Non-invasive, endoscopic imaging by use of VIDEO CAPSULE ENDOSCOPES to perform examination of the gastrointestinal tract, especially the small bowel.
A pill sized videocamera encased in a capsule. It is designed to be swallowed and subsequently traverse the gastrointestinal tract while transmitting diagnostic images along the way.
Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the gastrointestinal tract.
Hard or soft soluble containers used for the oral administration of medicine.
Instruments for the visual examination of the interior of the gastrointestinal tract.
Bleeding in any segment of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT from ESOPHAGUS to RECTUM.
Pathological processes in any segment of the INTESTINE from DUODENUM to RECTUM.
Procedures of applying ENDOSCOPES for disease diagnosis and treatment. Endoscopy involves passing an optical instrument through a small incision in the skin i.e., percutaneous; or through a natural orifice and along natural body pathways such as the digestive tract; and/or through an incision in the wall of a tubular structure or organ, i.e. transluminal, to examine or perform surgery on the interior parts of the body.
The portion of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT between the PYLORUS of the STOMACH and the ILEOCECAL VALVE of the LARGE INTESTINE. It is divisible into three portions: the DUODENUM, the JEJUNUM, and the ILEUM.
Pathological development in the JEJUNUM region of the SMALL INTESTINE.
Endoscopy of the small intestines accomplished while advancing the endoscope into the intestines from the stomach by alternating the inflation of two balloons, one on an innertube of the endoscope and the other on an overtube.
Instruments for the visual examination of interior structures of the body. There are rigid endoscopes and flexible fiberoptic endoscopes for various types of viewing in ENDOSCOPY.
Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the digestive tract.
Acquired degenerative dilation or expansion (ectasia) of normal BLOOD VESSELS, often associated with aging. They are isolated, tortuous, thin-walled vessels and sources of bleeding. They occur most often in mucosal capillaries of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT leading to GASTROINTESTINAL HEMORRHAGE and ANEMIA.
Agents that are used to stimulate evacuation of the bowels.
Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the interior of the stomach.
Passage of food (sometimes in the form of a test meal) through the gastrointestinal tract as measured in minutes or hours. The rate of passage through the intestine is an indicator of small bowel function.
Tumors or cancer in the JEJUNUM region of the small intestine (INTESTINE, SMALL).
A method of tissue ablation and bleeding control that uses ARGON plasma (ionized argon gas) to deliver a current of thermocoagulating energy to the area of tissue to be coagulated.
Diseases in any segment of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT from ESOPHAGUS to RECTUM.
Pathological processes in the ESOPHAGUS.
Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the luminal surface of the colon.
An envelope of loose gel surrounding a bacterial cell which is associated with the virulence of pathogenic bacteria. Some capsules have a well-defined border, whereas others form a slime layer that trails off into the medium. Most capsules consist of relatively simple polysaccharides but there are some bacteria whose capsules are made of polypeptides.
Inflammation of any segment of the SMALL INTESTINE.
The black, tarry, foul-smelling FECES that contain degraded blood.
A lesion on the surface of the skin or a mucous surface, produced by the sloughing of inflammatory necrotic tissue.
Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the luminal surface of the duodenum.
A poly(dimethylsiloxane) which is a polymer of 200-350 units of dimethylsiloxane, along with added silica gel. It is used as an antiflatulent, surfactant, and ointment base.
Tumors or cancer in the ILEUM region of the small intestine (INTESTINE, SMALL).
Pathological development in the ILEUM including the ILEOCECAL VALVE.
Infection with tapeworms of the genus Diphyllobothrium.
Pathological conditions in the INTESTINES that are characterized by the gastrointestinal loss of serum proteins, including SERUM ALBUMIN; IMMUNOGLOBULINS; and at times LYMPHOCYTES. Severe condition can result in HYPOGAMMAGLOBULINEMIA or LYMPHOPENIA. Protein-losing enteropathies are associated with a number of diseases including INTESTINAL LYMPHANGIECTASIS; WHIPPLE'S DISEASE; and NEOPLASMS of the SMALL INTESTINE.
Tumors or cancer of the INTESTINES.
Specially designed endoscopes for visualizing the interior surface of the colon.
A chronic transmural inflammation that may involve any part of the DIGESTIVE TRACT from MOUTH to ANUS, mostly found in the ILEUM, the CECUM, and the COLON. In Crohn disease, the inflammation, extending through the intestinal wall from the MUCOSA to the serosa, is characteristically asymmetric and segmental. Epithelioid GRANULOMAS may be seen in some patients.
Any impairment, arrest, or reversal of the normal flow of INTESTINAL CONTENTS toward the ANAL CANAL.
Transmission of the readings of instruments to a remote location by means of wires, radio waves, or other means. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
Dilatation of the intestinal lymphatic system usually caused by an obstruction in the intestinal wall. It may be congenital or acquired and is characterized by DIARRHEA; HYPOPROTEINEMIA; peripheral and/or abdominal EDEMA; and PROTEIN-LOSING ENTEROPATHIES.
Pathological processes in the COLON region of the large intestine (INTESTINE, LARGE).
Burns produced by contact with electric current or from a sudden discharge of electricity.
The sac enclosing a joint. It is composed of an outer fibrous articular capsule and an inner SYNOVIAL MEMBRANE.
The storing or preserving of video signals for television to be played back later via a transmitter or receiver. Recordings may be made on magnetic tape or discs (VIDEODISC RECORDING).
Sensation of discomfort, distress, or agony in the abdominal region.
The thin noncellular outer covering of the CRYSTALLINE LENS composed mainly of COLLAGEN TYPE IV and GLYCOSAMINOGLYCANS. It is secreted by the embryonic anterior and posterior epithelium. The embryonic posterior epithelium later disappears.
A distinct vascular lesion in the PYLORIC ANTRUM that is characterized by tortuous dilated blood vessels (ectasia) radiating outward from the PYLORUS. The vessel pattern resembles the stripes on the surface of a watermelon. This lesion causes both acute and chronic GASTROINTESTINAL HEMORRHAGE.
A condition with multiple tumor-like lesions caused either by congenital or developmental malformations of BLOOD VESSELS, or reactive vascular proliferations, such as in bacillary angiomatosis. Angiomatosis is considered non-neoplastic.
Dilated blood vessels in the ESOPHAGUS or GASTRIC FUNDUS that shunt blood from the portal circulation (PORTAL SYSTEM) to the systemic venous circulation. Often they are observed in individuals with portal hypertension (HYPERTENSION, PORTAL).
Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.
Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)
Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.
Anemia characterized by decreased or absent iron stores, low serum iron concentration, low transferrin saturation, and low hemoglobin concentration or hematocrit value. The erythrocytes are hypochromic and microcytic and the iron binding capacity is increased.
A dull red, firm, dome-shaped hemangioma, sharply demarcated from surrounding skin, usually located on the head and neck, which grows rapidly and generally undergoes regression and involution without scarring. It is caused by proliferation of immature capillary vessels in active stroma, and is usually present at birth or occurs within the first two or three months of life. (Dorland, 27th ed)
A malabsorption syndrome that is precipitated by the ingestion of foods containing GLUTEN, such as wheat, rye, and barley. It is characterized by INFLAMMATION of the SMALL INTESTINE, loss of MICROVILLI structure, failed INTESTINAL ABSORPTION, and MALNUTRITION.
Acute INFLAMMATION in the INTESTINAL MUCOSA of the continent ileal reservoir (or pouch) in patients who have undergone ILEOSTOMY and restorative proctocolectomy (PROCTOCOLECTOMY, RESTORATIVE).
A method in which either the observer(s) or the subject(s) is kept ignorant of the group to which the subjects are assigned.
Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the esophagus.
Discrete tissue masses that protrude into the lumen of the COLON. These POLYPS are connected to the wall of the colon either by a stalk, pedunculus, or by a broad base.
In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.
The washing of a body cavity or surface by flowing water or solution for therapy or diagnosis.
WHITE MATTER pathway, flanked by nuclear masses, consisting of both afferent and efferent fibers projecting between the WHITE MATTER and the BRAINSTEM. It consists of three distinct parts: an anterior limb, posterior limb, and genu.

Positive coeliac serology in irritable bowel syndrome patients with normal duodenal biopsies: Video capsule endoscopy findings and HLA-DQ typing may affect clinical management. (1/222)

OBJECTIVES: To investigate a group of IBS patients (Rome criteria) with positive coeliac serology (EMA, TTG, IgG or IgA AGA) and normal small bowel biopsies. Video capsule endoscopy (VCE) findings of the small bowell were compared with DQ-typing. METHODS: Twenty-two patients with chronic abdominal pain (with or without diarrhea) and at least one positive result of any of the coeliac serological markers (AGA, TTG, EMA) and normal duodenal biopsy were enrolled and underwent VCE. Twelve healthy volunteers with VCE served as control group. Coeliac related HLA DQ2 or DQ8 markers were determined. RESULTS: 12/ 22 (55%) patients had small bowel abnormalities with VCE. No mucosal abnormalities were recognized in the control group (p = 0.002). Inflammatory changes were classified as moderate or pronounced. Eight patients (36%) had moderate changes and four patients (18%) demonstrated pronounced changes. Only 6 of the 21 IBS patients were positive for DQ2 and/or DQ8. CONCLUSIONS: The patients in this study fulfilled the diagnostic Rome criteria for Irritable Bowel Syndrome. We suggest that patients with positive coeliac serology and normal duodenal biopsies should undergo HLA typing. In patients positive for DQ2 and/or DQ8, a VCE should be performed. Patients with mucosal abnormalities compatible with CD should be considered as a group distinct from IBS patients and could be tested with gluten challenge or treated with a gluten free diet.  (+info)

Gastrointestinal bleeding of obscure origin undetected by multiple tests for fecal occult blood and diagnosed only by capsule endoscopy: a case report. (2/222)

The term gastrointestinal bleeding of obscure origin is used to describe bleeding of unknown origin that persists or recurs after a negative initial esophagogastroduodenoscopy and colonoscopy. We report the case of a middle-aged woman with gastrointestinal bleeding of obscure origin who had 9 stool specimens that tested negative for occult blood but was found to have adenocarcinoma of the distal duodenum on capsule endoscopy. This case illustrates that, in the presence of unexplained iron-deficiency anemia, multiple negative fecal occult blood tests do not exclude the presence of GI blood loss, and that capsule endoscopy is a valuable diagnostic study in this context.  (+info)

Diagnostic yield and safety of capsule endoscopy. (3/222)

INTRODUCTION: the capsule endoscopy (CE), from his approval, has become a first line diagnostic procedure for the study of the small bowel disease. The aim of this study is to report our experience since the implantation of this technique in our hospital. MATERIAL AND METHODS: retrospective review of the CE undertaken in Department of Endoscopy. There was gathered in every case the age, sex, motive of consultation, previous diagnostic procedures, capsule endoscopy findings and complication of the technique. One took to end a descriptive and analytical analysis. RESULTS: there was achieved a total of 416 explorations in 388 patients. The obscure gastrointestinal bleeding was the most frequent indication (83.30%) followed by suspected Crohn s disease (7.5%). Angiodisplasia was the endoscopic lesion more frequently detected (42.2%), especially, in patients with digestive bleeding of obscure origin (OR 3.13 p < 0.001), followed by the flebectasia (10.6%) and the ulcer suspicious of Crohn s disease (9.9%). The global diagnostic yield as for the detection of injuries was 77.34% with a case of "not defecation of the capsule" and therefore need of laparotomy. CONCLUSIONS: the capsule endoscopy is a technique consolidated and as his potential is known, his indications are extended. The obscure gastrointestinal bleeding is the most frequent indication and the angiodisplasia the most identified injury. Once known his diagnostic yield, larger studies are needed that assess the influence of capsule endoscopy on clinical outcoumes.  (+info)

Use of video capsule endoscopy in a patient with an implantable cardiac defibrillator. (4/222)

Video capsule endoscopy (VCE) is a useful diagnostic tool in patients with unknown blood loss, particularly when there is a high suspicion of small bowel disease, but because of its use of radio frequency, it is relatively contraindicated in patients with a cardiac device. We report the case of a patient with an implantable cardiac defibrillator (ICD) who underwent VCE because of anaemia and previous surgery for colorectal cancer. Device interrogations were performed before and after the procedure. No interference between VCE and ICD was found. VCE is feasible and relatively safe in patients with ICDs.  (+info)

Does capsule endoscopy recognise gastric antral vascular ectasia more frequently than conventional endoscopy? (5/222)

BACKGROUND: Gastric antral vascular ectasia (GAVE) is a rare cause of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding which can be difficult to recognise endoscopically. Capsule endoscopy is primarily designed to image the small bowel, but may identify gastric and colonic lesions. There have been few reported cases of GAVE diagnosed by capsule endoscopy in the literature. OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to assess the frequency of GAVE in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding referred for capsule endoscopy. DESIGN: Case series. SETTING: This study was conducted in a tertiary referral hospital. PATIENTS. This study comprised 128 consecutive patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. INTERVENTIONS: All patients underwent capsule endoscopy. RESULTS. Six patients were diagnosed with GAVE on the basis of the capsule endoscopy findings (4.7%, five female, median age 71.5 years). All patients had previously had numerous gastrointestinal investigations prior to capsule endoscopy. Five patients to date have been treated with argon plasma coagulation of their vascular lesions. This has resulted in stabilisation of their haemoglobin and cessation of blood transfusions in 4/5 cases with an average follow up period of 15 months. CONCLUSIONS: GAVE is commonly missed at gastroscopy and accounted for 4.7% of patients referred for capsule endoscopy with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (in our series). This case series represents the largest number of GAVE recognised by capsule endoscopy. In the presence of any of the reported risk/associated factors for GAVE the gastroenterologist interpreting the capsule images should have a high index of suspicion.  (+info)

