Vernonia: A plant genus of the family ASTERACEAE. Members contain germacrane and sesquiterpene LACTONES.Cell Line, Tumor: A cell line derived from cultured tumor cells.Neoplasms: New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.Apoptosis: One of the mechanisms by which CELL DEATH occurs (compare with NECROSIS and AUTOPHAGOCYTOSIS). Apoptosis is the mechanism responsible for the physiological deletion of cells and appears to be intrinsically programmed. It is characterized by distinctive morphologic changes in the nucleus and cytoplasm, chromatin cleavage at regularly spaced sites, and the endonucleolytic cleavage of genomic DNA; (DNA FRAGMENTATION); at internucleosomal sites. This mode of cell death serves as a balance to mitosis in regulating the size of animal tissues and in mediating pathologic processes associated with tumor growth.Cell Transformation, Neoplastic: Cell changes manifested by escape from control mechanisms, increased growth potential, alterations in the cell surface, karyotypic abnormalities, morphological and biochemical deviations from the norm, and other attributes conferring the ability to invade, metastasize, and kill.Breast Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the human BREAST.Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in neoplastic tissue.Neoplasm Proteins: Proteins whose abnormal expression (gain or loss) are associated with the development, growth, or progression of NEOPLASMS. Some neoplasm proteins are tumor antigens (ANTIGENS, NEOPLASM), i.e. they induce an immune reaction to their tumor. Many neoplasm proteins have been characterized and are used as tumor markers (BIOMARKERS, TUMOR) when they are detectable in cells and body fluids as monitors for the presence or growth of tumors. Abnormal expression of ONCOGENE PROTEINS is involved in neoplastic transformation, whereas the loss of expression of TUMOR SUPPRESSOR PROTEINS is involved with the loss of growth control and progression of the neoplasm.Antineoplastic Agents: Substances that inhibit or prevent the proliferation of NEOPLASMS.Cell Proliferation: All of the processes involved in increasing CELL NUMBER including CELL DIVISION.Tumor Cells, Cultured: Cells grown in vitro from neoplastic tissue. If they can be established as a TUMOR CELL LINE, they can be propagated in cell culture indefinitely.Tumor Markers, Biological: Molecular products metabolized and secreted by neoplastic tissue and characterized biochemically in cells or body fluids. They are indicators of tumor stage and grade as well as useful for monitoring responses to treatment and predicting recurrence. Many chemical groups are represented including hormones, antigens, amino and nucleic acids, enzymes, polyamines, and specific cell membrane proteins and lipids.Signal Transduction: The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.Cell Line: Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Arsenic: A shiny gray element with atomic symbol As, atomic number 33, and atomic weight 75. It occurs throughout the universe, mostly in the form of metallic arsenides. Most forms are toxic. According to the Fourth Annual Report on Carcinogens (NTP 85-002, 1985), arsenic and certain arsenic compounds have been listed as known carcinogens. (From Merck Index, 11th ed)Neoplastic Stem Cells: Highly proliferative, self-renewing, and colony-forming stem cells which give rise to NEOPLASMS.Stem Cells: Relatively undifferentiated cells that retain the ability to divide and proliferate throughout postnatal life to provide progenitor cells that can differentiate into specialized cells.Arsenic Poisoning: Disorders associated with acute or chronic exposure to compounds containing ARSENIC (ARSENICALS) which may be fatal. Acute oral ingestion is associated with gastrointestinal symptoms and an encephalopathy which may manifest as SEIZURES, mental status changes, and COMA. Chronic exposure is associated with mucosal irritation, desquamating rash, myalgias, peripheral neuropathy, and white transverse (Mees) lines in the fingernails. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1212)National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (U.S.): Component of the NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH. It conducts and supports basic and applied research to reduce the burden of human illness and dysfunction from environmental causes by, defining how environmental exposures, genetic susceptibility, and age interact to affect an individual's health. It was established in 1969.Hematopoietic Stem Cells: Progenitor cells from which all blood cells derive.Environmental Health: The science of controlling or modifying those conditions, influences, or forces surrounding man which relate to promoting, establishing, and maintaining health.Speech: Communication through a system of conventional