Distemper Virus, Canine: A species of MORBILLIVIRUS causing distemper in dogs, wolves, foxes, raccoons, and ferrets. Pinnipeds have also been known to contract Canine distemper virus from contact with domestic dogs.Distemper: A name for several highly contagious viral diseases of animals, especially canine distemper. In dogs, it is caused by the canine distemper virus (DISTEMPER VIRUS, CANINE). It is characterized by a diphasic fever, leukopenia, gastrointestinal and respiratory inflammation and sometimes, neurologic complications. In cats it is known as FELINE PANLEUKOPENIA.Distemper Virus, Phocine: A species of MORBILLIVIRUS causing distemper in seals.Dogs: The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)Adenoviruses, Canine: Species of the genus MASTADENOVIRUS that causes fever, edema, vomiting, and diarrhea in dogs and encephalitis in foxes. Epizootics have also been caused in bears, wolves, coyotes, and skunks. The official species name is Canine adenovirus and it contains two serotypes.Lions: Large, chiefly nocturnal mammals of the cat family FELIDAE, species Panthera leo. They are found in Africa and southern Asia.Paramyxoviridae: A family of spherical viruses, of the order MONONEGAVIRALES, somewhat larger than the orthomyxoviruses, and containing single-stranded RNA. Subfamilies include PARAMYXOVIRINAE and PNEUMOVIRINAE.Raccoons: Carnivores of the genus Procyon of the family PROCYONIDAE. Two subgenera and seven species are currently recognized. They range from southern Canada to Panama and are found in several of the Caribbean Islands.Measles virus: The type species of MORBILLIVIRUS and the cause of the highly infectious human disease MEASLES, which affects mostly children.Morbillivirus: A genus of the family PARAMYXOVIRIDAE (subfamily PARAMYXOVIRINAE) where the virions of most members have hemagglutinin but not neuraminidase activity. All members produce both cytoplasmic and intranuclear inclusion bodies. MEASLES VIRUS is the type species.Seals, Earless: The family Phocidae, suborder PINNIPEDIA, order CARNIVORA, comprising the true seals. They lack external ears and are unable to use their hind flippers to walk. It includes over 18 species including the harp seal, probably the best known seal species in the world.Dog Diseases: Diseases of the domestic dog (Canis familiaris). This term does not include diseases of wild dogs, WOLVES; FOXES; and other Canidae for which the heading CARNIVORA is used.Phoca: A genus in the family of EARLESS SEALS (Phocidae) and collectively the most abundant PINNIPEDS in the Northern Hemisphere.Tigers: The species Panthera tigris, a large feline inhabiting Asia. Several subspecies exist including the Siberian tiger and Sumatran tiger.Vero Cells: A CELL LINE derived from the kidney of the African green (vervet) monkey, (CERCOPITHECUS AETHIOPS) used primarily in virus replication studies and plaque assays.Ferrets: Semidomesticated variety of European polecat much used for hunting RODENTS and/or RABBITS and as a laboratory animal. It is in the subfamily Mustelinae, family MUSTELIDAE.Antibodies, Viral: Immunoglobulins produced in response to VIRAL ANTIGENS.Hemagglutinins, Viral: Specific hemagglutinin subtypes encoded by VIRUSES.Rinderpest virus: A species of MORBILLIVIRUS causing cattle plague, a disease with high mortality. Sheep, goats, pigs, and other animals of the order Artiodactyla can also be infected.Parvovirus, Canine: A species of the genus PARVOVIRUS and a host range variant of FELINE PANLEUKOPENIA VIRUS. It causes a highly infectious fulminating ENTERITIS in dogs producing high mortality. It is distinct from CANINE MINUTE VIRUS, a species in the genus BOCAVIRUS. This virus can also infect cats and mink.Morbillivirus Infections: Infections with viruses of the genus MORBILLIVIRUS, family PARAMYXOVIRIDAE. Infections mainly cause acute disease in their hosts, although in some cases infection is persistent and leads to degenerative conditions.Antibodies: Immunoglobulin molecules having a specific amino acid sequence by virtue of which they interact only with the ANTIGEN (or a very similar shape) that induced their synthesis in cells of the lymphoid series (especially PLASMA CELLS).Cercopithecus aethiops: A species of CERCOPITHECUS containing three subspecies: C. tantalus, C. pygerythrus, and C. sabeus. They are found in the forests and savannah of Africa. The African green monkey (C. pygerythrus) is the natural host of SIMIAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS and is used in AIDS research.Viral Fusion Proteins: Proteins, usually glycoproteins, found in the viral envelopes of a variety of viruses. They promote cell membrane fusion and thereby may function in the uptake of the virus by cells.Foxes: Any of several carnivores in the family CANIDAE, that possess erect ears and long bushy tails and are smaller than WOLVES. They are classified in several genera and found on all continents except Antarctica.Viral Vaccines: Suspensions of attenuated or killed viruses administered for the prevention or treatment of infectious viral disease.Carnivora: An order of MAMMALS, usually flesh eaters with appropriate dentition. Suborders include the terrestrial carnivores Fissipedia, and the aquatic carnivores PINNIPEDIA.Receptors, Virus: Specific molecular components of the cell capable of recognizing and interacting with a virus, and which, after binding it, are capable of generating some signal that initiates the chain of events leading to the biological response.Raccoon Dogs: The lone species in the genus Nyctereutes, family CANIDAE. It is found in the woodland zone from southeastern Siberia to Vietnam and on the main islands of Japan.Feline Panleukopenia: A highly contagious DNA virus infection of the cat family, characterized by fever, enteritis and bone marrow changes. It is also called feline ataxia, feline agranulocytosis, feline infectious enteritis, cat fever, cat plague, and show fever. It is caused by FELINE PANLEUKOPENIA VIRUS or the closely related MINK ENTERITIS VIRUS or CANINE PARVOVIRUS.SSPE Virus: A defective variant of MEASLES VIRUS that has been isolated from the brain tissue of patients with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis.Mink: Carnivores of genus Mustela of the family MUSTELIDAE. The European mink, which has white upper and lower lips, was widely trapped for commercial purposes and is classified as endangered. The American mink, lacking a white upper lip, is farmed commercially.Viral Proteins: Proteins found in any species of virus.Cytopathogenic Effect, Viral: Visible morphologic changes in cells infected with viruses. It includes shutdown of cellular RNA and protein synthesis, cell fusion, release of lysosomal enzymes, changes in cell membrane permeability, diffuse changes in intracellular structures, presence of viral inclusion bodies, and chromosomal aberrations. It excludes malignant transformation, which is CELL TRANSFORMATION, VIRAL. Viral cytopathogenic effects provide a valuable method for identifying and classifying the infecting viruses.Avipoxvirus: A genus of the family POXVIRIDAE, subfamily CHORDOPOXVIRINAE, comprising bird poxviruses. The type species is FOWLPOX VIRUS. Transmission is mechanical by ARTHROPODS.Antigens, Viral: Substances elaborated by viruses that have antigenic activity.