Dogs: The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)Dog Diseases: Diseases of the domestic dog (Canis familiaris). This term does not include diseases of wild dogs, WOLVES; FOXES; and other Canidae for which the heading CARNIVORA is used.Distemper Virus, Canine: A species of MORBILLIVIRUS causing distemper in dogs, wolves, foxes, raccoons, and ferrets. Pinnipeds have also been known to contract Canine distemper virus from contact with domestic dogs.Parvovirus, Canine: A species of the genus PARVOVIRUS and a host range variant of FELINE PANLEUKOPENIA VIRUS. It causes a highly infectious fulminating ENTERITIS in dogs producing high mortality. It is distinct from CANINE MINUTE VIRUS, a species in the genus BOCAVIRUS. This virus can also infect cats and mink.Cuspid: The third tooth to the left and to the right of the midline of either jaw, situated between the second INCISOR and the premolar teeth (BICUSPID). (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p817)Coronavirus, Canine: A species of CORONAVIRUS infecting dogs. Onset of symptoms is usually sudden and includes vomiting, diarrhea, and dehydration.Distemper: A name for several highly contagious viral diseases of animals, especially canine distemper. In dogs, it is caused by the canine distemper virus (DISTEMPER VIRUS, CANINE). It is characterized by a diphasic fever, leukopenia, gastrointestinal and respiratory inflammation and sometimes, neurologic complications. In cats it is known as FELINE PANLEUKOPENIA.Hip Dysplasia, Canine: A hereditary disease of the hip joints in dogs. Signs of the disease may be evident any time after 4 weeks of age.Raccoon Dogs: The lone species in the genus Nyctereutes, family CANIDAE. It is found in the woodland zone from southeastern Siberia to Vietnam and on the main islands of Japan.Leishmania infantum: A parasitic hemoflagellate of the subgenus Leishmania leishmania that infects man and animals and causes visceral leishmaniasis (LEISHMANIASIS, VISCERAL). Human infections are confined almost entirely to children. This parasite is commonly seen in dogs, other Canidae, and porcupines with humans considered only an accidental host. Transmission is by Phlebotomus sandflies.Tooth Eruption, Ectopic: An abnormality in the direction of a TOOTH ERUPTION.Tooth, Impacted: A tooth that is prevented from erupting by a physical barrier, usually other teeth. Impaction may also result from orientation of the tooth in an other than vertical position in the periodontal structures.Cat Diseases: Diseases of the domestic cat (Felis catus or F. domesticus). This term does not include diseases of the so-called big cats such as CHEETAHS; LIONS; tigers, cougars, panthers, leopards, and other Felidae for which the heading CARNIVORA is used.Mammary Neoplasms, Animal: Tumors or cancer of the MAMMARY GLAND in animals (MAMMARY GLANDS, ANIMAL).Maxilla: One of a pair of irregularly shaped bones that form the upper jaw. A maxillary bone provides tooth sockets for the superior teeth, forms part of the ORBIT, and contains the MAXILLARY SINUS.Tooth, Unerupted: A normal developing tooth which has not yet perforated the oral mucosa or one that fails to erupt in the normal sequence or time interval expected for the type of tooth in a given gender, age, or population group.Venereal Tumors, Veterinary: Tumors most commonly seen on or near the genitalia. They are venereal, most likely transmitted through transplantation of cells by contact. Metastases have been reported. Spontaneous regression may occur.Cats: The domestic cat, Felis catus, of the carnivore family FELIDAE, comprising over 30 different breeds. The domestic cat is descended primarily from the wild cat of Africa and extreme southwestern Asia. Though probably present in towns in Palestine as long ago as 7000 years, actual domestication occurred in Egypt about 4000 years ago. (From Walker's Mammals of the World, 6th ed, p801)Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Hepatitis, Infectious Canine: A contagious disease caused by canine adenovirus (ADENOVIRUSES, CANINE) infecting the LIVER, the EYE, the KIDNEY, and other organs in dogs, other canids, and bears. Symptoms include FEVER; EDEMA; VOMITING; and DIARRHEA.Bites and StingsKidney: Body organ that filters blood for the secretion of URINE and that regulates ion concentrations.Dirofilariasis: Infection with nematodes of the genus DIROFILARIA, usually in animals, especially dogs, but occasionally in man.Herpesvirus 1, Canid: A species of VARICELLOVIRUS virus that causes a disease in newborn puppies.Dirofilaria immitis: A filarial parasite primarily of dogs but occurring also in foxes, wolves, and humans. The parasite is transmitted by mosquitoes.Leishmaniasis, Visceral: A chronic disease caused by LEISHMANIA DONOVANI and transmitted by the bite of several sandflies of the genera Phlebotomus and Lutzomyia. It is commonly characterized by fever, chills, vomiting, anemia, hepatosplenomegaly, leukopenia, hypergammaglobulinemia, emaciation, and an earth-gray color of the skin. The disease is classified into three main types according to geographic distribution: Indian, Mediterranean (or infantile), and African.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Bonding, Human-Pet: The emotional attachment of individuals to PETS.Coronary Circulation: The circulation of blood through the CORONARY VESSELS of the HEART.Pets: Animals kept by humans for companionship and enjoyment, as opposed to DOMESTIC ANIMALS such as livestock or farm animals, which are kept for economic reasons.Species Specificity: The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.Heart: The hollow, muscular organ that maintains the circulation of the blood.Heart Conduction System: An impulse-conducting system composed of modified cardiac muscle, having the power of spontaneous rhythmicity and conduction more highly developed than the rest of the heart.Myocardium: The muscle tissue of the HEART. It is composed of striated, involuntary muscle cells (MYOCYTES, CARDIAC) connected to form the contractile pump to generate blood flow.Hemodynamics: The movement and the forces involved in the movement of the blood through the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Madin Darby Canine Kidney Cells: An epithelial cell line derived from a kidney of a normal adult female dog.Wolves: Any of several large carnivorous mammals of the family CANIDAE that usually hunt in packs.Rabies: Acute VIRAL CNS INFECTION affecting mammals, including humans. It is caused by RABIES VIRUS and usually spread by contamination with virus-laden saliva of bites inflicted by rabid animals. Important animal vectors include the dog, cat, bat, fox, raccoon, skunk, and wolf.Heart Rate: The number of times the HEART VENTRICLES contract per unit of time, usually per minute.Animals, Domestic: Animals which have become adapted through breeding in captivity to a life intimately associated with humans. They include animals domesticated by humans to live and breed in a tame condition on farms or ranches for economic reasons, including LIVESTOCK (specifically CATTLE; SHEEP; HORSES; etc.), POULTRY; and those raised or kept for pleasure and companionship, e.g., PETS; or specifically DOGS; CATS; etc.Cardiac Pacing, Artificial: Regulation of the rate of contraction of the heart muscles by an artificial pacemaker.Blood Pressure: PRESSURE of the BLOOD on the ARTERIES and other BLOOD VESSELS.Ventricular Function: The hemodynamic and electrophysiological action of the HEART VENTRICLES.Parvoviridae Infections: Virus infections caused by the PARVOVIRIDAE.Cell Line: Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.Ehrlichia canis: Species of gram-negative bacteria in the family ANAPLASMATACEAE, causing EHRLICHIOSIS in DOGS. The most common vector is the brown dog tick. It can also cause disease in humans.Dose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.Coronary Vessels: The veins and arteries of the HEART.Heart Ventricles: The lower right and left chambers of the heart. The right ventricle pumps venous BLOOD into the LUNGS and the left ventricle pumps oxygenated blood into the systemic arterial circulation.Immunohistochemistry: Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.Heart Atria: The chambers of the heart, to which the BLOOD returns from the circulation.Incisor: Any of the eight frontal teeth (four maxillary and four mandibular) having a sharp incisal edge for cutting food and a single root, which occurs in man both as a deciduous and a permanent tooth. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p820)Models, Animal: Non-human animals, selected because of specific characteristics, for use in experimental research, teaching, or testing.Pericardium: A conical fibro-serous sac surrounding the HEART and the roots of the great vessels (AORTA; VENAE CAVAE; PULMONARY ARTERY). Pericardium consists of two sacs: the outer fibrous pericardium and the inner serous pericardium. The latter consists of an outer parietal layer facing the fibrous pericardium, and an inner visceral layer (epicardium) resting next to the heart, and a pericardial cavity between these two layers.Odontometry: Measurement of tooth characteristics.Radiography, Panoramic: Extraoral body-section radiography depicting an entire maxilla, or both maxilla and mandible, on a single film.Tooth Movement: Orthodontic techniques used to correct the malposition of a single tooth.Histiocytic Sarcoma: Malignant neoplasms composed of MACROPHAGES or DENDRITIC CELLS. Most histiocytic sarcomas present as localized tumor masses without a leukemic phase. Though the biological behavior of these neoplasms resemble lymphomas, their cell lineage is histiocytic not lymphoid.Dental Arch: The curve formed by the row of TEETH in their normal position in the JAW. The inferior dental arch is formed by the mandibular teeth, and the superior dental arch by the maxillary teeth.Zoonoses: Diseases of non-human animals that may be transmitted to HUMANS or may be transmitted from humans to non-human animals.Endocardium: The innermost layer of the heart, comprised of endothelial cells.Foxes: Any of several carnivores in the family CANIDAE, that possess erect ears and long bushy tails and are smaller than WOLVES. They are classified in several genera and found on all continents except Antarctica.Cross Circulation: The circulation in a portion of the body of one individual of blood supplied from another individual.Mastocytoma: A solid tumor consisting of a dense infiltration of MAST CELLS. It is generally benign.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Tooth Eruption: The emergence of a tooth from within its follicle in the ALVEOLAR PROCESS of the MAXILLA or MANDIBLE into the ORAL CAVITY. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)Ehrlichiosis: A tick-borne disease characterized by FEVER; HEADACHE; myalgias; ANOREXIA; and occasionally RASH. It is caused by several bacterial species and can produce disease in DOGS; CATTLE; SHEEP; GOATS; HORSES; and humans. The primary species causing human disease are EHRLICHIA CHAFFEENSIS; ANAPLASMA PHAGOCYTOPHILUM; and Ehrlichia ewingii.Influenza A Virus, H3N8 Subtype: A subtype of INFLUENZA A VIRUS comprised of the surface proteins hemagglutinin 3 and neuraminidase 8. The H3N8 subtype has frequently been found in horses.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Action Potentials: Abrupt changes in the membrane potential that sweep along the CELL MEMBRANE of excitable cells in response to excitation stimuli.Polymerase Chain Reaction: In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.Halothane: A nonflammable, halogenated, hydrocarbon anesthetic that provides relatively rapid induction with little or no excitement. Analgesia may not be adequate. NITROUS OXIDE is often given concomitantly. Because halothane may not produce sufficient muscle relaxation, supplemental neuromuscular blocking agents may be required. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual, 1994, p178)Electric Stimulation: Use of electric potential or currents to elicit biological responses.Vascular Resistance: The force that opposes the flow of BLOOD through a vascular bed. It is equal to the difference in BLOOD PRESSURE across the vascular bed divided by the CARDIAC OUTPUT.Tooth Crown: The upper part of the tooth, which joins the lower part of the tooth (TOOTH ROOT) at the cervix (TOOTH CERVIX) at a line called the cementoenamel junction. The entire surface of the crown is covered with enamel which is thicker at the extremity and becomes progressively thinner toward the cervix. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p216)Perfusion: Treatment process involving the injection of fluid into an organ or tissue.Norepinephrine: Precursor of epinephrine that is secreted by the adrenal medulla and is a widespread central and autonomic neurotransmitter. Norepinephrine is the principal transmitter of most postganglionic sympathetic fibers and of the diffuse projection system in the brain arising from the locus ceruleus. It is also found in plants and is used pharmacologically as a sympathomimetic.Parasitic Diseases, Animal: Infections or infestations with parasitic organisms. The infestation may be experimental or veterinary.Parvoviridae: A family of very small DNA viruses containing a single molecule of single-stranded DNA and consisting of two subfamilies: PARVOVIRINAE and DENSOVIRINAE. They infect both vertebrates and invertebrates.Veterinary Medicine: The medical science concerned with the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of diseases in animals.Carnivora: An order of MAMMALS, usually flesh eaters with appropriate dentition. Suborders include the terrestrial carnivores Fissipedia, and the aquatic carnivores PINNIPEDIA.Rabies Vaccines: Vaccines or candidate vaccines used to prevent and treat RABIES. The inactivated virus vaccine is used for preexposure immunization to persons at high risk of exposure, and in conjunction with rabies immunoglobulin, for postexposure prophylaxis.Vagus Nerve: The 10th cranial nerve. The vagus is a mixed nerve which contains somatic afferents (from skin in back of the ear and the external auditory meatus), visceral afferents (from the pharynx, larynx, thorax, and abdomen), parasympathetic efferents (to the thorax and abdomen), and efferents to striated muscle (of the larynx and pharynx).Brucella canis: A species of gram-negative bacteria infecting DOGS, the natural hosts, and causing canine BRUCELLOSIS. It can also cause a mild infection in humans.Propranolol: A widely used non-cardioselective beta-adrenergic antagonist. Propranolol has been used for MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION; ARRHYTHMIA; ANGINA PECTORIS; HYPERTENSION; HYPERTHYROIDISM; MIGRAINE; PHEOCHROMOCYTOMA; and ANXIETY but adverse effects instigate replacement by newer drugs.Otitis Externa: Inflammation of the OUTER EAR including the external EAR CANAL, cartilages of the auricle (EAR CARTILAGE), and the TYMPANIC MEMBRANE.Anesthesia: A state characterized by loss of feeling or sensation. This depression of nerve function is usually the result of pharmacologic action and is induced to allow performance of surgery or other painful procedures.Babesia: A genus of tick-borne protozoan parasites that infests the red blood cells of mammals, including humans. There are many recognized species, and the distribution is world-wide.Feces: Excrement from the INTESTINES, containing unabsorbed solids, waste products, secretions, and BACTERIA of the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.Atropine: An alkaloid, originally from Atropa belladonna, but found in other plants, mainly SOLANACEAE. Hyoscyamine is the 3(S)-endo isomer of atropine.Electrocardiography: Recording of the moment-to-moment electromotive forces of the HEART as projected onto various sites on the body's surface, delineated as a scalar function of time. The recording is monitored by a tracing on slow moving chart paper or by observing it on a cardioscope, which is a CATHODE RAY TUBE DISPLAY.Ehrlichia: Small, often pleomorphic, coccoid to ellipsoidal organisms occurring intracytoplasmically in circulating LYMPHOCYTES. They are the etiologic agents of tick-borne diseases of humans; DOGS; CATTLE; SHEEP; GOATS; and HORSES.Refractory Period, Electrophysiological: The period of time following the triggering of an ACTION POTENTIAL when the CELL MEMBRANE has changed to an unexcitable state and is gradually restored to the resting (excitable) state. During the absolute refractory period no other stimulus can trigger a response. This is followed by the relative refractory period during which the cell gradually becomes more excitable and the stronger impulse that is required to illicit a response gradually lessens to that required during the resting state.Muscle Contraction: A process leading to shortening and/or development of tension in muscle tissue. Muscle contraction occurs by a sliding filament mechanism whereby actin filaments slide inward among the myosin filaments.Histocytochemistry: Study of intracellular distribution of chemicals, reaction sites, enzymes, etc., by means of staining reactions, radioactive isotope uptake, selective metal distribution in electron microscopy, or other methods.Anal Gland Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the anal gland.Tick Infestations: Infestations with soft-bodied (Argasidae) or hard-bodied (Ixodidae) ticks.Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.Raccoons: Carnivores of the genus Procyon of the family PROCYONIDAE. Two subgenera and seven species are currently recognized. They range from southern Canada to Panama and are found in several of the Caribbean Islands.Bicuspid: One of the eight permanent teeth, two on either side in each jaw, between the canines (CUSPID) and the molars (MOLAR), serving for grinding and crushing food. The upper have two cusps (bicuspid) but the lower have one to three. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p822)Cardiac Output: The volume of BLOOD passing through the HEART per unit of time. It is usually expressed as liters (volume) per minute so as not to be confused with STROKE VOLUME (volume per beat).Radiation Hybrid Mapping: A method for ordering genetic loci along CHROMOSOMES. The method involves fusing irradiated donor cells with host cells from another species. Following cell fusion, fragments of DNA from the irradiated cells become integrated into the chromosomes of the host cells. Molecular probing of DNA obtained from the fused cells is used to determine if two or more genetic loci are located within the same fragment of donor cell DNA.Trachea: The cartilaginous and membranous tube descending from the larynx and branching into the right and left main bronchi.Basilar Artery: The artery formed by the union of the right and left vertebral arteries; it runs from the lower to the upper border of the pons, where it bifurcates into the two posterior cerebral arteries.Calcium: A basic element found in nearly all organized tissues. It is a member of the alkaline earth family of metals with the atomic symbol Ca, atomic number 20, and atomic weight 40. Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body and combines with phosphorus to form calcium phosphate in the bones and teeth. It is essential for the normal functioning of nerves and muscles and plays a role in blood coagulation (as factor IV) and in many enzymatic processes.Anti-Arrhythmia Agents: Agents used for the treatment or prevention of cardiac arrhythmias. They may affect the polarization-repolarization phase of the action potential, its excitability or refractoriness, or impulse conduction or membrane responsiveness within cardiac fibers. Anti-arrhythmia agents are often classed into four main groups according to their mechanism of action: sodium channel blockade, beta-adrenergic blockade, repolarization prolongation, or calcium channel blockade.Babesiosis: A group of tick-borne diseases of mammals including ZOONOSES in humans. They are caused by protozoa of the genus BABESIA, which parasitize erythrocytes, producing hemolysis. In the U.S., the organism's natural host is mice and transmission is by the deer tick IXODES SCAPULARIS.Canidae: A family of terrestrial carnivores with long snouts and non-retractable claws. Members include COYOTES; DOGS; FOXES; JACKALS; RACCOON DOGS; and WOLVES.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Radiographic Magnification: Use of optic and geometric techniques to enhance radiographic image quality and interpretation. It includes use of microfocal X-ray tubes and intensifying fluoroscopic screens.Regional Blood Flow: The flow of BLOOD through or around an organ or region of the body.Dirofilaria: A genus of filarial nematodes. Various immature species have been found to infect the eyes or subcutaneous tissue in humans.Osteosarcoma: A sarcoma originating in bone-forming cells, affecting the ends of long bones. It is the most common and most malignant of sarcomas of the bones, and occurs chiefly among 10- to 25-year-old youths. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Leishmaniasis: A disease caused by any of a number of species of protozoa in the genus LEISHMANIA. There are four major clinical types of this infection: cutaneous (Old and New World) (LEISHMANIASIS, CUTANEOUS), diffuse cutaneous (LEISHMANIASIS, DIFFUSE CUTANEOUS), mucocutaneous (LEISHMANIASIS, MUCOCUTANEOUS), and visceral (LEISHMANIASIS, VISCERAL).Muscle, Smooth: Unstriated and unstriped muscle, one of the muscles of the internal organs, blood vessels, hair follicles, etc. Contractile elements are elongated, usually spindle-shaped cells with centrally located nuclei. Smooth muscle fibers are bound together into sheets or bundles by reticular fibers and frequently elastic nets are also abundant. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Arrhythmias, Cardiac: Any disturbances of the normal rhythmic beating of the heart or MYOCARDIAL CONTRACTION. Cardiac arrhythmias can be classified by the abnormalities in HEART RATE, disorders of electrical impulse generation, or impulse conduction.Sinoatrial Node: The small mass of modified cardiac muscle fibers located at the junction of the superior vena cava (VENA CAVA, SUPERIOR) and right atrium. Contraction impulses probably start in this node, spread over the atrium (HEART ATRIUM) and are then transmitted by the atrioventricular bundle (BUNDLE OF HIS) to the ventricle (HEART VENTRICLE).Injections, Intravenous: Injections made into a vein for therapeutic or experimental purposes.Sertoli Cell Tumor: Gonadal neoplasm composed entirely of SERTOLI CELLS or may have a component of GRANULOSA CELLS. Some of the Sertoli cell tumors produce ESTROGEN or ANDROGENS, but seldom in sufficient quantity to cause clinical symptoms such as FEMINIZATION or masculinization (VIRILISM).Intercostal Muscles: Respiratory muscles that arise from the lower border of one rib and insert into the upper border of the adjoining rib, and contract during inspiration or respiration. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Sodium: A member of the alkali group of metals. It has the atomic symbol Na, atomic number 11, and atomic weight 23.Electrophysiology: The study of the generation and behavior of electrical charges in living organisms particularly the nervous system and the effects of electricity on living organisms.Breeding: The production of offspring by selective mating or HYBRIDIZATION, GENETIC in animals or plants.Microscopy, Electron: Microscopy using an electron beam, instead of light, to visualize the sample, thereby allowing much greater magnification. The interactions of ELECTRONS with specimens are used to provide information about the fine structure of that specimen. In TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY the reactions of the electrons that are transmitted through the specimen are imaged. In SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY an electron beam falls at a non-normal angle on the specimen and the image is derived from the reactions occurring above the plane of the specimen.Tooth Root: The part of a tooth from the neck to the apex, embedded in the alveolar process and covered with cementum. A root may be single or divided into several branches, usually identified by their relative position, e.g., lingual root or buccal root. Single-rooted teeth include mandibular first and second premolars and the maxillary second premolar teeth. The maxillary first premolar has two roots in most cases. Maxillary molars have three roots. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p690)Tachycardia: Abnormally rapid heartbeat, usually with a HEART RATE above 100 beats per minute for adults. Tachycardia accompanied by disturbance in the cardiac depolarization (cardiac arrhythmia) is called tachyarrhythmia.Fatal Outcome: Death resulting from the presence of a disease in an individual, as shown by a single case report or a limited number of patients. This should be differentiated from DEATH, the physiological cessation of life and from MORTALITY, an epidemiological or statistical concept.Stellate Ganglion: A paravertebral sympathetic ganglion formed by the fusion of the inferior cervical and first thoracic ganglia.Mandible: The largest and strongest bone of the FACE constituting the lower jaw. It supports the lower teeth.Myocardial Contraction: Contractile activity of the MYOCARDIUM.Rhipicephalus sanguineus: A species of tick (TICKS) in the family IXODIDAE, distributed throughout the world but abundant in southern Europe. It will feed on a wide variety of MAMMALS, but DOGS are its preferred host. It transmits a large number of diseases including BABESIOSIS; THEILERIASIS; EHRLICHIOSIS; and MEDITERRANEAN SPOTTED FEVER.Liver: A large lobed glandular organ in the abdomen of vertebrates that is responsible for detoxification, metabolism, synthesis and storage of various substances.Vasoconstriction: The physiological narrowing of BLOOD VESSELS by contraction of the VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE.Orthodontics, Interceptive: Recognition and elimination of potential irregularities and malpositions in the developing dentofacial complex.Acetylcholine: A neurotransmitter found at neuromuscular junctions, autonomic ganglia, parasympathetic effector junctions, a subset of sympathetic effector junctions, and at many sites in the central nervous system.Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay: An immunoassay utilizing an antibody labeled with an enzyme marker such as horseradish peroxidase. While either the enzyme or the antibody is bound to an immunosorbent substrate, they both retain their biologic activity; the change in enzyme activity as a result of the enzyme-antibody-antigen reaction is proportional to the concentration of the antigen and can be measured spectrophotometrically or with the naked eye. Many variations of the method have been developed.Dentition, Permanent: The 32 teeth of adulthood that either replace or are added to the complement of deciduous teeth. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Pressure: A type of stress exerted uniformly in all directions. Its measure is the force exerted per unit area. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Lameness, Animal: A departure from the normal gait in animals.Models, Cardiovascular: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of the cardiovascular system, processes, or phenomena; includes the use of mathematical equations, computers and other electronic equipment.Anal Sacs: A pair of anal glands or sacs, located on either side of the ANUS, that produce and store a dark, foul-smelling fluid in carnivorous animals such as MEPHITIDAE and DOGS. The expelled fluid is used as a defensive repellent (in skunks) or a material to mark territory (in dogs).Mucopolysaccharidosis I: Systemic lysosomal storage disease caused by a deficiency of alpha-L-iduronidase (IDURONIDASE) and characterized by progressive physical deterioration with urinary excretion of DERMATAN SULFATE and HEPARAN SULFATE. There are three recognized phenotypes representing a spectrum of clinical severity from severe to mild: Hurler syndrome, Hurler-Scheie syndrome and Scheie syndrome (formerly mucopolysaccharidosis V). Symptoms may include DWARFISM; hepatosplenomegaly; thick, coarse facial features with low nasal bridge; corneal clouding; cardiac complications; and noisy breathing.Flea Infestations: Parasitic attack by members of the order SIPHONAPTERA.Thelazioidea: A superfamily of parasitic nematodes which includes three genera: Thelazia, Spirocerca, and GNATHOSTOMA. Only Thelazia and GNATHOSTOMA occasionally occur in man.Epithelial Cells: Cells that line the inner and outer surfaces of the body by forming cellular layers (EPITHELIUM) or masses. Epithelial cells lining the SKIN; the MOUTH; the NOSE; and the ANAL CANAL derive from ectoderm; those lining the RESPIRATORY SYSTEM and the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM derive from endoderm; others (CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM and LYMPHATIC SYSTEM) derive from mesoderm. Epithelial cells can be classified mainly by cell shape and function into squamous, glandular and transitional epithelial cells.Dental Models: Presentation devices used for patient education and technique training in dentistry.Cloning, Molecular: The insertion of recombinant DNA molecules from prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic sources into a replicating vehicle, such as a plasmid or virus vector, and the introduction of the resultant hybrid molecules into recipient cells without altering the viability of those cells.Hemangiosarcoma: A rare malignant neoplasm characterized by rapidly proliferating, extensively infiltrating, anaplastic cells derived from blood vessels and lining irregular blood-filled or lumpy spaces. (Stedman, 25th ed)Palate: The structure that forms the roof of the mouth. It consists of the anterior hard palate (PALATE, HARD) and the posterior soft palate (PALATE, SOFT).Consciousness: Sense of awareness of self and of the environment.Kinetics: The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.Cell Polarity: Orientation of intracellular structures especially with respect to the apical and basolateral domains of the plasma membrane. Polarized cells must direct proteins from the Golgi apparatus to the appropriate domain since tight junctions prevent proteins from diffusing between the two domains.Random Allocation: A process involving chance used in therapeutic trials or other research endeavor for allocating experimental subjects, human or animal, between treatment and control groups, or among treatment groups. It may also apply to experiments on inanimate objects.Seroepidemiologic Studies: EPIDEMIOLOGIC STUDIES based on the detection through serological testing of characteristic change in the serum level of specific ANTIBODIES. Latent subclinical infections and carrier states can thus be detected in addition to clinically overt cases.Pulmonary Circulation: The circulation of the BLOOD through the LUNGS.Microspheres: Small uniformly-sized spherical particles, of micrometer dimensions, frequently labeled with radioisotopes or various reagents acting as tags or markers.Stomach: An organ of digestion situated in the left upper quadrant of the abdomen between the termination of the ESOPHAGUS and the beginning of the DUODENUM.Stifle: In horses, cattle, and other quadrupeds, the joint between the femur and the tibia, corresponding to the human knee.Tooth, Deciduous: The teeth of the first dentition, which are shed and replaced by the permanent teeth.Heart Block: Impaired conduction of cardiac impulse that can occur anywhere along the conduction pathway, such as between the SINOATRIAL NODE and the right atrium (SA block) or between atria and ventricles (AV block). Heart blocks can be classified by the duration, frequency, or completeness of conduction block. Reversibility depends on the degree of structural or functional defects.Rabbits: The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.Vasodilator Agents: Drugs used to cause dilation of the blood vessels.Feline Panleukopenia: A highly contagious DNA virus infection of the cat family, characterized by fever, enteritis and bone marrow changes. It is also called feline ataxia, feline agranulocytosis, feline infectious enteritis, cat fever, cat plague, and show fever. It is caused by FELINE PANLEUKOPENIA VIRUS or the closely related MINK ENTERITIS VIRUS or CANINE PARVOVIRUS.DNA Primers: Short sequences (generally about 10 base pairs) of DNA that are complementary to sequences of messenger RNA and allow reverse transcriptases to start copying the adjacent sequences of mRNA. Primers are used extensively in genetic and molecular biology techniques.Angiostrongylus: A genus of parasitic nematodes of the superfamily METASTRONGYLOIDEA. Two species, ANGIOSTRONGYLUS CANTONENSIS and A. vasorum, infest the lungs of rats and dogs, respectively. A. cantonensis is transmissible to man where it causes frequently fatal infection of the central nervous system.Atrial Function: The hemodynamic and electrophysiological action of the HEART ATRIA.Rabies virus: The type species of LYSSAVIRUS causing rabies in humans and other animals. Transmission is mostly by animal bites through saliva. The virus is neurotropic multiplying in neurons and myotubes of vertebrates.Oxygen Consumption: The rate at which oxygen is used by a tissue; microliters of oxygen STPD used per milligram of tissue per hour; the rate at which oxygen enters the blood from alveolar gas, equal in the steady state to the consumption of oxygen by tissue metabolism throughout the body. (Stedman, 25th ed, p346)Root Resorption: Resorption in which cementum or dentin is lost from the root of a tooth owing to cementoclastic or osteoclastic activity in conditions such as trauma of occlusion or neoplasms. (Dorland, 27th ed)Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction: A variation of the PCR technique in which cDNA is made from RNA via reverse transcription. The resultant cDNA is then amplified using standard PCR protocols.Recombinant Proteins: Proteins prepared by recombinant DNA technology.Vagotomy: The interruption or removal of any part of the vagus (10th cranial) nerve. Vagotomy may be performed for research or for therapeutic purposes.Orthodontic Wires: Wires of various dimensions and grades made of stainless steel or precious metal. They are used in orthodontic treatment.Administration, Oral: The giving of drugs, chemicals, or other substances by mouth.Gangliosidosis, GM1: An autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder caused by the absence or deficiency of BETA-GALACTOSIDASE. It is characterized by intralysosomal accumulation of G(M1) GANGLIOSIDE and oligosaccharides, primarily in neurons of the central nervous system. The infantile form is characterized by MUSCLE HYPOTONIA, poor psychomotor development, HIRSUTISM, hepatosplenomegaly, and facial abnormalities. The juvenile form features HYPERACUSIS; SEIZURES; and psychomotor retardation. The adult form features progressive DEMENTIA; ATAXIA; and MUSCLE SPASTICITY. (From Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, pp96-7)Dentition, Mixed: The complement of teeth in the jaws after the eruption of some of the permanent teeth but before all the deciduous teeth are absent. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)Vasodilation: The physiological widening of BLOOD VESSELS by relaxing the underlying VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE.Lung: Either of the pair of organs occupying the cavity of the thorax that effect the aeration of the blood.Malocclusion: Such malposition and contact of the maxillary and mandibular teeth as to interfere with the highest efficiency during the excursive movements of the jaw that are essential for mastication. (Jablonski, Illustrated Dictionary of Dentistry, 1982)Cell Membrane: The lipid- and protein-containing, selectively permeable membrane that surrounds the cytoplasm in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.Adenosine: A nucleoside that is composed of ADENINE and D-RIBOSE. Adenosine or adenosine derivatives play many important biological roles in addition to being components of DNA and RNA. Adenosine itself is a neurotransmitter.Epithelium: One or more layers of EPITHELIAL CELLS, supported by the basal lamina, which covers the inner or outer surfaces of the body.Isoflurane: A stable, non-explosive inhalation anesthetic, relatively free from significant side effects.DNA, Complementary: Single-stranded complementary DNA synthesized from an RNA template by the action of RNA-dependent DNA polymerase. cDNA (i.e., complementary DNA, not circular DNA, not C-DNA) is used in a variety of molecular cloning experiments as well as serving as a specific hybridization probe.Pancreas: A nodular organ in the ABDOMEN that contains a mixture of ENDOCRINE GLANDS and EXOCRINE GLANDS. The small endocrine portion consists of the ISLETS OF LANGERHANS secreting a number of hormones into the blood stream. The large exocrine portion (EXOCRINE PANCREAS) is a compound acinar gland that secretes several digestive enzymes into the pancreatic ductal system that empties into the DUODENUM.Ventricular Fibrillation: A potentially lethal cardiac arrhythmia that is characterized by uncoordinated extremely rapid firing of electrical impulses (400-600/min) in HEART VENTRICLES. Such asynchronous ventricular quivering or fibrillation prevents any effective cardiac output and results in unconsciousness (SYNCOPE). It is one of the major electrocardiographic patterns seen with CARDIAC ARREST.Antibodies, Protozoan: Immunoglobulins produced in a response to PROTOZOAN ANTIGENS.Myocardial Ischemia: A disorder of cardiac function caused by insufficient blood flow to the muscle tissue of the heart. The decreased blood flow may be due to narrowing of the coronary arteries (CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE), to obstruction by a thrombus (CORONARY THROMBOSIS), or less commonly, to diffuse narrowing of arterioles and other small vessels within the heart. Severe interruption of the blood supply to the myocardial tissue may result in necrosis of cardiac muscle (MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION).Swine: Any of various animals that constitute the family Suidae and comprise stout-bodied, short-legged omnivorous mammals with thick skin, usually covered with coarse bristles, a rather long mobile snout, and small tail. Included are the genera Babyrousa, Phacochoerus (wart hogs), and Sus, the latter containing the domestic pig (see SUS SCROFA).RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Adrenergic alpha-Antagonists: Drugs that bind to but do not activate alpha-adrenergic receptors thereby blocking the actions of endogenous or exogenous adrenergic agonists. Adrenergic alpha-antagonists are used in the treatment of hypertension, vasospasm, peripheral vascular disease, shock, and pheochromocytoma.Myocardial Reperfusion: Generally, restoration of blood supply to heart tissue which is ischemic due to decrease in normal blood supply. The decrease may result from any source including atherosclerotic obstruction, narrowing of the artery, or surgical clamping. Reperfusion can be induced to treat ischemia. Methods include chemical dissolution of an occluding thrombus, administration of vasodilator drugs, angioplasty, catheterization, and artery bypass graft surgery. However, it is thought that reperfusion can itself further damage the ischemic tissue, causing MYOCARDIAL REPERFUSION INJURY.Fluorescent Antibody Technique: Test for tissue antigen using either a direct method, by conjugation of antibody with fluorescent dye (FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY TECHNIQUE, DIRECT) or an indirect method, by formation of antigen-antibody complex which is then labeled with fluorescein-conjugated anti-immunoglobulin antibody (FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY TECHNIQUE, INDIRECT). The tissue is then examined by fluorescence microscopy.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Verapamil: A calcium channel blocker that is a class IV anti-arrhythmia agent.Pressoreceptors: Receptors in the vascular system, particularly the aorta and carotid sinus, which are sensitive to stretch of the vessel walls.Injections, Intra-Arterial: Delivery of drugs into an artery.Sympathetic Nervous System: The thoracolumbar division of the autonomic nervous system. Sympathetic preganglionic fibers originate in neurons of the intermediolateral column of the spinal cord and project to the paravertebral and prevertebral ganglia, which in turn project to target organs. The sympathetic nervous system mediates the body's response to stressful situations, i.e., the fight or flight reactions. It often acts reciprocally to the parasympathetic system.Hindlimb: Either of two extremities of four-footed non-primate land animals. It usually consists of a FEMUR; TIBIA; and FIBULA; tarsals; METATARSALS; and TOES. (From Storer et al., General Zoology, 6th ed, p73)
  • This organism is transmitted to humans in Ohio by the bite of infected American dog ticks ( Dermacentor variabilis ) ( see current human case map ). (ohio.gov)
  • Our results provide a genetic identikit of an ancient dog and demonstrate the robustness of mammalian somatic cells to survive for millennia despite a massive mutation burden. (thepawreport.org)
  • Genetic analysis suggests the tumor originated in an individual wolf or domesticated dog, probably in east Asia, between 200 and 2,500 years ago. (jwz.org)
  • The disease is primarily passed on during mating and leads to formation of genital tumours in both male and female dogs. (cam.ac.uk)
  • However, they have a great personality and they can easily adapt on other dogs and cats, but you should raise him in the multi-pet environment from the very beginning. (petcare.com.au)
  • This unusual cancer arose from the cells of one individual dog living around 8,000 years ago, and remarkably survived long beyond the death of that original host dog by spreading to other individuals. (cam.ac.uk)
  • Previous research has shown that at several points in history, mitochondria - which are compartments providing cells with their energy - from unrelated host dogs have been captured by CTVT, perhaps to aid survival of this long-lived cancer lineage. (cam.ac.uk)
  • Causes for impaction can be chronic soft stools or diarrhea, abnormally small anal sac duct openings, excessive glandular secretions, and poor muscle tone (usually seen in obese dogs). (wordpress.com)
  • Boss Dog® Brand offers unique treats for pets with special digestive benefits like pre and probiotics offering a unique addition to store shelves. (prweb.com)
  • Look for Boss Dog® Brand Greek Style Frozen Yogurt Dog Treats in the freezer section of your local pet store. (prweb.com)
  • All-Natural Boss Dog® Brand Greek Style Frozen Yogurt Dog Treats are made with real yogurt with milk from a single farm in the Central Valley of California. (prweb.com)
  • Before Millan, the popular wisdom was that dogs are best trained by giving them treats for good behavior. (slate.com)
  • Now reformulated and available in five dog-friendly flavor profiles, each of the colorful new packages contains eight ounces of high quality treats. (yahoo.com)
  • Although many people who were new to the dog world saw the pairings of different breeds as a 20th century fad that was worth noting, avid breeders had been crossing purebreds for centuries. (care2.com)
  • There are currently over 500 "designer" breeds recognized by the Designer Dogs Kennel Club, and some breeders take their programs very seriously. (care2.com)
  • Recently, a DNA test for cerebellar ataxia was made available, so reputable breeders should test their dogs for the disease. (vetinfo.com)