vocal symbols.Breast: In humans, one of the paired regions in the anterior portion of the THORAX. The breasts consist of the MAMMARY GLANDS, the SKIN, the MUSCLES, the ADIPOSE TISSUE, and the CONNECTIVE TISSUES.Breast Diseases: Pathological processes of the BREAST.Cell Differentiation: Progressive restriction of the developmental potential and increasing specialization of function that leads to the formation of specialized cells, tissues, and organs.Electric Impedance: The resistance to the flow of either alternating or direct electrical current.Cell Lineage: The developmental history of specific differentiated cell types as traced back to the original STEM CELLS in the embryo.Body Water: Fluids composed mainly of water found within the body.Body Composition: The relative amounts of various components in the body, such as percentage of body fat.Serotonin: A biochemical messenger and regulator, synthesized from the essential amino acid L-TRYPTOPHAN. In humans it is found primarily in the central nervous system, gastrointestinal tract, and blood platelets. Serotonin mediates several important physiological functions including neurotransmission, gastrointestinal motility, hemostasis, and cardiovascular integrity. Multiple receptor families (RECEPTORS, SEROTONIN) explain the broad physiological actions and distribution of this biochemical mediator.Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis: An angiocentric and angiodestructive lymphoproliferative disorder primarily involving the lungs. It is caused by an Epstein-Barr virus-induced transformation of the B-cells, in a T-cell rich environment. Clinically and pathologically it resembles EXTRANODAL NK-T-CELL LYMPHOMA.Wegener Granulomatosis: A multisystemic disease of a complex genetic background. It is characterized by inflammation of the blood vessels (VASCULITIS) leading to damage in any number of organs. The common features include granulomatous inflammation of the RESPIRATORY TRACT and kidneys. Most patients have measurable autoantibodies (ANTINEUTROPHIL CYTOPLASMIC ANTIBODIES) against neutrophil proteinase-3 (WEGENER AUTOANTIGEN).Cats: The domestic cat, Felis catus, of the carnivore family FELIDAE, comprising over 30 different breeds. The domestic cat is descended primarily from the wild cat of Africa and extreme southwestern Asia. Though probably present in towns in Palestine as long ago as 7000 years, actual domestication occurred in Egypt about 4000 years ago. (From Walker's Mammals of the World, 6th ed, p801)Rare Diseases: A large group of diseases which are characterized by a low prevalence in the population. They frequently are associated with problems in diagnosis and treatment.Lung Diseases: Pathological processes involving any part of the LUNG.Plasma Cells: Specialized forms of antibody-producing B-LYMPHOCYTES. They synthesize and secrete immunoglobulin. They are found only in lymphoid organs and at sites of immune responses and normally do not circulate in the blood or lymph. (Rosen et al., Dictionary of Immunology, 1989, p169 & Abbas et al., Cellular and Molecular Immunology, 2d ed, p20)Lung: Either of the pair of organs occupying the cavity of the thorax that effect the aeration of the blood.Nonlinear Dynamics: The study of systems which respond disproportionately (nonlinearly) to initial conditions or perturbing stimuli. Nonlinear systems may exhibit "chaos" which is classically characterized as sensitive dependence on initial conditions. Chaotic systems, while distinguished from more ordered periodic systems, are not random. When their behavior over time is appropriately displayed (in "phase space"), constraints are evident which are described by "strange attractors". Phase space representations of chaotic systems, or strange attractors, usually reveal fractal (FRACTALS) self-similarity across time scales. Natural, including biological, systems often display nonlinear dynamics and chaos.GermanyPostpericardiotomy Syndrome: A nonspecific hypersensitivity reaction caused by TRAUMA to the PERICARDIUM, often following PERICARDIOTOMY. It is characterized by PERICARDIAL EFFUSION; high titers of anti-heart antibodies; low-grade FEVER; LETHARGY; loss of APPETITE; or ABDOMINAL PAIN.ItalyNetherlands: Country located in EUROPE. It is bordered by the NORTH SEA, BELGIUM, and GERMANY. Constituent areas are Aruba, Curacao, Sint Maarten, formerly included in the NETHERLANDS ANTILLES.United StatesSaint Vincent and the Grenadines: A self-governing state of the Windward Islands in the West Indies, comprising Saint Vincent and the northern islets of the Grenadines. Its capital is Kingstown. It is one of the original homes of the Carib Indians supposed to have been sighted by Columbus in 1498. It was in English hands from 1627 till held by the French 1779-83. Saint Vincent subsequently became a British possession and, with other nearby British territories, was administered by the Governor of the Windward Islands till 1959. It attained a measure of independence in 1969 but achieved full independence as Saint Vincent and the Grenadines in 1979. Saint Vincent was the 4th century Spanish martyr on whose feast day Columbus discovered the island. Grenadines is derived from the Spanish kingdom of Granada. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p1054 & The Europa World Year Book 1993, p2441)Cancer Vaccines: Vaccines or candidate vaccines designed to prevent or treat cancer. Vaccines are produced using the patient's own whole tumor cells as the source of antigens, or using tumor-specific antigens, often recombinantly produced.Needles: Sharp instruments used for puncturing or suturing.Vaccines: Suspensions of killed or attenuated microorganisms (bacteria, viruses, fungi, protozoa), antigenic proteins, synthetic constructs, or other bio-molecular derivatives, administered for the prevention, amelioration, or treatment of infectious and other diseases.Convection: Transmission of energy or mass by a medium involving movement of the medium itself. The circulatory movement that occurs in a fluid at a nonuniform temperature owing to the variation of its density and the action of gravity. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed; Webster, 10th ed)Nanoparticles: Nanometer-sized particles that are nanoscale in three dimensions. They include nanocrystaline materials; NANOCAPSULES; METAL NANOPARTICLES; DENDRIMERS, and QUANTUM DOTS. The uses of nanoparticles include DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEMS and cancer targeting and imaging.JordanGenes, Transgenic, Suicide: Genes that are used transgenically, i.e., via GENE TRANSFER TECHNIQUES to induce CELL DEATH.Brain Neoplasms: Neoplasms of the intracranial components of the central nervous system, including the cerebral hemispheres, basal ganglia, hypothalamus, thalamus, brain stem, and cerebellum. Brain neoplasms are subdivided into primary (originating from brain tissue) and secondary (i.e., metastatic) forms. Primary neoplasms are subdivided into benign and malignant forms. In general, brain tumors may also be classified by age of onset, histologic type, or presenting location in the brain.Thymidine Kinase: An enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of ATP and thymidine to ADP and thymidine 5'-phosphate. Deoxyuridine can also act as an acceptor and dGTP as a donor. (From Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992) EC 2.7.1.21.Ganciclovir: An ACYCLOVIR analog that is a potent inhibitor of the Herpesvirus family including cytomegalovirus. Ganciclovir is used to treat complications from AIDS-associated cytomegalovirus infections.
... which is a sign of a cancerous cell. Therefore, the floxuridine kills the cancerous cells. For colorectal cancer and hepatic ... Floxuridine primarily works by stopping the growth of newly born cells. The drug essentially stops DNA from forming in new and ... In vitro uses of floxuridine include 5-minute treatments of fluorouracil, floxuridine, and mitomycin to increase cell ...
A dysfunction of neurofibromin can affect regulation, and cause uncontrolled cell proliferation. Schwann cells in neurofibromas ... The tumors are generally non cancerous. The cause is a genetic mutation in certain genes. In half of cases these are inherited ... Surgery may be done to remove tumors that are causing problems or have become cancerous. Radiation and chemotherapy may also be ... The tumors involve supporting cells in the nervous system rather than the neurons. In NF1 the tumors are neurofibromas (tumors ...
"Ultrasound Effect on Cancerous versus Non-Cancerous Cells". Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. 42 (7): 1560-1567. doi:10.1016/j. ... and the entrapment of bone and Langerhans cells. Dr. Kost was the first to propose the ultrasonically modulated systems in ...
Basal cell carcinoma Squamous cell carcinoma Wagner, Siobhan (2010-09-24). "Software-based service could identify cancerous ... Basal cell carcinoma, Squamous cell carcinoma) and melanoma skin cancers in moles. The firm developed a unique image processing ... cancerous' one. Moletest (UK) Ltd was set up to provide what is intended to be an easy-to-use, remotely accessible online ...
This, in turn, allows the cell to become cancerous. This gene is a partner in a fusion gene with the BCR gene in the ... cell division, cell adhesion, and stress response. Activity of ABL1 protein is negatively regulated by its SH3 domain, and ... Cell. 6 (6): 1413-23. doi:10.1016/S1097-2765(00)00138-6. PMID 11163214. Yoshida K, Komatsu K, Wang HG, Kufe D (May 2002). "c- ... Cell. Biol. 22 (12): 4020-32. doi:10.1128/MCB.22.12.4020-4032.2002. PMC 133860 . PMID 12024016. Cao C, Leng Y, Kufe D (August ...