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Antibodies, Monoclonal: Antibodies produced by a single clone of cells.Antibody Specificity: The property of antibodies which enables them to react with some ANTIGENIC DETERMINANTS and not with others. Specificity is dependent on chemical composition, physical forces, and molecular structure at the binding site.Fluorescent Antibody Technique: Test for tissue antigen using either a direct method, by conjugation of antibody with fluorescent dye (FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY TECHNIQUE, DIRECT) or an indirect method, by formation of antigen-antibody complex which is then labeled with fluorescein-conjugated anti-immunoglobulin antibody (FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY TECHNIQUE, INDIRECT). The tissue is then examined by fluorescence microscopy.Virus Cultivation: Process of growing viruses in live animals, plants, or cultured cells.Neutralization Tests: The measurement of infection-blocking titer of ANTISERA by testing a series of dilutions for a given virus-antiserum interaction end-point, which is generally the dilution at which tissue cultures inoculated with the serum-virus mixtures demonstrate cytopathology (CPE) or the dilution at which 50% of test animals injected with serum-virus mixtures show infectivity (ID50) or die (LD50).AzerbaijanPhylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.RNA, Viral: Ribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of viruses.Inclusion Bodies, Viral: An area showing altered staining behavior in the nucleus or cytoplasm of a virus-infected cell. Some inclusion bodies represent "virus factories" in which viral nucleic acid or protein is being synthesized; others are merely artifacts of fixation and staining. One example, Negri bodies, are found in the cytoplasm or processes of nerve cells in animals that have died from rabies.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Cross Reactions: Serological reactions in which an antiserum against one antigen reacts with a non-identical but closely related antigen.Emaciation: Clinical manifestation of excessive LEANNESS usually caused by disease or a lack of nutrition (MALNUTRITION).Encephalitis: Inflammation of the BRAIN due to infection, autoimmune processes, toxins, and other conditions. Viral infections (see ENCEPHALITIS, VIRAL) are a relatively frequent cause of this condition.Virus Replication: The process of intracellular viral multiplication, consisting of the synthesis of PROTEINS; NUCLEIC ACIDS; and sometimes LIPIDS, and their assembly into a new infectious particle.Germ-Free Life: Animals not contaminated by or associated with any foreign organisms.Antibodies, Bacterial: Immunoglobulins produced in a response to BACTERIAL ANTIGENS.Cell Line: Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.Genes, Viral: The functional hereditary units of VIRUSES.Disease Outbreaks: Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.Cell Fusion: Fusion of somatic cells in vitro or in vivo, which results in somatic cell hybridization.
Canine distemper (CD) is an extremely contagious virus that is considered always fatal. Being strict indoor pets does not ... In ferrets, the virus affects the immune system (causing it to produce non-neutralizing antibodies) and many internal organs, ... A ferret with partial immunity to distemper can be exposed to canine distemper and go through an incubation period of up to six ... The distemper virus is very short-lived in hot, dry weather, but may persist on hands or surfaces for much longer in cool, damp ...
... and distemper virus experimental challenges". Vet Ther. 5 (3): 173-86. PMID 15578450. Canine antibody diagnosis tests. ... Infectious canine hepatitis is an acute liver infection in dogs caused by canine adenovirus type-1 (CAV-1). CAV-1 also causes ... A rising antibody titer to CAV-1 is also seen. The disease can be confused with canine parvovirus because both will cause a low ... The virus is spread in the faeces, urine, blood, saliva, and nasal discharge of infected dogs. It is contracted through the ...
Canine distemper virus is closely related to measles virus and is the most important viral disease of dogs. The disease (which ... Invertebrates do not produce antibodies by the lymphocyte-based adaptive immune system that is central to vertebrate immunity, ... Animal viruses are viruses that infect animals. Viruses infect all cellular life and although viruses infect every animal, ... Chen, Y. P.; Siede, R. (2007). "Honey Bee Viruses". Advances in Virus Research Volume 70. Advances in Virus Research. 70. pp. ...
This was later identified as a strain of the closely related canine distemper virus (CDV) and was probably transmitted to the ... Antibodies to PDV and CDV have been found in a number of carnivorous mammal species in Canada, including polar bears, ... Phocine distemper virus (PDV) is a paramyxovirus of the genus Morbillivirus that is pathogenic for pinniped species, ... indicating the potential for the viruses to spread to new species. The suddenness of the emergence of PDV and related viruses ...
Where rabies occurs, rabies vaccination of dogs may be required by law. Other canine vaccines include canine distemper, canine ... Van Oirschot JT, Gielkens AL, Moormann RJ, Berns AJ (1990). "Marker vaccines, virus protein-specific antibody assays and the ... parvovirus, infectious canine hepatitis, adenovirus-2, leptospirosis, bordatella, canine parainfluenza virus, and Lyme disease ... "Differentiation of serum antibodies from pigs vaccinated or infected with Aujeszky's disease virus by a competitive enzyme ...
Dogs who catch Parvovirus usually die from the dehydration it causes or secondary infection rather than the virus itself. Dogs ... ISBN 0-8151-6351-7. Lobetti, Remo (2003). "Canine Parvovirus and Distemper". Proceedings of the 28th World Congress of the ... "One-Step Immunochromatography Assay Kit for Detecting Antibodies to Canine Parvovirus". Clin. Vaccine Immunol. 13 (4): 520-4. ... Canine parvovirus type 2 (CPV2, colloquially parvo) is a contagious virus mainly affecting dogs, and thought to originate in ...
"Experimental Adaptation of Wild-Type Canine Distemper Virus (CDV) to the Human Entry Receptor CD150". plosone.org. PLoS One. ... "Neutralizing Antibodies against Feline Herpesvirus Type 1 in Captive Wild Felids of Brazil". Journal of Zoo and Wildlife ... This research may lead to new ways to combat deadly viruses such as the Ebola virus and HIV. Research using wild-type mutations ... "Ebola Virus Pathogenesis: Implications for Vaccines and Therapies". jvi.asm.org. Journal of Virology. Retrieved 2014-11-14. ...
