A gram-negative gliding bacterium isolated from the oral cavity. It is a pathogen often causing PERIODONTITIS.
A family of gram-negative, gliding bacteria in the order Cytophagales, class Cytophagia. They are found in SOIL and SEA WATER.
Infections caused by bacteria that show up as pink (negative) when treated by the gram-staining method.
"Bites and stings refer to tissue damage or toxic reactions caused by the teeth, mouthparts, or venomous secretions of animals such as insects, spiders, snakes, and mammals during predatory or defensive attacks."
The oval-shaped oral cavity located at the apex of the digestive tract and consisting of two parts: the vestibule and the oral cavity proper.
A genus of gram-negative, anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria. Its organisms are normal inhabitants of the oral, respiratory, intestinal, and urogenital cavities of humans, animals, and insects. Some species may be pathogenic.
A film that attaches to teeth, often causing DENTAL CARIES and GINGIVITIS. It is composed of MUCINS, secreted from salivary glands, and microorganisms.
A genus of PASTEURELLACEAE described as gram-negative, nonsporeforming, nonmotile, facultative anaerobes. Most members are found both as pathogens and commensal organisms in the respiratory, alimentary, and genital tracts of animals.
Pathological processes involving the PERIODONTIUM including the gum (GINGIVA), the alveolar bone (ALVEOLAR PROCESS), the DENTAL CEMENTUM, and the PERIODONTAL LIGAMENT.
Inflammation and loss of connective tissues supporting or surrounding the teeth. This may involve any part of the PERIODONTIUM. Periodontitis is currently classified by disease progression (CHRONIC PERIODONTITIS; AGGRESSIVE PERIODONTITIS) instead of age of onset. (From 1999 International Workshop for a Classification of Periodontal Diseases and Conditions, American Academy of Periodontology)
A serine protease found in the azurophil granules of NEUTROPHILS. It has an enzyme specificity similar to that of chymotrypsin C.
Organic esters or salts of sulfonic acid derivatives containing an aliphatic hydrocarbon radical.
A genus of gram-negative gliding bacteria found in SOIL; HUMUS; and FRESHWATER and marine habitats.
Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)
Bites inflicted by humans.

Fulminant infection by uncommon organisms in animal bite wounds. (1/125)

In 1995 and 1996, 215 patients exposed to different species of animals were treated at the Amarnath Polyclinic, Balasore, in India. Among them were two children infected by uncommon organisms, i.e., Capnocytophaga canimorsus and Pasteurella multocida; the patients recovered with appropriate antibiotic therapy.  (+info)

Coenonia anatina gen. nov., sp. nov., a novel bacterium associated with respiratory disease in ducks and geese. (2/125)

Taxon 1502 was originally described as a Riemerella anatipestifer-like bacterium causing exudative septicaemia in ducks and geese. In the present study, an integrated genotypic and phenotypic approach was used to elucidate the phylogenetic affiliation and taxonomic relationships of 12 strains of taxon 1502. Whole-cell protein and fatty acid analyses and an extensive biochemical examination by using conventional tests and several API microtest systems indicated that all isolates formed a homogeneous taxon, which was confirmed by DNA-DNA hybridizations. 16S rDNA sequence analysis of a representative strain (LMG 14382T) indicated that this taxon belongs to the Cytophaga-Flavobacterium-Bacteroides phylum and revealed a moderate but distinct relationship to species of the genus Capnocytophaga (overall 16S rDNA sequence identities were 88.8-90.2%). Taxon 1502 is concluded to represent a single species that should be allocated to a novel genus, and the name Coenonia anatina gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The DNA G + C content of representative strains was 35-36 mol% and the type strain is LMG 14382T.  (+info)

Capnocytophaga ochracea: characterization of a plasmid-encoded extended-spectrum TEM-17 beta-lactamase in the phylum Flavobacter-bacteroides. (3/125)

A plasmid-encoded extended-spectrum TEM beta-lactamase with a pI of 5.5 was detected in a Capnocytophaga ochracea clinical isolate. The bla gene was associated with a strong TEM-2 promoter and was derived from bla(TEM-1a) with a single-amino-acid substitution: Glu(104)-->Lys, previously assigned to TEM-17, which is thus the first TEM beta-lactamase to be reported in the phylum Flavobacter-Bacteroides.  (+info)

In vitro susceptibilities of Capnocytophaga isolates to beta-lactam antibiotics and beta-lactamase inhibitors. (4/125)

The susceptibilities of 43 pharyngeal isolates of Capnocytophaga to beta-lactam antibiotics, alone or in combination with beta-lactamase inhibitors, were tested by an agar dilution method. The 34 beta-lactamase-positive strains were highly resistant to beta-lactams, but the intrinsic activities of clavulanate, tazobactam, and sulbactam against Capnocytophaga, even beta-lactamase producers, indicates that these beta-lactamase inhibitors could be used for empirical treatment of neutropenic patients with oral sources of infection.  (+info)

Capnocytophaga cynodegmi cellulitis, bacteremia, and pneumonitis in a diabetic man. (5/125)