... the signals are disrupted in a way that can cause the cells to become cancerous. She also showed that antisense methodology (a ... Her later research involved the study of cancerous cells. Her most notable achievement in this area involves ras oncogene. Ras ... process that inhibits the ability of genes to do their work) can be used to suppress genes that have become cancerous. While in ... proteins play a vital role in the transmission of signals that regulate the growth of cells. When the gene that initiates the ...
This same unbounded growth is a feature of cancerous growth. Embryonic stem cells express telomerase, which allows them to ... but also in epidermal cells, in activated T cell and B cell lymphocytes, as well as in certain adult stem cells, but in the ... Epithelial stem cell tissue and its early daughter cells are the only noncancerous cells in which hTERT can be detected. Since ... A good example of immortal cancer cells is HeLa cells, which have been used in laboratories as a model cell line since 1951. ...
... works by damaging the DNA of cancerous cells. This DNA damage is caused by one of two types of energy, photon ... Targeting double-stranded breaks increases the probability that cells will undergo cell death. Cancer cells are generally less ... Radiation therapy is commonly applied to the cancerous tumor because of its ability to control cell growth. Ionizing radiation ... Fractionation allows normal cells time to recover, while tumor cells are generally less efficient in repair between fractions. ...
Expression levels fluctuate in normal, but not in cancerous cells. Expression is often associated with cell proliferation. ... signalling and consequently regulates cell proliferation (in part through control of cyclin D1 levels and stability) and cell ... It was found to be essential for cell division in some organisms. By 1999, however, it was apparent that Pin1 knockout mice had ... He J, Xu J, Xu XX, Hall RA (Jul 2003). "Cell cycle-dependent phosphorylation of Disabled-2 by cdc2". Oncogene. 22 (29): 4524-30 ...
Usually the goal is to remove the cancerous cells entirely. This can be particularly tricky if the cancer is near the larynx ... Squamous-cell carcinoma is a cancer of the squamous cell - a kind of epithelial cell found in both the skin and mucous ... to identify and attack specific cancer cells without harming normal cells." Some targeted therapy used in squamous cell cancers ... Like any cancer, metastasization affects many areas of the body, as the cancer spreads from cell to cell and organ to organ. ...
Inhibition of the growth or growth signals of cancerous cells. Suppression of metastasis of cancerous cells in the body by the ... Enhanced chemotherapy sensitivity - V. amygdalina extracts may render cancerous cells to be more sensitive to chemotherapy. ... amygdalina Extracts Alter MCF-7 Cell Membrane Permeability and Efflux". Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health. 3 (2): 174-179. ... "Natural Inhibitor of Extracelular Signal-Regulated Kinases and Human Breast Cancer Cells". Exp Biol & Medicine. 229: 163-169. ...
Oncogenes responsible for cell growth are overexpressed in cancerous cells. Tumor suppressor genes prevent cells with erroneous ... Cancer cells ignore cell cycle regulators that control cell growth, division, and death. The histology of spontaneous ... The cancerous cell lines are transmitted between individuals that are in close contact with each other through acts of ... Cancer alters the DNA of cells and the mutated genetic material is passed on to daughter cells, resulting in neoplasms. The ...
Re-establishing expression of GPC3 prevented colony-forming by cancerous cells. In addition to GPC3, GPC1 has also been ... CAR T cells targeting GPC2 can eliminate tumors in a neuroblastoma mouse model. Glypicans can modify cell signaling pathways ... GPC1 plays a role in heparin-binding and cell cycle progression in the breast tissue. Glypican-2 (GPC2) is a cell surface ... GPC3 expression can be detected in normal ovarian cells; however, several ovarian cancer cell lines do not express GPC3. On the ...
Normal cells often turn cancerous when signal transduction molecules become mutated. Sebti's work at Moffitt has centred on ... June 15, 2009). "Discovery of a novel proteasome inhibitor selective for cancer cells over non-transformed cells". Cell Cycle. ... a selective small molecule inhibitor of Akt signaling with antitumor activity in cancer cells overexpressing Akt". Cancer Res. ... activator of transcription 3 signaling pathway inhibitor with potent antitumor activity against human and murine cancer cells ...