... a close relative of canine parvovirus. It is not related to canine distemper. Panleukopenia is highly contagious and can be ... Feline panleukopenia virus (FPV), more commonly known as feline distemper, is caused by the feline parvovirus, ... This is because core vaccines show an excellent correlation between the presence of antibody and protective immunity to a ... However, the viruses differ in many ways. Although many of the diseases caused by FeLV and FIV are similar, the specific ways ...
... canine distemper), CAV-2 (canine hepatitis virus or adenovirus-2) and CPV-2 (canine parvovirus). Non-core vaccines are those ... This is because core vaccines show an excellent correlation between the presence of antibody and protective immunity to a ... Programs supporting regular vaccination of dogs have contributed both to the health of dogs and to the public health. In ... "2011 AAHA Canine Vaccination Guidelines" (PDF). American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA) Canine Vaccination Task Force. 2011 ...
The group includes measles virus, which infects humans and primates; canine distemper virus, which infects many animals ... Barrett, p. 24 Chen J, Deng YM (2009). "Influenza virus antigenic variation, host antibody production and new approach to ... One way that viruses have been able to spread is with the evolution of virus transmission. The virus can find a new host ... Many viruses (for example, influenza A virus) can "shuffle" their genes with other viruses when two similar strains infect the ...
Canine distemper virus (CDV) is known to cause apoptosis in central nervous system and lymphoid tissue of infected dogs in vivo ... these mice demonstrated a deficiency in the maturation of an antibody response; they were able to generate normal levels of IgM ... "Canine distemper virus induces apoptosis in cervical tumor derived cell lines". Virol. J. 8 (1): 334. doi:10.1186/1743-422X-8- ... Canine Distemper Virus) is able to induce apoptosis despite the presence of these inhibitory proteins. This is an important ...
Other canine vaccines include canine distemper, canine parvovirus, infectious canine hepatitis, adenovirus-2, leptospirosis, ... van Oirschot JT, Gielkens AL, Moormann RJ, Berns AJ (June 1990). "Marker vaccines, virus protein-specific antibody assays and ... bordatella, canine parainfluenza virus, and Lyme disease, among others. Cases of veterinary vaccines used in humans have been ... "Differentiation of serum antibodies from pigs vaccinated or infected with Aujeszky's disease virus by a competitive enzyme ...
Canine distemper is an often fatal infectious disease that mainly has respiratory and neurologic signs. Canine influenza is a ... Canine minute virus is an infectious disease that can cause respiratory and gastrointestinal signs in young puppies. ... Antibodies are present on the cell surface, leading to lysis and severe anemia. Other causes of hemolytic lesion include ... Please see the article dog health for information on this disease in dogs. Canine parvovirus is a sometimes fatal ...
"Canine distemper virus induces apoptosis in cervical tumor derived cell lines". Virol. J. 8 (1): 334. doi:10.1186/1743-422X-8- ... The tubulin antibody shows the distribution of microtubules and the Ki-67 antibody is expressed in cells about to divide. ... HeLa cells have also been used to study canine distemper virus' ability to induce apoptosis in cancer cell lines,[28] which ... dogs, and cats.[25] These cells have also been used to study viruses such as the oropouche virus (OROV). OROV causes the ...
Other viruses cats may be exposed to include: Chlamydophila felis Feline leukemia virus (FeLV), a retrovirus not a cancer. ... The U.S. Food and Drug Administration Center for Veterinary Medicine has come out against vegetarian cat and dog food for ... Similar to Crohn's disease in humans, a cat's intestinal antibodies view food as the enemy and attack nutritional absorption as ... Feline panleukopenia (FPV) more commonly known as feline distemper. Rabies, a fatal disease transmitted by the bite of an ...
The close similarities between measles virus, canine distemper virus and rinderpest virus have given rise to speculation that ... This acquired immunity is only passed down to offspring temporarily, by antibodies in breast milk and other antibodies that ... There are numerous causes, including viruses - particularly hepatitis A virus, hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus. ... yellow fever virus, dengue virus and Pappataci fever virus. More than 100 of such viruses are now known to cause human diseases ...
When the adaptive immune system of a vertebrate encounters a virus, it produces specific antibodies that bind to the virus and ... In 1988 and 2002, thousands of harbour seals were killed in Europe by phocine distemper virus. Many other viruses, including ... Canine parvovirus is caused by a small DNA virus and infections are often fatal in pups. Like all invertebrates, the honey bee ... A virus has either a DNA or an RNA genome and is called a DNA virus or an RNA virus, respectively. The vast majority of viruses ...
"For his work on diseases due to viruses, including that on the cause and prevention of distemper in dogs.". ... "for his pioneering work in protein engineering and therapeutic monoclonal antibodies, and his contributions as an inventor and ... His studies and discoveries in the mechanisms by which influenza virus binds to the host cell, and in virus-cell membrane ... "For his distinguished work on bacteriophages, viruses and immunity; and for his contributions to the study of infectious ...
Dogs can also be vaccinated against many other diseases, including canine distemper, canine parvovirus, infectious canine ... canine parainfluenza virus, and Lyme disease. Several trends in vaccine development[change , change source]. *Nowadays, ... This means that their immune systems just do not create antibodies to fight off a disease, even after they are vaccinated ... It gives immunity to an infectious disease caused by a particular germ (bacteria or virus). For example, the flu vaccine makes ...
... and canine morbillivirus (previously known as canine distemper virus). The disease is highly contagious, and can have an 80-100 ... The virus can be detected in acute cases from various swabs and blood samples, using PCR and ELISA. Antibodies can also be ... which is related to but distinct from Rinderpest virus. Four genotypes (lineages) of the virus are described.[8] Their ... This virus appears to have evolved at the start of the 20th century in Nigeria.[14] The extant genotypes subsequently appeared ...
When the adaptive immune system of a vertebrate encounters a virus, it produces specific antibodies that bind to the virus and ... In 1988 and 2002, thousands of harbour seals were killed in Europe by phocine distemper virus.[236] Many other viruses, ... Canine parvovirus is caused by a small DNA virus and infections are often fatal in pups.[210] Like all invertebrates, the honey ... I: dsDNA viruses. II: ssDNA viruses. III: dsRNA viruses. IV: (+)ssRNA viruses. V: (−)ssRNA viruses. VI: ssRNA-RT viruses. VII: ...