The role of capsule endoscopy combined with double-balloon enteroscopy in diagnosis of small bowel diseases. (6/222)

BACKGROUND: The diagnosis of small bowel diseases remains relatively inefficient using traditional imaging techniques. Capsule endoscopy (CE) and double-balloon enteroscopy (DBE) are two novel methods of enteroscopy for examining the entire small bowel. The aim of this study was to evaluate the detection rate and diagnostic accuracy of CE and DBE in patients with suspected small bowel diseases and to investigate the clinical significance of combined use of these two novel modalities. METHODS: Two hundred and eighteen patients were evaluated for suspected small bowel disease, including 116 with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding and 102 with obscure abdominal pain or chronic diarrhea. One hundred and sixty-five out of these patients underwent CE first and 53 patients underwent DBE (under anesthesia with propofol) first. DBE was recommended after negative or equivocal evaluation on CE and vise versa. Introduction of the endoscope during DBE was either orally or anally and the patients were referred for a second procedure using the opposite route several days later when no abnormalities were found on the first procedure. The detection rates, diagnostic accuracy, tolerance and frequency of adverse events of these two modalities were then analyzed. RESULTS: Failure of the procedure was seen in one patient with CE and in two patients with DBE. Sixty-four DBE procedures were carried out in 51 patients; by the oral route in 34 cases, the anal route in 4 and both routes in 13 cases. The overall detection rate of small bowel diseases using CE (72.0%, 118/164) was superior to that with DBE (41.2%, 21/51); chi(2) = 16.1218, P < 0.0001. The diagnostic rate (51.8%, 85/164) was also higher than that with the latter procedure (39.2%, 20/51), but was not significantly different (chi(2) = 2.4771, P > 0.05). Furthermore, the detection rate of small bowel diseases in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding using CE (88.0%, 88/100) was superior to that of DBE (60.0%, 9/15); chi(2) = 7.7457, P = 0.0054. Lesions were detected by DBE in 1 out of 4 patients in whom CE had a negative result. Suspected findings by CE were confirmed by DBE combined with biopsy in 12 out of 15 patients. On the other hand, small bowel lesions were identified by CE in all 3 patients after negative evaluations by DBE. There were no severe complications during or after either of the two procedures. CONCLUSIONS: The detection rate of small bowel diseases by CE is very high. CE should be selected for the initial diagnosis in patients with suspected small bowel diseases, especially in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. DBE appears to be inferior to CE in the diagnosis of small bowel diseases. However, it was shown that abnormalities could still be identified by DBE in patients with normal images or used to confirm suspected findings from CE. DBE can also serve as a good complementary approach after an initial diagnostic imaging using CE.  (+info)

Intermittent bowel obstruction due to a retained wireless capsule endoscope in a patient with a small bowel carcinoid tumour. (7/222)

A 43-year-old man with a history of metastatic carcinoid disease is presented. The patient had symptoms of chronic intermittent abdominal pain two years after undergoing a wireless capsule endoscopy procedure. Radiological examinations revealed a retained capsule endoscope, and the patient underwent exploratory laparotomy with capsule retrieval. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first case presentation of chronic, partial small bowel obstruction caused by unrecognized retention of a capsule endoscope.  (+info)

Capsule endoscopy retention as a helpful tool in the management of a young patient with suspected small-bowel disease. (8/222)

Capsule endoscopy is an easy and painless procedure permitting visualization of the entire small-bowel during its normal peristalsis. However, important problems exist concerning capsule retention in patients at risk of small bowel obstruction. The present report describes a young patient who had recurrent episodes of overt gastrointestinal bleeding of obscure origin, 18 years after small bowel resection in infancy for ileal atresia. Capsule endoscopy was performed, resulting in capsule retention in the distal small bowel. However, this event contributed to patient management by clearly identifying the site of obstruction and can be used to guide surgical intervention, where an anastomotic ulcer is identified.  (+info)

Capsule endoscopy is a medical procedure that uses a small, pill-sized camera to capture images of the digestive tract. The capsule is swallowed and transmits images wirelessly as it moves through the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, allowing doctors to examine the lining of the small intestine, which can be difficult to reach with traditional endoscopes.

The procedure is commonly used to diagnose and monitor conditions such as Crohn's disease, celiac disease, obscure gastrointestinal bleeding, and tumors in the small intestine. The images captured by the capsule are transmitted to a recorder worn by the patient, and then reviewed and analyzed by a healthcare professional.

Capsule endoscopy is generally considered safe and non-invasive, with few risks or side effects. However, it may not be suitable for everyone, including patients with swallowing difficulties, pacemakers, or certain gastrointestinal obstructions. It's important to consult with a healthcare provider to determine if capsule endoscopy is the right diagnostic tool for a particular condition.

A capsule endoscope is a type of medical device used for minimally invasive examination of the digestive tract. It is a small, pill-sized capsule that contains a miniaturized camera, light source, and transmitter. The patient swallows the capsule, which then travels through the gastrointestinal (GI) tract while transmitting images to an external receiver worn by the patient.

The capsule endoscope typically captures approximately 50,000 to 60,000 color images during its journey through the digestive tract, providing detailed visualization of the mucosal lining of the small intestine, which can be difficult to reach with traditional endoscopes. The examination is called capsule endoscopy or wireless capsule enteroscopy.

Capsule endoscopes are mainly used for diagnosing various gastrointestinal conditions such as obscure gastrointestinal bleeding, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), small bowel tumors, and celiac disease. The procedure is generally safe, non-invasive, and well-tolerated by patients, with minimal discomfort or preparation required compared to traditional endoscopies. However, it may not be suitable for all patients, particularly those with swallowing difficulties, known or suspected gastrointestinal obstructions, or certain implanted electronic devices that could interfere with the capsule's signal transmission.

Gastrointestinal endoscopy is a medical procedure that allows direct visualization of the inner lining of the digestive tract, which includes the esophagus, stomach, small intestine, large intestine (colon), and sometimes the upper part of the small intestine (duodenum). This procedure is performed using an endoscope, a long, thin, flexible tube with a light and camera at its tip. The endoscope is inserted through the mouth for upper endoscopy or through the rectum for lower endoscopy (colonoscopy), and the images captured by the camera are transmitted to a monitor for the physician to view.

Gastrointestinal endoscopy can help diagnose various conditions, such as inflammation, ulcers, tumors, polyps, or bleeding in the digestive tract. It can also be used for therapeutic purposes, such as removing polyps, taking tissue samples (biopsies), treating bleeding, and performing other interventions to manage certain digestive diseases.

There are different types of gastrointestinal endoscopy procedures, including:

1. Upper Endoscopy (Esophagogastroduodenoscopy or EGD): This procedure examines the esophagus, stomach, and duodenum.
2. Colonoscopy: This procedure examines the colon and rectum.
3. Sigmoidoscopy: A limited examination of the lower part of the colon (sigmoid colon) using a shorter endoscope.
4. Enteroscopy: An examination of the small intestine, which can be performed using various techniques, such as push enteroscopy, single-balloon enteroscopy, or double-balloon enteroscopy.
5. Capsule Endoscopy: A procedure that involves swallowing a small capsule containing a camera, which captures images of the digestive tract as it passes through.

Gastrointestinal endoscopy is generally considered safe when performed by experienced medical professionals. However, like any medical procedure, there are potential risks and complications, such as bleeding, infection, perforation, or adverse reactions to sedatives used during the procedure. Patients should discuss these risks with their healthcare provider before undergoing gastrointestinal endoscopy.

A capsule is a type of solid pharmaceutical dosage form in which the drug is enclosed in a small shell or container, usually composed of gelatin or other suitable material. The shell serves to protect the drug from degradation, improve its stability and shelf life, and facilitate swallowing by making it easier to consume. Capsules come in various sizes and colors and can contain one or more drugs in powder, liquid, or solid form. They are typically administered orally but can also be used for other routes of administration, such as rectal or vaginal.

An endoscope is a medical device used for visualizing the internal surfaces of hollow organs or cavities in the body. Gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopes are specifically designed to examine the digestive tract, including the esophagus, stomach, small intestine, large intestine (colon), and rectum.

There are several types of GI endoscopes, including:

1. Gastroscope: Used for examining the stomach and upper part of the small intestine (duodenum).
2. Colonoscope: Used for examining the large intestine (colon) and rectum.
3. Sigmoidoscope: A shorter version of a colonoscope, used for examining the lower part of the large intestine (sigmoid colon) and rectum.
4. Duodenoscope: Used for examining and treating conditions in the pancreas and bile ducts.
5. Enteroscope: A longer endoscope used to examine the small intestine, which is more challenging to reach due to its length and location.

GI endoscopes typically consist of a long, flexible tube with a light source, camera, and channels for instruments to be passed through. The images captured by the camera are transmitted to a monitor, allowing the medical professional to inspect the internal surfaces of the digestive tract and perform various procedures, such as taking biopsies or removing polyps.

Gastrointestinal (GI) hemorrhage is a term used to describe any bleeding that occurs in the gastrointestinal tract, which includes the esophagus, stomach, small intestine, large intestine, and rectum. The bleeding can range from mild to severe and can produce symptoms such as vomiting blood, passing black or tarry stools, or having low blood pressure.

GI hemorrhage can be classified as either upper or lower, depending on the location of the bleed. Upper GI hemorrhage refers to bleeding that occurs above the ligament of Treitz, which is a point in the small intestine where it becomes narrower and turns a corner. Common causes of upper GI hemorrhage include gastritis, ulcers, esophageal varices, and Mallory-Weiss tears.

Lower GI hemorrhage refers to bleeding that occurs below the ligament of Treitz. Common causes of lower GI hemorrhage include diverticulosis, colitis, inflammatory bowel disease, and vascular abnormalities such as angiodysplasia.

The diagnosis of GI hemorrhage is often made based on the patient's symptoms, medical history, physical examination, and diagnostic tests such as endoscopy, CT scan, or radionuclide scanning. Treatment depends on the severity and cause of the bleeding and may include medications, endoscopic procedures, surgery, or a combination of these approaches.

Intestinal diseases refer to a wide range of conditions that affect the function or structure of the small intestine, large intestine (colon), or both. These diseases can cause various symptoms such as abdominal pain, diarrhea, constipation, bloating, nausea, vomiting, and weight loss. They can be caused by infections, inflammation, genetic disorders, or other factors. Some examples of intestinal diseases include inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), celiac disease, Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, and intestinal infections. The specific medical definition may vary depending on the context and the specific condition being referred to.

Endoscopy is a medical procedure that involves the use of an endoscope, which is a flexible tube with a light and camera at the end, to examine the interior of a body cavity or organ. The endoscope is inserted through a natural opening in the body, such as the mouth or anus, or through a small incision. The images captured by the camera are transmitted to a monitor, allowing the physician to visualize the internal structures and detect any abnormalities, such as inflammation, ulcers, or tumors. Endoscopy can also be used for diagnostic purposes, such as taking tissue samples for biopsy, or for therapeutic purposes, such as removing polyps or performing minimally invasive surgeries.

The small intestine is the portion of the gastrointestinal tract that extends from the pylorus of the stomach to the beginning of the large intestine (cecum). It plays a crucial role in the digestion and absorption of nutrients from food. The small intestine is divided into three parts: the duodenum, jejunum, and ileum.

1. Duodenum: This is the shortest and widest part of the small intestine, approximately 10 inches long. It receives chyme (partially digested food) from the stomach and begins the process of further digestion with the help of various enzymes and bile from the liver and pancreas.
2. Jejunum: The jejunum is the middle section, which measures about 8 feet in length. It has a large surface area due to the presence of circular folds (plicae circulares), finger-like projections called villi, and microvilli on the surface of the absorptive cells (enterocytes). These structures increase the intestinal surface area for efficient absorption of nutrients, electrolytes, and water.
3. Ileum: The ileum is the longest and final section of the small intestine, spanning about 12 feet. It continues the absorption process, mainly of vitamin B12, bile salts, and any remaining nutrients. At the end of the ileum, there is a valve called the ileocecal valve that prevents backflow of contents from the large intestine into the small intestine.

The primary function of the small intestine is to absorb the majority of nutrients, electrolytes, and water from ingested food. The mucosal lining of the small intestine contains numerous goblet cells that secrete mucus, which protects the epithelial surface and facilitates the movement of chyme through peristalsis. Additionally, the small intestine hosts a diverse community of microbiota, which contributes to various physiological functions, including digestion, immunity, and protection against pathogens.

Jejunal diseases refer to a range of medical conditions that affect the jejunum, which is the middle section of the small intestine. These diseases can cause various symptoms such as abdominal pain, diarrhea, bloating, nausea, vomiting, and weight loss. Some examples of jejunal diseases include:

1. Jejunal inflammation or infection (jejunitis)
2. Crohn's disease, which can affect any part of the gastrointestinal tract including the jejunum
3. Intestinal lymphoma, a type of cancer that can develop in the small intestine
4. Celiac disease, an autoimmune disorder that causes damage to the small intestine when gluten is consumed
5. Intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO), which can occur due to various reasons including structural abnormalities or motility disorders of the jejunum
6. Meckel's diverticulum, a congenital condition where a small pouch protrudes from the wall of the intestine, usually located in the ileum but can also affect the jejunum
7. Intestinal strictures or obstructions caused by scarring, adhesions, or tumors
8. Radiation enteritis, damage to the small intestine caused by radiation therapy for cancer treatment.