It is due to release of IL-6 from cancerous cell. Maurice H. Stauffer, M.D., a gastroenterologist at the Mayo Clinic in ... Stauffer syndrome is a constellation of signs and symptoms of liver dysfunction that arise due to presence of renal cell ... The symptoms and signs resolve if the renal cell carcinoma (or another associated tumor) is successfully ablated. ... Reversible hepatic dysfunction in renal cell carcinoma (author's transl)]". Wien Klin Wochenschr. 90 (8): 268-70. PMID 636440. ...
By measuring the general state of activity inside a cell, FSM can be applied to identify malignant cancerous cells, which are ... Dimensionality of extracellular environment greatly influences FSM measurements of cancerous cells. In a 3D matrix, MDA-MB-231 ... FSM measurements on malignant MCF-7 breast cancer cells and benign MCF-10A breast cancer cells revealed a statistically ... Cell. 158: 822-832. doi:10.1016/j.cell.2014.06.051. PMC 4183065 . PMID 25126787. Brangwynne, C.P.; Koenderink, G.H.; Mackintosh ...
The person's T-cells are engineered to target CD19. The CD19 are found on the surface of certain cancerous cells. The cost for ... is an adoptive cell transfer therapy for used for certain cases of large B-cell lymphoma. In this treatment T cells from a ... The FDA granted approval on October 18 for the second-line treatment of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. "FDA approves CAR-T cell ... Axi-cel was awarded US FDA breakthrough therapy designation on October 18, 2017 for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, transformed ...
However, AKT's regulation of cells becomes dysfunctional as cancerous cells develop. Essentially, cancerous cells attack the ... 13-MTD helps down-regulate AKT, allowing stability in cells and inducing programmed cell death to the tumor cells. In a related ... to the cell's DNA.) 13-MTD brings stability to the cell by down-regulating signals that the cell receives and sends, and also ... The fatty chain acid's ability to resist and inhibit cancerous cells through apoptosis is impressive; however, what separates ...
"NASA's new e-nose can detect scent of cancerous brain cells". Engadget. AOL. "Why Brain Mapping Matters". EverydayHealth.com. ... The Brain Mapping Foundation used the electronic nose to detect brain cancer cells. The ability of the electronic nose to ...
NK cells are needed to fight against bacteria and cancerous tumours; but even when they are present, they cannot fight the ... Dilber and his team managed to increase the number of cells by 200. http://www.siracdilber.com. ...
A second colonoscopy in January 2000, did not detect cancerous cells. Further problems arose after Stewart was diganosed with ...
Other oncomir genes are tumor suppressors in a normal cell, so that underexpression of the gene leads to cancerous growth. ... miR-17 has been confirmed to target the cell cycle transcription factor E2F1, a protein that not only promotes cell growth but ... For example, in a study of cancer patients with a type of lymphoma called diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), serum levels ... It has been shown that miRNA's from the OncomiR-1 line inhibit cell death, thus increased expression of oncomir-1 leads to the ...
Ependymomas arise from oncogenic events mutating normal ependymal cells into cancerous cells. Recent evidence suggests the ... 2005). "Radial glia cells are candidate stem cells of ependymoma". Cancer Cell. 8 (4): 323-35. doi:10.1016/j.ccr.2005.09.001. ... Ependymomas have been suggested to arise from radial glial cells, suggesting neural stem cell maintenance pathways such as ... isolate cells suggest that inhibition of telomerase activity may inhibit cell proliferation and increase sensitivity of cells ...
outlined a number of different effects of Rho activation in cancerous cells. First, in the initiation of the tumor modification ... Before the cell can bud, Cdc42 is used to locate the region of the cell's membrane that will begin to bulge into the new cell. ... Finally, after inhibition of apoptosis, cell polarity and adhesion molecules, the cancerous mass is free to metastasize and ... Before cells can undergo key processes such as budding, mitosis, or locomotion, it must have some manner of cell polarity. One ...
Cell. Biol. 25 (4): 1238-57. doi:10.1128/MCB.25.4.1238-1257.2005. PMC 548016 . PMID 15684378. Rual JF, Venkatesan K, Hao T, et ... The MAGE-A family are linked to many kinds of cancerous tumors. MAGE-A11 expression is positively associated with HER-2 ... They are expressed in tumor cells. MAGE-A11 in particular shows high expression in a small number of tumors, but low levels in ... Cell. Biol. United States. 28 (6): 1947-63. doi:10.1128/MCB.01672-07. PMC 2268407 . PMID 18212060. Askew EB, Bai S, Blackwelder ...