Canine distemper virus (CDV) is known to cause apoptosis in central nervous system and lymphoid tissue of infected dogs in vivo and in vitro.[90] Apoptosis caused by CDV is typically induced via the extrinsic pathway, which activates caspases that disrupt cellular function and eventually leads to the cells death.[74] In normal cells, CDV activates caspase-8 first, which works as the initiator protein followed by the executioner protein caspase-3.[74] However, apoptosis induced by CDV in HeLa cells does not involve the initiator protein caspase-8. HeLa cell apoptosis caused by CDV follows a different mechanism than that in vero cell lines.[74] This change in the caspase cascade suggests CDV induces apoptosis via the intrinsic pathway, excluding the need for the initiator caspase-8. The executioner protein is instead activated by the internal stimuli caused by viral infection not a caspase cascade.[74]. The Oropouche ...
... (GME) is an inflammatory disease of the central nervous system (CNS) of dogs and, rarely, cats. It is a form of meningoencephalitis. GME is likely second only to encephalitis caused by canine distemper virus as the most common cause of inflammatory disease of the canine CNS. The disease is more common in female toy dogs of young and middle age. It has a rapid onset. The lesions of GME exist mainly in the white matter of the cerebrum, brainstem, cerebellum, and spinal cord. The cause is only known to be noninfectious and is considered at this time to be idiopathic. Because lesions resemble those seen in allergic meningoencephalitis, GME is thought to have an immune-mediated cause, but it is also thought that the disease may be based on an abnormal response to an infectious agent. One study searched for viral DNA from canine herpesvirus, ...
... , formerly Phocine distemper virus (PDV), is a paramyxovirus of the genus Morbillivirus that is pathogenic for pinniped species, particularly seals.[2] Clinical signs include laboured breathing, fever and nervous symptoms. PDV was first identified in 1988 as the cause of death of 18,000 harbor seals (Phoca vitulina) and 300 grey seals (Halichoerus grypus) along the northern European coast.[3] In 2002, an epidemic of PDV along the North Sea coast resulted in the deaths of 21,700 seals, estimated to be 51% of the population. Antibodies to PDV have been found in a number of carnivorous mammal species in the Western North Atlantic, including polar bears, and the Atlantic walrus.[3] The suddenness of the emergence of PDV and related viruses in aquatic mammals has implicated environmental changes as the cause. Pollutants have been posited as contributors by interfering with the ability of ...
... , formerly Phocine distemper virus (PDV), is a paramyxovirus of the genus Morbillivirus that is pathogenic for pinniped species, particularly seals.[2] Clinical signs include laboured breathing, fever and nervous symptoms. PDV was first identified in 1988 as the cause of death of 18,000 harbor seals (Phoca vitulina) and 300 grey seals (Halichoerus grypus) along the northern European coast.[3] In 2002, an epidemic of PDV along the North Sea coast resulted in the deaths of 21,700 seals, estimated to be 51% of the population. Antibodies to PDV have been found in a number of carnivorous mammal species in the Western North Atlantic, including polar bears, and the Atlantic walrus.[3] The suddenness of the emergence of PDV and related viruses in aquatic mammals has implicated environmental changes as the cause. Pollutants have been posited as contributors by interfering with the ability of ...
Canine distemper virus (CDV) is known to cause apoptosis in central nervous system and lymphoid tissue of infected dogs in vivo and in vitro.[90] Apoptosis caused by CDV is typically induced via the extrinsic pathway, which activates caspases that disrupt cellular function and eventually leads to the cells death.[74] In normal cells, CDV activates caspase-8 first, which works as the initiator protein followed by the executioner protein caspase-3.[74] However, apoptosis induced by CDV in HeLa cells does not involve the initiator protein caspase-8. HeLa cell apoptosis caused by CDV follows a different mechanism than that in vero cell lines.[74] This change in the caspase cascade suggests CDV induces apoptosis via the intrinsic pathway, excluding the need for the initiator caspase-8. The executioner protein is instead activated by the internal stimuli caused by viral infection not a caspase cascade.[74]. The Oropouche ...
... (GME) is an inflammatory disease of the central nervous system (CNS) of dogs and, rarely, cats. It is a form of meningoencephalitis. GME is likely second only to encephalitis caused by canine distemper virus as the most common cause of inflammatory disease of the canine CNS. The disease is more common in female toy dogs of young and middle age. It has a rapid onset. The lesions of GME exist mainly in the white matter of the cerebrum, brainstem, cerebellum, and spinal cord. The cause is only known to be noninfectious and is considered at this time to be idiopathic. Because lesions resemble those seen in allergic meningoencephalitis, GME is thought to have an immune-mediated cause, but it is also thought that the disease may be based on an abnormal response to an infectious agent. One study searched for viral DNA from canine herpesvirus, ...
... (equine distemper) is a contagious upper respiratory tract infection of horses and other equines caused by a gram-positive bacterium, Streptococcus equi. As a result, the lymph nodes swell, compressing the pharynx, larynx and trachea and can cause airway obstruction leading to death, hence the name Strangles. Strangles is enzootic in domesticated horses worldwide. The contagious nature of the infection has at times led to limitations on sporting events. The disease is spread by an infected horse when nasal discharge or pus from the draining lymph nodes contaminate pastures, feed troughs, brushes, bedding, tack etc. Equines of any age may contract the disease, although younger and elderly equines are more susceptible. Young equines may lack immunity to the disease because they have not had prior exposure. Geriatric equines may have a weaker immune system. A horse with strangles will typically develop abscesses in the lymph nodes of the head and neck causing coughing fits ...
... , formerly Phocine distemper virus (PDV), is a paramyxovirus of the genus Morbillivirus that is pathogenic for pinniped species, particularly seals.[2] Clinical signs include laboured breathing, fever and nervous symptoms. PDV was first identified in 1988 as the cause of death of 18,000 harbor seals (Phoca vitulina) and 300 grey seals (Halichoerus grypus) along the northern European coast.[3] In 2002, an epidemic of PDV along the North Sea coast resulted in the deaths of 21,700 seals, estimated to be 51% of the population. Antibodies to PDV have been found in a number of carnivorous mammal species in the Western North Atlantic, including polar bears, and the Atlantic walrus.[3] The suddenness of the emergence of PDV and related viruses in aquatic mammals has implicated environmental changes as the cause. Pollutants have been posited as contributors by interfering with the ability of ...
