication of other eye conditions such as diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration, retinal vein occlusion, or uveitis. It's important to note that while macular edema can affect anyone, it is more common in people with certain medical conditions like diabetes.

Ophthalmology is a branch of medicine that deals with the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of diseases and disorders of the eye and visual system. It is a surgical specialty, and ophthalmologists are medical doctors who complete additional years of training to become experts in eye care. They are qualified to perform eye exams, diagnose and treat eye diseases, prescribe glasses and contact lenses, and perform eye surgery. Some subspecialties within ophthalmology include cornea and external disease, glaucoma, neuro-ophthalmology, pediatric ophthalmology, retina and vitreous, and oculoplastics.

A Retinal Vein is a vessel that carries oxygen-depleted blood away from the retina, a light-sensitive layer at the back of the eye. The retinal veins originate from a network of smaller vessels called venules and ultimately merge to form the central retinal vein, which exits the eye through the optic nerve.

Retinal veins are crucial for maintaining the health and function of the retina, as they facilitate the removal of waste products and help regulate the ocular environment. However, they can also be susceptible to various pathological conditions such as retinal vein occlusions, which can lead to vision loss or damage to the eye.

Cytokines are a broad and diverse category of small signaling proteins that are secreted by various cells, including immune cells, in response to different stimuli. They play crucial roles in regulating the immune response, inflammation, hematopoiesis, and cellular communication.

Cytokines mediate their effects by binding to specific receptors on the surface of target cells, which triggers intracellular signaling pathways that ultimately result in changes in gene expression, cell behavior, and function. Some key functions of cytokines include:

1. Regulating the activation, differentiation, and proliferation of immune cells such as T cells, B cells, natural killer (NK) cells, and macrophages.
2. Coordinating the inflammatory response by recruiting immune cells to sites of infection or tissue damage and modulating their effector functions.
3. Regulating hematopoiesis, the process of blood cell formation in the bone marrow, by controlling the proliferation, differentiation, and survival of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells.
4. Modulating the development and function of the nervous system, including neuroinflammation, neuroprotection, and neuroregeneration.

Cytokines can be classified into several categories based on their structure, function, or cellular origin. Some common types of cytokines include interleukins (ILs), interferons (IFNs), tumor necrosis factors (TNFs), chemokines, colony-stimulating factors (CSFs), and transforming growth factors (TGFs). Dysregulation of cytokine production and signaling has been implicated in various pathological conditions, such as autoimmune diseases, chronic inflammation, cancer, and neurodegenerative disorders.

... or capsulorrhexis, and the commonly used technique known as continuous curvilinear capsulorhexis (CCC), is a ... Prior to the advent of the CCC, a "can opener" approach was used for capsulorhexis, with a small bent needle making small ... In children younger than 7 years, in addition to the anterior capsulorhexis, a posterior capsulorhex is commonly made, since ... Gimbel, HV; Neuhann, T. (January 1991). "Continuous curvilinear capsulorhexis". J Cataract Refract Surg. 17 (1): 110-1. doi: ...
Manual capsulorhexis and particularly the commonly used technique known as continuous curvilinear capsulorhexis (CCC), is used ... A well constructed capsulorhexis using the method has good circularity and no stress raisers along the edge of the tear The ... Mohammadpour, Mehrdad; Erfanian, Reza; Karimi, Nasser (2012). "Capsulorhexis: Pearls and pitfalls". Saudi Journal of ...
In capsulorhexis, a circular opening is made on the front surface of the lens capsule to access the lens within. In ... The continuous curvilinear capsulorhexis technique is frequently used. An anterior capsulotomy consists in the opening of the ... "Capsulorhexis using a cystotome needle during cataract surgery". Archived from the original on 26 August 2008. Retrieved 28 May ... The types of capsular openings commonly used in MSICS are continuous curvilinear capsulorhexis, can-opener capsulotomy and ...
A continuous curvilinear capsulorhexis is usually used to create a round, smooth-edged opening through which the lens nucleus ... A method of pre-chopping the cataract using the same bent cystotome needle used for capsulorhexis and a Nagahara chopper was ... Mohammadpour M, Erfanian R, Karimi N (January 2012). "Capsulorhexis: Pearls and pitfalls". Saudi Journal of Ophthalmology. 26 ( ... problematic capsulorhexis with a hard cataract; or a very dense cataract where phacoemulsification is likely to cause permanent ...