Capnocytophaga cynodegmi (formerly "DF-2 like organism"), a commensal organism of the canine oral cavity, is a capnophilic, gram-negative, facultative bacillus. C. cynodegmi has rarely been encountered in human diseases. We report the first known case of cellulitis, bacteremia, and pneumonitis caused by C. cynodegmi in a diabetic man from central India following a dog bite.  (+info)

C-telopeptide pyridinoline cross-links (ICTP) and periodontal pathogens associated with endosseous oral implants. (6/125)

Detection of periodontal or peri-implant sites exhibiting progressing disease or those at risk of deterioration has proven difficult. Pyridinoline cross-linked carboxyterminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP), a marker specific for bone degradation found in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF), has been associated with both bone and attachment loss in periodontitis and may be useful for predicting disease activity. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to examine the relationship between ICTP levels and subgingival species around implants and teeth from 20 partially and 2 fully edentulous patients. GCF and plaque samples were collected from the mesiobuccal site of each implant and tooth. Radioimmunoassay techniques were utilized to determine GCF ICTP levels. Plaque samples were analyzed utilizing checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization. Traditional clinical parameters were assessed. Seventy-one implants and 370 teeth from 22 subjects were examined. ICTP levels and subgingival plaque composition were not significantly different between implants and teeth. Implant sites colonized by Prevotella intermedia, Capnocytophaga gingivalis, Fusobacterium nucleatum ss vincentii, and Streptococcus gordonii exhibited odds ratios of 12.4, 9.3, 8.1, and 6.7, respectively of detecting ICTP. These results suggest a relationship between elevated ICTP levels at implant sites and some species associated with disease progression. Longitudinal studies are necessary to determine whether elevated ICTP levels may predict the development of peri-implant bone loss.  (+info)

Bacteremia caused by Capnocytophaga species in patients with neutropenia and cancer: results of a multicenter study. (7/125)

We investigated 28 cases of bacteremia caused by Capnocytophaga species that occurred during an 8-year period, most of which were in patients with hematologic malignancy and neutropenia. Infections were uncomplicated, without serious organ involvement and without any apparent source except ulcerations of the oropharyngeal mucosa, and only 1 isolate showed resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics; 9 of 16 isolates were resistant to ciprofloxacin.  (+info)

Lipopolysaccharides from periodontopathic bacteria Porphyromonas gingivalis and Capnocytophaga ochracea are antagonists for human toll-like receptor 4. (8/125)

Toll-like receptors (TLRs) 2 and 4 have recently been identified as possible signal transducers for various bacterial ligands. To investigate the roles of TLRs in the recognition of periodontopathic bacteria by the innate immune system, a Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB)-dependent reporter cell line, 7.7, which is defective in both TLR2- and TLR4-dependent signaling pathways was transfected with human CD14 and TLRs. When the transfectants were exposed to freeze-dried periodontopathic bacteria, Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Capnocytophaga ochracea, and Fusobacterium nucleatum, and a non-oral bacterium, Escherichia coli, all species of the bacteria induced NF-kappaB-dependent CD25 expression in 7.7/huTLR2 cells. Although freeze-dried A. actinomycetemcomitans, F. nucleatum, and E. coli also induced CD25 expression in 7.7/huTLR4 cells, freeze-dried P. gingivalis did not. Similarly, lipopolysaccharides (LPS) extracted from A. actinomycetemcomitans, F. nucleatum, and E. coli induced CD25 expression in 7.7/huTLR4 cells, but LPS from P. gingivalis and C. ochracea did not. Furthermore, LPS from P. gingivalis and C. ochracea attenuated CD25 expression in 7.7/huTLR4 cells induced by repurified LPS from E. coli. LPS from P. gingivalis and C. ochracea also inhibited the secretion of interleukin-6 (IL-6) from U373 cells, the secretion of IL-1beta from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and ICAM-1 expression in human gingival fibroblasts induced by repurified LPS from E. coli. These findings indicated that LPS from P. gingivalis and C. ochracea worked as antagonists for human TLR4. The antagonistic activity of LPS from these periodontopathic bacteria may be associated with the etiology of periodontal diseases.  (+info)

Capnocytophaga is a genus of gram-negative, rod-shaped bacteria that are part of the normal oral flora of humans and some animals. These bacteria are facultative anaerobes, meaning they can grow in both the presence and absence of oxygen. They are known to cause various types of infections, including bloodstream infections, meningitis, and soft tissue infections, particularly in individuals with weakened immune systems. The infection can be acquired through animal bites or scratches, or through close contact with saliva from infected animals. In humans, Capnocytophaga can also be part of the normal oral flora, but it rarely causes disease.

It is important to note that while Capnocytophaga can cause serious infections, they are relatively rare and proper hygiene and handling of pets can help reduce the risk of infection. If you have a weakened immune system or if you develop symptoms such as fever, chills, or severe illness after being bitten or scratched by an animal, it is important to seek medical attention promptly.

Cytophagaceae is a family of bacteria within the phylum Bacteroidetes. These bacteria are characterized by their ability to degrade complex organic matter, including proteins, polysaccharides, and lipids. They are commonly found in aquatic environments, such as soil, freshwater, and marine systems, as well as in association with animals and plants.

