A genus of trichuroid nematodes parasitic in the liver and intestines of many mammals and birds. Two species, C. hepatica and C. philippinensis, produce often fatal infections in man.
Infections with nematodes of the order ENOPLIDA.
Liver diseases caused by infections with PARASITES, such as tapeworms (CESTODA) and flukes (TREMATODA).
An order of nematodes of the subclass SECERNENTEA. Its organisms possess two or three pairs of dorsolateral caudal papillae.
A superfamily of nematodes of the order ENOPLIDA. Its organisms have a well developed intestine and rectum.
Infestation of animals with parasitic worms of the helminth class. The infestation may be experimental or veterinary.
'Zoo animals' are various species of captive wild animals, housed and displayed in a facility for the purpose of public education, conservation, research, and recreation.
A family of terrestrial carnivores with long snouts and non-retractable claws. Members include COYOTES; DOGS; FOXES; JACKALS; RACCOON DOGS; and WOLVES.
Infections with nematodes of the order ASCARIDIDA.
Experimentally induced chronic injuries to the parenchymal cells in the liver to achieve a model for LIVER CIRRHOSIS.
A subclass of segmented worms comprising the tapeworms.
Infections or infestations with parasitic organisms. The infestation may be experimental or veterinary.
The study of disease in prehistoric times as revealed in bones, mummies, and archaeologic artifacts.
An order of heavy-bodied, largely terrestrial BIRDS including pheasants, TURKEYS, grouse, QUAIL, and CHICKENS.
Infections by nematodes, general or unspecified.
Substances used in the treatment or control of nematode infestations. They are used also in veterinary practice.
Diseases of rodents of the order RODENTIA. This term includes diseases of Sciuridae (squirrels), Geomyidae (gophers), Heteromyidae (pouched mice), Castoridae (beavers), Cricetidae (rats and mice), Muridae (Old World rats and mice), Erethizontidae (porcupines), and Caviidae (guinea pigs).
Immunoglobulins produced in a response to HELMINTH ANTIGENS.

Hepatic capillariasis in children: report of 3 cases in Brazil. (1/53)

Capillaria hepatica is a helminth that may cause an extremely rare condition of parasitic hepatitis. Only 29 cases have been published, 2 of them in Brazil. We report here 3 cases of children in Brazil with massive hepatic capillariasis who presented the characteristic triad of this type of infection, i.e., persistent fever, hepatomegaly, and eosinophilia. The diagnosis was made by liver biopsy. All children responded well after treatment with thiabendazole (case 1), albendazole (case 3), and albendazole in combination with a corticoid (case 2). Case 1 has been followed-up for 24 years, an event not previously reported in the literature.  (+info)

Serological detection of Capillaria hepatica by indirect immunofluorescence assay. (2/53)

In this paper, a serological assay for the detection of antibodies to Capillaria hepatica, a zoonotic parasite, is described. In the past, the only way of detecting Capillaria hepatica was to perform a liver biopsy. The indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) assay, based on liver sections of naturally infected mice and human serum samples, is suitable for detecting early stages of human infections and for screening purposes. No cross-reactivity with other parasitic infections was detected. We have applied the IIF assay to serum samples of 60 employees of the Zoological Garden of Vienna, Schonbrunn, Austria, and found one positive and one questionable sample.  (+info)

Hepatic capillariasis (Capillaria hepatica) in porcupines (Erethizon dorsatum) in Pennsylvania. (3/53)

Tissues of 53 adult porcupines (Erethizon dorsatum) from Pennsylvania were obtained for histopathologic examination. Hepatic capillariasis was recorded in 9% of the porcupines. An additional 11% of the liver sections showed lesions that were compatible with migration by Capillaria hepatica. Because only 1 section of the liver per animal was examined microscopically, the documented prevalence of C. hepatica in Pennsylvania is considered conservatively low. However, this condition was subclinical, because none of the infected animals showed clinical signs, and none revealed severe pathologic changes in the affected livers. This seems to be the only report of C. hepatica in porcupines.  (+info)

Hepatic capillariasis in rats: a new model for testing antifibrotic drugs. (4/53)

Rats infected with the helminth Capillaria hepatica regularly develop septal hepatic fibrosis that may progress to cirrhosis in a relatively short time. Because of such characteristics, this experimental model was selected for testing drugs exhibiting antifibrosis potential, such as pentoxifylline, gadolinium chloride and vitamin A. Hepatic fibrosis was qualitatively and quantitatively evaluated in liver samples obtained by partial hepatectomy and at autopsy. The material was submitted to histological, biochemical and morphometric methods. A statistically significant reduction of fibrosis was obtained with pentoxifylline when administered intraperitoneally rather than intravenously. Gadolinium chloride showed moderate activity when administered prophylactically (before fibrosis had started), but showed a poor effect when fibrosis was well advanced. No modification of fibrosis was seen after vitamin A administration. Hydroxyproline content was correlated with morphometric measurements. The model appears to be adequate, since few animals die of the infection, fibrosis develops regularly in all animals, and the effects of different antifibrotic drugs and administration protocols can be easily detected.  (+info)

Effect of interferon-alpha on experimental septal fibrosis of the liver - study with a new model. (5/53)

Interferon-alpha is used in antiviral therapy in humans, mainly for viral hepatitis B and C. An anti-fibrotic effect of interferon has been postulated even in the absence of anti-viral response, which suggests that interferon directly inhibits fibrogenesis. Rats infected with the helminth Capillaria hepatica regularly develop diffuse septal fibrosis of the liver, which terminates in cirrhosis 40 days after inoculation. The aim of this study was to test the anti-fibrotic effect of interferon in this experimental model. Evaluation of fibrosis was made by three separate methods: semi-quantitative histology, computerized morphometry and hydroxyproline measurements. Treatment with interferon-alpha proved to inhibit the development of fibrosis in this model, especially when doses of 500,000 and 800,000 IU were used for 60 days. Besides confirming the anti-fibrotic potential of interferon-alpha on a non-viral new experimental model of hepatic fibrosis, a clear-cut dose-dependent effect was observed.  (+info)

Worm load and septal fibrosis of the liver in Capillaria hepatica-infected rats. (6/53)

Inocula, varying from 15 to 1,000 embryonated Capillaria hepatica eggs, were administered to young adult rats by gastric tube, in an attempt to investigate the influence of worm load in the production of septal fibrosis of the liver. Low doses of 15, 30 or 50 eggs were sufficient to produce septal fibrosis, but it appeared with variable degrees of intensity and always with focal distribution. Septal fibrosis became diffuse, progressive with time, and already well developed 40 days after infection, when 100 eggs or more were administered. However, higher inocula (200, 500 and 1,000 eggs) did not intensify septal fibrosis, although the number of parasitic focal lesions proportionally augmented.  (+info)