... s are solitary, but are gregarious when hauled out and during the breeding season, though they do not form groups as large as some other seals. When not actively feeding, they haul to rest. They tend to be coastal, not venturing more than 20 km offshore. The mating system is not known, but thought to be polygamous. Females give birth once per year, with a gestation period around nine months. Females have a mean age at sexual maturity of 3.72 years and a mean age at first parturition of 4.64.[9] Both courtship and mating occur under water.[10][9] Pregnancy rate of females was 92% from age 3 to age 36, with lowered reproductive success after the age of 25 years.[9]. Birthing of pups occurs annually on shore. The timing of the pupping season varies with location,[11] occurring in February for populations in lower latitudes, and as late as July in the subarctic zone. The mothers are the sole providers of care, with lactation lasting 24 days.[12] Researchers have found males gather under ...
... s are solitary, but are gregarious when hauled out and during the breeding season, though they do not form groups as large as some other seals. When not actively feeding, they haul to rest. They tend to be coastal, not venturing more than 20 km offshore. Both courtship and mating occur under water. The mating system is not known, but thought to be polygamous. Females give birth once per year, with a gestation period around nine months. Females have a mean age at sexual maturity of 3.72 years and a mean age at first parturition of 4.64.[9] Pregnancy rate of females was 92% from age 3 to age 36, with lowered reproductive success after the age of 25 years.[9]. Birthing of pups occurs annually on shore. The timing of the pupping season varies with location,[10] occurring in February for populations in lower latitudes, and as late as July in the subarctic zone. The mothers are the sole providers of care, with lactation lasting 24 days.[11] Researchers have found males gather under water, ...
... s are dogs belonging to two breeds of the spaniel dog type: the American Cocker Spaniel and the English Cocker Spaniel, both of which are commonly called simply Cocker Spaniel in their countries of origin. In the early 20th century, Cocker Spaniels also included small hunting Spaniels. Cocker Spaniels were originally bred as hunting dogs in the United Kingdom, with the term cocker deriving from their use to hunt the Eurasian woodcock. When the breed was brought to the United States, it was bred to a different standard, which enabled it to specialize in hunting the American woodcock. Further physical changes were bred into the cocker in the United States during the early part of the 20th century. Spaniels were first mentioned in the 14th century by Gaston III of Foix-Béarn in his work the Livre de Chasse. The "cocking" or "cocker spaniel" was a type of field or land spaniel in the 19th century. Prior to 1901, Cocker Spaniels were only separated from Field Spaniels and Springer ...
In the eighteenth century in Britain, only two types of terriers were recognized, long- and short-legged.[4] Today, terriers are often informally categorized by size or by function. Hunting-types are still used to find, track, or trail quarry, especially underground, and sometimes to bolt the quarry. Modern examples include the Jack Russell Terrier, Rat Terrier and the Patterdale Terrier. There are also the short-legged terriers such as the Cairn Terrier, Scottish Terrier, and West Highland White Terrier which were also used to kill small vermin. The original hunting terriers include the fell terrier-breeds developed in northern England to assist in the killing of foxes-and the hunt terrier-breeds developed in southern England to locate, kill or bolt foxes during a traditional mounted fox hunt. The various combinations of bulldog and terrier that were used for bull-baiting and dog-fighting in the late nineteenth century, were later refined into separate breeds that combined both terrier and ...
The dog leukocyte antigen (DLA) is a part of the major hisocompatability complex (MHC) in dogs, encoding genes in the MHC. The DLA and MHC system are interchangeable terms in canines. The MHC plays a critical role in the immune response system and consists of three regions: class I, class II and class III. DLA genes belong to the first two classes, which are involved in the regulation of antigens in the immune system. The class II genes are highly polymorphic, with many different alleles/haplotypes that have been linked to diseases, allergies, and autoimmune conditions such as diabetes, polyarthritus, and hypothyroidism in canines. There are likely hundreds of immunologically relevant genes making up the DLA region in the canine genome; as of the present date the complete characteristics of the gene is unknown. MHC genes represent candidates for disease susceptibility in ...
Distemper Virus antibody LS-C683174 is an unconjugated mouse monoclonal antibody to canine distemper virus Canine Distemper ... Canine Distemper Virus antibody LS-C683174 is an unconjugated mouse monoclonal antibody to canine distemper virus Canine ... Test your therapeutic antibodies in immunohistochemistry against a broad panel of normal frozen human tissue types in order to ... Outsource the entire localization process without having to worry about finding and characterizing target specific antibodies, ...
Mouse Anti-Viral Monoclonal Antibody validated in WB, IHC-P, IHC-F, E (ABD11656), Abgent ... Anti-Canine Distemper Virus Antibody, clone DV2-12 Anti-Canine Distemper Virus Antibody, clone DV2-12 Mouse Anti-Viral ... Mouse anti-canine distemper virus antibody, clone DV2-12 recognizes canine distemper virus nucleoprotein. In Western blots the ... Anti-Canine Distemper Virus Antibody, clone DV2-12 is for research use only and not for use in diagnostic or therapeutic ...
... antibodies to canine distemper virus (CDV) and canine parvovirus (cpv) was assessed. The titres of IgM antibodies to CDV and ... Evaluation of a dot ELISA kit for measuring immunoglobulin M antibodies to canine parvovirus and distemper virus ... Evaluation of a dot ELISA kit for measuring immunoglobulin M antibodies to canine parvovirus and distemper virus ... and IgM antibodies to cpv and CDv in 10 puppies vaccinated with a polyvalent vaccine. High levels of IgM antibodies to cpv were ...
... recognizes the envelope protein of canine distemper virus (CDV), a negatively stranded RNA morbillivirus. CDV infection induces ... strong,Mouse anti Canine distemper virus antibody, clone 7515,/strong, ... Mouse anti Canine distemper virus antibody, clone 7515 recognizes the envelope protein of canine distemper virus (CDV), a ... References for Canine Distemper Virus antibody. * Kabak YB et al. (2015) Immunohistochemical detection of autophagy-related ...
Learn more about Anti-Canine Distemper Virus Mouse Monoclonal Antibody. We enable science by offering product choice, services ... Anti-Canine Distemper Virus Mouse Monoclonal Antibody. Anti-Canine Distemper Virus Mouse Monoclonal Antibody. Supplier: Genetex ... This antibody recognizes canine Distemper Virus.. Type: Primary. Antigen: Canine Distemper Virus. Clonality: Monoclonal. Clone ... 4. Upload files that contain viruses, corrupted files, or any other similar software or programs that may damage the operation ...