Members of Cytophagaceae are typically gram-negative, non-spore forming, rod-shaped bacteria that may be straight or slightly curved. They often have a polar flagellum for motility and may form filamentous or aggregated growth forms. Some species within this family can also produce extracellular enzymes that help them break down complex organic matter into simpler compounds that can be taken up and used for energy and growth.

Cytophagaceae is a diverse family of bacteria, with many different genera and species that have been identified based on their genetic and biochemical characteristics. Some notable members of this family include Cytophaga, Flavobacterium, and Flexibacter, which are commonly found in aquatic environments and play important roles in the breakdown of organic matter and nutrient cycling. Other genera within Cytophagaceae, such as Capnocytophaga and Sphingobacterium, have been identified as opportunistic pathogens that can cause infections in humans and animals under certain circumstances.

Gram-negative bacterial infections refer to illnesses or diseases caused by Gram-negative bacteria, which are a group of bacteria that do not retain crystal violet dye during the Gram staining procedure used in microbiology. This characteristic is due to the structure of their cell walls, which contain a thin layer of peptidoglycan and an outer membrane composed of lipopolysaccharides (LPS), proteins, and phospholipids.

The LPS component of the outer membrane is responsible for the endotoxic properties of Gram-negative bacteria, which can lead to severe inflammatory responses in the host. Common Gram-negative bacterial pathogens include Escherichia coli (E. coli), Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Proteus mirabilis, among others.

Gram-negative bacterial infections can cause a wide range of clinical syndromes, such as pneumonia, urinary tract infections, bloodstream infections, meningitis, and soft tissue infections. The severity of these infections can vary from mild to life-threatening, depending on the patient's immune status, the site of infection, and the virulence of the bacterial strain.

Effective antibiotic therapy is crucial for treating Gram-negative bacterial infections, but the increasing prevalence of multidrug-resistant strains has become a significant global health concern. Therefore, accurate diagnosis and appropriate antimicrobial stewardship are essential to ensure optimal patient outcomes and prevent further spread of resistance.

"Bites and stings" is a general term used to describe injuries resulting from the teeth or venomous secretions of animals. These can include:

1. Insect bites: The bite marks are usually small, punctate, and may be accompanied by symptoms such as redness, swelling, itching, and pain. Examples include mosquito, flea, bedbug, and tick bites.

2. Spider bites: Some spiders possess venomous fangs that can cause localized pain, redness, and swelling. In severe cases, systemic symptoms like muscle cramps, nausea, vomiting, and difficulty breathing may occur. The black widow and brown recluse spiders are notorious for their venomous bites.

3. Snake bites: Venomous snakes deliver toxic saliva through their fangs, which can lead to local tissue damage, swelling, pain, and potentially life-threatening systemic effects such as paralysis, bleeding disorders, and respiratory failure.

4. Mammal bites: Animal bites from mammals like dogs, cats, and wild animals can cause puncture wounds, lacerations, and crush injuries. They may also transmit infectious diseases, such as rabies.

5. Marine animal stings: Stings from jellyfish, sea urchins, stingrays, and other marine creatures can result in localized pain, redness, swelling, and systemic symptoms like difficulty breathing, muscle cramps, and altered heart rhythms. Some marine animals' venoms can cause severe allergic reactions or even death.

Treatment for bites and stings varies depending on the type and severity of the injury. It may include wound care, pain management, antibiotics to prevent infection, and in some cases, antivenom therapy to counteract the effects of venom. Seeking immediate medical attention is crucial in severe cases or when systemic symptoms are present.

In medical terms, the mouth is officially referred to as the oral cavity. It is the first part of the digestive tract and includes several structures: the lips, vestibule (the space enclosed by the lips and teeth), teeth, gingiva (gums), hard and soft palate, tongue, floor of the mouth, and salivary glands. The mouth is responsible for several functions including speaking, swallowing, breathing, and eating, as it is the initial point of ingestion where food is broken down through mechanical and chemical processes, beginning the digestive process.

Bacteroides are a genus of gram-negative, anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that are normally present in the human gastrointestinal tract. They are part of the normal gut microbiota and play an important role in breaking down complex carbohydrates and other substances in the gut. However, some species of Bacteroides can cause opportunistic infections, particularly in individuals with weakened immune systems or when they spread to other parts of the body. They are resistant to many commonly used antibiotics, making infections caused by these bacteria difficult to treat.

Dental plaque is a biofilm or mass of bacteria that accumulates on the surface of the teeth, restorative materials, and prosthetic devices such as dentures. It is initiated when bacterial colonizers attach to the smooth surfaces of teeth through van der Waals forces and specific molecular adhesion mechanisms.

The microorganisms within the dental plaque produce extracellular polysaccharides that help to stabilize and strengthen the biofilm, making it resistant to removal by simple brushing or rinsing. Over time, if not regularly removed through oral hygiene practices such as brushing and flossing, dental plaque can mineralize and harden into tartar or calculus.