Pathogenesis of hepatic septal fibrosis associated with Capillaria hepatica infection of rats. (7/53)

Septal fibrosis is a common form of hepatic fibrosis, but its etiology and pathogenesis are poorly understood. Rats infected with the helminth Capillaria hepatica constitute a good experimental model of such fibrosis. To investigate the pathogenetic contribution of the several parasitic factors involved, the following procedures were performed in rats: a) regarding the role of eggs, these were isolated and injected either into the peritoneal cavity or directly into the liver parenchyma; b) for worms alone, 15-day-old infection was treated with mebendazole, killing the parasites before oviposition started; c) for both eggs and worms, rats at the 30th day of infection were treated with either mebendazole or ivermectin. Eggs only originated focal fibrosis from cicatricial granulomas, but no septal fibrosis. Worms alone induced a mild degree of perifocal septal fibrosis. Systematized septal fibrosis of the liver, similar to that observed in the infected controls, occurred only in the rats treated with mebendazole or ivermectin, with dead worms and immature eggs in their livers. Thus, future search for fibrogenic factors associated with C. hepatica infection in rats should consider lesions with both eggs and worms.  (+info)

Capillariidae eggs found in the urine of a free ranging maned wolf from Argentina. (8/53)

The first finding of a Capillariid in the urinary tract of a free ranging maned wolf (Chrysocyon brachyurus) is described. The individual was an adult male attacked by dogs in the locality of Cayastacito (Santa Fe, Argentina, 31 degrees 05' S, 60 degrees 34' W). Eggs found in urine measured 64.6-66.9 micrometer (mean 65.4 micrometer) x 26.9-31 micrometer (mean 29 micrometer). Further studies are needed to determine whether this finding corresponds to a new Capillariid species, related to C. brachyurus, or it is an already described species that has been introduced by domestic dogs.  (+info)

Capillaria is a genus of small, slender nematode (roundworm) parasites that can infect various animals, including humans. The medical definition of Capillaria refers to the infection caused by these parasites, which is known as capillariasis.

There are several species of Capillaria that can infect humans, with the most common being Capillaria philippinensis and Capillaria aerophila. Capillaria philippinensis primarily infects the small intestine, while Capillaria aerophila infects the respiratory system.

Capillariasis is usually contracted by consuming raw or undercooked fish or meat that contains Capillaria larvae. Once inside the human body, the larvae mature into adults and begin to lay eggs, which can cause inflammation and damage to the affected organ. Symptoms of capillariasis vary depending on the species of Capillaria and the location of the infection but may include abdominal pain, diarrhea, weight loss, coughing, and difficulty breathing.

Treatment for capillariasis typically involves medication to kill the parasites, such as albendazole or mebendazole. In severe cases, hospitalization may be necessary to manage complications such as malnutrition or respiratory failure. Preventing capillariasis involves cooking food thoroughly and avoiding consumption of raw or undercooked fish or meat, particularly in areas where the infection is more common.

Enoplida is a group of nematodes (roundworms) that are not typically associated with human infections. There are very few reports of human infections caused by Enoplida, and these are usually the result of accidental ingestion or penetration of the skin by the worms.

There is no established medical definition for "Enoplida infections" as they are not a common or well-known type of infection in humans. If you have any concerns about a possible Enoplida infection, it is important to consult a healthcare professional for proper diagnosis and treatment.

Parasitic liver diseases refer to conditions caused by protozoa or helminths (parasitic worms) that infect and damage the liver. These parasites can enter the body through contaminated food, water, or direct contact with an infected host. Some examples of parasitic liver diseases include:

1. Ascariasis: Caused by the roundworm Ascaris lumbricoides, which can infect the liver and bile ducts, leading to inflammation, obstruction, and abscess formation.
2. Echinococcosis (Hydatid disease): A rare but serious condition caused by the larval stage of tapeworms from the genus Echinococcus. The liver is the most commonly affected organ, with cysts forming in the liver parenchyma that can grow slowly over several years and cause complications such as rupture or secondary bacterial infection.
3. Fascioliasis: A foodborne trematode (fluke) infection caused by Fasciola hepatica or Fasciola gigantica, which affects the liver and bile ducts. The larvae migrate through the liver tissue, causing inflammation, necrosis, and fibrosis.
4. Leishmaniasis: A protozoan infection caused by Leishmania spp., which can affect various organs, including the liver. Visceral leishmaniasis (kala-azar) is the most severe form of the disease, characterized by hepatosplenomegaly, fever, and anemia.
5. Toxoplasmosis: A protozoan infection caused by Toxoplasma gondii, which can affect the liver and other organs. While most immunocompetent individuals remain asymptomatic or experience mild flu-like symptoms, immunocompromised patients are at risk of severe liver damage and disseminated disease.
6. Schistosomiasis: A trematode (fluke) infection caused by Schistosoma spp., which affects the liver and portal venous system. The parasites lay eggs in the liver, causing granulomatous inflammation, fibrosis, and portal hypertension.
7. Fasciolopsiasis: A trematode (fluke) infection caused by Fasciolopsis buski, which affects the small intestine and liver. The larvae migrate through the liver tissue, causing inflammation, necrosis, and fibrosis.
8. Paragonimiasis: A trematode (lung fluke) infection caused by Paragonimus spp., which can affect the lungs, brain, and other organs, including the liver. The larvae migrate through the liver tissue, causing inflammation, necrosis, and fibrosis.
9. Clonorchiasis: A trematode (liver fluke) infection caused by Clonorchis sinensis, which affects the bile ducts and liver. The parasites lay eggs in the bile ducts, causing inflammation, cholangitis, and cholangiocarcinoma.
10. Opisthorchiasis: A trematode (liver fluke) infection caused by Opisthorchis spp., which affects the bile ducts and liver. The parasites lay eggs in the bile ducts, causing inflammation, cholangitis, and cholangiocarcinoma.
11. Heterophyiasis: A trematode (intestinal fluke) infection caused by Heterophyes spp., which affects the small intestine and liver. The larvae migrate through the liver tissue, causing inflammation, necrosis, and fibrosis.
12. Metagonimiasis: A trematode (intestinal fluke) infection caused by Metagonimus spp., which affects the small intestine and liver. The larvae migrate through the liver tissue, causing inflammation, necrosis, and fibrosis.
13. Echinostomiasis: A trematode (intestinal fluke) infection caused by Echinostoma spp., which affects the small intestine and liver. The larvae migrate through the liver tissue, causing inflammation, necrosis, and fibrosis.
14. Gastrodiscoidiasis: A trematode (intestinal fluke) infection caused by Gastrodiscoides spp., which affects the large intestine and liver. The larvae migrate through the liver tissue, causing inflammation, necrosis, and fibrosis.
15. Fascioliasis: A trematode (liver fluke) infection caused by Fasciola spp., which affects the liver and bile ducts. The larvae migrate through the liver tissue, causing inflammation, necrosis, and fibrosis.
16. Paragonimiasis: A trematode (lung fluke) infection caused by Paragonimus spp., which affects the lungs and sometimes the liver. The larvae migrate through the liver tissue, causing inflammation, necrosis, and fibrosis.
17. Schistosomiasis: A trematode (blood fluke) infection caused by Schistosoma spp., which affects the blood vessels and sometimes the liver. The larvae migrate through the liver tissue, causing inflammation, necrosis, and fibrosis.
18. Clonorchiasis: A trematode (liver fluke) infection caused by Clonorchis sinensis, which affects the liver and bile ducts. The larvae migrate through the liver tissue, causing inflammation, necrosis, and fibrosis.
19. Opisthorchiasis: A trematode (liver fluke) infection caused by Opisthorchis spp., which affects the liver and bile ducts. The larvae migrate through the liver tissue, causing inflammation, necrosis, and fibrosis.
20. Metagonimiasis: A trematode (intestinal fluke) infection caused by Metagonimus spp., which affects the small intestine and sometimes the liver. The larvae migrate through the liver tissue, causing inflammation, necrosis, and fibrosis.
21. Heterophyesiasis: A trematode (intestinal fluke) infection caused by Heterophyes spp., which affects the small intestine and sometimes the liver. The larvae migrate through the liver tissue, causing inflammation, necrosis, and fibrosis.
22. Echinostomiasis: A trematode (intestinal fluke) infection caused by Echinostoma spp., which affects the small intestine and sometimes the liver. The larvae migrate through the liver tissue, causing inflammation, necrosis, and fibrosis.
23. Fasciolopsiasis: A trematode (intestinal fluke) infection caused by Fasciolopsis buski, which affects the small intestine and sometimes the liver. The larvae migrate through the liver tissue, causing inflammation, necrosis, and fibrosis.
24. Paragonimiasis: A trematode (lung fluke) infection caused by Paragonimus spp., which affects the lungs and sometimes the liver. The larvae migrate through the liver tissue, causing inflammation, necrosis, and fibrosis.
25. Spirometra mansoni: A trematode (tapeworm) infection caused by Spirometra mansoni, which affects the brain and sometimes the liver. The larvae migrate through the liver tissue, causing inflammation, necrosis, and fibrosis.
26. Taenia solium: A trematode (tapeworm) infection caused by Taenia solium, which affects the brain and sometimes the liver. The larvae migrate through the liver tissue, causing inflammation, necrosis, and fibrosis.
27. Hymenolepis nana: A trematode (tapeworm) infection caused by Hymenolepis nana, which affects the small intestine and sometimes the liver. The larvae migrate through the liver tissue, causing inflammation, necrosis, and fibrosis.
28. Diphyllobothrium latum: A trematode (tapeworm) infection caused by Diphyllobothrium latum, which affects the small intestine and sometimes the liver. The larvae migrate through the liver tissue, causing inflammation, necrosis, and fibrosis.
29. Echinococcus granulosus:

Ascaridida is an order of large, parasitic roundworms that belong to the phylum Nematoda. These worms are known to infect a wide range of hosts, including humans, and can cause significant damage to their host's health. The most well-known species in this order is Ascaris lumbricoides, which is the causative agent of ascariasis in humans.

Ascariasis is a common parasitic infection that affects millions of people worldwide, particularly in areas with poor sanitation and hygiene. The life cycle of Ascaris lumbricoides involves the ingestion of eggs present in contaminated food or water. Once inside the human body, the larvae hatch from the eggs and migrate through the lungs, where they mature into adult worms that can grow up to 15 inches long. The adult worms then lay thousands of eggs that are passed through the feces, perpetuating the life cycle.

Symptoms of ascariasis can range from mild to severe and may include abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and coughing. In severe cases, the worms can cause intestinal obstruction or perforation, which can be life-threatening if left untreated.

Prevention of ascariasis involves practicing good hygiene and sanitation, including washing hands thoroughly with soap and water before eating or preparing food, avoiding contact with contaminated soil or water, and cooking food thoroughly. Treatment typically involves the use of anti-parasitic drugs that kill the worms and their eggs.

Trichuroidea is a superfamily of parasitic nematodes (roundworms) that includes several medically important genera such as Trichuris, Capillaria, and Heterobilharzia. These parasites are known to infect the gastrointestinal tract of humans and other animals, causing various diseases.

Trichuris species, including Trichuris trichiura (whipworm), are among the most common human intestinal nematodes worldwide. The adult worms live in the large intestine, where they can cause chronic inflammation, diarrhea, and other gastrointestinal symptoms.

Capillaria species, such as Capillaria philippinensis (Philippine threadworm) and Capillaria hepatica (human capillariasis), can infect various organs in humans, including the small intestine, lungs, and liver. These infections can lead to a range of symptoms depending on the organ involved.

Heterobilharzia americana is a fluke-like parasite that can cause schistosomiasis (also known as snail fever) in humans and animals. The parasite's larval stage infects freshwater snails, which then release another larval stage that can penetrate the skin of humans or animals that come into contact with contaminated water.

Overall, Trichuroidea includes several important parasitic nematodes that can cause significant morbidity and mortality in humans and other animals worldwide.

Helminthiasis, in general, refers to the infection or infestation of humans and animals by helminths, which are parasitic worms. When referring to "Animal Helminthiasis," it specifically pertains to the condition where animals, including domestic pets and livestock, are infected by various helminth species. These parasitic worms can reside in different organs of the animal's body, leading to a wide range of clinical signs depending on the worm species and the location of the infestation.

Animal Helminthiasis can be caused by different types of helminths:

1. Nematodes (roundworms): These include species like Ascaris suum in pigs, Toxocara cati and Toxascaris leonina in cats, and Toxocara canis in dogs. They can cause gastrointestinal issues such as diarrhea, vomiting, and weight loss.
2. Cestodes (tapeworms): Examples include Taenia saginata in cattle, Echinococcus granulosus in sheep and goats, and Dipylidium caninum in dogs and cats. Tapeworm infestations may lead to gastrointestinal symptoms like diarrhea or constipation and may also cause vitamin deficiencies due to the worm's ability to absorb nutrients from the host animal's digestive system.
3. Trematodes (flukes): These include liver flukes such as Fasciola hepatica in sheep, goats, and cattle, and schistosomes that can affect various animals, including birds and mammals. Liver fluke infestations may cause liver damage, leading to symptoms like weight loss, decreased appetite, and jaundice. Schistosome infestations can lead to issues in multiple organs depending on the species involved.