  • Blue said the only time Cruz was not being watched by Chaffin while in New York was when the dog was "benched" at Westminster, a time when the dogs are required to stay in an assigned area with other owners and breeders. (go.com)
  • M)ore than 7 million cats and dogs are entering U.S. shelters every year with half of them being euthanized due to a lack of good homes - homes that are filled with dogs from breeders and puppy mills because of Westminster. (go.com)
  • This website is designed to provide information on these projects and serve as a resource for those concerned with canine diseases: breeders, owners, veterinarians, and researchers. (caninegeneticdiseases.net)
  • According to the Companion Animal Parasite Council (CAPC) , many dogs will be infected with parasites at some point in their life. (akc.org)
  • The dog has been an honourary member of the human family for at least 15,000 years, graduating from the servant role as guard and hunting companion to the additional roles of spoiled child substitute and career dog with its own labour union and pension fund. (everything2.com)
  • They stand for Canine Good Citizen, Rally Advanced, and Companion Dog. (dailypress.com)
  • 3. A German Shepherd guide dog led her blind companion the entire 2100-mile Appalachian Trail. (newsblaze.com)
  • Traveling with your canine companion can be exciting, as long as you know the facts and have the right breed. (dogster.com)
  • The cruel sports were banned, and the development of the Staffordshire Bull Terrier moved toward that of a courageous, loyal dog meant to live alongside people as a companion. (orvis.com)
  • Though veterinarians look for these typical signs , most dogs harboring this parasite do not have clinical symptoms prior to the worms being detected via screening tests. (akc.org)
  • As with a number of intestinal parasites in dogs, diarrhea and weight loss are common symptoms of infection. (akc.org)
  • Cerebellar ataxia is a progressive canine disease that causes symptoms to appear in a certain order. (vetinfo.com)
  • In some dogs, symptoms appear slowly and cause only mild disability for up to five years. (vetinfo.com)
  • In other dogs, symptoms progress swiftly and cause rapid, serious impairment. (vetinfo.com)
  • Symptoms usually appear in dogs older than two years of age. (vetinfo.com)
  • Treatment involves keeping the dog as comfortable as possible until his symptoms have progressed to the point where he is no longer enjoying a good quality of life. (vetinfo.com)
  • Canines that experience muscle wasting are most often showing symptoms of a larger problem. (ehow.co.uk)
  • While you may not be able to determine which type of intestinal worms your dog has, keeping an eye out for these symptoms can help you determine if your dog may need treatment for intestinal worms. (wikihow.com)
  • The iodine and water bath is effective against all of these symptoms even if fleas are not found on the dog. (ehow.co.uk)
  • Our dog was put to sleep in Feb due to illness- she began to shake, walk slowly, ears back, urinating wherever she sat or layed down- then neurological symptoms surfaced. (terrificpets.com)
  • Feb. 28, 2013 -- The Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show that earlier this month made headlines by crowning an affenpinscher as Best in Show for the first time ever, is back in the headlines today after the unexpected death of another competitor. (go.com)
  • Parasites in dogs take many forms, but they all have one thing in common: sooner or later their presence will almost always have an impact on your pet's health or comfort. (akc.org)
  • A man's dog stands by him in prosperity and in poverty , in health and in sickness . (everything2.com)
  • And if he has health problems, speak to your vet about the issues involved for your dog when exercising. (wikihow.com)
  • 30. Obesity is the #1 health problem among dogs. (newsblaze.com)
  • Pet Dogs and Children's Health: Opportunities for Chronic Disease Prevention? (cdc.gov)
  • This study investigates the hypothesis that pet dogs are positively associated with healthy weight and mental health among children. (cdc.gov)
  • Pet dogs have been linked with varied physical and mental health benefits for adults (3,4), benefits that are promoted by the US Public Health Service (USPHS) (Figure 1). (cdc.gov)
  • Although dog ownership may improve adult physical activity, body weight, and mental health (5,6), less is known about the relationship between pet dogs and children's health. (cdc.gov)
  • Animal-assisted therapy (AAT) with dogs affects children's mental health and developmental disorders by reducing anxiety and arousal or enhancing attachment (13). (cdc.gov)
  • If exposure to pet dogs during childhood is inversely related to mental health problems, positive child---dog interactions could prevent the evolution of these problems into full-fledged disorders during adolescence or later life. (cdc.gov)
  • Summary of an article written by AKC/AKC Canine Health Foundation/Theriogenology Foundation Theriogenology Residency recipient Dr. Carla Barstow on breeding soundness examination of the bitch. (akcchf.org)
  • AKC Canine Health Foundation (CHF) and its donors are currently funding two studies aimed at new treatment strategies for canine mammary tumors. (akcchf.org)
  • AKC Canine Health Foundation Requests for proposals (RFPs) are categorized by Research Program Area and grants must be submitted in response to specific RFPs. (akcchf.org)
  • While chicken livers are a safe food for dogs, eating too many livers can cause health problems. (reference.com)
  • Canna-Biscuits for Dogs are an ideal means to introduce consumers to the health benefits that hemp-based cannabinoids offer. (yahoo.com)
  • SENTRY products for dogs include flea control, health and behavior aids. (petsmart.com)
  • Expert Dog Health and Wellness Info. (petplace.com)
  • In a study published last year in Nature Scientific Reports, Swedish researchers examined the relationship between dog ownership and cardiovascular health in a sample of nearly 3.5 million Swedish adults. (scientificamerican.com)
  • The researchers were thus able to link health and dog ownership data. (scientificamerican.com)
  • Claims of canine exceptionalism abound, from people's anecdotes about their dogs' ability to read their minds ("Sparky looked into my eyes and then at the refrigerator-he knew I wanted a beer! (scientificamerican.com)
  • The Essential (and Affordable) Gear You'll Need to Puppy-Proof Your Home Dogs are pure joy. (nymag.com)
  • For some people, the term conjures images of little dogs traveling in their little designer totes, which are perched on the shoulders of their high-fashion, globe trotting "puppy-mammas. (care2.com)
  • Puppy training classes memphis, how to train puppy not to bite pants, greyhounds dogs. (amazonaws.com)
  • Whether you're teaching a young puppy or an older dog you've rescued from the shelter, the first step is always to establish that coming to you is the best thing he can do. (petfinder.com)
  • According to The Daily Puppy, chicken livers are filled with dog-friendly vitamins and nutrients, such as vitamin A, vitamin B, iron, protein, and omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids. (reference.com)
  • If you need to stop a digging puppy, and solve other dog behavior problems, visit No More Bad Dogs at http://NoMoreBadDogs.com to learn about a dog training course that will work wonders! (issuu.com)
  • The Tahitian dogs were described as having a small or medium build, resembling terriers or crooked-legged dachshund in size. (wikipedia.org)
  • Meanwhile, the equally distressing canine equivalent, canine compulsive disorder (CCD), is more prevalent in certain dog breeds, especially Dobermans and Bull Terriers. (scienceblog.com)
  • Terriers, retrievers, and hounds were all bred as hunting dogs who would go to any extreme to retrieve game, including digging a hole to China if need be. (issuu.com)
  • Pyloric obstruction or stenosis is most commonly seen in brachycephalic (short-faced) breeds of dog such as boxers, Boston terriers and bulldogs. (petplace.com)
  • DNA mutation responsible for Canine Multipe System Degeneration (CMSD or PNA) in Kerry Blue Terriers and Chinese Crested Dogs has been identified - test available. (caninegeneticdiseases.net)
  • There Are Lots of Handsome Dog Accessories on Sale at Nordstrom Including a collapsible Filson dog bowl and a beaded Snoopy dog collar, all 40 percent off. (nymag.com)
  • Seresto Flea & Tick Collar for Large Dogs over 18 lbs(27 inch) Exp. (ebay.com)
  • Put a flea collar on your dog. (wikihow.com)
  • Most flea collars are longer than you'll need, so cut off the excess portion of the collar once you've fit it on your dog. (wikihow.com)