The continuous curvilinear capsulorhexis (CCC) has been crucial to modern cataract surgery. It consists of making a small ... He is better known for his invention, along with Thomas Neuhann, of the continuous curvilinear capsulorhexis (CCC), a technique ... Gimbel H, Neuhann T. Continuous curvilinear capsulorhexis. J Cataract Refract Surg 1991;17(1):110-1. Kelman C. The history and ... It was around this time that he perfected the continuous curvilinear capsulorhexis (CCC), and the divide and conquer ...
Larger well-structured tunnels and larger capsulorhexis are acceptable to allow better control of the surgery. Various methods ... The types of capsular openings commonly used in MSICS are the continuous curvilinear capsulorhexis, the can-opener capsulotomy ... The continuous curvilinear capsulorhexis technique is in common use. A posterior capsulotomy is an opening of the back portion ... done and the entire lens is carefully released from the capsule and removed into the anterior chamber through the capsulorhexis ...
"Automated capsulorhexis based on a hybrid magnetic-mechanical actuation system". Proc. IEEE Int. Conf. Robotics Automation, ...
Capsulorhexis is a technique used to remove the lens capsule during cataract surgery. Various dyes are used to stain lens ... ICG-enhanced anterior and posterior capsulorhexis is useful in childhood cataract surgery. It may also use in adult cataract ...
"Objective assessment of intraoperative technical skill in capsulorhexis using videos of cataract surgery." International ...
Capsulorhexis - A needle or small pair of forceps is used to create a circular hole in the capsule in which the lens sits. ... The incision at the junction of the sclera and cornea and the hole in capsule during capsulorhexis, traditionally made with a ...
... before creating the continuous curvilinear capsulorhexis. In keratoplasty, trypan blue can be used to stain the posterior ...
... capsulorhexis MeSH E04.540.208.704 - phacoemulsification MeSH E04.540.225 - corneal transplantation MeSH E04.540.225.225 - ...
Cataract surgery - Removal of opacified lens from the eye Aphakia - Absence of the lens of the eye Capsulorhexis - Tearing an ...
... also known as continuous curvilinear capsulorhexis, a type of cataract surgery Clinical Care Classification System, a nursing ... a graph used as a communications network topology Capsulorhexis or capsulorrhexis, ...
Capsulorhexis or capsulorrhexis, and the commonly used technique known as continuous curvilinear capsulorhexis (CCC), is a ... Prior to the advent of the CCC, a "can opener" approach was used for capsulorhexis, with a small bent needle making small ... In children younger than 7 years, in addition to the anterior capsulorhexis, a posterior capsulorhex is commonly made, since ... Gimbel, HV; Neuhann, T. (January 1991). "Continuous curvilinear capsulorhexis". J Cataract Refract Surg. 17 (1): 110-1. doi: ...
Tips and techniques for creating a capsulorhexis during cataract surgery. ... Retrieved from "https://eyewiki.org/w/index.php?title=Capsulorhexis_Technique&oldid=92721" ...
Calladine-Inamura Capsulorhexis Forceps Incision down to 1.8mm ● Sharp pointed serrated interlocking tips ● Cross action tips, ... Utilising the smooth action of the Inamura cross action capsulorhexis forceps, the new Calladine-Inamura Capsulorhexis Forceps ... Capsulorhexis Forceps Product No: 2-716G-9RSE £240.00. Add to basket. Compare ... Capsulorhexis Forceps Product No: 2-714-3ER8 £190.00. Add to basket. Compare ...
"Capsulorhexis" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicines controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH (Medical Subject ... Continuous Curvilinear Capsulorhexis Performed With the VERUS Ophthalmic Caliper. J Refract Surg. 2016 Oct 01; 32(10):654-658. ... This graph shows the total number of publications written about "Capsulorhexis" by people in this website by year, and whether ... Below are MeSH descriptors whose meaning is more general than "Capsulorhexis".. *Analytical, Diagnostic and Therapeutic ...