The diagnosis and management of jejunal diseases depend on the specific condition and its severity. Treatment options may include medications, dietary modifications, surgery, or a combination of these approaches.

Double-balloon enteroscopy (DBE) is a medical procedure used to examine the small intestine, which is difficult to reach with traditional endoscopes due to its length and twists and turns. DBE uses a specialized endoscope with two inflatable balloons on its tip. The endoscope is inserted through the mouth or the rectum and advanced slowly into the small intestine while alternately inflating and deflating the balloons to help move the endoscope forward and provide better visualization of the intestinal lining.

DBE can be used for diagnostic purposes, such as evaluating obscure gastrointestinal bleeding, Crohn's disease, tumors, or polyps in the small intestine. It can also be used for therapeutic interventions, such as removing polyps, taking biopsies, or placing feeding tubes.

The procedure is usually done under sedation and takes several hours to complete. While it is considered a safe procedure, potential risks include perforation of the intestinal wall, bleeding, and adverse reactions to the anesthesia.

An endoscope is a medical device used for examining the interior of a body cavity or organ. It consists of a long, thin, flexible (or rigid) tube with a light and a camera at one end. The other end is connected to a video monitor that displays the images captured by the camera. Endoscopes can be inserted through natural openings in the body, such as the mouth or anus, or through small incisions. They are used for diagnostic purposes, as well as for performing various medical procedures, including biopsies and surgeries. Different types of endoscopes include gastroscopes, colonoscopes, bronchoscopes, and arthroscopes, among others.

Endoscopy of the digestive system, also known as gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy, is a medical procedure that allows healthcare professionals to visually examine the inside lining of the digestive tract using a flexible tube with a light and camera attached to it, called an endoscope. This procedure can help diagnose and treat various conditions affecting the digestive system, including gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), ulcers, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and cancer.

There are several types of endoscopy procedures that focus on different parts of the digestive tract:

1. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD): This procedure examines the esophagus, stomach, and duodenum (the first part of the small intestine). It is often used to investigate symptoms such as difficulty swallowing, abdominal pain, or bleeding in the upper GI tract.
2. Colonoscopy: This procedure explores the large intestine (colon) and rectum. It is commonly performed to screen for colon cancer, as well as to diagnose and treat conditions like inflammatory bowel disease, diverticulosis, or polyps.
3. Sigmoidoscopy: Similar to a colonoscopy, this procedure examines the lower part of the colon (sigmoid colon) and rectum. It is often used as a screening tool for colon cancer and to investigate symptoms like rectal bleeding or changes in bowel habits.
4. Upper GI endoscopy: This procedure focuses on the esophagus, stomach, and duodenum, using a thin, flexible tube with a light and camera attached to it. It is used to diagnose and treat conditions such as GERD, ulcers, and difficulty swallowing.
5. Capsule endoscopy: This procedure involves swallowing a small capsule containing a camera that captures images of the digestive tract as it passes through. It can help diagnose conditions in the small intestine that may be difficult to reach with traditional endoscopes.

Endoscopy is typically performed under sedation or anesthesia to ensure patient comfort during the procedure. The images captured by the endoscope are displayed on a monitor, allowing the healthcare provider to assess the condition of the digestive tract and make informed treatment decisions.

Angiodysplasia is a vascular disorder characterized by the dilation and abnormal formation of blood vessels, particularly in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. These abnormal blood vessels are prone to leakage or rupture, which can lead to bleeding. Angiodysplasia is most commonly found in the colon but can occur in other parts of the GI tract as well. It is more common in older adults and can cause symptoms such as anemia, fatigue, and bloody stools. The exact cause of angiodysplasia is not known, but it may be associated with chronic low-grade inflammation or increased pressure in the blood vessels. Treatment options include endoscopic therapies to stop bleeding, medications to reduce acid production in the stomach, and surgery in severe cases.

Cathartics are a type of medication that stimulates bowel movements and evacuates the intestinal tract. They are often used to treat constipation or to prepare the bowel for certain medical procedures, such as colonoscopies. Common cathartic medications include laxatives, enemas, and suppositories.

Cathartics work by increasing the muscle contractions of the intestines, which helps to move stool through the digestive tract more quickly. They may also increase the amount of water in the stool, making it softer and easier to pass. Some cathartics, such as bulk-forming laxatives, work by absorbing water and swelling in the intestines, which helps to bulk up the stool and stimulate a bowel movement.

While cathartics can be effective at relieving constipation, they should be used with caution. Overuse of cathartics can lead to dependence on them for bowel movements, as well as electrolyte imbalances and other complications. It is important to follow the instructions carefully when using cathartic medications and to speak with a healthcare provider if constipation persists or worsens.

Gastroscopy is a medical procedure that involves the insertion of a gastroscope, which is a thin, flexible tube with a camera and light on the end, through the mouth and into the digestive tract. The gastroscope allows the doctor to visually examine the lining of the esophagus, stomach, and duodenum (the first part of the small intestine) for any abnormalities such as inflammation, ulcers, or tumors.

The procedure is usually performed under sedation to minimize discomfort, and it typically takes only a few minutes to complete. Gastroscopy can help diagnose various conditions, including gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), gastritis, stomach ulcers, and Barrett's esophagus. It can also be used to take tissue samples for biopsy or to treat certain conditions, such as bleeding or the removal of polyps.

Gastrointestinal transit refers to the movement of food, digestive secretions, and waste products through the gastrointestinal tract, from the mouth to the anus. This process involves several muscles and nerves that work together to propel the contents through the stomach, small intestine, large intestine, and rectum.

The transit time can vary depending on factors such as the type and amount of food consumed, hydration levels, and overall health. Abnormalities in gastrointestinal transit can lead to various conditions, including constipation, diarrhea, and malabsorption. Therefore, maintaining normal gastrointestinal transit is essential for proper digestion, nutrient absorption, and overall health.

Jejunal neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors in the jejunum, which is the middle section of the small intestine. These neoplasms can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). Malignant jejunal neoplasms are often aggressive and can spread to other parts of the body, making them potentially life-threatening.

There are several types of jejunal neoplasms, including:

1. Adenocarcinomas: These are cancerous tumors that develop from the glandular cells lining the jejunum. They are the most common type of jejunal neoplasm.
2. Carcinoid tumors: These are slow-growing neuroendocrine tumors that arise from the hormone-producing cells in the jejunum. While they are usually benign, some can become malignant and spread to other parts of the body.
3. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs): These are rare tumors that develop from the connective tissue cells in the jejunum. They can be benign or malignant.
4. Lymphomas: These are cancerous tumors that develop from the immune system cells in the jejunum. They are less common than adenocarcinomas but can be aggressive and spread to other parts of the body.
5. Sarcomas: These are rare cancerous tumors that develop from the connective tissue cells in the jejunum. They can be aggressive and spread to other parts of the body.

Symptoms of jejunal neoplasms may include abdominal pain, bloating, diarrhea, weight loss, and bleeding in the stool. Treatment options depend on the type and stage of the neoplasm but may include surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, or a combination of these approaches.

Argon Plasma Coagulation (APC) is a medical procedure that uses ionized argon gas to deliver electrical current and heat to tissue, resulting in coagulation. It is commonly used in the treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding, as well as for cutting and coagulating during surgical procedures. The argon plasma is created by passing argon gas through a high-voltage electrical field, which ionizes the gas and creates a highly precise and controllable plasma beam. This beam can be directed at the tissue to achieve hemostasis (stopping bleeding) or to cut tissue with minimal thermal damage to surrounding structures. The procedure is often performed under endoscopic guidance.

Gastrointestinal diseases refer to a group of conditions that affect the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, which includes the organs from the mouth to the anus, responsible for food digestion, absorption, and elimination of waste. These diseases can affect any part of the GI tract, causing various symptoms such as abdominal pain, bloating, diarrhea, constipation, nausea, vomiting, and weight loss.

Common gastrointestinal diseases include:

1. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) - a condition where stomach acid flows back into the esophagus, causing heartburn and other symptoms.
2. Peptic ulcers - sores that develop in the lining of the stomach or duodenum, often caused by bacterial infection or long-term use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).
3. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) - a group of chronic inflammatory conditions of the intestine, including Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis.
4. Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) - a functional gastrointestinal disorder characterized by abdominal pain, bloating, and altered bowel habits.
5. Celiac disease - an autoimmune disorder where the ingestion of gluten leads to damage in the small intestine.
6. Diverticular disease - a condition that affects the colon, causing diverticula (small pouches) to form and potentially become inflamed or infected.
7. Constipation - a common gastrointestinal symptom characterized by infrequent bowel movements, hard stools, and difficulty passing stools.
8. Diarrhea - a common gastrointestinal symptom characterized by loose, watery stools and frequent bowel movements.
9. Food intolerances and allergies - adverse reactions to specific foods or food components that can cause various gastrointestinal symptoms.
10. Gastrointestinal infections - caused by bacteria, viruses, parasites, or fungi that can lead to a range of symptoms, including diarrhea, vomiting, and abdominal pain.

Esophageal diseases refer to a range of medical conditions that affect the esophagus, which is the muscular tube that connects the throat to the stomach. Here are some common esophageal diseases with their brief definitions:

1. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD): A chronic condition in which stomach acid or bile flows back into the esophagus, causing symptoms such as heartburn, chest pain, and difficulty swallowing.
2. Esophagitis: Inflammation of the esophageal lining, often caused by GERD, infection, or medication.
3. Esophageal stricture: Narrowing of the esophagus due to scarring or inflammation, which can make swallowing difficult.
4. Esophageal cancer: Cancer that forms in the tissues of the esophagus, often as a result of long-term GERD or smoking.
5. Esophageal motility disorders: Disorders that affect the normal movement and function of the esophagus, such as achalasia, diffuse spasm, and nutcracker esophagus.
6. Barrett's esophagus: A condition in which the lining of the lower esophagus changes, increasing the risk of esophageal cancer.
7. Esophageal diverticula: Small pouches that form in the esophageal wall, often causing difficulty swallowing or regurgitation.
8. Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE): A chronic immune-mediated disorder characterized by inflammation of the esophagus due to an allergic reaction.

These are some of the common esophageal diseases, and their diagnosis and treatment may vary depending on the severity and underlying cause of the condition.

A colonoscopy is a medical procedure used to examine the large intestine, also known as the colon and rectum. It is performed using a flexible tube with a tiny camera on the end, called a colonoscope, which is inserted into the rectum and gently guided through the entire length of the colon.

The procedure allows doctors to visually inspect the lining of the colon for any abnormalities such as polyps, ulcers, inflammation, or cancer. If any polyps are found during the procedure, they can be removed immediately using special tools passed through the colonoscope. Colonoscopy is an important tool in the prevention and early detection of colorectal cancer, which is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide.

Patients are usually given a sedative to help them relax during the procedure, which is typically performed on an outpatient basis in a hospital or clinic setting. The entire procedure usually takes about 30-60 minutes to complete, although patients should plan to spend several hours at the medical facility for preparation and recovery.

Bacterial capsules are slimy, gel-like layers that surround many types of bacteria. They are made up of polysaccharides, proteins, or lipopolysaccharides and are synthesized by the bacterial cell. These capsules play a crucial role in the virulence and pathogenicity of bacteria as they help the bacteria to evade the host's immune system and promote their survival and colonization within the host. The presence of a capsule can also contribute to the bacteria's resistance to desiccation, phagocytosis, and antibiotics.

The chemical composition and structure of bacterial capsules vary among different species of bacteria, which is one factor that contributes to their serological specificity and allows for their identification and classification using methods such as the Quellung reaction or immunofluorescence microscopy.

Enteritis is a medical term that refers to inflammation of the small intestine. The small intestine is responsible for digesting and absorbing nutrients from food, so inflammation in this area can interfere with these processes and lead to symptoms such as diarrhea, abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, and weight loss.

Enteritis can be caused by a variety of factors, including bacterial or viral infections, parasites, autoimmune disorders, medications, and exposure to toxins. In some cases, the cause of enteritis may be unknown. Treatment for enteritis depends on the underlying cause, but may include antibiotics, antiparasitic drugs, anti-inflammatory medications, or supportive care such as fluid replacement therapy.

Melena is a medical term that refers to the passage of black, tarry stools. It's not a specific disease but rather a symptom caused by the presence of digested blood in the gastrointestinal tract. The dark color results from the breakdown of hemoglobin, the protein in red blood cells, by gut bacteria and stomach acids.

Melena stools are often associated with upper gastrointestinal bleeding, which can occur due to various reasons such as gastric ulcers, esophageal varices (dilated veins in the esophagus), Mallory-Weiss tears (tears in the lining of the esophagus or stomach), or tumors.

It is essential to differentiate melena from hematochezia, which refers to the passage of bright red blood in the stool, typically indicating lower gastrointestinal bleeding. A healthcare professional should evaluate any concerns related to changes in bowel movements, including the presence of melena or hematochezia.

A medical definition of an ulcer is:

A lesion on the skin or mucous membrane characterized by disintegration of surface epithelium, inflammation, and is associated with the loss of substance below the normal lining. Gastric ulcers and duodenal ulcers are types of peptic ulcers that occur in the gastrointestinal tract.

Another type of ulcer is a venous ulcer, which occurs when there is reduced blood flow from vein insufficiency, usually in the lower leg. This can cause skin damage and lead to an open sore or ulcer.

There are other types of ulcers as well, including decubitus ulcers (also known as pressure sores or bedsores), which are caused by prolonged pressure on the skin.

Duodenoscopy is a medical procedure that involves the insertion of a duodenoscope, which is a flexible, lighted tube with a camera and tiny tools on the end, through the mouth and down the throat to examine the upper part of the small intestine (duodenum) and the opening of the bile and pancreatic ducts.