Learn more about Anti-Canine Distemper Virus Mouse Monoclonal Antibody [clone: 7514]. We enable science by offering product ... Home , Antibodies , Anti-Canine Distemper Virus Mouse Monoclonal Antibody [clone: 7514]. Anti-Canine Distemper Virus Mouse ... The Canine Distemper Virus Antibody (7514) from Novus Biologicals is a mouse monoclonal antibody to Canine Distemper Virus. ... This antibody reacts with virus. The Canine Distemper Virus Antibody (7514) has been validated for the following applications: ...
... clone 7515 recognizes the envelope protein of canine distemper virus (CDV), a negatively stran ... Canine Distemper Virus Antibody , 7515. //www.bio-rad-antibodies.com/viral-canine-distemper-virus-antibody-7515-mca2592.html? ... Mouse anti Canine distemper virus antibody, clone 7515 recognizes the envelope protein of canine distemper virus (CDV), a ... Bevacizumab Antibodies Anti-Cetuximab Antibodies Anti-Denosumab Antibodies Anti-Etanercept Antibodies Anti-Golimumab Antibodies ...
... from 2000 to 2008 for antibodies to canine parvovirus (CPV) and canine distemper virus (CDV) in Banff and Jasper National Parks ... PREVALENCE OF ANTIBODIES TO CANINE PARVOVIRUS AND DISTEMPER VIRUS IN WOLVES IN THE CANADIAN ROCKY MOUNTAINS. ... "PREVALENCE OF ANTIBODIES TO CANINE PARVOVIRUS AND DISTEMPER VIRUS IN WOLVES IN THE CANADIAN ROCKY MOUNTAINS," Journal of ... "PREVALENCE OF ANTIBODIES TO CANINE PARVOVIRUS AND DISTEMPER VIRUS IN WOLVES IN THE CANADIAN ROCKY MOUNTAINS," Journal of ...
Duration of maternal antibodies against canine distemper virus and hendra virus in pteropid bats ... Duration of maternal antibodies against canine distemper virus and hendra virus in pteropid bats. PloS One, 8(6), e67584. ISSN ... canine distemper virus antigen in vaccinated captive Pteropus hypomelanus; and 2) Hendra virus in wild-caught, naturally ... Nipah and Hendra virus), Ebola virus, and Marburg virus. Epidemiological studies of these viruses in bats often utilize ...
The results on Saturday, June 2nd were positive for Distemper antibodies. For these last two weeks his symptoms had been ... It is unlikely to be harmful in a dog that is past the growth stage in age, though. 4) Dogs with distemper produce interferon ... nutritional supplements or other therapies that have proven to be successful in treating canine distemper virus consistently. ... our dog Princess was euthanized due to Acute Distemper. Princess was rescued from the street around March 18, 2001. Our dogs ...
Antibodies to canine distemper virus were not detected in sera of sick black-footed ferrets. Antibodies to canine distemper ... Canine distemper virus was isolated from four animals and paramyxovirus nucleocapsids were observed by electron microscopy of ... CANINE DISTEMPER IN BLACK-FOOTED FERRETS (MUSTELA NIGRIPES) FROM WYOMING. E. S. Williams, E. T. Thome, M. J. G. Appel, D. W. ... E. S. Williams, E. T. Thome, M. J. G. Appel, and D. W. Belitsky "CANINE DISTEMPER IN BLACK-FOOTED FERRETS (MUSTELA NIGRIPES) ...
Titration of Neutralizing Antibody - Canine Distemper. Oct 29, 2014. 302. Titration of Canine Distemper Virus in Primary Cell ... Titration of Distemper Virus in Embryonated Chicken Eggs. Oct 30, 2014. 304. Titration of Infectious Canine Hepatitis Virus in ... Titration of Canine Distemper Virus in Vero Cell Culture. Nov 20, 2014. ... Titration of Canine Parvovirus in Cell Culture. Nov 14, 2014. 317. Titration of Canine Adenovirus in Canine Kidney Cell Culture ...
... a highly contagious virus, can lay hidden in your pet for several months after infection without them showing any clinical ... The best way to definitively diagnose canine distemper in a living dog is a fluorescent antibody test that can be performed on ... Canine Distemper Symptoms. The canine distemper virus typically attacks a dogs tonsils and lymph nodes first, and then after ... Its referred to as the canine distemper virus or CDV. How CDV Is Transmitted. Non-immunized dogs that come in contact with an ...
Antibodies to Canine distemper virus (CDV) were detected in all species; 9% of 127 European mink, 20% of 210 polecats (Mustela ... KEYWORDS: canine adenovirus, canine distemper virus, canine parainfluenza virus, Martes, Mustela, rabies virus, serologic ... antibody prevalence estimates ranging from 2% to 10%. Antibodies to canine parainfluenza virus were detected in 1% of European ... Antibodies to Rabies virus (RV) were detected in three animals, possibly because of interspecies transmission of bat ...
Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay for evaluation of antibodies to canine distemper virus. Amer. J. Vet. Res., 41: 605-609. ... Antigen requirement and specificity of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of canine IgG against canine distemper ... Enzymelinked immunosorbent assay for detection of the blue tongue virus antibodies. Amer. J. Vet. Res.,42: 61-65.Google Scholar ... Micro ELISA test for detecting antibodies to rinderpest virus antigens. Trop. Anim. Health Prod., 13: 113-116.Google Scholar ...
Although dogs immunized with measles virus (MV) do not elicit canine distemper virus (CDV) neutralizing antibodies, they are ... against canine distemper virus-induced encephalitis with vaccinia virus recombinants encoding measles or canine distemper virus ... Measles and canine distemper are caused by serologically related viruses. ... To investigate the potential role of the MV antigens in protection against CDV, we have immunized mice with vaccinia virus (VV ...
The occurrence of antibodies against canine distemper virus (CDV), parvovirus and Ehrlichia spp. in wild captive carnivores was ... Antibodies against canine distemper virus, parvovirus and Ehrlichia spp. in wild captive carnivores in midwestern Brazil / ... Antibodies were evaluated by virus neutralization assay for CDV, hemagglutination inhibition test for parvovirus, indirect ... TwoCanidae presented antibodies reactive to E. canis antigens. The high antibodies rates to CDV and parvovirus suggest the ...
... which is closely related to the human measles virus. ... treatment and prevention of this potentially fatal virus in ... there is a good chance of a dog making a full recovery. Some dogs are able, at this stage, to make antibodies to fight the ... What is canine distemper?. Canine distemper is a virus that at one time used to wipe out entire towns of dogs. Its potentially ... Will my dog recover from canine distemper?. If an otherwise healthy dog contracts canine distemper and supportive care is ...