Preventing and controlling Helminthiasis in animals is crucial for maintaining animal health and welfare, as well as ensuring food safety for humans who consume products from these animals. Regular deworming programs, good hygiene practices, proper pasture management, and monitoring for clinical signs are essential components of a comprehensive parasite control strategy.

"Animals, Zoo" is not a medical term. However, it generally refers to a collection of various species of wild animals kept in enclosures or exhibits for the public to view and learn about. These animals are usually obtained from different parts of the world and live in environments that attempt to simulate their natural habitats. Zoos play an essential role in conservation efforts, education, and research. They provide a unique opportunity for people to connect with wildlife and understand the importance of preserving and protecting endangered species and their ecosystems.

Canidae is a biological family that includes dogs, wolves, foxes, and other members of the canine group. Canids are characterized by their long legs, narrow snouts, and sharp teeth adapted for hunting. They are generally social animals, often living in packs with complex hierarchies. Many species are known for their endurance and speed, as well as their strong sense of smell and hearing. Some members of this family are domesticated, such as dogs, while others remain wild and are sometimes kept as pets or used for hunting.

Ascaridida infections are caused by roundworms belonging to the order Ascaridida, which includes several species that can infect humans and animals. The most common species that infects humans is Ascaris lumbricoides, also known as the human roundworm. Other species that can cause infection in humans include Toxocara spp., Baylisascaris procyonis, and Ascaris suum (the pig roundworm).

Infection with these parasites typically occurs through ingestion of contaminated food or water containing eggs or larvae. The larvae hatch in the small intestine and then migrate through the body to various organs, including the liver, lungs, and eyes, where they can cause damage. After several weeks, the larvae return to the small intestine, where they mature into adult worms and begin producing eggs.

Symptoms of ascariasis (infection with Ascaris lumbricoides) can vary depending on the severity of the infection and the location of the worms in the body. Mild infections may cause no symptoms or only mild gastrointestinal symptoms such as abdominal pain, nausea, and diarrhea. More severe infections can lead to intestinal obstruction, malnutrition, and other complications.

Infection with Toxocara spp. can cause a condition called visceral larva migrans, which is characterized by fever, cough, rash, and liver enlargement. Ocular larva migrans can occur when the larvae migrate to the eye, causing inflammation and potentially leading to vision loss.

Baylisascaris procyonis infection can cause a similar condition called neural larva migrans, which can lead to neurological symptoms such as seizures, muscle weakness, and paralysis.

Prevention of Ascaridida infections involves practicing good hygiene, including washing hands thoroughly with soap and water after using the toilet or handling soil or contaminated objects. Proper cooking and cleaning of food can also help prevent infection. In areas where ascariasis is common, treatment of human waste and improvement of sanitation infrastructure can help reduce transmission.

Experimental liver cirrhosis refers to a controlled research setting where various factors and substances are intentionally introduced to induce liver cirrhosis in animals or cell cultures. The purpose is to study the mechanisms, progression, potential treatments, and prevention strategies for liver cirrhosis. This could involve administering chemicals, drugs, alcohol, viruses, or manipulating genes associated with liver damage and fibrosis. It's important to note that results from experimental models may not directly translate to human conditions, but they can provide valuable insights into disease pathophysiology and therapeutic development.

Cestoda is a class of parasitic worms belonging to the phylum Platyhelminthes, also known as flatworms. Cestodes are commonly known as tapeworms and have a long, flat, segmented body that can grow to considerable length in their adult form. They lack a digestive system and absorb nutrients through their body surface.

Cestodes have a complex life cycle involving one or two intermediate hosts, usually insects or crustaceans, and a definitive host, which is typically a mammal, including humans. The tapeworm's larval stage develops in the intermediate host, and when the definitive host consumes the infected intermediate host, the larvae mature into adults in the host's intestine.

Humans can become infected with tapeworms by eating raw or undercooked meat from infected animals or through accidental ingestion of contaminated water or food containing tapeworm eggs or larvae. Infection with tapeworms can cause various symptoms, including abdominal pain, diarrhea, weight loss, and vitamin deficiencies.

Parasitic diseases, animal, refer to conditions in animals that are caused by parasites, which are organisms that live on or inside a host and derive benefits from the host at its expense. Parasites can be classified into different groups such as protozoa, helminths (worms), and arthropods (e.g., ticks, fleas).

Parasitic diseases in animals can cause a wide range of clinical signs depending on the type of parasite, the animal species affected, and the location and extent of infection. Some common examples of parasitic diseases in animals include:

* Heartworm disease in dogs and cats caused by Dirofilaria immitis
* Coccidiosis in various animals caused by different species of Eimeria
* Toxoplasmosis in cats and other animals caused by Toxoplasma gondii
* Giardiasis in many animal species caused by Giardia spp.
* Lungworm disease in dogs and cats caused by Angiostrongylus vasorum or Aelurostrongylus abstrusus
* Tapeworm infection in dogs, cats, and other animals caused by different species of Taenia or Dipylidium caninum

Prevention and control of parasitic diseases in animals typically involve a combination of strategies such as regular veterinary care, appropriate use of medications, environmental management, and good hygiene practices.

Paleopathology is the study of ancient diseases and injuries as recorded in bones, mummies, and other archaeological remains. It is an interdisciplinary field that combines knowledge from pathology, epidemiology, anthropology, and archaeology to understand the health and disease patterns of past populations. The findings of paleopathology can provide valuable insights into the evolution of diseases, the effectiveness of ancient medical practices, and the impact of environmental and social factors on human health over time. Examples of conditions that may be studied in paleopathology include infectious diseases (such as tuberculosis or leprosy), nutritional deficiencies, trauma, cancer, and genetic disorders.

Galliformes is not a medical term, but a taxonomic order in ornithology, which is the study of birds. It includes landfowl such as grouses, turkeys, chickens, pheasants, quails, and other related species. These birds are characterized by their strong and stout bodies, short tails, and rounded wings. They typically inhabit a variety of terrestrial habitats worldwide, except for Australia and some oceanic islands. Some members of this order have cultural and economic significance as sources of food and feathers.

Nematode infections, also known as roundworm infections, are caused by various species of nematodes or roundworms. These parasitic worms can infect humans and animals, leading to a range of health problems depending on the specific type of nematode and the location of the infection within the body.