During the procedure, the doctor can take tissue samples for biopsy, remove polyps or other abnormal growths, or perform other interventions as needed. Duodenoscopy is commonly used to diagnose and treat conditions such as gastrointestinal bleeding, inflammation, infection, and cancer.

It's important to note that duodenoscopes have been associated with the spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in some cases, so healthcare providers must follow strict cleaning and disinfection protocols to minimize this risk.

Simethicone is an anti-foaming agent that is commonly used in the medical field, particularly for the treatment of gastric symptoms such as bloating and discomfort caused by excessive gas in the gastrointestinal tract. It works by reducing the surface tension of gas bubbles in the stomach and intestines, allowing them to combine and be expelled more easily from the body.

Simethicone is not absorbed into the bloodstream and has minimal systemic absorption, making it a safe and well-tolerated medication for most individuals. It can be found in various forms, including tablets, chewable tablets, capsules, and liquids, and is often combined with other medications to provide symptomatic relief of gastric discomfort.

It's important to note that simethicone should only be used as directed by a healthcare professional, and individuals should always consult their doctor or pharmacist before taking any new medication.

Ileal neoplasms refer to abnormal growths in the ileum, which is the final portion of the small intestine. These growths can be benign or malignant (cancerous). Common types of ileal neoplasms include:

1. Adenomas: These are benign tumors that can develop in the ileum and have the potential to become cancerous over time if not removed.
2. Carcinoids: These are slow-growing neuroendocrine tumors that typically start in the ileum. They can produce hormones that cause symptoms such as diarrhea, flushing, and heart problems.
3. Adenocarcinomas: These are malignant tumors that develop from the glandular cells lining the ileum. They are relatively rare but can be aggressive and require prompt treatment.
4. Lymphomas: These are cancers that start in the immune system cells found in the ileum's lining. They can cause symptoms such as abdominal pain, diarrhea, and weight loss.
5. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs): These are rare tumors that develop from the connective tissue of the ileum's wall. While most GISTs are benign, some can be malignant and require treatment.

It is important to note that early detection and treatment of ileal neoplasms can significantly improve outcomes and prognosis. Regular screenings and check-ups with a healthcare provider are recommended for individuals at higher risk for developing these growths.

Ileal diseases refer to conditions that primarily affect the ileum, which is the final portion of the small intestine. The ileum plays a crucial role in nutrient absorption, particularly vitamin B12 and bile salts. Ileal diseases can cause various symptoms, including diarrhea, abdominal pain, weight loss, and malnutrition, depending on their nature and extent. Some common ileal diseases include:

1. Crohn's disease: A type of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) that can affect any part of the gastrointestinal tract, including the ileum. Crohn's disease causes chronic inflammation, which can lead to symptoms such as diarrhea, abdominal pain, and fatigue.
2. Celiac disease: An autoimmune disorder triggered by gluten ingestion in genetically susceptible individuals. In celiac disease, the immune system attacks the lining of the small intestine, including the ileum, causing inflammation and impaired nutrient absorption.
3. Intestinal tuberculosis: A bacterial infection caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis that can affect any part of the gastrointestinal tract, including the ileum. Intestinal tuberculosis can cause symptoms such as abdominal pain, diarrhea, and weight loss.
4. Typhlitis: Also known as neutropenic enterocolitis, typhlitis is an inflammatory condition that affects the cecum and terminal ileum, typically in immunocompromised individuals. It can cause symptoms such as abdominal pain, fever, and diarrhea.
5. Meckel's diverticulum: A congenital condition characterized by a small pouch protruding from the wall of the ileum. While many people with Meckel's diverticulum do not experience symptoms, it can sometimes become inflamed or bleed, causing abdominal pain and rectal bleeding.
6. Lymphoma: A type of cancer that originates in the lymphatic system and can affect any part of the body, including the ileum. Ileal lymphoma can cause symptoms such as abdominal pain, diarrhea, and weight loss.

Diphyllobothriasis is a parasitic infection caused by the tapeworm of the genus Diphyllobothrium. The most common species to infect humans is Diphyllobothrium latum, which is found in freshwater fish. Humans can become infected with this tapeworm by consuming raw or undercooked fish that contain larval stages of the parasite.

The infection can cause a variety of symptoms, including abdominal discomfort, diarrhea, vomiting, and weight loss. In some cases, vitamin B12 deficiency may also occur, leading to neurological symptoms such as numbness, tingling, or weakness in the legs.

Treatment for diphyllobothriasis typically involves administration of a medication called niclosamide, which is an anthelmintic drug that kills the tapeworm. Prevention measures include cooking fish thoroughly before eating it and practicing good hygiene after handling raw fish.

Protein-losing enteropathies (PLE) refer to a group of conditions characterized by excessive loss of proteins from the gastrointestinal tract into the intestinal lumen and ultimately into the stool. This results in hypoproteinemia, which is a decrease in the concentration of proteins in the bloodstream, particularly albumin.

The protein loss can occur due to various reasons such as increased permeability of the intestinal mucosa, lymphatic obstruction, or inflammatory processes affecting the gastrointestinal tract. Common causes of PLE include conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease, intestinal lymphangiectasia, celiac disease, Whipple's disease, and menetrier's disease.

Symptoms of PLE may include edema, ascites, weight loss, diarrhea, and fatigue. The diagnosis of PLE typically involves measuring the concentration of proteins in the stool, as well as other diagnostic tests to determine the underlying cause. Treatment of PLE depends on the underlying cause and may involve dietary modifications, medications, or surgical interventions.

Intestinal neoplasms refer to abnormal growths in the tissues of the intestines, which can be benign or malignant. These growths are called neoplasms and they result from uncontrolled cell division. In the case of intestinal neoplasms, these growths occur in the small intestine, large intestine (colon), rectum, or appendix.

Benign intestinal neoplasms are not cancerous and often do not invade surrounding tissues or spread to other parts of the body. However, they can still cause problems if they grow large enough to obstruct the intestines or cause bleeding. Common types of benign intestinal neoplasms include polyps, leiomyomas, and lipomas.

Malignant intestinal neoplasms, on the other hand, are cancerous and can invade surrounding tissues and spread to other parts of the body. The most common type of malignant intestinal neoplasm is adenocarcinoma, which arises from the glandular cells lining the inside of the intestines. Other types of malignant intestinal neoplasms include lymphomas, sarcomas, and carcinoid tumors.

Symptoms of intestinal neoplasms can vary depending on their size, location, and type. Common symptoms include abdominal pain, bloating, changes in bowel habits, rectal bleeding, weight loss, and fatigue. If you experience any of these symptoms, it is important to seek medical attention promptly.

A colonoscope is a medical device that is used in a procedure called colonoscopy to examine the interior lining of the large intestine, also known as the colon and rectum. It is a long, thin, flexible tube with a lighted end and a camera that allows the doctor to view the inside of the colon on a video monitor. The colonoscope can also have channels that allow for the insertion of tools to take biopsies or remove polyps. Regular colonoscopies are recommended as a screening method for colorectal cancer, which is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths in many countries.

Crohn's disease is a type of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) that can affect any part of the gastrointestinal tract, from the mouth to the anus. It is characterized by chronic inflammation of the digestive tract, which can lead to symptoms such as abdominal pain, diarrhea, fatigue, weight loss, and malnutrition.

The specific causes of Crohn's disease are not fully understood, but it is believed to be related to a combination of genetic, environmental, and immune system factors. The disease can affect people of any age, but it is most commonly diagnosed in young adults between the ages of 15 and 35.

There is no cure for Crohn's disease, but treatments such as medications, lifestyle changes, and surgery can help manage symptoms and prevent complications. Treatment options depend on the severity and location of the disease, as well as the individual patient's needs and preferences.

Intestinal obstruction, also known as bowel obstruction, is a medical condition characterized by a blockage that prevents the normal flow of contents through the small intestine or large intestine (colon). This blockage can be caused by various factors such as tumors, adhesions (scar tissue), hernias, inflammation, or impacted feces.

The obstruction can be mechanical, where something physically blocks the intestinal lumen, or functional, where the normal muscular contractions of the bowel are impaired. Mechanical obstructions are more common than functional ones.

Symptoms of intestinal obstruction may include abdominal pain and cramping, nausea and vomiting, bloating, inability to pass gas or have a bowel movement, and abdominal distention. If left untreated, intestinal obstruction can lead to serious complications such as tissue death (necrosis), perforation of the intestine, and sepsis. Treatment typically involves hospitalization, intravenous fluids, nasogastric decompression, and possibly surgery to remove the obstruction.

Telemetry is the automated measurement and wireless transmission of data from remote or inaccessible sources to receiving stations for monitoring and analysis. In a medical context, telemetry is often used to monitor patients' vital signs such as heart rate, blood pressure, oxygen levels, and other important physiological parameters continuously and remotely. This technology allows healthcare providers to track patients' conditions over time, detect any abnormalities or trends, and make informed decisions about their care, even when they are not physically present with the patient. Telemetry is commonly used in hospitals, clinics, and research settings to monitor patients during procedures, after surgery, or during extended stays in intensive care units.

Intestinal lymphangiectasis is a rare condition characterized by the dilation and dysfunction of the lacteals (lymphatic vessels) within the intestinal villi. This results in the leakage of lymphatic fluid into the gastrointestinal lumen, leading to chronic protein loss, malabsorption of nutrients, and various other complications.

The condition can be primary (congenital), which is usually caused by genetic mutations affecting lymphatic development, or secondary, resulting from acquired conditions that obstruct or damage the intestinal lymphatics. Secondary intestinal lymphangiectasis may occur due to various causes such as abdominal surgeries, radiation therapy, inflammatory bowel disease, or tumors compressing the lymphatic vessels.

Symptoms of intestinal lymphangiectasis include diarrhea, steatorrhea (fatty stools), weight loss, edema (swelling), and hypoproteinemia (low protein levels in the blood). The diagnosis typically involves imaging techniques like lymphangiography or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to visualize the dilated lymphatic vessels. Treatment often focuses on dietary modifications, such as a low-fat, high-protein, and medium-chain triglyceride diet, along with managing any underlying conditions contributing to the development of the disease. In some cases, medications or surgical interventions may be necessary to alleviate symptoms and improve quality of life.

Colonic diseases refer to a group of medical conditions that affect the colon, also known as the large intestine or large bowel. The colon is the final segment of the digestive system, responsible for absorbing water and electrolytes, and storing and eliminating waste products.

Some common colonic diseases include:

1. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD): This includes conditions such as Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, which cause inflammation and irritation in the lining of the digestive tract.
2. Diverticular disease: This occurs when small pouches called diverticula form in the walls of the colon, leading to symptoms such as abdominal pain, bloating, and changes in bowel movements.
3. Colorectal cancer: This is a type of cancer that develops in the colon or rectum, often starting as benign polyps that grow and become malignant over time.
4. Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS): This is a functional gastrointestinal disorder characterized by abdominal pain, bloating, and changes in bowel movements, but without any underlying structural or inflammatory causes.
5. Constipation: This is a common condition characterized by infrequent bowel movements, difficulty passing stools, or both.
6. Infectious colitis: This occurs when the colon becomes infected with bacteria, viruses, or parasites, leading to symptoms such as diarrhea, abdominal cramps, and fever.

Treatment for colonic diseases varies depending on the specific condition and its severity. Treatment options may include medications, lifestyle changes, surgery, or a combination of these approaches.

Electric burns are injuries to the skin and underlying tissues caused by exposure to electrical current. The damage can be both internal and external, and it depends on the voltage, amperage, type of current (alternating or direct), duration of exposure, and the pathway the current takes through the body.

Electric burns can cause extensive tissue damage, including deep burns, nerve damage, muscle damage, and fractures. They may also result in cardiac arrest, irregular heart rhythms, and respiratory failure. In some cases, electric burns may not appear severe on the surface of the skin, but they can still cause significant internal injuries.

Treatment for electric burns typically involves wound care, pain management, and monitoring for complications such as infection or organ damage. In severe cases, surgery may be necessary to remove damaged tissue and repair injured muscles, nerves, and blood vessels.

A joint capsule is the fibrous sac that encloses a synovial joint, which is a type of joint characterized by the presence of a cavity filled with synovial fluid. The joint capsule provides stability and strength to the joint, while also allowing for a range of motion. It consists of two layers: an outer fibrous layer and an inner synovial membrane. The fibrous layer is made up of dense connective tissue that helps to stabilize the joint, while the synovial membrane produces synovial fluid, which lubricates the joint and reduces friction during movement.

I apologize, but "video recording" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. It generally refers to the process of capturing and storing moving visual images on electronic media, which is used in various medical fields for different purposes such as surgical training, telemedicine consultations, or monitoring patient conditions. However, there is no unique medical meaning associated with this term.

Abdominal pain is defined as discomfort or painful sensation in the abdomen. The abdomen is the region of the body between the chest and the pelvis, and contains many important organs such as the stomach, small intestine, large intestine, liver, gallbladder, pancreas, and spleen. Abdominal pain can vary in intensity from mild to severe, and can be acute or chronic depending on the underlying cause.

Abdominal pain can have many different causes, ranging from benign conditions such as gastritis, indigestion, or constipation, to more serious conditions such as appendicitis, inflammatory bowel disease, or abdominal aortic aneurysm. The location, quality, and duration of the pain can provide important clues about its cause. For example, sharp, localized pain in the lower right quadrant of the abdomen may indicate appendicitis, while crampy, diffuse pain in the lower abdomen may suggest irritable bowel syndrome.