4-0395 Capsulorhexis Forceps with Scale (2.50/5.00 mm), Cross-Action, for 1.50 mm Incisions, Curved Stainless Steel Jaws (8.50 ... 4-03314T Utrata Capsulorhexis Forceps with Scale (2 Engravings at 3.00, 6.00 mm), Cystotome Tips, 11.50 mm Curved Jaws, Round ... 4-0301S Utrata Capsulorhexis Forceps, Cystotome Tips, 11.50 mm Straight Jaws, Long Flat Handle, Length 107 mm, Stainless Steel ... 4-0392S Capsulorhexis Forceps, Inamura Style, Cross-Action, S-R, 12.00 mm Curved Jaws, Length 117 mm, Stainless Steel ...
Precision and control define our capsulorhexis forceps, favored by eye surgeons for their exceptional performance. Explore the ... Introduction Utrata Capsulorhexis Forceps. Utrata Capsulorhexis Forceps are regularly used in ophthalmology, especially during ... Utrata, Mico Capsulorhexis forceps, round handle, for 11 mm shanks, 10.5 cm long quantity. ... Utrata, Mico Capsulorhexis forceps, round handle, for 11 mm shanks, 10.5 cm long. ...
Using just forceps is sufficient to start and complete a great capsulorhexis in your routine cataract surgeries.… ... I do not use a cystotome to start the capsulorhexis. I find that it is a superfluous step in cataract surgery and it actually ... Capsulorhexis technique with just forceps. Uday Devgan MD. October 29, 2019. October 25, 2019. beginning surgeons / novice ... In more than 99% of my cataract surgery cases, I do not use a cystotome to start the capsulorhexis. I find that it is a ...
Home / Instruments / Stainless Steel / FORCEPS steel / CAPSULORHEXIS FORCEPS steel. CAPSULORHEXIS FORCEPS steel. ...
The greatest effiency for the smallest incisions (up to 1.6mm) and maximum freedom of movement
Buy IndoWebal Ultrata Capsulorhexis Forceps (There Hole Body Titanium) in best price ... Buy IndoWebal Ultrata Capsulorhexis Forceps (There Hole Body Titanium) from mituja. Enjoy discount and home delivery all over ... IndoWebal Ultrata Capsulorhexis Forceps (There Hole Body Titanium) 0 out of 5 ...
Utrata Capsulorhexis Forceps 85mm (3.25) - Curved Jaw Titanium - ... Utrata Capsulorhexis Forceps 85mm (3.25″) - Curved Jaw Titanium ... Home / Surgical Instruments / Reusable Surgical Instruments / Forceps / Utrata Capsulorhexis Forceps 85mm (3.25″) - Curved Jaw ... SKU: A6025 Categories: Forceps, Forceps - Capsulorhexis, Reusable Surgical Instruments, Surgical Instruments Tags: Altomed, ...
If the view is cloudy, remember the capsulorhexis margins. Uday Devgan MD. November 21, 2018. November 5, 2018. capsulorhexis, ... The key is to keep the position of the critical structures, such as the capsulorhexis, in your mind. You must remember the ... position of the capsulorhexis edges so that when you perform phaco chop, you will avoid inadvertently hitting or damaging it. ...
Our Blink Medical Curved Shaft Inamura Capsulorhexis Forceps have a grasping tip with curved shaft. They are available to buy ... Our Blink Medical Curved Shaft Inamura Capsulorhexis Forceps have a grasping tip with a curved shaft. ... Please quote 11-5021 as an internal reference for these Curved Shaft Inamura Capsulorhexis Forceps. ...
4-0395 Capsulorhexis Forceps with Scale (2.50/5.00 mm), Cross-Action, for 1.50 mm Incisions, Curved Stainless Steel Jaws (8.50 ... 4-0312S Microcoaxial Capsulorhexis Forceps, Ultrathin, 11.50 mm Curved Jaws, for 2.00 mm Incision, with Alignment Mechanism, ... 4-032S Small-incision Capsulorhexis Forceps with Limiter, Cystotome Tips, Curved Micro-Thin Jaws, Fits through 2.00 mm Incision ... 4-0395-cross_action_capsulorrhexis_forceps_with_scale,4-0312s-microcoaxial_capsulorhexis_forceps_with_limiter,7-065d-disposable ...