Common forms of nematode infections include:

1. Ascariasis: Caused by Ascaris lumbricoides, this infection occurs when people ingest the parasite's eggs through contaminated food or water. The larvae hatch in the small intestine, mature into adult worms, and can cause abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. In severe cases, the worms may obstruct the intestines or migrate to other organs, leading to potentially life-threatening complications.
2. Hookworm infections: These are caused by Ancylostoma duodenale and Necator americanus. The larvae penetrate the skin, usually through bare feet, and migrate to the small intestine, where they attach to the intestinal wall and feed on blood. Symptoms include abdominal pain, diarrhea, anemia, and protein loss.
3. Trichuriasis: Also known as whipworm infection, this is caused by Trichuris trichiura. The larvae hatch in the small intestine, mature into adult worms, and reside in the large intestine, causing abdominal pain, diarrhea, and rectal prolapse in severe cases.
4. Strongyloidiasis: Caused by Strongyloides stercoralis, this infection occurs when the larvae penetrate the skin, usually through contaminated soil, and migrate to the lungs and then the small intestine. Symptoms include abdominal pain, diarrhea, and skin rashes. In immunocompromised individuals, strongyloidiasis can lead to disseminated disease, which is potentially fatal.
5. Toxocariasis: This infection is caused by the roundworms Toxocara canis or Toxocara cati, found in dogs and cats, respectively. Humans become infected through ingestion of contaminated soil or undercooked meat. Symptoms include fever, cough, abdominal pain, and vision loss in severe cases.
6. Enterobiasis: Also known as pinworm infection, this is caused by Enterobius vermicularis. The larvae hatch in the small intestine, mature into adult worms, and reside in the large intestine, causing perianal itching and restlessness, especially at night.

Preventive measures include:

1. Proper hand hygiene: Wash hands with soap and water after using the toilet, changing diapers, handling pets or their feces, and before preparing or eating food.
2. Personal hygiene: Keep fingernails short and clean, avoid biting nails, and wear shoes in public areas, especially where soil may be contaminated with human or animal feces.
3. Food safety: Wash fruits and vegetables thoroughly, cook meat properly, and avoid consuming raw or undercooked meat, poultry, or fish.
4. Environmental cleanliness: Regularly clean surfaces that come into contact with food, such as countertops, cutting boards, and utensils. Dispose of trash properly and maintain a clean living environment.
5. Pet care: Keep pets healthy and regularly deworm them as recommended by a veterinarian. Pick up pet feces promptly to prevent contamination of the environment.
6. Public health measures: Implement public health interventions, such as regular waste disposal, sewage treatment, and vector control, to reduce the transmission of parasitic infections.

Antinematodal agents are a type of medication used to treat infections caused by nematodes, which are also known as roundworms. These agents work by either killing the parasitic worms or preventing them from reproducing. Some examples of antinematodal agents include albendazole, ivermectin, and mebendazole. These medications are used to treat a variety of nematode infections, such as ascariasis, hookworm infection, and strongyloidiasis. It is important to note that the use of antinematodal agents should be under the guidance of a healthcare professional, as they can have side effects and may interact with other medications.

Rodent-borne diseases are infectious diseases transmitted to humans (and other animals) by rodents, their parasites or by contact with rodent urine, feces, or saliva. These diseases can be caused by viruses, bacteria, fungi, or parasites. Some examples of rodent-borne diseases include Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome, Leptospirosis, Salmonellosis, Rat-bite fever, and Plague. It's important to note that rodents can also cause allergic reactions in some people through their dander, urine, or saliva. Proper sanitation, rodent control measures, and protective equipment when handling rodents can help prevent the spread of these diseases.

Antibodies are proteins produced by the immune system in response to the presence of a foreign substance, known as an antigen. They are capable of recognizing and binding to specific antigens, neutralizing or marking them for destruction by other immune cells.

Helminths are parasitic worms that can infect humans and animals. They include roundworms, tapeworms, and flukes, among others. Helminth infections can cause a range of symptoms, depending on the type of worm and the location of the infection.

Antibodies to helminths are produced by the immune system in response to an infection with one of these parasitic worms. These antibodies can be detected in the blood and serve as evidence of a current or past infection. They may also play a role in protecting against future infections with the same type of worm.

There are several different classes of antibodies, including IgA, IgD, IgE, IgG, and IgM. Antibodies to helminths are typically of the IgE class, which are associated with allergic reactions and the defense against parasites. IgE antibodies can bind to mast cells and basophils, triggering the release of histamine and other inflammatory mediators that help to protect against the worm.

In addition to IgE, other classes of antibodies may also be produced in response to a helminth infection. For example, IgG antibodies may be produced later in the course of the infection and can provide long-term immunity to reinfection. IgA antibodies may also be produced and can help to prevent the attachment and entry of the worm into the body.

Overall, the production of antibodies to helminths is an important part of the immune response to these parasitic worms. However, in some cases, the presence of these antibodies may also be associated with allergic reactions or other immunological disorders.