  • This means you may want to take the collar off or replace it if you dog goes for a swim. (wikihow.com)
  • In order to avoid having dogs contract tick diseases, treat them with a monthly tick repellent such as Frontline or have them wear a tick collar such as Preventic. (ehow.co.uk)
  • To run at large unless such dog is restrained by an adequate collar and leash and accompanied by its owner or by a responsible person able to control the animal. (ecode360.com)
  • The leash is a length of thick cord like an ordinary dog lead, but with a central core of strong wire so that the leash keeps its shape. (newscientist.com)
  • The proud owner bends the leash into a shape that matches the height of a dog or cat. (newscientist.com)
  • Teaching your pup the basic command of "heel" will allow you to keep your dog under control while on or off the leash. (wikihow.com)
  • Such a dog can play in the dog run, hike with you in leash-free parks, and keep out of trouble in most any situation. (petfinder.com)
  • Even if you never plan to have your dog off his leash, things happen. (petfinder.com)
  • We have gone through all the steps of where he was, what was done, and he was always on a leash," Blue, 67, who has co-owned Cruz since birth and has raised and shown the fluffy, snow-white breed of dogs since the 1960s, told ABC News today. (go.com)
  • Volunteers will be encouraged to leash train each dog as they walk them to the playground and give them some play time out of the kennel at least twice a week. (volunteermatch.org)
  • Flea collars are another method to help prevent fleas from taking up residence on your dog. (wikihow.com)
  • Colloid goitre can occur in hypothrydoid dogs, and often occurs when tumors in the pituitary gland suppress the ability of the thyroid gland to produce the correct amount of hormones. (vetinfo.com)
  • remission occurs in 70%-90% of dogs treated, and some dogs are cured completely. (petsbest.com)
  • Interestingly, not all dogs going through closely conforming traumatic events developed PTSD. (psychologytoday.com)
  • The dog and the extant gray wolf are sister taxa as modern wolves are not closely related to the wolves that were first domesticated, which implies that the direct ancestor of the dog is extinct. (wikipedia.org)
  • Murchison says the cancer probably evolved in a badly inbred population, in which the cancer cells passed between the animals during sex, but were overlooked by the immune system because the dogs were so closely related. (newscientist.com)
  • herding dogs that would develop amazing abilities to control herds, pointing dogs with an instinct to find prey and retrieve it for their master, agile greyhounds that hunted swift game, and mastiffs , great, imposing watchdogs . (everything2.com)
  • 25. Greyhounds are the fastest dogs on earth, with speeds of up to 45 miles per hour. (newsblaze.com)
  • Discuss the control methods for preventing fleas, ticks, heartworms, and intestinal parasites (worms) for a dog in your area from puppyhood through adulthood. (meritbadge.org)
  • Alternatively, you can use a few drop of lavender essential oil on your dog to help prevent and repel fleas. (wikihow.com)
  • Tapeworms specifically are transmitted by dogs accidentally ingesting fleas. (wikihow.com)
  • Fleas, ticks and mites rank as one of the top problems for dogs. (ehow.co.uk)
  • Some dogs develop life-threatening allergies to fleas. (ehow.co.uk)
  • You might not see fleas on your dog until an infestation has become severe and very difficult to control. (ehow.co.uk)
  • There are five basic types of worms that a dog owner should be familiar with: heartworms, and four types of intestinal worms including roundworms, tapeworms, hookworms, and whipworms. (wikihow.com)
  • The 7 Best Travel Accessories for Small Dogs A packing list for your corgi. (nymag.com)
  • European peasants defended themselves from rats using small, valiant canines . (everything2.com)
  • Use toothpaste made for dogs - toothpaste for people can make your dog sick if he swallows it - and apply it with a brush designed for dogs, or a finger brush, or a small disposable dental sponge, whichever you find easiest. (petfinder.com)
  • Feeding Guide: Feed small/medium adult dogs 1 treat a day. (walgreens.com)
  • It means that the cancer lived in just one small population of dogs for 10,500 years, but dogs carrying it were then picked up by explorers or seafarers who spread them, and the cancers they carried, all round the world," says Murchison. (newscientist.com)
  • Choosing a small breed-specific formula means you can feel confident your dog is getting nutrition tailored to his unique needs. (purina.com)
  • The pylorus is the lower portion of the stomach that leads into the small intestine of the dog. (petplace.com)
  • A lower percentage of children with dogs (12%) met the clinical cut-off value of Screen for Child Anxiety and Related Disorders (SCARED-5) of 3 or more, compared with children without dogs (21%, P = .002). (cdc.gov)
  • The Canine Eye Registry Foundation (C.E.R.F.), located in the USA, registers dogs that are found to be clear of eye problems. (angelfire.com)
  • The maternal mitochondrial DNA sequences of the Inuit dogs were classified as haplotype A31 that indicates a common female ancestor, and this haplotype could not be found in other modern dogs but the nearest match was with a 1,000 year-old dog from Florida. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Only Crate That Can Contain My Houdini Dog He escaped from every kennel - until I found this one. (nymag.com)
  • Wild dogs can be found throughout the world - from the fanged pack of wolves , running through northern winters, to the dingo , cunningly prowling the Australian desert. (everything2.com)
  • A quarter of Britain's dogs are suffering from depression because of the stress of being left alone while their owners are at work, a new study has found. (telegraph.co.uk)
  • 32. An American Animal Hospital Assoc. poll found that 33% of dog owners admit to talking to their dogs on the phone and leaving answering machine messages for them while away. (newsblaze.com)
  • As many mushers have found, giving certain dogs the opportunity to lead has surprising effects. (iditarod.com)
  • Roundworms, tapeworms, whipworms and hookworms are found in the intestinal tract of dogs and are shed in the feces of infected animals. (wikihow.com)
  • MANILA (Reuters) - A group of secondary school students in the Philippines has found a way to convert poo from stray dogs into a mixture for bricks, aiming to rid city streets of excrement and potentially even lower construction costs. (reuters.com)
  • The Best Dog Leashes, According to Veterinarians and Trainers Ten experts recommend 23 leashes (and a few accessories) for everything from late-night walks to jogs with your pup. (nymag.com)
  • Veterinarians can confirm whether or not a dog is suffering from myositis through a sample of tissue. (ehow.co.uk)
  • They were brought from Siberia to North America by the Thule people 1,000 years ago, along with the Canadian Eskimo Dog that is genetically identical. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, people and their dogs did not settle in the Arctic until the Paleo-Eskimo people 4,500 years ago and then the Thule people 1,000 years ago, both originating from Siberia. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Inuit dogs from Canada ( Canadian Eskimo Dog ) and Greenland (Greenland Dog) descended from dogs associated with Thule people, who relied on them for transportation from Siberia. (wikipedia.org)
  • It seems a pity that with dogs of war being such a good model for the study of PTSD in people, that funding has not been forthcoming in this direction. (psychologytoday.com)
  • And Bangkok's street dog population will continue to grow until more people are willing to take more action. (nationalgeographic.com)
  • The Labrador, recognized for its excellent guiding abilities, and the Poodle, known for its intelligence, trainability and very low shedding, were paired to fill a need for disabled people who had allergies to dog dander. (care2.com)
  • Similar to other strains of Polynesian dogs, it was introduced to the Society Islands and Tahiti by the ancestors of the Tahitian (Mā'ohi) people during their migrations to Polynesia. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Tahitian Dog, known as the ʻŪrī Mā'ohi in the Tahitian language, was introduced to Tahiti and the Society Islands (in modern French Polynesia) by the ancestors of the Tahitian (Mā'ohi) people during their migrations to Polynesia. (wikipedia.org)
  • Similar breeds of Polynesian dogs were brought alongside pigs and chickens when the people settled the islands of Polynesia. (wikipedia.org)