D50-7651-Micro Capsulorhexis Forceps, Ophthalmic Forceps, Ophthalmology Instruments, Ophthalmic Surgery Instruments ... Micro Capsulorhexis Forceps. Capsulorhexis forceps 4mm long jaws with angled,. grasping platform. Curved shaft 24mm long.. 21G/ ... Tags: D50-7651-Micro Capsulorhexis Forceps, Ophthalmic Forceps, Ophthalmology Instruments, Ophthalmic Surgery Instruments ...
4-0391S Capsulorhexis Forceps, Inamura Style, Cross-Action, S-R, 10.00 mm Curved Jaws, Length 115 mm, Stainless Steel. $0 ... 4-03962/MFS Capsulorhexis Forceps with Scale (2.50/5.00 mm), Cross-Action, for 1.50 mm Incisions, Straight Stainless Steel Jaws ... 4-032S Small-incision Capsulorhexis Forceps with Limiter, Cystotome Tips, Curved Micro-Thin Jaws, Fits through 2.00 mm Incision ... 4-032s-microincisional_capsulorrhexis_forceps,4-0391s-rumex_capsulorhexis_forceps_inamura_type,7-128-quick_chopper_with_rounded ...
CAPSULORHEXIS. For cataract surgery, a complete continuous curvilinear capsulorhexis (CCC) is critical for the safest execution ... Sometimes, the capsulorhexis can be peeled in the usual fashion. In many zonulopathy cases, however, circumferential ... support the equator of the capsular bag rather than the capsulorhexis margin. These hooks are larger than iris retractors, ... countertraction is absent, and propagation of the capsulorhexis tear is very difficult. Placing a small, flexible iris ...
Titanium Utrata Style Capsulorhexis Forceps 84mm , 84mm long , angled 3mm shafts with iris stop allows ease of movement in the ... www.optical-world.com Utrata Style Capsulorhexis Forceps 84mm 1401190 [1401190] - ... Utrata Style Capsulorhexis Forceps 84mm 1401190. *Item ID #:1401190. SKU:228. 0 review. Share ... Titanium Utrata Style Capsulorhexis Forceps 84mm , 84mm long , angled 3mm shafts with iris stop allows ease of movement in the ...
... find complete details about TF-11173-2 Capsulorhexis Forceps, TF-11173-2 Capsulorhexis Forceps - Ophsurin Co., Ltd ... TF-11173-2 Capsulorhexis Forceps 105mm, Straight shafts, very delicate grasiping tips ...
Capsulorhexis rescue after peripheral radial tear-out: Quick-pull technique. Coelho, Roberto Pinto; Paula, Jayter Silva; Neto, ... Validation of an evaluation tool for assessing surgical technique of capsulorhexis. Smith, Ronald J.; McCannel, Colin A.; ...
Principal > Sala de prensa > Vídeos > VisionBlue Capsule staining to visualize the capsulorhexis in cataract surgery ... VisionBlue Capsule staining to visualize the capsulorhexis in cataract surgery Usage tips ...
4-0395/MRS Capsulorhexis Forceps with Scale (2.50/5.00 mm), Cross-Action, for 1.50 mm Incisions, Curved Stainless Steel Jaws ( ... 4-0391S Capsulorhexis Forceps, Inamura Style, Cross-Action, 10.00 mm Curved Jaws, Length 115 mm, Stainless Steel ... 4-0395/MRS Capsulorhexis Forceps with Scale (2.50/5.00 mm), Cross-Action, for 1.50 mm Incisions, Curved Stainless Steel Jaws ( ... 4-032S Small-Incision Capsulorhexis Forceps with Limiter, Cystotome Tips, Curved Micro-Thin Jaws, Fits through 2.00 mm Incision ...
4-0331t-utrata_capsulorhexis_forceps_curved_jaws_round_handle,4-03315t-utrata_capsulorhexis_forceps_cystotome_tips_with_scale,5 ... 4-0321S Utrata Capsulorhexis Forceps, Cystotome Tips, 11.50 mm Curved Jaws, Flat Handle, Length 107 mm, Stainless Steel ... 4-03315T Utrata Capsulorhexis Forceps with Scale (6 Engravings, 1.00 mm), Cystotome Tips, 11.50 mm Curved Jaws, Round Handle, ... 4-0331T Utrata Capsulorhexis Forceps, Cystotome Tips, 11.50 mm Curved Jaws, Round Handle, Length 110 mm, Titanium ...