... is the sequel to Karinthy's 1916 novel, Voyage to Faremido, in which the protagonist is transported from the ... It featured the voices of John Rowe as Gulliver, Jane Wenham as the Queen of Capillaria, as well as Norma Ronald, Garard Green ... Capillaria title listing at the Internet Speculative Fiction Database v t e (Articles with short description, Short description ... Capillaria (Hungarian: Capillária, 1921) is a fantasy novel by Hungarian author Frigyes Karinthy, which depicts an undersea ...
"Capillaria aerophila, The Merck Veterinary Manual". Merck & Co. Retrieved 2008-11-26. Cross, J.H. (1998) "Capillaria aerophila ... Capillaria aerophila has been found on every continent, and occurs in dogs, cats, and a wide range of wild mammals. The ... Capillaria aerophila is a nematode parasite found in the respiratory tract of foxes, dogs, and various other carnivorous ... Most cases of Capillaria aerophila infestation in dogs and cats are without serious clinical symptoms. Heavy infestations may ...
Usually, Capillaria hepatica is found in rodents, monkeys and other animals. Capillaria hepatica is rarely found in humans and ... Capillaria hepatica is a parasitic nematode which causes hepatic capillariasis in rodents and numerous other mammal species, ... Capillaria hepatica can also cause Hepatomegaly. Infections of C. hepatica can present with several clinical symptoms including ... Capillaria hepatica): part 1-Muroidea". Parasitology Research. Springer. 113 (2): 619-640. doi:10.1007/s00436-013-3691-x. ISSN ...
... a parasite of the respiratory system of foxes and other mammals Capillaria gastrica; a parasite of rodents Capillaria hepatica ... Species in the genus Capillaria include (among hundreds of described species): Capillaria aerophila; modern name Eucoleus ... Capillaria is a genus of nematodes in the family Capillariidae (or Trichinellidae, according to some classifications). The ... list of genera in pages 30-32) (ISBN 8020008055) Moravec, F.; Justine, J.-L. (2014). "Capillaria plectropomi n. sp. (Nematoda: ...
... (also known as Pearsonema feliscati, the cat bladder worm is a worm that affects cats, and seldom dogs. ... Bédard C, Desnoyers M, Lavallée MC, Poirier D (2002). "Capillaria in the bladder of an adult cat". Can Vet J. 43 (12): 973-4. ... "Capillaria feliscati" at the Encyclopedia of Life (Articles with short description, Short description is different from ... There are so far no true vaccines against Capillaria worms. This parasite is readily treated with proprietary medicines such as ...
... is a parasitic nematode in the genus Capillaria. Among the known host species are the marsh rice rat ( ...
... is often found in the urine, urinary bladder or kidneys of dogs and cats in North America, Europe, Asia and ... Capillaria plica (dog bladder worm) is a parasitic nematode which is most often found in the urinary bladder, and occasionally ... Bédard C, Desnoyers M, Lavallée MC, Poirier D (December 2002). "Capillaria in the bladder of an adult cat". Can. Vet. J. 43 (12 ... Senior DF, Solomon GB, Goldschmidt MH, Joyce T, Bovee KC (May 1980). "Capillaria plica infection in dogs". J. Am. Vet. Med. ...
... is a parasitic nematode which causes intestinal capillariasis. This sometimes fatal disease was first ... In 1968, the cause was identified as Capillaria philippinensis. Adult C. philippinensis are very small, with males measuring ... However, this species is almost universally referred to as Capillaria philippinensis in the current medical literature. The ... Chitwood; Valesquez, C; Salazar, NG (1968). "Capillaria philippinensis sp. n. (Nematoda: Trichinellida), from the intestine of ...
The specific epithet (capillaris) is "named from the Latin capillaris (hair-like), in reference to the very slender style". ... Verticordia capillaris is a flowering plant in the myrtle family, Myrtaceae and is endemic to the south-west of Western ... Verticordia capillaris was first formally described by Alex George in 1991 and the description was published in Nuytsia from ... Verticordia capillaris is classified as "Priority Four" by the Government of Western Australia Department of Parks and Wildlife ...
Podelepis capillaris is a very hardy plant and suitable for dry and hot conditions. It grows most often in deep inland sands or ... Podelepis capillaris, sometimes referred to as an invisible plant is a wiry many branched annual herb that can grow up to 45 cm ... Podelepis capillaris, the wiry podolepis, is a hardy small herb endemic to inland and central Australia, it produces a thin ... Podelepis capillaris can be differentiated from other species in the genus Podolepis by it having mostly white flowers, often ...
M. capillaris is not transmissible to humans. M. capillaris is less pathogenic in sheep, because it normally only affects the ... Muelleries capillaris, also known as the hair or goat lungworm, is one of the most economically important nematodes of small ... Since there are many intermediate hosts, M. capillaris is found worldwide. In areas of temperate climates, nearly all sheep are ... The presence of eggs on fecal samples can also confirm an M. capillaris infections. Treatment of sheep is normally unnecessary ...
... f. capillaris - most of species range Tillandsia capillaris f. cordobensis (Hieron.) L.B.Sm. - Bolivia, ... Tillandsia capillaris is a species in the genus Tillandsia. This species is native to southern and western South America ( ... Peru, Argentina, Chile Tillandsia capillaris f. virescens (Ruiz & Pav.) L.B.Sm. - Bolivia, Peru, Argentina, Chile Kew World ... How many taxa can be recognised within the complex Tillandsia capillaris (Bromeliaceae, Tillandsioideae)?. PhytoKeys 23: 25-39 ...
... , (Chinese: 茵陈蒿 yīn chén hāo), is a species of flowering plant in the wormwood genus Artemisia, family ... Artemisia capillaris is biennial or perennial herb, 30-80(100) cm tall with vertical, woody rootstock and usually a single to ... "Artemisia capillaris". www.efloras.org. Flora of China. Retrieved 28 March 2023. Geng, Chang-An; Yang, Tong-Hua; Huang, Xiao- ... "Artemisia capillaris Thunb". Plants of the World Online. Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. Retrieved 3 January 2022. "Artemisia ...
... is a small sea snail, a marine gastropod mollusc in the family Mangeliidae. The length of the shell ... WoRMS (2009). Eucithara capillaris Kilburn & Dekker, 2008. In: MolluscaBase (2017). Accessed through: World Register of Marine ... Basteria, 72(1-3), 1-19 "Eucithara capillaris". Gastropods.com. Retrieved 16 January 2019. (Articles with short description, ...
... is a species of stonewort belonging to the family Characeae. It is native to Europe and Northern America. " ... "Nitella capillaris (Krock.) J.Groves & Bull.-Webst". www.gbif.org. Retrieved 12 February 2021. (Articles with short description ...
The specific epithet (capillaris) is a Latin word meaning "of hair". Wahlenbergia capillaris is widespread in all mainland ... In 1839, George Don changed the name to Wahlenbergia capillaris. Roger Carolin rejected the name Campanula capillaris because ... "Wahlenbergia capillaris". Australian Plant Census. Retrieved 2 September 2020. Walsh, Neville. "Wahlenbergia capillaris". Royal ... Wahlenbergia capillaris is a perennial herb with a thickened taproot and a few to many thin, erect, branched stems that grows ...