The bacteria in dental plaque can cause tooth decay (dental caries) by metabolizing sugars and producing acid that demineralizes the tooth enamel. Additionally, certain types of bacteria in dental plaque can cause periodontal disease, an inflammation of the gums that can lead to tissue damage and bone loss around the teeth. Regular professional dental cleanings and good oral hygiene practices are essential for preventing the buildup of dental plaque and maintaining good oral health.

According to the Merriam-Webster Medical Dictionary, 'actinobacillus' is defined as:

"A genus of gram-negative, nonmotile, facultatively anaerobic rods (family Pasteurellaceae) that are parasites or commensals in animals and occasionally cause disease in humans. Some species produce a polysaccharide capsule."

In simpler terms, Actinobacillus is a type of bacteria that can be found in animals, including sometimes as normal flora in their mouths and throats. These bacteria can sometimes infect humans, usually through close contact with animals or through the consumption of contaminated food or water. Some species of Actinobacillus can produce a polysaccharide capsule, which can make them more resistant to the body's immune defenses and more difficult to treat with antibiotics.

It is worth noting that while some species of Actinobacillus can cause disease in humans, they are generally not considered major human pathogens. However, they can cause a variety of clinical syndromes, including respiratory tract infections, wound infections, and bacteremia (bloodstream infections). Treatment typically involves the use of antibiotics that are active against gram-negative bacteria, such as amoxicillin/clavulanate or fluoroquinolones.

According to the American Academy of Periodontology, periodontal diseases are chronic inflammatory conditions that affect the tissues surrounding and supporting the teeth. These tissues include the gums, periodontal ligament, and alveolar bone. The primary cause of periodontal disease is bacterial plaque, a sticky film that constantly forms on our teeth.

There are two major stages of periodontal disease:

1. Gingivitis: This is the milder form of periodontal disease, characterized by inflammation of the gums (gingiva) without loss of attachment to the teeth. The gums may appear red, swollen, and bleed easily during brushing or flossing. At this stage, the damage can be reversed with proper dental care and improved oral hygiene.
2. Periodontitis: If left untreated, gingivitis can progress to periodontitis, a more severe form of periodontal disease. In periodontitis, the inflammation extends beyond the gums and affects the deeper periodontal tissues, leading to loss of bone support around the teeth. Pockets filled with infection-causing bacteria form between the teeth and gums, causing further damage and potential tooth loss if not treated promptly.

Risk factors for developing periodontal disease include poor oral hygiene, smoking or using smokeless tobacco, genetic predisposition, diabetes, hormonal changes (such as pregnancy or menopause), certain medications, and systemic diseases like AIDS or cancer. Regular dental check-ups and good oral hygiene practices are crucial for preventing periodontal disease and maintaining overall oral health.

Periodontitis is a severe form of gum disease that damages the soft tissue and destroys the bone supporting your teeth. If left untreated, it can lead to tooth loss. It is caused by the buildup of plaque, a sticky film of bacteria that constantly forms on our teeth. The body's immune system fights the bacterial infection, which causes an inflammatory response. If the inflammation continues for a long time, it can damage the tissues and bones that support the teeth.

The early stage of periodontitis is called gingivitis, which is characterized by red, swollen gums that bleed easily when brushed or flossed. When gingivitis is not treated, it can advance to periodontitis. In addition to plaque, other factors that increase the risk of developing periodontitis include smoking or using tobacco products, poor oral hygiene, diabetes, a weakened immune system, and genetic factors.

Regular dental checkups and good oral hygiene practices, such as brushing twice a day, flossing daily, and using an antimicrobial mouth rinse, can help prevent periodontitis. Treatment for periodontitis may include deep cleaning procedures, medications, or surgery in severe cases.

Cathepsin G is a serine protease, which is a type of enzyme that breaks down other proteins. It is produced and released by neutrophils, a type of white blood cell that plays an important role in the body's immune response to infection. Cathepsin G helps to digest and kill microorganisms that have invaded the body. It can also contribute to tissue damage and inflammation in certain diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and cystic fibrosis.

Alkanesulfonates are organic compounds that consist of a hydrocarbon chain, typically consisting of alkane molecules, which is bonded to a sulfonate group. The sulfonate group (-SO3-) consists of a sulfur atom bonded to three oxygen atoms, with one of the oxygen atoms carrying a negative charge.

Alkanesulfonates are commonly used as detergents and surfactants due to their ability to reduce surface tension and improve the wetting, emulsifying, and dispersing properties of liquids. They are also used in various industrial applications, such as in the production of paper, textiles, and leather.

In medical terms, alkanesulfonates may be used as topical antimicrobial agents or as ingredients in personal care products. However, some alkanesulfonates have been found to have potential health and environmental hazards, such as irritation of the skin and eyes, respiratory effects, and potential toxicity to aquatic life. Therefore, their use is subject to regulatory oversight and safety assessments.

Cytophaga is a genus of gram-negative, rod-shaped bacteria that are found in various environments such as soil, water, and decaying organic matter. They are known for their gliding motility and unique method of cell division, where the cells divide transversely into several disc-shaped protoplasts that then separate from each other.