It is important to seek medical attention if you experience severe or persistent abdominal pain, especially if it is accompanied by other symptoms such as fever, vomiting, or bloody stools. A thorough physical examination, including a careful history and a focused abdominal exam, can help diagnose the underlying cause of the pain and guide appropriate treatment.

The crystalline lens of the eye is covered by a transparent, elastic capsule known as the lens capsule. This capsule is made up of collagen and forms the continuous outer layer of the lens. It is highly resistant to both physical and chemical insults, which allows it to protect the lens fibers within. The lens capsule is important for maintaining the shape and transparency of the lens, which are essential for proper focusing of light onto the retina.

Gastric Antral Vascular Ectasia (GAVE) is a condition characterized by abnormal, dilated blood vessels in the antrum, which is the lower part of the stomach. These blood vessels can become fragile and prone to bleeding, leading to symptoms such as vomiting blood or having dark, tarry stools. GAVE is also sometimes referred to as "watermelon stomach" because the appearance of the affected area can resemble the stripes on a watermelon when viewed during endoscopy.

The exact cause of GAVE is not well understood, but it has been associated with conditions such as autoimmune disorders and chronic kidney disease. Treatment for GAVE typically involves addressing any underlying conditions and using various techniques to control bleeding, such as argon plasma coagulation or surgery.

Angiomatosis is a medical term that refers to a benign condition characterized by the proliferation of blood vessels in various tissues and organs. It is typically composed of small, tangled blood vessels called capillaries, which can form clusters or networks. The condition can affect skin, internal organs, bones, and other tissues.

Angiomatosis is often asymptomatic and may be discovered incidentally during medical imaging or surgical procedures. In some cases, it may cause symptoms such as pain, swelling, or bleeding, depending on the location and extent of the lesions.

While angiomatosis is generally a benign condition, in rare cases, it can be associated with malignant tumors or other medical conditions. Treatment options for angiomatosis depend on the size, location, and symptoms of the lesions and may include observation, medication, or surgical removal.

Esophageal varices and gastric varices are abnormal, enlarged veins in the lower part of the esophagus (the tube that connects the throat to the stomach) and in the stomach lining, respectively. They occur as a result of increased pressure in the portal vein, which is the large blood vessel that carries blood from the digestive organs to the liver. This condition is known as portal hypertension.

Esophageal varices are more common than gastric varices and tend to be more symptomatic. They can cause bleeding, which can be life-threatening if not treated promptly. Gastric varices may also bleed, but they are often asymptomatic until they rupture.

The most common causes of esophageal and gastric varices are cirrhosis (scarring of the liver) and portal hypertension due to other liver diseases such as schistosomiasis or Budd-Chiari syndrome. Treatment options for esophageal and gastric varices include medications to reduce bleeding, endoscopic therapies to treat active bleeding or prevent recurrent bleeding, and surgical procedures to relieve portal hypertension.

Retrospective studies, also known as retrospective research or looking back studies, are a type of observational study that examines data from the past to draw conclusions about possible causal relationships between risk factors and outcomes. In these studies, researchers analyze existing records, medical charts, or previously collected data to test a hypothesis or answer a specific research question.

Retrospective studies can be useful for generating hypotheses and identifying trends, but they have limitations compared to prospective studies, which follow participants forward in time from exposure to outcome. Retrospective studies are subject to biases such as recall bias, selection bias, and information bias, which can affect the validity of the results. Therefore, retrospective studies should be interpreted with caution and used primarily to generate hypotheses for further testing in prospective studies.

Sensitivity and specificity are statistical measures used to describe the performance of a diagnostic test or screening tool in identifying true positive and true negative results.

* Sensitivity refers to the proportion of people who have a particular condition (true positives) who are correctly identified by the test. It is also known as the "true positive rate" or "recall." A highly sensitive test will identify most or all of the people with the condition, but may also produce more false positives.
* Specificity refers to the proportion of people who do not have a particular condition (true negatives) who are correctly identified by the test. It is also known as the "true negative rate." A highly specific test will identify most or all of the people without the condition, but may also produce more false negatives.

In medical testing, both sensitivity and specificity are important considerations when evaluating a diagnostic test. High sensitivity is desirable for screening tests that aim to identify as many cases of a condition as possible, while high specificity is desirable for confirmatory tests that aim to rule out the condition in people who do not have it.

It's worth noting that sensitivity and specificity are often influenced by factors such as the prevalence of the condition in the population being tested, the threshold used to define a positive result, and the reliability and validity of the test itself. Therefore, it's important to consider these factors when interpreting the results of a diagnostic test.

Prospective studies, also known as longitudinal studies, are a type of cohort study in which data is collected forward in time, following a group of individuals who share a common characteristic or exposure over a period of time. The researchers clearly define the study population and exposure of interest at the beginning of the study and follow up with the participants to determine the outcomes that develop over time. This type of study design allows for the investigation of causal relationships between exposures and outcomes, as well as the identification of risk factors and the estimation of disease incidence rates. Prospective studies are particularly useful in epidemiology and medical research when studying diseases with long latency periods or rare outcomes.

Iron-deficiency anemia is a condition characterized by a decrease in the total amount of hemoglobin or red blood cells in the blood, caused by insufficient iron levels in the body. Hemoglobin is a protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen from the lungs to the rest of the body. When iron levels are low, the body cannot produce enough hemoglobin, leading to the production of smaller and fewer red blood cells, known as microcytic hypochromic anemia.

Iron is essential for the production of hemoglobin, and a deficiency in iron can result from inadequate dietary intake, chronic blood loss, or impaired absorption. In addition to fatigue and weakness, symptoms of iron-deficiency anemia may include shortness of breath, headaches, dizziness, pale skin, and brittle nails. Treatment typically involves iron supplementation and addressing the underlying cause of the iron deficiency.

A capillary hemangioma is a benign (non-cancerous) vascular tumor that is made up of an overgrowth of small blood vessels called capillaries. These lesions are quite common and usually appear during the first few weeks or months of life, although they can also develop later in childhood or even in adulthood.

Capillary hemangiomas typically appear as a bright red, raised, and rubbery lesion on the skin. They may be small and localized, or they can grow and spread to cover a larger area of the body. In some cases, capillary hemangiomas may also form on internal organs such as the liver, brain, or gastrointestinal tract.

While capillary hemangiomas are generally harmless, they can cause cosmetic concerns if they appear on the face or other visible areas of the body. In some cases, these lesions may also interfere with vision, hearing, or other bodily functions if they grow too large or are located in sensitive areas.

Most capillary hemangiomas will eventually shrink and disappear on their own over time, typically within the first few years of life. However, in some cases, medical treatment may be necessary to help speed up this process or to address any complications that arise. Treatment options for capillary hemangiomas may include medications such as corticosteroids or beta-blockers, laser therapy, or surgical removal.

Celiac disease is a genetic autoimmune disorder in which the consumption of gluten, a protein found in wheat, barley, and rye, leads to damage in the small intestine. In people with celiac disease, their immune system reacts to gluten by attacking the lining of the small intestine, leading to inflammation and destruction of the villi - finger-like projections that help absorb nutrients from food.

This damage can result in various symptoms such as diarrhea, bloating, fatigue, anemia, and malnutrition. Over time, if left untreated, celiac disease can lead to serious health complications, including osteoporosis, infertility, neurological disorders, and even certain types of cancer.

The only treatment for celiac disease is a strict gluten-free diet, which involves avoiding all foods, beverages, and products that contain gluten. With proper management, individuals with celiac disease can lead healthy lives and prevent further intestinal damage and related health complications.

Pouchitis is a condition characterized by inflammation of the ileal pouch, a surgically created reservoir that is connected to the patient's anus in individuals who have undergone proctocolectomy with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (IPAA). This procedure is often performed in patients with ulcerative colitis or familial adenomatous polyposis.

Pouchitis can present with symptoms such as diarrhea, abdominal cramps, urgency, and fecal incontinence. The exact cause of pouchitis remains unclear, but it is thought to be related to changes in the microbiota or an overactive immune response in the ileal pouch.

The diagnosis of pouchitis typically involves a combination of clinical symptoms, endoscopic findings, and histopathological examination of biopsies taken during endoscopy. Treatment options for pouchitis include antibiotics, anti-inflammatory medications, and probiotics, depending on the severity and frequency of the condition.

A single-blind method in medical research is a study design where the participants are unaware of the group or intervention they have been assigned to, but the researchers conducting the study know which participant belongs to which group. This is done to prevent bias from the participants' expectations or knowledge of their assignment, while still allowing the researchers to control the study conditions and collect data.

In a single-blind trial, the participants do not know whether they are receiving the active treatment or a placebo (a sham treatment that looks like the real thing but has no therapeutic effect), whereas the researcher knows which participant is receiving which intervention. This design helps to ensure that the participants' responses and outcomes are not influenced by their knowledge of the treatment assignment, while still allowing the researchers to assess the effectiveness or safety of the intervention being studied.

Single-blind methods are commonly used in clinical trials and other medical research studies where it is important to minimize bias and control for confounding variables that could affect the study results.

Esophagoscopy is a medical procedure that involves the visual examination of the esophagus, which is the tube that connects the throat to the stomach. This procedure is typically carried out using an esophagogastroduodenoscope (EGD), a flexible tube with a camera and light on the end.

During the procedure, the EGD is inserted through the mouth and down the throat into the esophagus, allowing the medical professional to examine its lining for any abnormalities such as inflammation, ulcers, or tumors. The procedure may also involve taking tissue samples (biopsies) for further examination and testing.

Esophagoscopy is commonly used to diagnose and monitor conditions such as gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), Barrett's esophagus, esophageal cancer, and other disorders affecting the esophagus. It may also be used to treat certain conditions, such as removing polyps or foreign objects from the esophagus.

Colonic polyps are abnormal growths that protrude from the inner wall of the colon (large intestine). They can vary in size, shape, and number. Most colonic polyps are benign, meaning they are not cancerous. However, some types of polyps, such as adenomas, have a higher risk of becoming cancerous over time if left untreated.

Colonic polyps often do not cause any symptoms, especially if they are small. Larger polyps may lead to symptoms like rectal bleeding, changes in bowel habits, abdominal pain, or iron deficiency anemia. The exact cause of colonic polyps is not known, but factors such as age, family history, and certain medical conditions (like inflammatory bowel disease) can increase the risk of developing them.

Regular screening exams, such as colonoscopies, are recommended for individuals over the age of 50 to detect and remove polyps before they become cancerous. If you have a family history of colonic polyps or colorectal cancer, your doctor may recommend earlier or more frequent screenings.

The Predictive Value of Tests, specifically the Positive Predictive Value (PPV) and Negative Predictive Value (NPV), are measures used in diagnostic tests to determine the probability that a positive or negative test result is correct.

Positive Predictive Value (PPV) is the proportion of patients with a positive test result who actually have the disease. It is calculated as the number of true positives divided by the total number of positive results (true positives + false positives). A higher PPV indicates that a positive test result is more likely to be a true positive, and therefore the disease is more likely to be present.

Negative Predictive Value (NPV) is the proportion of patients with a negative test result who do not have the disease. It is calculated as the number of true negatives divided by the total number of negative results (true negatives + false negatives). A higher NPV indicates that a negative test result is more likely to be a true negative, and therefore the disease is less likely to be present.

The predictive value of tests depends on the prevalence of the disease in the population being tested, as well as the sensitivity and specificity of the test. A test with high sensitivity and specificity will generally have higher predictive values than a test with low sensitivity and specificity. However, even a highly sensitive and specific test can have low predictive values if the prevalence of the disease is low in the population being tested.

Therapeutic irrigation, also known as lavage, is a medical procedure that involves the introduction of fluids or other agents into a body cavity or natural passageway for therapeutic purposes. This technique is used to cleanse, flush out, or introduce medication into various parts of the body, such as the bladder, lungs, stomach, or colon.

The fluid used in therapeutic irrigation can be sterile saline solution, distilled water, or a medicated solution, depending on the specific purpose of the procedure. The flow and pressure of the fluid are carefully controlled to ensure that it reaches the desired area without causing damage to surrounding tissues.

Therapeutic irrigation is used to treat a variety of medical conditions, including infections, inflammation, obstructions, and toxic exposures. It can also be used as a diagnostic tool to help identify abnormalities or lesions within body cavities.

Overall, therapeutic irrigation is a valuable technique in modern medicine that allows healthcare providers to deliver targeted treatment directly to specific areas of the body, improving patient outcomes and quality of life.

The internal capsule is a critical structure in the brain that consists of a bundle of white matter fibers (nerve tracts) located deep within the cerebral hemispheres. It serves as a major pathway for the transmission of motor, sensory, and cognitive information between different regions of the brain. The internal capsule is divided into several segments, including the anterior limb, genu, posterior limb, and retrolentiform and sublentiform parts.

The fibers within the internal capsule can be categorized into three groups: corticopontine fibers, corticospinal and corticobulbar fibers, and thalamocortical fibers. Corticopontine fibers originate from the cerebral cortex and terminate in the pons. Corticospinal and corticobulbar fibers are responsible for motor functions, with corticospinal fibers controlling movements of the trunk and limbs, while corticobulbar fibers control movements of the face and head. Thalamocortical fibers carry sensory information from the thalamus to the cerebral cortex.

Damage to the internal capsule can result in various neurological deficits, depending on the specific location and extent of the injury. These may include motor impairments, sensory loss, cognitive dysfunction, or a combination of these symptoms.