Canine Distemper Virus: Highly contagious, often fatal, virus that is spread among dogs and some wildlife. Vaccination provides ... Once vaccinated, your pets body will produce antibodies to fight against the bacteria or virus, which will circulate until the ... Canine Influenza Virus (Dog Flu): Canine influenza is an extremely contagious, sometimes fatal, respiratory disease virus. Two ... Canine Parainfluenza Virus: Contagious virus that causes respiratory disease. Vaccination may not fully protect puppies, but it ...
Prevalence of antibodies against canine distemper virus and canine parvovirus among foxes and wolves from Spain. Vet Microbiol ... Elia G, Decaro N, Martella V, Cirone F, Lucente MS, Lorusso E, Detection of canine distemper virus in dogs by real-time RT-PCR. ... To the Editor: Canine distemper virus (CDV) is an enveloped, single-stranded, negative RNA virus of the family Paramyxoviridae, ... Martella V, Elia G, Lucente MS, Decaro N, Lorusso E, Banyai K, Genotyping canine distemper virus (CDV) by a hemi-nested ...
Learn about the veterinary topic of Overview of Canine Distemper. Find specific details on this topic and related topics from ... vaccine induces immunity to canine distemper virus in the presence of relatively greater levels of maternal distemper antibody ... Although canine distemper antigen has been detected in the brains of some dogs with ODE by fluorescent antibody staining or ... widespread vaccination of domestic dogs is essential. Successful immunization of pups with canine distemper modified-live virus ...
Identification of linear B-cell epitopes on the phosphoprotein of canine distemper virus using four monoclonal antibodies. ... Virus Res. 2018 Sep 10;257:52-56. doi: 10.1016/j.virusres.2018.08.021. [Epub ahead of print] ... inactivated chimeric H7/H5 avian influenza vaccine against highly pathogenic avian influenza H7N9 and clade 2.3.4.4 H5 viruses. ...
NeoVac DA2 protects dogs against Distemper and Adenovirus Type 2. Features a short period from vaccination to protection and a ... NeoVac® DA2 provides protection against canine Distemper and Adenovirus Type 2. *Stimulates antibody production in the presence ... All viruses in this vaccine are modified live versions of the virus. Recommended for dogs 6 weeks of age or older. ... Dog Vaccine Abbreviations. Dog Vaccination FAQs. How to Vaccinate Your Dog or Cat. How to Safely Ship Vaccines. Safe Disposal ...
India is scrambling to protect its beleaguered tiger population after several big cats tested positive for a virus common among ... dogs but deadly to other carnivores, experts say. ... Canine distemper virus, a close relative of measles, is ... another virus similar to canine distemper. Increasing antibodies against rinderpest in the environment could help boost ... while authorities also consider a massive campaign to vaccinate dogs against canine distemper.. "We cannot vaccinate every dog ...
  • Peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV) causes an economically important disease of sheep and goats, primarily in developing countries. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Bacterial infections, especially of the respiratory or gastrointestinal (GI) tract may also make dogs more susceptible to the virus. (mercola.com)
  • Affected dogs are also susceptible to developing secondary opportunistic bacterial infections. (mercola.com)
  • Development of mycoplasma enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (Myco-ELISA) for the detection of antibody for mycoplasma infections in chickens. (springer.com)
  • These include reports describing virus morphology, the function and antigenic analysis of virus structural components, virus genome structure and expression, analysis on virus replication processes, virus evolution in connection with antiviral interventions, effects of viruses on their host cells, particularly on the immune system, and the pathogenesis of virus infections, including oncogene activation and transduction. (antibodies-online.com)
  • McAloose and her colleagues are now working on collecting samples from dogs and small wild carnivores in the Russian Far East to get a more complete picture of the various strains of CDV in circulation in the hopes of linking tiger infections to a source, knowledge that would hopefully aid in preventing more infections among tigers. (phys.org)
  • Almost all dogs experience a drop in the immune system's white blood cells (lymphopenia), and as a result, other infections can invade and make them even sicker. (1800petmeds.com)
  • It's a highly immunosuppressive virus and thus increases host's susceptibility to several opportunistic infections, which are a main cause of distemper associated deaths (Pawar et al. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • Veterinarians typically make a presumptive diagnosis of Infectious Canine Hepatitis, Parvovirus and Distemper infections based on clinical signs which range in severity from mild to severe. (drugs.com)
  • Immunoenzyme techniques for diagnosis of Aujeszky's virus infections. (springer.com)
  • She focuses on diagnosis and management of viruses and bacteria that cause respiratory infections in shelter dogs. (maddiesfund.org)
  • Virus was reisolated from the upper and lower respiratory tracts, but infection of epithelial or neuronal cells was not detectable at the time points examined, and the infections were self-limiting. (eur.nl)
  • Lethal infections with canine distemper virus (CDV) have recently been diagnosed in Amur tigers (Panthera tigris altaica), but long-term implications for the population are unknown. (jove.com)
  • Distemper infections often go undiagnosed when an owner believes the dog just has a cold or some other non-life threatening illness. (dogshealth.com)
  • Within the past 30 years, and before the emergence of HPAI viruses (H5N1), 5 documented outbreaks of influenza virus infections occurred in 2 carnivore species--the harbor seal (Phoca vitulina) (1-4), and the American mink (Mustela vison) (5). (thefreelibrary.com)
  • Also, recently, outbreaks of equine influenza virus (H3N8) infections resulted in respiratory disease in domestic dogs (10,11). (thefreelibrary.com)
  • The sources of most HPAI virus (H5N1) infections in carnivores were traced to infected birds eaten by the animals (12-15,19). (thefreelibrary.com)
  • We have previously demonstrated that virulence phenotypes in human infections are faithfully reproduced by infection of human thymus/liver (thy/liv) implants engrafted into SCID mice, where the virus grows primarily in stromal cells but induces thymocyte apoptosis (P. G. Auwaerter et al. (asm.org)
  • Although antibiotics have no effect on the distemper virus itself, they are used to prevent secondary bacterial infections. (corysstory.com)
  • Short-lasting CDV infections are unlikely to be maintained in small populations of species with limited connectivity like leopards, where viruses fade out as susceptible hosts are depleted. (tehrantimes.com)
  • Hepatitis B virus (HBV) acute and chronic infections remain a major worldwide health problem. (asm.org)
  • We found that in both species, antibodies were transferred from dam to pup. (kingston.ac.uk)
  • Antibody prevalence was significantly higher in stone marten and polecats, possibly because their ranges overlap more closely with that of domestic species than that of the other species tested. (bioone.org)
  • The disconnection between human and dog rabies in China reflects a lack of awareness of the concept of one medicine, or health without regard to species, in approaches to rabies control in the public health system. (cdc.gov)