It induces apoptosis of CD20+ cells.. The combined effect results in the elimination of B cells (including the cancerous ones) ... cells in destroying these B cells. When an NK cell latched onto the cap, it had an 80% success rate at killing the cell. In ... The antibody binds to the cell surface protein CD20. CD20 is widely expressed on B cells, from early pre-B cells to later in ... ocrelizumab, humanized (90%-95% human) B cell-depleting agent.. *ofatumumab (HuMax-CD20) a fully human B cell-depleting agent.[ ...
... and can develop into either B-cells or T-cells. Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis of Skin arises from cancerous B-cells ... They help combat infections and abnormalities within the cells (cell-mediated immunity). They fight viruses and cancerous cells ... Natural killer cells or NK cells: They perform diverse functions related to both cell-mediated and humoral immunity. They also ... Lymphocytes are a type of white blood cells that are responsible for providing immunity in the human body. B-cells and T-cells ...
... the normal stem cells very rapidly acquire the characteristics of cancer stem cells. It demonstrates that malignant cells are ... Arsenic turns stem cells cancerous, spurring tumor growth. Researchers at the National Institutes of Health have discovered how ... "Using stem cells to answer questions about disease is an important new growing area of research. Stem cells help to explain a ... A growing body of evidence suggests that cancer is a stem-cell based disease. Normal stem cells are essential to normal tissue ...
Then she found another lump, this time they are saying they have found pre cancerous cells. ... ... Then she found another lump, this time they are saying they have found pre cancerous cells. What are pre cancerous cells? They ... You need to discuss the type of pre-cancerous cells the pathology reports say - because some are responsive to chemotherapy ... Precancerous cells are abnormal cells which have an altered multiplcation pattern. What you need to understand is that puts ...
... abnormal cells. Rather than dying in an orderly way, cancerous cells grow out of control and invade or grow... ... Normal cells become cancerous when changes in their DNA force them to grow and form new, ... Normal cells become cancerous when changes in their DNA force them to grow and form new, abnormal cells. Rather than dying in ... What is renal cell carcinoma?. A: Renal cell carcinoma is a type of cancer in the cells that line the tiny tubules of the ...
Researchers studying brain tumors said they have discovered a new biological mechanism that causes normal cells to become ... cancer cells, a finding that both challenges current treatment strategies and could lead to new approaches against the disease. ... Study Finds Mechanism That Causes Normal Cells to Become Cancerous Finding challenges current treatment strategies and may lead ... Researchers studying brain tumors said they have discovered a new biological mechanism that causes normal cells to become ...
... most metastatic tumors are seeded not by single cells from the primary tumor but by clusters of cancer cells ... Cancerous Coconspirators: Tumor Cells That Travel Together Spread Cancer. Contrary to expectations, most metastatic tumors are ... In a second experiment, the researchers examined hundreds of cancerous cells grown together in a petri dish but placed so that ... most metastatic tumors are seeded not by single cells from the primary tumor but by clusters of diverse cancer cells that leave ...
... have emerged as a promising cell source for regenerative medicine, disease modeling and drug discovery. Assurance of genetic... ... B) If a mutation causes cell differentiation, the mutant cell will not only be lost from the stem cell pool, but it may also ... the ability of cells to re-enter the cell cycle, and (iii) survival of daughter cells following mitosis (Barbaric et al., 2014 ... Self-renewal of human embryonic stem cells is supported by a shortened G1 cell cycle phase. J Cell Physiol 209:883-893CrossRef ...
... the role played by the surrounding non-cancerous cells is coming under increasing scrutiny ... Cancer Cells Trigger Supporting Cells to Turn Cancerous. by Medindia Content Team on December 17, 2005 at 7:01 PM Research News ... "Think of it as a microcosm of evolution, such that every change that goes on in the cancer cell can impact cells around it. ... This meant that the cells continued to merrily divide thereby evolving as cancer cells. "This occurred in 100 percent of the ...