There are several advantages to choosing to use capsule endoscopy over standard endoscopy. Standard endoscopy can be more ... Capsule endoscopy uses a small vitamin-sized wireless camera to capture images of a patient's digestive tract. The capsule is ... Capsule endoscopy can still not yet replace standard endoscopy for various diseases, as is the case for those with cirrhosis. ... Capsule endoscopy is therefore used to examine parts of the gastrointestinal tract that cannot be seen by standard endoscopy. ...
... is an Israeli electro-optical engineer and the inventor of wireless capsule endoscopy. Initially at RAFAEL ... Retrieved August 25, 2008.[dead link] "Gavriel Iddan: Wireless Capsule Endoscopy". CNN. Retrieved December 10, 2013. v t e (All ... Armament Development Authority working on guided missile technology, Iddan got the idea for an endoscopic capsule while on ...
Capsule endoscopy (CE) allows identification of typical mucosal changes observed in coeliac disease but has a lower sensitivity ... Often-utilised capsule systems were the Watson capsule and the Crosby-Kugler capsule. This method has now been largely replaced ... Redondo-Cerezo E, Sánchez-Capilla AD, De La Torre-Rubio P, De Teresa J (November 2014). "Wireless capsule endoscopy: ... biopsies were obtained using metal capsules attached to a suction device. The capsule was swallowed and allowed to pass into ...
... the International Conference of Capsule Endoscopy's consensus statement for clinical application of the capsule endoscopy Barry ... "International Conference of Capsule Endoscopy Consensus Statement". Archived from the original on October 3, 2008. Retrieved ...
These can include colonoscopy, upper GI endoscopy, capsule endoscopy, endoscopic ultrasound. Since patients with megaduodenum ... In addition, a histological examination such as upper endoscopy, an X-ray of the abdomen, and biopsies can also be performed to ...
Krystallis, C.; Koulaouzidis, A.; Douglas, S.; Plevris, J. N. (2011). "Chromoendoscopy in small bowel capsule endoscopy: Blue ... Brown, SR; Baraza, W; Din, S; Riley, S (2016). "Chromoscopy versus conventional endoscopy for the detection of polyps in the ... Tóth, E.; Sjölund, K.; Thorsson, O.; Thorlacius, H. (2002). "Evaluation of gastric acid secretion at endoscopy with a modified ... Other techniques that can enhance detail of mucosa include confocal microscopy, magnification endoscopy and optical coherence ...
The company's first capsule endoscopy products was named M2A capsule and received it CE marking in May 2001 and in August 2001 ... The accuracy of PillCam ESO capsule endoscopy versus conventional upper endoscopy for the diagnosis of esophageal varices: a ... Given Imaging pioneered the capsule endoscopy technology and has also developed capsule-based pH monitoring. Through Sierra ... SB Video Capsule for the small bowel De Bona M, Bellumat A, Cian E, Valiante F, Moschini A, De Boni M. Capsule endoscopy ...
The company established and developed several companies including: Given Imaging - focusing on capsule endoscopy technologies. ...
Pillcam by Given Imaging, the first Capsule Endoscopy solution to record images of the digestive tract. The capsule is the size ... "20 Years of PillCam Capsule Endoscopy Innovation". mddionline.com. 2021-05-27. Retrieved 2021-06-02. Reuters Staff. "Covidien ... Israel's 'camera in a capsule' approved for esophagus diagnosis Archived 2012-02-21 at archive.today " ...
Capsule endoscopy is where a capsule containing a camera is swallowed in order to examine the tract. Biopsies may also be taken ... Infection can be detected in a number of ways: GI X-rays, endoscopy, blood tests for anti-Helicobacter antibodies, a stool test ... This is known as endoscopy if examining the upper gastrointestinal tract and colonoscopy or sigmoidoscopy if examining the ... Digestive Endoscopy. 27 (1): 67-72. doi:10.1111/den.12309. ISSN 0915-5635. PMID 24861190. S2CID 19069407. Lin, L; Zhang, J ( ...
Turk J Gastroenterol 19:57-63 (2008) Mungan Z, Pınarbaşı B, Akyuz F, Bektas H, Akyuz A. Wireless endoscopy capsule remaining ... 20:874-80 (2008) Akyuz F, Mungan Z. Diagnostic capability of capsule endoscopy in small bowel diseases. Gastroenterology ... mostly in the fields of endoscopy, GI peptides, pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP), irritable bowel ...
Lewis, B. S.; Eisen, G. M.; Friedman, S. (2005). "A Pooled Analysis to Evaluate Results of Capsule Endoscopy Trials". Endoscopy ... the first clinical trial of capsule endoscopy for the small intestine and also the first clinical trial of capsule endoscopy ... Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Clinics of North America; Enteroscopy (1999), and Capsule Endoscopy Simplified (2010). He also holds ... "A Prospective Study of the Diagnostic Accuracy of PillCam ESO Esophageal Capsule Endoscopy Versus Conventional Upper Endoscopy ...
Wireless capsule endoscopy has proven to be the endoscopic investigation of choice for visualization of the entire small bowel ... chip enteroscopy Double-balloon enteroscopy Single-balloon enteroscopy Spiral enteroscopy Wireless endoscopy Capsule endoscopy ... Newer techniques, including single and double-balloon endoscopy have been developed to overcome some of these issues, but are ... Esophagogastroduodenoscopy, also called upper endoscopy, gets as far as the first segment of the small bowel, the duodenum, but ...
HCP: Pill Cam, Capsule Endoscopy, Esophageal Endoscopy Archived June 16, 2008, at the Wayback Machine Scheinfeld NS, Teplitz E ... capsule endoscopy, small-bowel follow-through, and ileoscopy". Radiology. 238 (1): 128-34. doi:10.1148/radiol.2381050296. PMID ... "A meta-analysis of the yield of capsule endoscopy compared to other diagnostic modalities in patients with non-stricturing ... Fix OK, Soto JA, Andrews CW, Farraye FA (December 2004). "Gastroduodenal Crohn's disease". Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. 60 (6): ...
Enteroclysis compares favorably with wireless capsule endoscopy and double-balloon endoscopy in the diagnosis of mucosal ... endoscopy and capsule endoscopy, barium contrast imaging remains in common use because it offers the advantages of greater ... Barium swallow studies are better than endoscopy at demonstrating the anatomic findings in gastroesophageal reflux disease ...
Enteroscopy for enteropathy and jejunal aspirate and culture for bacterial overgrowth Capsule Endoscopy is able to visualise ...
2019), "Assessment of small bowel mucosal healing by video capsule endoscopy predicts short and long-term risk of Crohn's ... "Assessment of small bowel mucosal healing by video capsule endoscopy for the prediction of short-term and long-term risk of ... Endoscopy. 48 (3): 215-222. doi:10.1055/s-0034-1393119. PMID 26427000. S2CID 40568703. Ben-Horin, S.; Yavzori, M.; Benhar, I.; ... Endoscopy 2016. Ben-Horin, S., Yavzori, M., Benhar, I. (2016), "Cross-immunogenicity: Antibodies to infliximab in Remicade- ...
In primary small intestinal EMZL cases, double-balloon enteroscopy and capsule endoscopy reveal the presence of extensive ... Endoscopy, endosonography and chest CT scans reveal a solitary esophageal mass of varying size or, more commonly, a linear ...
... or following endoscopy. In transnasal placement, the capsule is placed 5 cm above the upper border of the LES, and in ... The same applies to OMOM pH monitoring capsule. A reflux episode is defined as esophageal pH drops below four. Esophageal pH ... October 1997). "Can the combination of symptoms and endoscopy confirm the presence of gastroesophageal reflux disease?". Am ... monitoring capsule The duration of the test is 24 hours in the first and second techniques and 48 hours for the Bravo capsule ...
Chromosomal microarray Exome sequencing Else Endoscopic repair of laryngeal cleft in 2.5 kg preemie Video capsule endoscopy for ...
Capsule endoscopy - Tarun Mullick 1986 - Fluoxetine HCl - Eli Lilly and Co 1987 - commercially available Statins - Merck & Co. ...
Electroneuronography Electronystagmography Electrooculography Electroretinography Endoluminal capsule monitoring Endoscopy ...
... and Ikona medical which developed software for enhanced capsule endoscopy review. Hager is currently on leave from Johns ... "Self-supervised learning for dense depth estimation in monocular endoscopy." OR 2.0 Context-Aware Operating Theaters, Computer ... A pilot study of the accuracy of quantitative endoscopy." The Laryngoscope E Plaku, GD Hager. "Sampling-based motion and ... Assisted Robotic Endoscopy, Clinical Image-Based Procedures, and Skin Image Analysis EM Meisner, GD Hager, SL Ishman, D Brown, ...
Canada Capsule Endoscopy, a medical procedure involving swallowing a capsule with remote imaging capabilities World Challenge ...
... as other modern techniques such as capsule endoscopy are not routinely performed as it is seldom available in most centers. ... The need for imaging assessment of small bowel diseases comes from the limits of traditional endoscopy in evaluating ileum ...
... and out-patient surgical and rehabilitative services Joint Replacement Center Palliative Care PillCam Capsule Endoscopy ...
... in Capsule Endoscopy they can be used as a trigger for biopsy action. The late 1980s saw the commercial introduction of Nitinol ...
It is equipped with high-grade, precision and advanced inspection machines: ultrasound endoscope, capsule endoscopy, soft and ...
... many medical applications such as capsule endoscopy and dental x-ray systems, scientific imaging, automotive safety systems, ...
... pancreatoscopy in Kerala First to introduce double balloon enteroscopy in Kerala First to introduce wireless capsule endoscopy ... Later, he specialised in Gastroenterology and had training in ultrasonography and endoscopy at various institutions. In 1996, ... Philip Augustine, an Indian gastroenterologist, specialist in gastrointestinal endoscopy and a hospital administrator from ... India portal medicine portal Gastroenterology Crohn's disease Endoscopy "LS credits". YouTube. Retrieved 22 July 2014. " ...
There are several advantages to choosing to use capsule endoscopy over standard endoscopy. Standard endoscopy can be more ... Capsule endoscopy uses a small vitamin-sized wireless camera to capture images of a patients digestive tract. The capsule is ... Capsule endoscopy can still not yet replace standard endoscopy for various diseases, as is the case for those with cirrhosis. ... Capsule endoscopy is therefore used to examine parts of the gastrointestinal tract that cannot be seen by standard endoscopy. ...
Video capsule endoscopy provides an alternative triage tool for acute GI bleeding that could reduce personnel exposure to SARS- ... Video capsule endoscopy (VCE) offers an alternative triage tool for acute GI bleeding that may reduce personnel exposure to ... Cite this: Video Capsule Endoscopy May Reduce Exposure to COVID - Medscape - Oct 30, 2020. ... Current guidelines recommend early upper endoscopy and/or colonoscopy for evaluation of GI bleeding, but Hakimian noted that ...
Kvasir-Capsule, a video capsule endoscopy dataset. *Mark. Smedsrud, Pia H. ; Thambawita, Vajira ; Hicks, Steven A. ; Gjestang, ... Artificial intelligence (AI) is predicted to have profound effects on the future of video capsule endoscopy (VCE) technology. ... Artificial intelligence (AI) is predicted to have profound effects on the future of video capsule endoscopy (VCE) technology. ... We present Kvasir-Capsule, a large VCE dataset collected from examinations at a Norwegian Hospital. Kvasir-Capsule consists of ...
What is Capsule Endoscopy?. Capsule endoscopy is a wireless technology used to readily explore regions of the small intestine ... Why is Capsule Endoscopy Used?. Capsule endoscopy is particularly useful in identifying abnormalities in the small intestine ... Capsule endoscopy is proven to be a safe, non-invasive, reliable diagnostic test. However, in rare instances, the capsule can ... Capsule endoscopy is also employed to assess the effectiveness of treatments and interventions for conditions affecting the ...
What Is Capsule Endoscopy?. It is a modern and rather safe form of endoscopy which requires the swallowing of a capsule which ... Capsule Endoscopy Arash Sh 2017-04-30T22:15:26-07:00 The traditional endoscopy made use of a long flexible tube with a video ... Capsule endoscopy takes scientists where the traditional endoscopy failed or proved to be limited in its use. ... Capsule endoscopy involves a fasting of 6 to 10 hours prior to the procedure and the usage of laxatives at least 5 days before ...
VCE technology offers greater magnification than traditional endoscopy while also providing excellent resolution. ... Video capsule endoscopy (VCE) is a powerful diagnostic tool that has proven especially useful in imaging the small intestine. ... 7] Future studies are also likely to define the use of capsule endoscopy in children. [7] Capsule endoscopy may also play a ... Capsule endoscopy in patients with suspected Crohns disease and negative endoscopy. Endoscopy. 2003 Jul. 35(7):564-8. [QxMD ...
Wireless capsule endoscopy color video segmentation. In: IEEE Transactions on Medical Imaging. 2008 ; Vol. 27, No. 12. pp. 1769 ... Mackiewicz, M., Berens, J., & Fisher, M. (2008). Wireless capsule endoscopy color video segmentation. IEEE Transactions on ... Mackiewicz, M, Berens, J & Fisher, M 2008, Wireless capsule endoscopy color video segmentation, IEEE Transactions on Medical ... Wireless capsule endoscopy color video segmentation. / Mackiewicz, Michal; Berens, Jeff; Fisher, Mark. ...
Should clinicians use capsule endoscopy or angiography to determine the causes of gastrointestinal bleeding in their patients? ... Objectives: Both capsule endoscopy (CE) and angiography have been recommended as first investigation for patients with acute ... Capsule Endoscopy or Angiography in Patients With Acute Overt Obscure Gastrointestinal Bleeding. A Prospective Randomized Study ... W.K.L. was involved in a multicenter colon capsule endoscopy trial sponsored by Given Imaging. The other authors declare no ...
Better diagnostic accuracy with capsule endoscopy compared to MRI- and CT-enterography in patients with suspected or newly ...
Video Capsule Endoscopy - Explore from the MSD Manuals - Medical Consumer Version. ... Rarely, the capsule becomes stuck in the digestive tract and doctors may need to do endoscopy Endoscopy Endoscopy is an ... Video capsule endoscopy (wireless video endoscopy) is a procedure in which the person swallows a battery-powered capsule. ... Video capsule endoscopy is especially useful for finding hidden bleeding in the digestive tract and problems on the inner ...
Browse for products by category, and find endoscopy devices used for a variety of procedures. ... ENTEROSCOPY AND VIDEO CAPSULE ENDOSCOPY *STERIS once again meets an unmet need on the market and now offers a complete range of ... Endoscopy Suite * ENDOSCOPE REPROCESSING ENDOSCOPY DEVICES AND ACCESSORIES ENDOSCOPY EQUIPMENT SOFTWARE & AUDIOVISUAL ... Endoscopy Devices. Endoscopy procedures are nonsurgical procedures that utilize endoscopy instruments and supplies to examine ...