"Styphelia capillaris". Plants of the World Online. Retrieved 2 September 2023. "Styphelia capillaris". FloraBase. Western ... Styphelia capillaris is a dense, spreading shrub that typically grows up to 0.8 m (2 ft 7 in) high and 1.5 m (4 ft 11 in) wide ... Styphelia capillaris, commonly known as Horts' styphelia, is a species of flowering plant in the heath family Ericaceae and is ... The specific epithet (capillaris) means "hair-like" or "thread-like", referring to the tips of the sepals. Horts' styphelia ...
Wikimedia Commons has media related to Drosera capillaris. "Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center - Drosera capillaris". www. ... Drosera capillaris)". The American Midland Naturalist. 141 (1): 28-42. ISSN 0003-0031. "Drosera capillaris (Bog Sundew, Pink ... Drosera capillaris, also known as the pink sundew, is a species of carnivorous plant belonging to the family Droseraceae. It is ... D. capillaris can be confused with D. intermedia (spoonleaf sundew) especially when young, as both form flat rosettes and ...
... is a species of acroporid coral found in the Red Sea. Hoeksema, Bert (2018). "Acropora capillaris ( ...
... is a species of agaric fungus in the family Marasmiaceae. A saprobic fungus, it produces fruit bodies ( ... "Marasmius capillaris Morgan". MycoBank. International Mycological Association. Retrieved 2012-06-18. Kuo M (October 2006). " ... ISBN 0-395-91090-0. Marasmius capillaris in Index Fungorum (Articles with short description, Short description matches Wikidata ... "Marasmius capillaris". MushroomExpert.Com. Retrieved 2012-06-18. McKnight VB, McKnight KH. (1987). A Field Guide to Mushrooms: ...
"Acianthera capillaris (Lindl.) Pridgeon & M.W.Chase , Plants of the World Online , Kew Science". Plants of the World Online. ... Acianthera capillaris is a species of orchid plant native to Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Paraguay, Venezuela, the ...
Flowers "Sonchus capillaris", The Plant List, retrieved 2018-02-27 "Sonchus capillaris Svent". African Plant Database. ... Sonchus capillaris is a species of flowering plant in the family Asteraceae. It is endemic to the Canary Islands. ...
... (formerly Gilia capillaris) is a species of flowering plant in the phlox family known by the common name ...
... grows in many types of habitat, generally in moist areas such as streamside meadows. It is an annual ... Bulbostylis capillaris is a species of sedge known by the common names densetuft hairsedge and threadleaf beakseed. It is ... 23 Page 136, Bulbostylis capillaris (Linnaeus) C. B. Clarke in J. D. Hooker, Fl. Brit. India. 6: 652. 1893. Biota of North ... Along with Piptochaetium montevidense and Juncus capillacaeus, Bulbostylis capillaris is used in Rio Grande do Sul as a ...
... is a moth in the family Lecithoceridae first described by Kyu-Tek Park and John B. Heppner in 2000. It is ...
... The Nature Conservancy. Primula capillaris. Flora of North America. (Articles with short description, Short ... Primula capillaris is a rare species of flowering plant in the primrose family known by the common name Ruby Mountains primrose ... "NatureServe Explorer". NatureServe Explorer Primula capillaris. NatureServe. 2022. Retrieved 22 May 2022. ...
... is a species of damselfly in the family Protoneuridae. It is endemic to Cuba. Its natural habitats are ... Paulson, D. R. (2009). "Protoneura capillaris". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. 2009: e.T59764A11979541. doi:10.2305/IUCN. ...
USDA Plants Profile for Crepis capillaris - invasive plant species. UC Calphotos gallery Media related to Crepis capillaris at ... Crepis capillaris is a low, annual plant common in disturbed ground and open habitats, such as thin grassland, lawns, spoil ... Crepis capillaris, the smooth hawksbeard, is a species of flowering plant in the tribe Cichorieae within the family Asteraceae ... "Crepis capillaris". Germplasm Resources Information Network. Agricultural Research Service, United States Department of ...
"Trox capillaris Say, 1824". www.gbif.org. Retrieved 2022-09-28. Media related to Trox capillaris at Wikimedia Commons v t e ( ... Trox capillaris is a beetle of the family Trogidae. " ...
Plants Profile for Agrostis Capillaris Retrieved 14 March 2010. "Agrostis capillaris". Germplasm Resources Information Network ... Agrostis capillaris forms a constituent of purple moor grass and rush pastures, a type of Biodiversity Action Plan habitat in ... Agrostis capillaris, the common bent, colonial bent, or browntop, is a rhizomatous and stoloniferous perennial in the grass ... "Global Invasive Species Database: Ecology of Agrostis capillaris". Invasive Species Specialist Group. Retrieved 15 March 2010. ...
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Capillaria hepatica pseudoinfection Miguel M Cabada et al. Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2013 Oct. ... Capillaria hepatica (syn Calodium hepaticum) in primates in a zoological collection in the UK. Pizzi R, Gordon JC, Flach EJ, ... Capillaria Ova and Diagnosis of Trichuris trichiura Infection in Humans by Kato-Katz Smear, Liberia. Fischer K, Gankpala A, ... Capillaria Ova and Diagnosis of Trichuris trichiura Infection in Humans by Kato-Katz Smear, Liberia. Fischer K, Gankpala A, ...
Capillaria Ova and Diagnosis of Trichuris trichiura Infection in Humans by Kato-Katz Smear, Liberia Kerstin Fischer, Abakar ... Capillaria Ova and Diagnosis of Trichuris trichiura Infection in Humans by Kato-Katz Smear, Liberia. ...
Tufted or open erect perennial herb with thickened taproot, branching from base. Plants often die back in dry seasons and reshoot in winter.
Capillaria hepatica and Capillaria philippinensis. C. hepatica is transferred through the fecal matter of infected animals and ...
Muhlenbergia capillaris. Read more. £10.99. Pot Size: 3LtrAvailable Soon. Add To Wish List ...
Roundworm-Capillaria (Dogs). you can get Capillaria from just about any infected animal-especially carnivores like dogs, cats, ...
Eragrostis capillaris (L.) Nees * Collector(s). A. Clapp 1031, 19 Sep 1837 ...
Capillaria hepatica Rodents. Ingestion of embryonated eggs. Liver. Histopathology. Anatrichosoma buccalis Opossums. Unknown. ... A, Capillaria hepatica in liver (hematoxylin/eosin [H&E] staining, original magnification [OM] ×400; inset at ×1000). B, ... A, Capillaria hepatica in liver (hematoxylin/eosin [H&E] staining, original magnification [OM] ×400; inset at ×1000). B, ...
Start Over You searched for: Defendants Capillaris Manufacturing Co. ✖Remove constraint Defendants: Capillaris Manufacturing Co ... Misbranding of Capillaris-X. U. S. v. 299 3/4 Dozen Packages of Capillaris-X. Decree of condemnation and forfeiture. Product ... Misbranding of Capillaris-X. U. S. v. 299 3/4 Dozen Packages of Capillaris-X. Decree of condemnation and forfeiture. Product ...
Agrostis capillaris. CCH1 Determination History. ICPN Name Status. JFP Rank 2, accepted name for taxon naturalized in CA link ...