4-0395/SF Capsulorhexis Forceps with Scale (2.50/5.00 mm), Cross-Action, for 1.50 mm Incisions, Curved Stainless Steel Jaws ( ... 4-0395/SF Capsulorhexis Forceps with Scale (2.50/5.00 mm), Cross-Action, for 1.50 mm Incisions, Curved Stainless Steel Jaws ( ... 4-0391S Capsulorhexis Forceps, Inamura Style, Cross-Action, 10.00 mm Curved Jaws, Length 115 mm, Stainless Steel ... 4-032S Small-Incision Capsulorhexis Forceps with Limiter, Cystotome Tips, Curved Micro-Thin Jaws, Fits through 2.00 mm Incision ...
4-0391S Capsulorhexis Forceps, Inamura Style, Cross-Action, 10.00 mm Curved Jaws, Length 115 mm, Stainless Steel ... 4-0396/LRS Capsulorhexis Forceps with Scale (2.50/5.00 mm), Cross-Action, for 1.50 mm Incisions, Straight Stainless Steel Jaws ... 4-032S Small-Incision Capsulorhexis Forceps with Limiter, Cystotome Tips, Curved Micro-Thin Jaws, Fits through 2.00 mm Incision ... 4-032s-microincisional_capsulorrhexis_forceps,4-0391s-rumex_capsulorhexis_forceps_inamura_type,7-128-quick_chopper_with_rounded ...
Capsular opening contraction after continuous curvilinear capsulorhexis and intraocular lens implantation. J Cataract Refract ...
... capsulorhexis forceps with straight active part and ≈ 90° ball-shaped tip to produce the rhexis of the ... Reusable capsulorhexis forceps with straight active part and ≈ 90° ball-shaped tip to produce the rhexis of the anterior ... Capsulorhexis forceps used in cataract surgery to perform the rhexis of the capsular bag. ...
The technique described requires a precise, intact capsulorhexis. With dense nuclei, a larger capsulorhexis is preferred. ... I make several radial cuts in the capsulorhexis margin and enlarge the incision. If I have made any kind of notch in the ...
The posterior capsulorhexis was created using utrata forceps in 17 eyes or through a vitrector in 33 eyes. Forceps ... This study was done to compare the results of posterior continuous curvilinear capsulorhexis created using forceps with those ... Vitrectorhexis versus forceps posterior capsulorhexis in pediatric cataract surgery. Lav Kochgaway, Partha Biswas, Ajoy Paul, ... Vitrectorhexis after IOL implantation was an easy to learn alternative to manual posterior continuous curvilinear capsulorhexis ...
Unlike the CTR and MCTR, the CTS can be used in cases where a discontinuous capsulorhexis, an anterior capsule tear or a ...
  • Utrata Capsulorhexis Forceps are regularly used in ophthalmology, especially during phacoemulsification procedures. (stellmachermed.com)
  • Capsulorhexis or capsulorrhexis, and the commonly used technique known as continuous curvilinear capsulorhexis (CCC), is a surgical technique used to remove the central anterior part of the capsule of the lens from the eye during cataract surgery by shear and tensile forces. (wikipedia.org)
  • clarification needed] Continuous curvilinear capsulorhexis is a technique that was pioneered by Howard Gimbel, and is in common use as it has a low risk of initiating further outward tears in the capsule, and does not require complex or expensive instruments. (wikipedia.org)
  • Continuous Curvilinear Capsulorhexis Performed With the VERUS Ophthalmic Caliper. (ucdenver.edu)
  • New device for creating a continuous curvilinear capsulorhexis. (ucdenver.edu)
  • For cataract surgery, a complete continuous curvilinear capsulorhexis (CCC) is critical for the safest execution of phacoemulsification. (crstoday.com)
  • Available data have shown that capsulotomies created using the femtosecond laser are more accurate in size than those created by manual continuous curvilinear capsulorhexis and that laser lens fragmentation is accompanied by a significantly decreased phacoemulsification power. (dovepress.com)
  • Reusable capsulorhexis forceps with straight active part and ≈ 90° ball-shaped tip to produce the rhexis of the anterior capsular bag through a 2.2-mm incision. (moria-surgical.com)
  • One of those designs is the Silverstein MICS 1.8mm Capsulorhexis Forceps, a unique styled forceps which is ultra-thin profile, allowing maximum maneuverability through a sub-2.0mm incision without oar-locking or unnecessary distortion of the wound architecture during capsulorhexis. (bausch.com)
  • Ifantides C, Sretavan D. Automated precision pulse capsulotomy vs manual capsulorhexis in white cataracts: reduction in procedural time and resource utilization. (ucdenver.edu)