Cytophaga species are capable of breaking down complex polysaccharides, such as cellulose and chitin, due to their ability to produce a variety of enzymes that can degrade these substances. They play an important role in the carbon cycle by helping to recycle organic matter in the environment.

While Cytophaga species are not typically associated with human diseases, they have been isolated from clinical specimens such as wounds, sputum, and feces. However, their exact role in human health and disease is not well understood.

An encyclopedia is a comprehensive reference work containing articles on various topics, usually arranged in alphabetical order. In the context of medicine, a medical encyclopedia is a collection of articles that provide information about a wide range of medical topics, including diseases and conditions, treatments, tests, procedures, and anatomy and physiology. Medical encyclopedias may be published in print or electronic formats and are often used as a starting point for researching medical topics. They can provide reliable and accurate information on medical subjects, making them useful resources for healthcare professionals, students, and patients alike. Some well-known examples of medical encyclopedias include the Merck Manual and the Stedman's Medical Dictionary.

'Human bites' refer to wounds or injuries resulting from the human mouth coming into contact with another person's body tissue. These bites can occur during fights, accidents, or intentional acts and can cause damage ranging from minor abrasions to serious tissue injury or infection. Human bite wounds may also pose a risk of transmission for various pathogens, including bacteria like Streptococcus and Staphylococcus species, hepatitis B and C viruses, and herpes simplex virus. Proper evaluation, wound care, and potential antibiotic treatment are crucial to prevent complications associated with human bites.