  • Domestic dogs (including feral populations) are considered to be the reservoir species in most, if not all, locations. (merckvetmanual.com)
  • The possibility of a disease like canine distemper hitting the world's last population of wild Asiatic lions was a major consideration in last year's Indian Supreme Court's decision ordering Gujarat state to safeguard the species by transferring some lions to a second, faraway sanctuary. (news24.com)
  • As of 2006-2007 when this study was conducted, the KZN population of 80 to 90 wild dogs accounted for approximately a quarter of South Africa's total population of this species [ 10 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • Although the KZN wild dogs occur primarily within Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park (HiP), the establishment of a viable population with adequate gene flow for outbreeding in this species requires the dispersal of individuals for maintenance of population-wide genetic diversity [ 11 - 13 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • In the Russian Far East, domestic dogs are one of the biggest concerns, but other species, like raccoon dogs or foxes, can also harbor the disease," says McAloose. (phys.org)
  • This disease is not species specific and can affect wolves, raccoons, ferrets and coyotes apart from dogs. (vetinfo.com)
  • This includes approaches to understand how endangered species are impacted at a population level by infectious disease (such as canine distemper virus in free-ranging Amur tigers), as well non-infectious agents (such as the pharmaceutical diclofenac in Asian vultures). (cornell.edu)
  • Influenza A viruses rarely infect species of the order Carnivora. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • However, since 2003, highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses of subtype H5N1 have infected a wide range of carnivore species. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • The occurrence of HPAI viruses (H5N1) in wild bird populations is likely to result in the exposure and infection of free-living wild carnivore species. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • However, the susceptibility of this species to infection with influenza viruses is unknown. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • Our case study in Mongolia suggests that efforts to conserve threatened and endangered species that do not include management actions aimed to reduce dog-wildlife interactions may be ineffective in areas where feral and free-roaming dogs occur. (tehrantimes.com)
  • The results of their study seem to indicate that the wider dog population and other wildlife species drive CDV dynamics. (tehrantimes.com)
  • Hence, although widespread dog vaccination reduced the infection in dogs, transmission to lion populations still occurred, warranting further investigation into effective management options of CDV in this species-rich ecosystem. (tehrantimes.com)
  • Nevertheless, to exist as a species, virus replication and transfer to a new host are essential. (intechopen.com)
  • Check out links to articles that cite our custom service antibodies, peptides, and proteins in major peer-reviewed journals, organized by research category. (abgent.com)
  • Molecular analyses to identify CDV-specific proteins and immunolabelling with CDV-specific antibodies confirmed that CDV was present in these tissues. (phys.org)
  • In simple terms, antibodies are proteins made by the pet's white blood cells (specifically B lymphocytes). (animalwellnessmagazine.com)
  • [2012 June] Interview with PhD Immunologist, Dr Tetyana Obukhanych- part 1, by Catherine Frompovich I believe that the exposure to yeast, egg, animal, or human proteins in the context of immunogenic (antibody producing) stimuli has the potential to result in sensitization to these proteins or even to break human immunologic tolerance to self. (whale.to)
  • These processes are associated with the production of antigenic proteins that make the virus vulnerable to immune control mechanisms 'warning' the host of the presence of an invader [ 1 ]. (intechopen.com)
  • Viruses encode homologs of complement regulatory proteins that are secreted and block complement activation and neutralization of virus particles. (intechopen.com)
  • Stimmer L, Siebert U, Wohlsein P, Fontaine J, Baumgartner W, Beineke A. Viral protein expression and phenotyping of inflammatory responses in the central nervous system of phocine distemper virus-infected harbor seals (Phoca vitulina). (labome.org)
  • Wohlsein P, Muller G, Haas L, Siebert U, Harder T, Baumgartner W. Antigenic characterization of phocine distemper virus causing mass mortality in 2002 and its relationship to other morbilliviruses. (labome.org)
  • Infected dogs can shed the virus for several months after infection, even when they are not showing clinical signs of illness. (mercola.com)
  • Later, when the virus enters the bloodstream, liver, kidney and/or other body organs it may cause clinical signs such as: "blue eye", vomiting, diarrhea, increased thirst and seizures. (drugs.com)
  • The wide range of clinical signs accompanying an infection of distemper often makes it very difficult to diagnose a young dog with distemper. (dogshealth.com)
  • The clinical signs of distemper will begin to show approximately 10 to 14 days after infection. (dogshealth.com)
  • To answer these questions, we experimentally assessed the excretion pattern (based on route, duration, and concentration of virus excretion) and pathogenicity (based on clinical signs, death rates, and distribution of lesions and virus) of a wild bird isolate of clade 2.2 HPAI virus (H5N1) in red foxes infected intratracheally and in red foxes fed infected bird carcasses. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • Phenotypic features of circulating leucocytes as immunological markers for clinical status and bone marrow parasite density in dogs naturally infected by Leishmania chagasi. (acris-antibodies.com)
  • It is easy to make the virus defective in replication, and it doesn't integrate into chromosomes, addressing two clinical safety issues. (iavireport.org)
  • We report here a dog that showed distinct clinical and pathological similarities to Klüver-Bucy syndrome of primates, including human patients. (vin.com)
  • When analyzed using seven sorts of viruses which rearranged the variation of N, P, and L genes of La strain with L strain, independently or simultaneous using the reverse genetics system … More , clinical condition was mitigated only for what changed N gene to La strain type. (nii.ac.jp)
  • Not only are annual boosters for parvo and distemper unnecessary, they subject the pet to potential risks of allergic reactions and immune-mediated hemolytic anemia. (thatsmydog.com)
  • Consult with your local veterinarian to determine the appropriate vaccination schedule for your dog. (terrificpets.com)
  • Dr. Jean Dodds' Recommended Vaccination Schedule claims that distemper is rare and boosters for this have been questioned as some research suggests that once a dog is vaccinated they are protected for years or even life. (dfordog.co.uk)
  • High levels of IgM antibodies to cpv were first detected seven days after they were vaccinated, and after nine days all the pups had high titres of IgG antibodies to cpv. (bmj.com)
  • High levels of IgM antibodies to CDV were detected after nine days and the highest average titres were recorded after 12 days. (bmj.com)