  • Rao SK, Padmanabhan P. Capsulorhexis in white cataracts. (medscape.com)
  • Prior to the advent of the CCC, a "can opener" approach was used for capsulorhexis, with a small bent needle making small incisions around the anterior surface of the lens, forming a roughly continuous cut hole in the capsule that the lens could be removed through. (wikipedia.org)
  • In children younger than 7 years, in addition to the anterior capsulorhexis, a posterior capsulorhex is commonly made, since the posterior capsule becomes cloudy even more commonly in children than adults. (wikipedia.org)
  • The looped ends of two capsule retractors (MicroSurgical Technology) support the equator of the capsular bag rather than the capsulorhexis margin. (crstoday.com)
  • For example, in a very young patient the capsule is much more elastic and the capsulorhexis will be much more difficult. (reviewofophthalmology.com)
  • After creation of the capsulorhexis, two capsule retractors (MicroSurgical Technology) were placed to support and center the crystalline lens. (crstodayeurope.com)
  • Capsulorhexis, phacoemulsification, and IOL insertion. (crstodayeurope.com)
  • I created the capsulorhexis and performed phacoemulsification using a slow-motion technique and low energy. (crstodayeurope.com)
  • IntelliAxis Refractive Capsulorhexis improved guidance for toric IOL alignment by including marks for the steep axis as part of the capsulorhexis, which also eliminated parallax inherent to corneal markings. (lensar.com)
  • Utilising the smooth action of the Inamura cross action capsulorhexis forceps, the new Calladine-Inamura Capsulorhexis Forceps incorporate a visible scale marked at the functional end of the tips that denotes the desired diameter and radius of the capsulorhexis. (duckworth-and-kent.com)
  • Our Blink Medical Curved Shaft Inamura Capsulorhexis Forceps have a grasping tip with a curved shaft. (blinkmedical.co.uk)
  • Please quote '11-5021' as an internal reference for these Curved Shaft Inamura Capsulorhexis Forceps. (blinkmedical.co.uk)
  • Capsulorhexis forceps 4mm long jaws with angled, grasping platform. (daudjee.com)
  • Precision and control define our capsulorhexis forceps, favored by eye surgeons for their exceptional performance. (stellmachermed.com)
  • IntelliAxis-C, the predecessor to IntelliAxis Refractive Capsulorhexis ® , provided surgeons with the ability to mark the cornea with the precision of the LENSAR Laser, eliminating the need for manual ink markings. (lensar.com)
  • Have any question or inquire for Utrata Style Capsulorhexis Forceps 84mm 1401190? (optical-world.com)
  • You must remember the position of the capsulorhexis edges so that when you perform phaco chop, you will avoid inadvertently hitting or damaging it. (cataractcoach.com)
  • The surgeon can repeatedly measure the size of the capsulorhexis using the forceps within the anterior chamber. (duckworth-and-kent.com)
  • In addition, the 6.0mm marks on the anterior blade surface allow the surgeon to create a consistent, central capsulorhexis. (bausch.com)
  • Trust in the precision and reliability of our capsulorhexis forceps for successful cataract procedures. (stellmachermed.com)
  • The previous page is sending you to http://depot.buzz/product/1005004138439739/retinal-capsulorhexis-forceps-intraocular-ophthalmic-micro-surgical-instruments . (google.ht)
  • Using just forceps is sufficient to start and complete a great capsulorhexis in your routine cataract surgeries. (cataractcoach.com)
  • Success depends on the creation of a large capsulorhexis (≥ 5.5 mm) and complete hydrodissection. (crstodayeurope.com)
  • In many zonulopathy cases, however, circumferential countertraction is absent, and propagation of the capsulorhexis tear is very difficult. (crstoday.com)
  • Obtaining an intact capsulorhexis was more difficult because of pre-existing subcapsular fibrosis. (mackoolonlinecme.com)
  • Tell us what you think about Utrata Style Capsulorhexis Forceps 84mm 1401190, share your opinion with other people. (optical-world.com)
  • Capsulorhexis forceps used in cataract surgery to perform the rhexis of the capsular bag. (moria-surgical.com)