Endoscopy and wireless capsule endoscopy (WCE). Symptoms such as abdominal pain or anemia/melena require investigation with ... 15] Capsule endoscopy appears to be safe and as sensitive as barium enterography in the detection of significant small ... Contribution of capsule endoscopy to Peutz-Jeghers syndrome management in children. Dig Liver Dis. 2012 Oct. 44 (10):839-43. [ ... Feasibility of video capsule endoscopy in the management of children with Peutz-Jeghers syndrome: a blinded comparison with ...
Metastatic Malignant Melanoma of the Small Intestines Diagnosed by Capsule Endoscopy ... Capsule endoscopy which is non invasive, convenient to the patient and devoid of radiation should form part of their diagnostic ... Metastatic Malignant Melanoma of the Small Intestines Diagnosed by Capsule Endoscopy. Hussain Issa, Abduljaleel M. ... a case of metastatic malignant melanoma to the small intestines diagnosed several years post excision by capsule endoscopy. ...
Adherence to European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy recommendations of endoscopists performing small bowel capsule ... has recently issued a technical review focused on small bowel capsule endoscopy (SBCE).Aim: To compare SBCE current practice in ... has recently issued a technical review focused on small bowel capsule endoscopy (SBCE).Aim: To compare SBCE current practice in ... Background: The European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) ...
Capsule endoscopy. *MRI of the abdomen. *Enteroscopy. *MR enterography. A stool culture may be done to check for other possible ...
Small bowel capsule endoscopy examination and open access database with artificial intelligence: The SEE-artificial ... Artificial intelligence (AI) may be practical for image classification of small bowel capsule endoscopy (CE). However, creating ... Small bowel capsule endoscopy examination and open access database with artificial intelli ...
Capsule Endoscopy. Celiac Disease. Cirrhosis. Colon Cancer. Colon Cancer Screening. Fatty Liver Disease ...
Colon capsule endoscopy (CCE) is a minimally invasive procedure that uses a small camera to examine the colon. It is a good ... Colon Capsule Endoscopy with AI: A Promising Approach for Early Cancer Detection. ... 19Colon Capsule Endoscopy with AI: A Promising Approach for Early Cancer Detection. ... cost cost of care COVID-19 CRC screening diabetes Diet disparity EAO-CRC EAOCRC early onset colorectal cancer endoscopy FIT FIT ...
Welcome to our Advanced GI Endoscopy Center and Gastroenterology. We specialize in diagnosing and treating digestive system ... A capsule endoscopy camera sits inside a vitamin-size capsule that you swallow. As the capsule travels through your digestive ... The capsule endoscopy procedure is complete after eight hours or when you see the camera capsule in the toilet after a bowel ... Capsule Endoscopy (Pill Cam) A procedure that uses a tiny wireless camera to take pictures of your digestive tract. ...
Capsule endoscopy. Another reason to join Geisinger GI Fellowship program? Our people. Youll have an entire team working ...
Capsule endoscopy.. How long does it take to get small intestine biopsy results?. For a typical biopsy, results are often ... An endoscopy and/or biopsy usually takes 30 minutes (half an hour). ...
Capsule Endoscopy. This procedure has revolutionized the diagnosis of small bowel disorders by providing a sensitive (able to ... A vitamin-sized capsule that contains a video camera is swallowed and takes pictures of your small intestine. It captures the ... Push enteroscopy reaches further into the small intestine than the standard upper gastrointestinal endoscopy (also known as ...
We conduct research related to medical imaging applications including video capsule endoscopy, CT, and MRI. We work closely ...
Assessment of Crohns Disease Lesions in Wireless Capsule Endoscopy Images. IEEE Trans Biomed Eng 2012;59:355-62.doi:10.1109/ ... Potential of hybrid adaptive filtering in inflammatory lesion detection from capsule endoscopy images. WJG 2016;22:8641.doi: ... It paves the way for automated analysis of wireless capsule endoscopy images to detect CD lesions via detection of predefined ... machine learning algorithms could assist with the time-consuming assessment of wireless capsule endoscopy data. ...
Diagnostic accuracy of magnetically guided capsule endoscopy with a detachable string for detecting oesophagogastric varices in ...
For instance, smart pills have key applications in diagnostic imaging such as capsule endoscopy. The capsule endoscopy is a ... ingestible capsule that can be easily swallowed and has a wide range of applications in capsule endoscopy, drug delivery, and ... 3) By Application: Capsule Endoscopy, Patient Monitoring, Drug Delivery. 4) By End User: Hospital, Diagnostic Center, Research ... 3) By Application: Capsule Endoscopy, Patient Monitoring, Drug Delivery 4) By End User: Hospital, Diagnostic Center, Research ...
Small-bowel imaging (CT enterography or capsule endoscopy) * Chest CT * Biochemical evaluation if clinically indicated by ... Type I, 1 cm to , 2 cm: Surveillance with repeat endoscopy every 3 years or endoscopic resection ...
A deep enteroscopy may be useful for patients who cannot undergo video capsule endoscopy. ... such as a capsule endoscopy or a computed tomography (CT) scan. ...
  • Current guidelines recommend early upper endoscopy and/or colonoscopy for evaluation of GI bleeding, but Hakimian noted that two out of three initial tests are nondiagnostic, so multiple procedures are often needed to find an answer. (medscape.com)
  • A colonoscopy, on the other hand, is an endoscopy of the colon and rectum, most commonly used to screen for colon cancer and precancerous polyps. (centraljersey.com)
  • But neither upper endoscopy nor colonoscopy can examine the entire small intestine, which makes up the majority of the digestive tract, measuring approximately 20 to 25 feet. (centraljersey.com)
  • It does not replace upper endoscopy or colonoscopy. (gastrodoc1.com)
  • Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) is defined as bleeding of unknown origin that persists or recurs after an initial negative endoscopic evaluation including upper endoscopy and colonoscopy. (medscape.com)
  • For patients with active overt GIB after negative upper endoscopy and colonoscopy, most current guidelines recommended CE to be the investigation of choice. (medscape.com)
  • This part of the bowel cannot be reached by traditional upper endoscopy or by colonoscopy. (kevinmarksmd.com)
  • VCE technology offers greater magnification than traditional endoscopy while also providing excellent resolution. (medscape.com)
  • Much of the small bowel is not accessible with traditional endoscopy or even push endoscopy (which allows imaging up to 80-120 cm beyond the ligament of Treitz) but can be visualized with the capsule endoscope (see the image below). (medscape.com)
  • The traditional endoscopy made use of a long flexible tube with a video camera at either end. (sleeveamerica.com)
  • Capsule endoscopy takes scientists where the traditional endoscopy failed or proved to be limited in its use. (sleeveamerica.com)
  • Other than small bowel, the capsule had been used in clinical study of the oesophagus, without clinical benefit over traditional endoscopy. (healthcare-in-europe.com)
  • A traditional endoscopy is an invasive procedure for patients, not to mention it is costly due to the need for anesthesia and time off work," said Andrew Meltzer, a professor of Emergency Medicine at the GW School of Medicine & Health Sciences. (healthquill.com)
  • Professor Meltzer got interested in the magnetically controlled capsule endoscopy after seeing patients in the emergency room with stomach pain or suspected upper GI bleeding who faced barriers to getting a traditional endoscopy as an outpatient. (healthquill.com)
  • For patients who come to the emergency room or a doctor's office with severe stomach pain, the ability to swallow a capsule and get a diagnosis on the spot - without a second appointment for a traditional endoscopy - is a real plus, not to mention potentially life-saving, Prof Meltzer said. (healthquill.com)
  • Capsule endoscopy is a medical procedure used to record internal images of the gastrointestinal tract for use in disease diagnosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • General advantages of capsule endoscopy over standard endoscopy include the minimally invasive procedure setup, ability to visualize more of the gastrointestinal tract, and lower cost of the procedure. (wikipedia.org)
  • Endoscopy is a safe and effective procedure that uses a thin flexible tube with a tiny camera and light at its tip to examine the inside of a person's body. (centraljersey.com)
  • To prepare for a capsule endoscopy, patients will likely be instructed not to eat or drink for approximately 12 hours prior to the procedure to ensure the bowels are clear. (centraljersey.com)
  • The camera capsule is disposable and passes painlessly and naturally during a bowel movement, typically within 24 to 48 after the procedure. (centraljersey.com)
  • I am aware that I should avoid MRI machines during the procedure and until the capsule passes following the exam. (gastrodoc1.com)
  • It is also possible that due to interference, some images may be lost and this may result in the need to repeat the capsule procedure. (gastrodoc1.com)
  • If the capsule has not been excreted, it may be necessary to retrieve it either by a specialised endoscopy or a surgical procedure. (loganendoscopy.com.au)
  • The capsule endoscopy is famous because it is a very safe procedure. (sleeveamerica.com)
  • Capsule endoscopy involves a fasting of 6 to 10 hours prior to the procedure and the usage of laxatives at least 5 days before the procedure is carried out to empty the stomach. (sleeveamerica.com)
  • Capsule endoscopy is a procedure with a camera that sits inside a vitamin-sized capsule. (fdhs.com)
  • Why is the capsule endoscopy procedure used? (fdhs.com)
  • Video capsule endoscopy (wireless video endoscopy) is a procedure in which the person swallows a battery-powered capsule. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Despite the benefits of traditional endoscopies, studies suggest some patients have trouble accessing the procedure. (healthquill.com)
  • On the day of the procedure, our caring team meets with you and your child in our Endoscopy Suites . (rchsd.org)
  • After a patient swallows the capsule, it passes along the gastrointestinal tract, taking a number of images per second which are transmitted wirelessly to an array of receivers connected to a portable recording device carried by the patient. (wikipedia.org)
  • It uses a small capsule-encased camera, which is swallowed and passed through the gastrointestinal (GI) tract without the requirement of anesthesia. (imarcgroup.com)
  • As a result, capsule endoscopy is widely adopted for the diagnosis and treatment of chronic abdominal pain, gastrointestinal cancer, Crohn's disease, celiac disease, excessive bleeding, and ulcers. (imarcgroup.com)
  • The capsule takes pictures as it moves through your gastrointestinal tract. (loganendoscopy.com.au)
  • Both capsule endoscopy (CE) and angiography have been recommended as first investigation for patients with acute overt obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB). (medscape.com)
  • This information was developed by the Publications Committee of the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE). (kevinmarksmd.com)
  • Capsule Endoscopy lets your doctor examine the lining of the middle part of your gastrointestinal tract, which includes the three portions of the small intestine (duodenum, jejunum and ileum). (kevinmarksmd.com)
  • Through collaboration with clinicians and new product development, STERIS is proud to offer a broad portfolio of therapeutic devices and infection prevention products for gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy procedures. (steris.com)
  • Background: The European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) has recently issued a technical review focused on small bowel capsule endoscopy (SBCE).Aim: To compare SBCE current practice in Italy to ESGE technical recommendations.Material and methods: A dedicated per-centre semi-quantitative questionnaire was prepared by a group of SBCE experts. (units.it)
  • Unlike the more widely used endoscope, capsule endoscopy provides the ability to see the middle portion of the small intestine. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 2001 the FDA (Food and Drug Administration) approved the first capsule endoscope developed by Given Imaging for use in patients. (wikipedia.org)
  • Newer models of the capsule endoscope have looked to add camera systems on both ends of the pill or even store images within the pill itself to minimize the amount of medical equipment one must carry with them while using the device. (wikipedia.org)
  • [ 8 ] In 2001, VCE was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in patients in the United States, and by 2003, the capsule endoscope had already been used in more than 4000 patients. (medscape.com)
  • Video capsule endoscopy is especially useful for finding hidden bleeding in the digestive tract and problems on the inner surface of the small intestine, which is an area that is difficult to evaluate with an endoscope. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Endoscopy Endoscopy is an examination of internal structures using a flexible viewing tube (endoscope). (msdmanuals.com)
  • The pill-sized capsule endoscope is swallowed and passes naturally through your digestive tract while transmitting video images to a data recorder worn on your belt for approximately eight hours. (kevinmarksmd.com)
  • The capsule endoscope is about the size of a large pill. (kevinmarksmd.com)
  • With infection control as a top priority in any GI endoscopy unit, our extensive endoscope care and endoscope accessories offer an array of solutions to address these concerns. (steris.com)
  • If larger studies can prove this method is sufficiently sensitive to detect high-risk lesions, magnetically controlled capsules could be used as a quick and easy way to screen for health problems in the upper GI tract such as ulcers or stomach cancer. (healthquill.com)
  • According to Neil Sengupta, MD , of the University of Chicago, "a VCE-first strategy in GI bleeding may be a useful triage tool in the COVID-19 era to determine which patients truly benefit from invasive endoscopy," although he also noted that "further data are needed to determine the efficacy and safety of this approach. (medscape.com)