... is a genus of Gram-negative bacteria. Normally found in the oropharyngeal tract of mammals, they are involved in ... The term Capnocytophaga comes from "capno-" for its dependence on CO2 and "cytophaga" for its flexibility and mobility shift ( ... For Capnocytophaga canimorsus, the drug of choice is penicillin G, given with or without a beta-lactamase inhibitor depending ... Capnocytophaga is a commensal genus considered as an opportunistic pathogen. These bacteria are involved in different types of ...
... is a fastidious, slow-growing, Gram-negative rod of the genus Capnocytophaga. It is a commensal ... "Capnocytophaga canimorsus". GenBank. 30 January 2014. CP002113. "Capnocytophaga canimorsus". Bacterial Diversity Metadatabase ( ... The name Capnocytophaga is derived from the Greek word kapnos, meaning "smoke", and given here because of its dependence on ... Capnocytophaga canimorsus sp. nov. (Formerly CDC Group DF-2), a Cause of Septicemia following Dog Bite, and C. cynodegmi sp. ...
Capnocytophaga spp. Veillonella spp. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Prevotella intermedia Eubacterium spp. Treponema spp ...
A notable exception is Capnocytophaga canimorsus, for which clindamycin is a first-line drug of choice. The following ... Jolivet-Gougeon A, Sixou JL, Tamanai-Shacoori Z, Bonnaure-Mallet M (April 2007). "Antimicrobial treatment of Capnocytophaga ...
2005 Capnocytophaga Leadbetter et al. 1982 Cellulophaga Johansen et al. 1999 Changchengzhania Wang et al. 2017 "Citreibacter" ... Most species are aerobic, while some are microaerobic to anaerobic; for example Capnocytophaga and Coenonia. The family ...
June 1995). "Capnocytophaga canimorsus septicemia: fifth report of a cat-associated infection and five other cases". Eur. J. ... A dog lick to an Australian woman's minor burn caused sepsis and necrosis due to Capnocytophaga canimorsus infection, resulting ... Low SC, Greenwood JE (July 2008). "Capnocytophaga canimorsus: infection, septicaemia, recovery and reconstruction". J. Med. ... Low, Stephanie Chiang-Mei; Greenwood, John Edward (2008). "Capnocytophaga canimorsus: infection, septicaemia, recovery and ...
A neutrophil disorder induced by Capnocytophaga, a dental microorganism. N Engl J Med. 1979; 301:849-854. 49. Arnaout MA, ...
Since 2004, Cornelis also studies Capnocytophaga canimorsus, a bacterium from dog's mouths responsible for fatal infections in ... "Resistance of Capnocytophaga canimorsus to killing by human complement and polymorphonuclear leukocytes". Infect. Immun. 77 (6 ...
Capnocytophaga canimorsus, and Prevotella. Treatment for those who have been attacked depends on the injuries. Though trauma ...
Infection with Capnocytophaga canimorsus after dog bites can also cause the condition. OPSI may initially present with mild ...
Tierney, DM; Strauss, LP; Sanchez, JL (2006). "Capnocytophaga canimorsus Mycotic Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: Why the Mailman Is ...
Both Capnocytophaga spp and Prevotella intermedia were the most frequently detected microorganisms in a study, which also noted ... Capnocytophaga spp are implicated as prime periodontal pathogens, especially in localised aggressive periodontitis. ... the synergism of the disease also accounts for both Capnocytophaga spp and Porphyromonas gingivalis. Aggressive periodontitis ... that Capnocytophaga spp was the most prominent bacteria in subgingival samples of patients with aggressive periodontitis. An ...
It has also been used to great effect as a second-line treatment for Capnocytophaga infections. Linezolid's spectrum of ... Geisler WM, Malhotra U, Stamm WE (December 2001). "Pneumonia and sepsis due to fluoroquinolone-resistant Capnocytophaga ...
"Capnocytophaga canimorsus - An Underestimated Danger After Dog or Cat Bite - Review of the Literature", Przegl Epidemiol. 2016; ... Hookworm, Ancylostoma tubaeforme, Ancylostoma braziliense, and Uncinaria stenocephala Capnocytophaga canimorsus Pasteurellosis ...
... against Capnocytophaga sputigena". Journal of Dental Research. 72 (2): 517-523. doi:10.1177/00220345930720020801. PMID 8423249 ...
... against Capnocytophaga sputigena". J. Dent. Res. 72 (2): 517-23. doi:10.1177/00220345930720020801. PMID 8423249. S2CID 8311930 ...
Capnocytophaga canimorsus, MRSA, tetanus, and Pasteurella can be transmitted from a dog to someone bitten by the dog. ...
... which was caused by Capnocytophaga. Her spleen had been removed after the 2008 car crash, which increased her risk of serious ...
The bacterium Capnocytophaga canimorsus can pose a risk of severe diseases in high-risk groups such as the elderly, transplant ... Exposure to cats with this infection has been associated with meningitis.Capnocytophaga canimorsus sepsis has also been ...
Genera in the Cytophagales comprise Cytophaga, Flexibacter, Sporocytophaga, Sphaero-cytophagal, Capnocytophaga, Microscilla, ...
... except Capnocytophaga spp. and Sphingobacterium spp. that can be detected in the human oral cavity. Bacteroidota are not ...
Asplenic patients are particularly susceptible to infection by capnocytophaga canimorsus and should receive a five-day course ...
cause septic spinal arthritis Eikenella corrodens - human bites Pasteurella multocida, bartonella henselae, capnocytophaga - ...
Bacillus brevis Bacillus cereus Bacillus megaterium Bacillus subtilis Burkholderia cepacia Campylobacter jejuni Capnocytophaga ...
Capnocytophaga MeSH B03.440.450.342 - cardiobacteriaceae MeSH B03.440.450.342.100 - Cardiobacterium MeSH B03.440.450.342.550 - ... Capnocytophaga MeSH B03.140.190.120 - Chryseobacterium MeSH B03.140.190.250 - Flavobacterium MeSH B03.140.190.600 - ...
Streptococcus intermedius Campylobacter rectus Capnocytophaga sp. A number of types of fungi, especially Candida spp., also ...
Capnocytophaga is a genus of Gram-negative bacteria. Normally found in the oropharyngeal tract of mammals, they are involved in ... The term Capnocytophaga comes from "capno-" for its dependence on CO2 and "cytophaga" for its flexibility and mobility shift ( ... For Capnocytophaga canimorsus, the drug of choice is penicillin G, given with or without a beta-lactamase inhibitor depending ... Capnocytophaga is a commensal genus considered as an opportunistic pathogen. These bacteria are involved in different types of ...