  • Historian Margaret Titcomb noted that Tuamotuan varieties may not have been a separate breed that developed in isolation, arguing that the people of the Tuamotus could have eaten their short hair varieties and kept their longer haired dogs for exports to the Society Islands. (wikipedia.org)
  • People will stop her so they can pet the dog. (dailypress.com)
  • 20. 15 people die in the U.S. every year from dog bites. (newsblaze.com)
  • 21. In 2002 alone, more people in the U.S. were killed by dogs than by sharks in the past 100 years. (newsblaze.com)
  • B lind people with guide dogs are the only citizens exempted from the clean-up laws. (telegraph.co.uk)
  • Many people are trying to pass off untrained pets as service dogs. (psychologytoday.com)
  • However, there appears to be a rising threat to the credibility and acceptance of such service dogs because some people are trying to pass off their untrained pets as assistance dogs. (psychologytoday.com)
  • Obviously many people would like to have their pets accompany them when they go to various places where dogs are usually banned. (psychologytoday.com)
  • Actually, notamerican, only in America do people clean up after their dogs. (coolest-gadgets.com)
  • Looking for a way to meet new people and friends for your dog? (dogster.com)
  • The American Staffordshire Terrier is a loyal dog who is ready to alert owners of people approaching the door-or of suspicious critters in the yard. (orvis.com)
  • I mean your not going to become one of those people you see on those shows where their dog is tied up in the yard and it is skinnier than a stick. (terrificpets.com)
  • If your dog does have mastitis, she will need antibiotic treatment, warm water compresses and her mammary glands emptied. (petfinder.com)
  • The goal of this pilot study is to determine whether tacrolimus 0.1% ointment would be beneficial (improvement of clinical signs) in the treatment of canine familial dermatomyositis (DM). (akcchf.org)
  • Dogs will be monitored at monthly intervals for a three-month treatment period. (akcchf.org)
  • The majority of dogs respond well to treatment with Phenobarbital and/or potassium bromide, but according to the breed, somewhere between 10 and 20 percent of dogs do not respond to Phenobarbital. (akcchf.org)
  • Amoxicillin, Cephalexin, Clavamox and Otomox are said to be safe for the treatment of illnesses in dogs. (reference.com)
  • Dog owners concerned about treatment costs can ease their fears with pet insurance comparison . (petsbest.com)
  • Canna-Biscuits are the ideal treat for any dog, and for many pet owners the biscuits are an ideal supplement to the Canna-Pet™ lineup of hemp-based capsule products. (yahoo.com)
  • Can you put Neosporin on dogs to treat a minor wound, cut, or scrape? (dogster.com)
  • Always watch your dog while he or she is chewing the treat to prevent choking. (1800petmeds.com)
  • Kilo, a drug-detection dog in rural Moffat County, flagged a man's truck for containing contraband. (nytimes.com)
  • FRONTLINE Plus Flea and Tick Control for 5-22lbs Dogs - 3 Doses NOBOX! (ebay.com)
  • When dogs become allergic to flea saliva the skin turns red and hives form. (ehow.co.uk)
  • While iodine baths relieve immediate flea and skin problems directly on your dog, you need to find ways to control infestations in the environment. (ehow.co.uk)
  • Often they are lumped together with the Hawaiian Poi Dog by 19th-century taxonomists because of their similar appearance and diet, in contrast to the kurī, which was much larger in size due to their higher protein diet. (wikipedia.org)
  • For two millenniums, from Ancient Rome through the 19th century, it was generally believed that dogs-like horses and, well, children-had a wild spirit that needed to be "broken. (slate.com)
  • If you plan to breed or show your dog, you will want to find a knowledgeable person in the breed to show you the ropes. (angelfire.com)
  • In fact, returning to Australia, we find that one of the most popular designer dogs, the Labradoodle, originated there in the 1970s, and even this breed began as a working dog. (care2.com)
  • You don't want to find out for the first time when he decides to brawl with another dog while you're in your exercise gear and far from home. (wikihow.com)
  • Find out about our actions for pedigree dog welfare (PDF 52KB) since the BBC documentary, Pedigree Dogs Exposed. (rspca.org.uk)
  • M adrid's mayor has told dirty dog owners to start picking up their pet's mess or find themselves sweeping the streets their animal has fouled. (telegraph.co.uk)
  • A Bored Dog Will Find Something To Do Keeping your pup occupied will prevent many dog behavior problems from developing. (issuu.com)
  • If left to his own devices, a bored dog will find many things to do, including digging holes and excessive barking. (issuu.com)
  • And if you missed Chris Gall's Dog vs. Cat back in May, head to your nearest bookstore or library shelf to find out what happens when Dog and Cat are forced to share a room. (kirkusreviews.com)
  • Find out why they benefit your dogs diet. (dogster.com)
  • If your female dog goes into heat/season, make sure to keep her properly secured. (angelfire.com)
  • As a result of living in a pack structure, the Greenland dog takes a very firm and confident owner to make a good pet. (wikipedia.org)
  • The circuit is preprogrammed to make a variety of animal sounds, such as a dog barking or growling, or a cat meowing. (newscientist.com)
  • Although relatively expensive, regular professional dental care will make your dog feel better and keep his breath more pleasant for you to be near. (petfinder.com)
  • The difference was that earlier hybrids were intended for work purposes to make better hunting or shepherding dogs, in many cases. (care2.com)
  • their meat was included in Tahitian cuisine and other parts of the dog were used to make tools and ornamental clothing. (wikipedia.org)
  • 56. Chocolate contains a substance known as theobromine (similar to caffeine), which can kill dogs or at the very least make them violently ill. (newsblaze.com)
  • The owner of any dog reaching the age of four months shall immediately make application for a dog license. (ecode360.com)
  • Golden Retrievers are at the highest risk of developing Lymphoma, and other dogs in the high-risk pool include Beagles, Boxers, and Rottweilers. (petsbest.com)
  • Samples are needed from healthy dogs and dogs affected by specific diseases. (akcchf.org)
  • Muscle wasting is a symptom of many different canine diseases and should be taken very seriously. (ehow.co.uk)
  • When a dog is bitten by a tick it can contract any one of these diseases. (ehow.co.uk)
  • This article provides some guidelines for recognizing and treating all five types of worms, though it should be noted at the outset that parasitic diseases are often undetectable unless the dog is heavily infested or has been infected for a long time. (wikihow.com)
  • IWs are too serene to be fierce guard dogs, but just the sight of them is enough to deter intruders. (akc.org)
  • While they're good watchdogs, they aren't ideal guard dogs as they are likely to greet a stranger with a wagging tail. (orvis.com)
  • Though often referred to as a 'Pit Bull,' the Pit Bull is a type of dog-not a specific breed-that includes the Amstaff, Staffordshire Bull Terrier, and American Pit Bull Terrier, among others. (orvis.com)
  • The Best Gifts for Dog Lovers, According to Groomers, Trainers, and Dog Owners Including the Rubik's Cube for dogs and a personalized dog caftan. (nymag.com)
  • Those owners whose dogs are suffering from depression are encouraged to slowly build up the amount of time they spend away from them. (telegraph.co.uk)
  • 18. 87% of dog owners say their dog curls up beside them or at their feet while they watch T.V. (newsblaze.com)
  • Mayor Manuela Carmena announced on Monday a new zero-tolerance campaign against dog mess on Madrid's pavements with a "massive" wave of fines against offending owners. (telegraph.co.uk)
  • It has a significant impact on quality of life for dogs and owners alike. (akcchf.org)
  • Dogs sampled during the research, or owners willing to send a blood sample can be tested NOW! (caninegeneticdiseases.net)
  • Even after the researchers statistically controlled for age, education, and socioeconomic status, dog owners were significantly less likely to have had a heart attack and significantly less likely to have died from cardiovascular disease than non-dog owners were. (scientificamerican.com)
  • The really bad news is that more than 80 percent of dogs over the age of three have gum disease, and among dogs adopted from shelters and rescue groups the percentage is closer to one hundred. (petfinder.com)