  • Capsule endoscopy is particularly useful in identifying abnormalities in the small intestine that are otherwise unable to be detected without invasive testing. (centraljersey.com)
  • Capsule endoscopy is proven to be a safe, non-invasive, reliable diagnostic test. (centraljersey.com)
  • Capsule Endoscopy is a non invasive test, which does not require any sedation For capsule endoscopy, patient swallows a small capsule, capsule has inbuilt camera, which captures and send the images of small intestine to external data recorder, which are later studied for the evaluation of small intestine. (drvikassingla.com)
  • Capsule endoscopy which is non invasive, convenient to the patient and devoid of radiation should form part of their diagnostic investigation. (gastrores.org)
  • The patient swallows the capsule, and as the capsule descends through the digestive tract, pictures are taken and recorded on a sensor device that the patient wears on their abdomen for approximately eight to 12 hours. (centraljersey.com)
  • Once the patient swallows the capsule, they can go about their day and carry out their normal activities, though they are advised not to exercise during the test period and to eat and drink lightly. (centraljersey.com)
  • A combined approach based on wireless capsule endoscopy, magnetic resonance enterography and device-assisted enteroscopy is effective in reduction of the polyp burden and thus decreasing the risk of bleeding and intussusception. (nih.gov)
  • An upper endoscopy examines the upper part of the (GI) tract, including the esophagus, stomach and beginning part of the small intestine. (centraljersey.com)
  • Consecutive patients presented with acute melena or hematochezia, but nondiagnostic upper and lower endoscopy, were immediately randomized to receive small-bowel CE or angiography. (medscape.com)
  • This upper endoscopy image shows multiple gastric polyps. (medscape.com)
  • More than 7 million traditional endoscopies of the stomach and the upper part of the intestine are performed every year in the United States. (healthquill.com)
  • Video capsule endoscopy (VCE) is a powerful diagnostic tool that has proven especially useful in imaging the small intestine. (medscape.com)
  • We could not do an endoscopy in the ER and many patients faced unacceptable barriers to getting an outpatient endoscopy, a crucial diagnostic tool to preventing life-threatening hemorrhage," Prof Meltzer said. (healthquill.com)
  • Diagnostic visualization of the small bowel or esophagus using a swallowable capsule with a built-in camera. (rchsd.org)
  • Capsule endoscopy may detect superficial lesions that barium studies miss. (medscape.com)
  • The external magnet allows the capsule to be painlessly driven to visualize all anatomic areas of the stomach and record video and photograph any possible bleeding, inflammatory or malignant lesions. (healthquill.com)
  • The development of endoscopy enabled direct visualization of the esophagus, stomach, proximal small bowel, and colon. (medscape.com)
  • The availability of small-bowel capsule endoscopy (CE), which enables direct and complete visualization of small-bowel mucosa, has revolutionized the approach to OGIB. (medscape.com)
  • So, when it comes to diagnosing and treating diseases of the digestive tract, board certified gastroenterologists at the Center for Digestive Health at Penn Medicine Princeton Medical Center (PMC) rely on advanced endoscopic tools and techniques - including capsule endoscopy - that can see hard-to-reach areas. (centraljersey.com)
  • The following endoscopy products include clinically superior polypectomy snares, hemostatic clips, tissue acquisition endoscopy devices and trusted endoscopic tools for retrieval. (steris.com)
  • As the capsule passes down the gastric tract, the camera takes multiple pictures which are then transmitted to the transmitter the patient wears on the waist. (sleeveamerica.com)
  • In 2000, the Israeli firm Given Imaging introduced Video Capsule Endoscopy (VCE), a new technology initially devoted to small bowel examination. (healthcare-in-europe.com)
  • Stomach examination is still not possible because VCE movements are linked to the digestive motility and we do not have a manoeuvrable capsule yet. (healthcare-in-europe.com)
  • In summary, capsule examination is a very potentially useful tool. (healthcare-in-europe.com)
  • Capsule endoscopy allows for examination of the small intestine, which cannot be easily reached by traditional methods of endoscopy. (kevinmarksmd.com)
  • After ingesting the capsule and until it is excreted, you should not be near an MRI device or schedule an MRI examination. (kevinmarksmd.com)
  • Small bowel capsule endoscopy examination and open access database with artificial intelligence: The SEE-artificial intelligence project. (bvsalud.org)
  • Capsule endoscopy is used to obtain images of the stomach, esophagus, and small intestines. (imarcgroup.com)
  • Capsule endoscopy uses a small vitamin-sized wireless camera to capture images of a patient's digestive tract. (wikipedia.org)
  • Standard endoscopy can be more uncomfortable for a patient, can be more prone to puncturing the digestive tract walls, and is not able to access the middle portion of the small intestine. (wikipedia.org)
  • The capsule is swallowed and travels through your digestive tract, taking pictures that are transmitted to a recorder. (fdhs.com)
  • You will not feel the capsule as it moves through your digestive tract. (fdhs.com)
  • Endoscopy procedures are nonsurgical procedures that utilize endoscopy instruments and supplies to examine the interior of a patient's digestive tract. (steris.com)
  • Travel trough the digestive system - follow the capsule camera from the mouth to the rectum. (lu.se)
  • [ 17 ] In this study, capsule endoscopy was found to be more sensitive, in that enteroscopy detected no cases that capsule endoscopy had missed. (medscape.com)
  • Endoscopists and staff are at high risk of exposure to coronavirus through aerosols, as well as unintended, unrecognized splashes that are well known to occur frequently during routine endoscopy," Hakimian said during a virtual presentation at the annual meeting of the American College of Gastroenterology. (medscape.com)
  • Erik A. Holzwanger, MD , a gastroenterology fellow at Tufts Medical Center in Boston, suggested that these findings may "serve as a foundation" for similar studies, "as it appears COVID-19 will be an ongoing obstacle in endoscopy for the foreseeable future. (medscape.com)
  • However, in rare instances, the capsule can become lodged inside the body, which may require surgery to have it removed. (centraljersey.com)
  • As the current capsule cannot be guided, it needs technical improvements but, in the future, it could take over some endoscopic diagnosis examinations. (healthcare-in-europe.com)
  • If capsule endoscopy leads to a diagnosis, your gastroenterologist will discuss the treatment options. (fdhs.com)
  • medical citation needed] Capsule endoscopy was first conceptualized by Israeli engineer Gavrial Iddan and Israeli gastroenterologist Eitan Scapa in Boston, MA in the early 1980s. (wikipedia.org)
  • You will then be asked to swallow the capsule. (loganendoscopy.com.au)
  • You can go home after you swallow the capsule and perform most of your daily activities. (fdhs.com)
  • Capsule endoscopy is a wireless technology used to readily explore regions of the small intestine that cannot easily be seen by other types of GI endoscopy procedures. (centraljersey.com)
  • Capsule endoscopy is also employed to assess the effectiveness of treatments and interventions for conditions affecting the small intestine. (centraljersey.com)
  • Capsule endoscopy is a wireless endoscopic exam of the small intestine. (gastrodoc1.com)
  • I understand that due to variations in a patient's intestinal motility, the capsule may only image part of the small intestine. (gastrodoc1.com)
  • Capsule endoscopy is a method of examining the small intestine by using a tiny video recording device inside a plastic capsule, which is swallowed. (loganendoscopy.com.au)
  • Clinical studies have confirmed that capsule endoscopy is effective for observing the small intestine. (loganendoscopy.com.au)
  • it may also provide functional information as the capsule moves passively through the small intestine. (medscape.com)
  • From the medical point of view, the capsule endoscopy allows the doctors to see the whole of the small intestine something which was not possible with traditional endoscopic techniques. (sleeveamerica.com)
  • Be sure your doctor knows if you have a pacemaker, swallowing disorder, or stricture of the small bowel, as these may be relative contraindications to routine capsule testing. (fdhs.com)
  • Capsule should not be used, if there is suspicion of stricture in small intestine Moreover, tissue cannot be obtained from diseased areas and endotherapy cannot be done. (drvikassingla.com)
  • The capsule contains one or two small cameras, a light, and a transmitter. (msdmanuals.com)
  • This paper describes the use of color image analysis to automatically discriminate between oesophagus, stomach, small intestine, and colon tissue in wireless capsule endoscopy (WCE). (uea.ac.uk)
  • Capsule endoscopy helps your doctor evaluate the small intestine. (kevinmarksmd.com)
  • The most common reason for doing capsule endoscopy is to search for a cause of bleeding from the small intestine. (kevinmarksmd.com)
  • We present a case of metastatic malignant melanoma to the small intestines diagnosed several years post excision by capsule endoscopy. (gastrores.org)
  • Artificial intelligence (AI) may be practical for image classification of small bowel capsule endoscopy (CE). (bvsalud.org)
  • You will be able to drink clear liquids after two hours and eat a light meal after four hours following the capsule ingestion, unless your doctor instructs you otherwise. (kevinmarksmd.com)
  • I would have patients who came to the ER with concerns for a bleeding ulcer and, even if they were clinically stable, I would have no way to evaluate them without admitting them to the hospital for an endoscopy. (healthquill.com)
  • The capsule has a camera fitted inside it which helps take pictures of the track it passes through. (sleeveamerica.com)
  • June 2, 2023: In a first, researchers at George Washington University have used an external magnet to remotely control ingestible video capsules in three dimensions to perform endoscopy. (healthquill.com)
  • With the new capsules, physicians can remotely drive a miniature video capsule to all regions of the stomach to visualize and photograph potential problem areas. (healthquill.com)
  • The technology uses an external magnet and handheld video game-style joysticks to move the capsule in three dimensions in the stomach. (healthquill.com)
  • Magnetic resonance imaging showed mucosal thickening and opacification of the patient's left sinuses ( Figure 1 , panel A). Nasal endoscopy revealed a black eschar on the middle turbinate, which our clinical colleagues interpreted as highly characteristic of mucormycosis, and we performed surgical debridement. (cdc.gov)
  • Normal daily activities are largely unaffected by capsule endoscopy, unlike many endoscopic procedures that require sedation. (kevinmarksmd.com)
  • With the help of a PDA that sits in a belt and some electrodes attached to the body, sensors capture images that the capsule camera takes during its journey through the intestines. (lu.se)
  • Current ingestible video capsules endoscopes cannot be controlled by physicians and they moved passively, driven by gravity and the natural movement of the body. (healthquill.com)
  • During an endoscopy, doctors insert endoscopes, a thin tube with a light and tiny camera, into a person's body to see an inner organ in detail. (healthquill.com)
  • Currently, within the United States, capsule endoscopy can not be used as a primary imaging method over standard endoscopy first. (wikipedia.org)
  • The capsule can be used to take images from any point of the track which allows it to be useful in taking images from the oesophagus down to the colon. (sleeveamerica.com)
  • At the end of the process, the capsule is passed naturally and painlessly during a bowel movement. (centraljersey.com)
  • The camera capsule endoscopy does not evaluate the colon (large intestine). (fdhs.com)
  • Video capsule endoscopy (VCE) offers an alternative triage tool for acute GI bleeding that may reduce personnel exposure to SARS-CoV-2, based on a cohort study with historical controls. (medscape.com)
  • Artificial intelligence (AI) is predicted to have profound effects on the future of video capsule endoscopy (VCE) technology. (lu.se)
  • citation needed] As a result, many patients must first undergo standard endoscopy to then be referred for capsule endoscopy. (wikipedia.org)
  • Capsule endoscopy has been favorably compared with push endoscopy in patients with obscure GI bleeding. (medscape.com)
  • Normal results on capsule endoscopy are reassuring: 95.5% of patients with negative study results have no pathology on follow-up evaluation. (medscape.com)
  • Capsule is passed out later in the stool, and it is not required to retrieve the capsule. (drvikassingla.com)
  • People usually pass the capsule in their stool after about 12 hours, and some people do not notice it. (msdmanuals.com)
  • A webinar covering patient selection for capsule endoscopy and guideline recommendations. (medtronic.com)
  • Our single-use endoscopy products promote patient safety and support infection control guidelines. (steris.com)
  • Capsule endoscopy is when a patient is allowed to swallow a camera, which is only slightly larger than a pill. (lu.se)
  • As research into capsule endoscopy has increased and technology has advanced better wireless and more energy-efficient systems have allowed for the creation of more compact capsules and image processing systems, with many in development today. (wikipedia.org)
  • On the basis of the accessory, the market has been bifurcated into wireless capsule, and workstation and recorder. (imarcgroup.com)
  • In Wireless Capsule Endoscopy (WCE), image compression can be used to reduce the necessary bandwidth and power consumption for the wireless transmission, allowing for a longer battery life for a given image resolution and frame rate. (sdu.dk)
  • In this paper an FPGA implementation of the JPEG-LS compression algorithm is developed for use in Wireless Capsule Endoscopy with the aim of investigating the hardware resource utilization and power consumption. (sdu.dk)
  • The capsule is generally composed of a camera, antenna, and light array. (wikipedia.org)
  • For systems that utilize the setup with the camera system at the end of the capsule, the field of view ranges from 140 to 170 degrees. (wikipedia.org)
  • The capsule, no larger than a vitamin pill, contains a tiny camera, light, battery and radio transmitter that is encased in a tiny plastic shell. (centraljersey.com)