... of illness and death from Capnocytophaga canimorsus infection, which can be acquired through contact with cats or dogs ( ... Other articles where Capnocytophaga canimorsus is discussed: zoonotic disease: Populations at increased risk: … ... of illness and death from Capnocytophaga canimorsus infection, which can be acquired through contact with cats or dogs ( ...
Etymologia: Capnocytophaga canimorsus On This Page Capnocytophaga canimorsus [kapʺno-si-tofʹǝ-gǝ kanʺǝ-morʹsǝs] Cite This ... Capnocytophaga canimorsus sp. nov. (formerly CDC group DF-2), a cause of septicemia following dog bite, and C. cynodegmi sp. ... Henry R. Etymologia: Capnocytophaga canimorsus. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2018;24(12):2201. doi:10.3201/eid2412.et2412.. ... Etymologia: Capnocytophaga canimorsus. Volume 24, Number 12-December 2018. Article Views: 570. Data is collected weekly and ...
Copyright © 2023 PerezHilton.com , All Rights Reserved. ...
Capnocytophaga canimorsus tricuspid valve endocarditis. *Mark. Lindén, Sienna ; Gilje, Patrik LU ; Tham, Johan LU ; Lindstedt, ... Capnocytophaga canimorsus, Infective endocarditis, Tricuspid valve. in IDCases. volume. 24. article number. e01083. publisher. ... Capnocytophaga canimorsus is an uncommon cause of infective endocarditis (IE) and mainly affects persons with compromised ... article{ec593035-da82-497a-97b7-32be66f9b942, abstract = {{,p,Capnocytophaga canimorsus is an uncommon cause of infective ...
Full Lineage: Bacteria; Bacteroidetes; Flavobacteriia; Flavobacteriales; Flavobacteriaceae; Capnocytophaga; Capnocytophaga ...
Note: These kits are not intended for diagnosing or treatment.
Capnocytophaga is a bacteria commonly found in the mouths of healthy dogs and cats. It has been around for years but it has ... Human infections with Capnocytophaga usually occurs through contact of broken skin with animal saliva, often after a bite or ...
Capnocytophaga spp. answers are found in the Johns Hopkins ABX Guide powered by Unbound Medicine. Available for iPhone, iPad, ... Other Capnocytophaga species may be part of animal oral flora, or normal human oral flora/dental plaques, e.g., C. sputigena, C ... "Capnocytophaga Spp." Johns Hopkins ABX Guide, The Johns Hopkins University, 2023. Pediatrics Central, peds.unboundmedicine.com/ ... pedscentral/view/Johns_Hopkins_ABX_Guide/540078/all/Capnocytophaga_spp_. Auwaerter P. Capnocytophaga spp. Johns Hopkins ABX ...
title = "Capnocytophaga sp",. keywords = "Capnocytophaga, article, classification, drug effect, physiology, ... Capnocytophaga sp. / Fernández V., Alejandra; Juliet L, Chrystal; Eugenia, M. et al. In: Revista Chilena de Infectologia, Vol. ... Fernández V. A, Juliet L C, Eugenia M, Valenzuela M. Capnocytophaga sp. Revista Chilena de Infectologia. 2007 Feb;24(1):57-58. ... Fernández V., A., Juliet L, C., Eugenia, M., & Valenzuela, M. (2007). Capnocytophaga sp. Revista Chilena de Infectologia, 24(1 ...
Capnocytophaga infections often begin showing their symptoms around the bite area itself. It may manifest as puffiness and ... The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention examine capnocytophaga infections. This is a type of bacteria in the dogs mouth ...
Capnocytophaga spp.. Capnocytophaga is a common type of bacteria that normally lives in the mouths of dogs and cats. These ... Signs in dogs: Capnocytophaga bacteria are common in the mouths of dogs and cats but do not cause them to get sick. ... How it spreads: Rarely, Capnocytophaga can spread to people through bites, scratches, or close contact with a dog or cat that ... Symptoms in people: People may start to show symptoms within 1-14 days after infection with Capnocytophaga. Symptoms include ...
Capnocytophaga. These bacteria and germs can cause bacterial infection if the dog bit breaks your skin. The risk of infection ...
Wanted: Capnocytophaga canimorsus rapid test development. Add to Favorites Aug 5, 2021 ...
Capnocytophaga canimorsus may cause sepsis in patients with asplenia/hepatic disease.. Avoid first-generation cephalosporins/ ...
Preliminary results from a recent study showed that Capnocytophaga gingivalis and Prevotella melaninogenica were associated ... Preliminary results from a recent study showed that Capnocytophaga gingivalis and Prevotella melaninogenica were associated ... Analysis and the Influence of the Chemopreventive Agent Curcumin on the Bacteria Prevotella Melaninogenica and Capnocytophaga ... Analysis and the Influence of the Chemopreventive Agent Curcumin on the Bacteria Prevotella Melaninogenica and Capnocytophaga ...
Capnocytophaga spp.. Eikenella corrodens Haemophilus influenzae2 Moraxella catarrhalis Pasteurella multocida Anaerobic micro- ...
Capnocytophaga. Eikenella. Porphyromonas. Prevotella. Fusobacterium. Campylobacter. Bacteroides. Spirochetes. Treponema. ...
GAMS reduced the pathogenic bacterial species, including Neisseria sp., Desulfobulbus sp., Capnocytophaga canis, and ...
Chorioamnionitis with intact membranes caused by Capnocytophaga sputigena. Eur. J. Obstet. Gynecol. Reprod. Biol. 83, 109-112. ...
Lethal Waterhouse-Friderichsen syndrome caused by Capnocytophaga canimorsus in an asplenic patient. Schuler F, Padberg JS, ...
aPDT reduced Streptococcus, Acinetobacteria, Capnocytophaga, and Rothia bacteria species in plaques. Conclusion: ICG-assisted ... Capnocytophaga and Acinetobacteria can be associated with periodontitis, and streptococcal species, especially the S. mutans ... median 82, range 3-2883, p = 0.0032), Capnocytophaga species (median 1050, range 11-4382 vs. median 1220, range 15-8599; p = ... aPDT reduced Streptococcus, Acinetobacteria, Capnocytophaga, and Rothia bacteria species in plaques. Conclusion: ICG-assisted ...
Capnocytophaga canimorsus may cause sepsis in patients with asplenia/hepatic disease.. Avoid first-generation cephalosporins/ ...