  • This graph shows the total number of publications written about "Capsulorhexis" by people in this website by year, and whether "Capsulorhexis" was a major or minor topic of these publications. (ucdenver.edu)
  • Tell us what you think about Utrata Style Capsulorhexis Forceps 84mm 1401190, share your opinion with other people. (optical-world.com)
  • Please make sure that your review focus on Utrata Style Capsulorhexis Forceps 84mm 1401190. (optical-world.com)
  • Have any question or inquire for Utrata Style Capsulorhexis Forceps 84mm 1401190? (optical-world.com)
  • Capsulorhexis or capsulorrhexis, and the commonly used technique known as continuous curvilinear capsulorhexis (CCC), is a surgical technique used to remove the central anterior part of the capsule of the lens from the eye during cataract surgery by shear and tensile forces. (wikipedia.org)
  • clarification needed] Continuous curvilinear capsulorhexis is a technique that was pioneered by Howard Gimbel, and is in common use as it has a low risk of initiating further outward tears in the capsule, and does not require complex or expensive instruments. (wikipedia.org)
  • If suction is lost during the creation of the capsulorhexis, this step must be completed manually. (medscape.com)
  • Laser creation of the capsulorhexis, the laser increases the precision of the opening's size, shape, and position, which has a significant impact on capsulotomy centration outcomes. (crstoday.com)
  • Daniel Palanker, MD, and colleagues have shown that performing anterior capsulotomy, lens segmentation, and corneal incisions with a laser that is guided by diagnostic imaging produces continuous incisions in the anterior capsule that are twice as strong as and the size and shape of which are more than five times as precise than a manual capsulorhexis. (crstoday.com)
  • Inamura Cross Action Capsulorhexis Forceps are designed to perform capsulorhexis through an incision down to 1.5 mm with a possibility to denote the desired size of capsulorhexis thanks to marks engraved on shafts. (titanmedicalshop.com)
  • In children younger than 7 years, in addition to the anterior capsulorhexis, a posterior capsulorhex is commonly made, since the posterior capsule becomes cloudy even more commonly in children than adults. (wikipedia.org)
  • Less well known are the phenomena of recurrent posterior capsule opacification and capsulorhexis contracture post cataract surgery. (nih.gov)
  • It is proposed that a common aetiology may underlie both posterior capsule opacification and capsulorhexis contracture in myotonic dystrophy cases. (nih.gov)
  • Precise interlocking serrated tips with a sharp point enable the surgeon to initiate the capsule tear then securely grasp the capsule to perform the capsulorhexis. (stellmachermed.com)
  • 4 That said, although the capsulorhexis is more precise when created by a laser, the tendency for an anterior capsule tear may be higher with this approach. (crstoday.com)
  • A capsulorhexis should be an exact circle of a specific size in a precise position. (crstoday.com)
  • The main goal of a manual capsulorhexis or a laser capsulotomy is to create an exact circle of a specific size in a precise position to ensure the proper amount of optic-capsule overlap, thereby facilitating the IOL's placement. (crstoday.com)
  • A temporary template to create a more precise anterior capsulorhexis. (fci-ophthalmics.com)
  • Prior to the advent of the CCC, a "can opener" approach was used for capsulorhexis, with a small bent needle making small incisions around the anterior surface of the lens, forming a roughly continuous cut hole in the capsule that the lens could be removed through. (wikipedia.org)
  • Posterior capsulorhexis combined with optic buttonholing: an alternative to standard in-the-bag implantation of sharp-edged intraocular lenses? (nih.gov)
  • Since it was all removed en-bloc, there was no residual lens material. (wikipedia.org)
  • In August, the LENSAR laser was approved by the FDA to create the perfectly round and centered capsulorhexis, as well as to pre-fragment the clouded lens of the eye in order to reduce the required ultrasonic energy to break up and remove the cataract. (centerforsight.net)
  • Designed for performing capsulorhexis through small 1.8 mm incisions with the possibility to denote the desired size of capsulorhexis. (titanmedical.eu)