Orders destined for Alaska, Hawaii, Puerto Rico and other U.S. territories please call 760-436-4239 or email us at [email protected] for further details as shipping charges and methods will vary. We generally use USPS to ship orders to these destinations ...
Policy Notes are designed to update the public on the activities of the Pinelands Commission, which have been summarized by Pinelands Preservation Alliance staff who attend all public meetings of the Commission. ...
Capillaria philippinensis in Upper Egypt: has it become endemic? Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2012;86:126-33. DOIPubMedGoogle Scholar ... features that are consistent with eggs of Capillaria hepatica (syn. Calodium hepaticum) and some other Capillaria species ( ... Capillaria hepatica in man-an overview of hepatic capillariosis and spurious infections. Parasitol Res. 2011;109:969-79. DOI ... Capillaria Ova and Diagnosis of Trichuris trichiura Infection in Humans by Kato-Katz Smear, Liberia On This Page ...
Enterobius, trichuris, capillaria, and hookworm including ancylostoma caninum. Gastroenterol Clin North Am. 1996 Sep. 25(3):579 ...
AGROSTIS CAPILLARIS POLLEN (UNII: 1ZWG7J43CL) (AGROSTIS CAPILLARIS POLLEN - UNII:1ZWG7J43CL) AGROSTIS CAPILLARIS POLLEN. 30 [hp ...
Othonna capillaris L.f. -- Suppl. 388. * Othonna carnosa Less. -- Syn. Comp. 88. ...
Capillaris. Rotundifolua. Fiformis. Sarracenia:. Alata maroon throut Hummer hammerhead. Purperea Flava x alata red/black. ( ...
Crepis capillaris), bramble (Rubus fruticosus agg.), English stonecrop (Sedum anglicum), sea spurge (Euphorbia maritima), bell ...
OCT demonstrated a chorio-capillaris/RPE complex disruption and its resolution over time in all patients with choroidal rupture ...
Japanese artemisia capillaris is also used to counter the impact of blue light on the skin. ...
Muhlenbergia capillaris White Cloud (White Awn Muhly). Sun. Zone: 6b-10, possibly hardier 48" tall Origin: USA. Open House/ ... Muhlenbergia capillaris (Hairy Awn Muhly). Sun to Part Sun. Zone: 6b-10, possibly hardier 30" tall Origin: USA. Im in love ... Muhlenbergia capillaris and M. lindheimeri had a conjugal encounter on a warm Texas night and the result was Muhlenbergia Pink ... Muhlenbergia capillaris is another US native ornamental deer-resistant grass (Massachusetts to Texas) that will knock your ...
2. Anti-hepatitis B virus effects of the traditional Chinese herb Artemisia capillaris and its active enynes.. Geng CA; Yang TH ... 1. Polyacetylenes and anti-hepatitis B virus active constituents from Artemisia capillaris.. Zhao Y; Geng CA; Sun CL; Ma YB; ... 4. UFLC/MS-IT-TOF guided isolation of anti-HBV active chlorogenic acid analogues from Artemisia capillaris as a traditional ... Isolation, synthesis and anti-hepatitis B virus evaluation of p-hydroxyacetophenone derivatives from Artemisia capillaris. ...
Crepis capillaris. (hawksbeard). Herbs - Dicotyledonous composites. Exotic. Cystopteris tasmanica. (bladder fern). Ferns. Not ...
Antihepatotoxic principles of Artemisia capillaris buds. Kiso Y, Ogasawara S, Hirota K, Watanabe N, Oshima Y, Konno C, Hikino H ...
PP 0442-0444 MODIFICATION OF THE MUTAGENIC EFFECT OF GAMMA IR W IATION FROM 137CS ON THE CELLS OF CREPIS CAPILLARIS SEEDS WHEN ... PP 0442-0444 MODIFICATION OF THE MUTAGENIC EFFECT OF GAMMA IARAOIA7ION FROM 137CS ON THE CELLS OF CREPIS CAPILLARIS SEEDS WHEN ...
Capillaria B01.050.500.500.294.100.275.780.608 Trichinella B01.050.500.500.294.100.275.780.608.700 Trichinella spiralis B01.050 ...
  • Muhlenbergia capillaris (Lam. (wildflower.org)
  • Pink muhly grass (Muhlenbergia capillaris) is a medium height ornamental grass that can be a good alternative to traditional lawn grasses. (tallahassee.com)
  • A pretty medium height ornamental grass that is seen often in our area on road medians and in yards is pink muhly grass ( Muhlenbergia capillaris ), which should not be confused with purple fountain grass ( Pennisetum setaceum ). (tallahassee.com)
  • Artemisia capillaris thunb is bitter, slightly cold and clear, with a clear and fragrant qi that flows into the spleen, stomach, liver, and gallbladder meridians. (biohoer.com)
  • Artemisia capillaris thunb extract is good at clearing dampness and heat, and reducing jaundice. (biohoer.com)
  • Artemisia capillaris thunb is the dry above-ground part of the Asteraceae plant Artemisia scoparia Waldst.etkit. (biohoer.com)
  • Aqueous extract of Artemisia capillaris improves non-alcoholic fatty liver and obesity in mice induced by high-fat diet. (bvsalud.org)
  • Artemisia capillaris (AC) is the above-ground dried part of Artemisia capillaris Thunb. (bvsalud.org)
  • In order to evaluate the therapeutic effect of Artemisia capillaris on NAFLD and obesity , experiments were conducted using aqueous extracts of Artemisia capillaris (WAC) to intervene in NAFLD models in vivo and in vitro . (bvsalud.org)
  • BASIONYM: Drosera capillaris Poiret 1804. (usf.edu)
  • Title : Capillaria Ova and Diagnosis of Trichuris trichiura Infection in Humans by Kato-Katz Smear, Liberia Personal Author(s) : Fischer, Kerstin;Gankpala, Abakar;Gankpala, Lincoln;Bolay, Fatorma K.;Curtis, Kurt C.;Weil, Gary J.;Fischer, Peter U. (cdc.gov)
  • available online at https://doi.org/10.5962/bhl.title.1972 page(s): 509-510, plate IV fig. 10 [details] original description (of Ancistria capillaris Verrill, 1874 ) Verrill, Addison Emery. (marinespecies.org)
  • Japanese artemisia capillaris is also used to counter the impact of blue light on the skin. (leisureopportunities.co.uk)
  • 1. Polyacetylenes and anti-hepatitis B virus active constituents from Artemisia capillaris. (nih.gov)
  • 2. Anti-hepatitis B virus effects of the traditional Chinese herb Artemisia capillaris and its active enynes. (nih.gov)
  • 4. UFLC/MS-IT-TOF guided isolation of anti-HBV active chlorogenic acid analogues from Artemisia capillaris as a traditional Chinese herb for the treatment of hepatitis. (nih.gov)
  • 12. Isolation, synthesis and anti-hepatitis B virus evaluation of p-hydroxyacetophenone derivatives from Artemisia capillaris. (nih.gov)
  • Antihepatotoxic principles of Artemisia capillaris buds. (nih.gov)
  • Capillaria hepatica (syn Calodium hepaticum) in primates in a zoological collection in the UK. (nih.gov)
  • Capillaria hepatica and Capillaria philippinensis . (cdc.gov)
  • Marked hypoalbuminemia caused by Capillaria philippinensis]. (nih.gov)
  • Parasitological aspects of Capillaria philippinensis recovered from Egyptian patients. (nih.gov)
  • hawk's beard ( Crepis capillaris ), bramble ( Rubus fruticosus agg. (bwars.com)
  • D. capensis albino D. capensis broad leaf [pictures] D. capensis typical D. capillaris D. filiformis D. (terraforums.com)
  • Navarretia Capillaris, or more commonly know as Miniature Gilia , is a forb/herb (a forb/herb is a non-woody plant that is not a grass) of the genus Navarretia. (sagebud.com)
  • Navarretia Capillaris or Miniature Gilia 's floral region is North America US Lower 48, specifically in the states of California, Idaho, Nevada, Oregon, Utah and Washington. (sagebud.com)
  • Laat je e-mailadres achter en we sturen je een mailtje wanneer dit product weer op voorraad is. (boozyshop.nl)