Den norske tannlegeforenings Tidende - Antibiotikaresistens hos orale bakterier
Capnocytophaga carnimorsus. CDC groups EF-4a and EF-4b. CDC group NO-1 ...
In those cases, the bacteria Capnocytophaga canimorsus was the culprit. This particular bacteria is found in both dogs and cats ...
Dominguez E, Greene J, Sandin R. Capnocytophaga: a case series and review. Infect Med. 1996.13(3):165-168. ...
Glycan-foraging systems reveal the adaptation of Capnocytophaga canimorsus to the dog mouth ... that has been identified in the oral pathogen Capnocytophaga canimorsus [Renzi et al., 2015]. C. canimorsus is auxotrophic for ...
  • C. canimorsus and C. cynodegmi are commonly transmitted by dog bites and known to cause sepsis, potentially complicated by thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and hemolytic uremic syndrome, in immunocompromised patients Capnocytophaga spp. (wikipedia.org)
  • of illness and death from Capnocytophaga canimorsus infection, which can be acquired through contact with cats or dogs (particularly through dog bites). (britannica.com)
  • From the Greek kapnos ("smoke") for its dependence on carbon dioxide, which is a large component of smoke, Capnocytophaga canimorsus (Latin canis , "dog," and morsus , "bite") are gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that are part of the normal oral microbiota of dogs and cats ( Figure ). (cdc.gov)
  • Capnocytophaga canimorsus is an uncommon cause of infective endocarditis (IE) and mainly affects persons with compromised immune-systems who have been in contact with dogs. (lu.se)
  • Lethal Waterhouse-Friderichsen syndrome caused by Capnocytophaga canimorsus in an asplenic patient. (nih.gov)
  • In those cases, the bacteria Capnocytophaga canimorsus was the culprit. (petmd.com)
  • Capnocytophaga Canimorsus is an organism carried in the mouths of dogs, and it causes a very bad sepsis infection. (liverpoolecho.co.uk)
  • By MEGAN TREMELLING, DVM, LVS This summer, a Wisconsin woman died of an infection caused by a bacterium called Capnocytophaga canimorsus, and a Wisconsin man suffered serious illness requiring multiple amputations from the same organism. (fetchmag.com)
  • Capnocytophaga is a genus of Gram-negative bacteria. (wikipedia.org)
  • Capnocytophaga is a bacteria commonly found in the mouths of healthy dogs and cats. (minthilltimes.com)
  • Capnocytophaga is a common type of bacteria that normally lives in the mouths of dogs and cats. (cdc.gov)
  • Capnocytophaga bacteria are common in the mouths of dogs and cats but do not cause them to get sick. (cdc.gov)
  • Blood tests revealed capnocytophaga, the bacteria that spread throughout Manteufel's body. (wkbw.com)
  • And 1 out of 5 bites become infected, with such diseases as rabies, MRSA - a type of Staph infection, or different types of bacteria such as capnocytophaga or pasteurella. (mymotherlode.com)
  • Capnocytophaga: This bacteria often causes infection after a dog bite in those with a weak immune system. (autoaccident.com)
  • Human infections with Capnocytophaga usually occurs through contact of broken skin with animal saliva, often after a bite or scratch or from allowing a pet to lick an open sore. (minthilltimes.com)
  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention examine capnocytophaga infections . (amendtlaw.com)
  • Capnocytophaga infections often begin showing their symptoms around the bite area itself. (amendtlaw.com)
  • The CDC doesn't track the number of infections from capnocytophaga because they're so rare. (fox5atlanta.com)
  • In 2018, we saw an outbreak of psittacosis in poultry plant workers, drug-resistant brucellosis linked to drinking raw (unpasteurized) milk , dog lick-related Capnocytophaga infections, and Salmonella infections linked to pet guinea pigs, hedgehogs , and backyard poultry. (cdc.gov)
  • Preliminary results from a recent study showed that Capnocytophaga gingivalis and Prevotella melaninogenica were associated with oral cancer lesions, acting as diagnostic indicators for Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC). (kzoo.edu)
  • Most beta-lactamases identified in Bacteroides, Prevotella, and Capnocytophaga belong to the Ambler class A. Several beta-lactamases encoded by the chromosome or a plasmid and associated with mobile genetic elements have been described in Capnocytophaga spp. (wikipedia.org)
  • I en undersøkelse fra 2004 ble det påvist at opptil 42 % av Prevotella- species (n=303) utviklet resistens overfor amoksicillin (11). (tannlegetidende.no)
  • Pasteurella multocida is often the cause in cat bites, and Pasteurella or Capnocytophaga species are typically responsible in dog bites. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Capnocytophaga is a commensal genus considered as an opportunistic pathogen. (wikipedia.org)
  • Twelve Complete Reference Genomes of Clinical Isolates in the Capnocytophaga Genus. (cdc.gov)
  • Capnocytophaga strains are often isolated from periodontal pockets, but also from apical and periodontal abscesses, in association with other bacterial periodontal species. (wikipedia.org)
  • Other Capnocytophaga species may be part of animal oral flora, or normal human oral flora/dental plaques, e.g. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • Rarely, Capnocytophaga can spread to people through bites, scratches, or close contact with a dog or cat that is infected. (cdc.gov)
  • Low disease contained a high frequency of Veillonella and Streptococcus, with a moderate number of Capnocytophaga. (cdc.gov)
  • Susceptibility to various beta-lactam antibiotics has been described as variable depending on the strain of Capnocytophaga. (wikipedia.org)
  • According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, up to 74 percent of dogs and up to 57 percent of cats carry capnocytophaga. (fox5atlanta.com)
  • They require enriched media, type blood agar, incubated at 37 °C. The isolation of strains of Capnocytophaga from polymicrobial samples is also possible on selective media containing antibiotics. (wikipedia.org)

No images available that match "capnocytophaga"