Now research from Rockefeller University shows that having too many stem cells, or stem ... ... Stem cells, the prodigious precursors of all the tissues in our body, can make almost anything, given the right circumstances. ... By identifying a mechanism that regulates programmed cell death in precursor cells for blood, or hematopoietic stem cells, the ... stem cells are able to make it so if your are parizlyed in your spin then if you had a sciencist to give you a stem cell and ...
It has been discovered that these telomeres behave differently in cancerous cells. An online article on this phenomenon has ... and how this changes in cancerous cells. In these experiments, a specific gene in a cell was disrupted, causing it to become ... which changes during the cell cycle. The most recent research has shown that this organisation is disrupted in cancerous cells ... and thus chromosomes get tangles in cancerous cells. At each next cell division, these chromosomes break off at random ...
... cells_can_cause_stem_cells_descendants_to_trigger_melanomalike_growth_in_pigment_cells_the_tufts_team_also_found_that_this_ ... "instructor cells" can cause stem cells descendants to trigger melanoma-like growth in pigment cells. The Tufts team also found ... The body normally tells cells dont become cancerous and go off on your own; instead, participate in keeping up the normal ... Misregulation of stem cells is a known factor in cancers and birth defects. Recent studies have shown that stem cells exhibit ...
Stomach stem cells pushed into cancerous overdrive by H. pylori. August 17, 2017. ... Home Health Stomach stem cells pushed into cancerous overdrive by H. pylori ... as well as all their daughter cells. They found the stomach glands have two different stem cell types, one of which is pushed ... which are constantly replacing stomach cells "from the bottom up." The researchers studied transgenic mice to trace cells ...
Every human cell contains a kill code which can be triggered to cause its own self-destruction, say Northwestern University, ... The end of chemotherapy? Scientists discover all cancerous cells have a KILL CODE that can be triggered without the gruelling ... The end of chemotherapy? Scientists discover all cancerous cells have a KILL CODE. * ... Every cell in the human body contains a kill code which can be triggered to cause its own self-destruction. ...
MCF7 a cancerous but nonmetastatic cell line, whereas MDA-MB-231 is a metastatic cancer cell line. The 3 cell lines show ... cancerous and metastatic human breast cells; and (iii) isogenic normal, cancerous and metastatic murine epithelial cell lines. ... Detection of human cancerous cell lines. (A) Change in fluorescence intensities (F − F0) for 4 different cancer cell lines HeLa ... Detection of Normal/Cancerous and Metastatic Cells.. An important issue in cancer therapy is assessing whether tissue/cells are ...
Further reports about: , anti-cancer drug , cancer drug , cancerous tumor , cancerous tumors , healthy cell , iron oxide , iron ... Researchers found that the treatment easily destroyed the cells of cancerous tumors that were composed entirely of a type of ... have found that head and neck cancerous tumor cells in mice can be killed in half an hour without harming healthy cells. ... Researchers use nanoparticles, magnetic current to damage cancerous cells in mice. 28.03.2012 ...
... lymphocytes and plasma cells) infiltrate lung tissue, it is known as Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis, a rare disease that affects ... When cancerous lymphoid cells (lymphocytes and plasma cells) infiltrate lung tissue, it is known as Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis ... Giant Cell Tumors in Cats Histiocytes are white blood cells that reside within the connective tissue of the body. Referred to ... Lung Cancer (Squamous Cell Carcinoma) in Cats. A squamous cell carcinoma of the lung is a type of metastasizing tumor that ...
... a pathway that could prevent metastatic growth in cancer by stimulating the formation of tight seals between epithelial cells ... Strengthening cancerous cell junctions with RhoA-stimulating drugs. Creating stronger seals between tissue surface cells could ... In cancerous tissue, these structures often fail to assemble properly, which can result in cancerous cells detaching, ... Many cancerous cells still produce the correct junction building blocks but are unable to form normal junctions "even though ...
p53 keeps pre-cancerous cells in check by causing cells, among other things, to become senescent - aging at the cellular level ... Loss of p53 causes cells to ignore the cellular signals that would normally make mutant or damaged cells die or stop growing. ... p53 keeps pre-cancerous cells in check by causing cells, among other things, to become senescent - aging at the cellular level ... p53 activation suppresses malic enzyme expression and leads to senescence in pre-cancerous cells. *Download PDF Copy ...
Major grant awarded for research into cancerous cells Understanding how cells divide is a major goal in cancer research. A new ... Halting tumour cell division in cancer is a valid therapeutic route, and so finding pioneering ways to target cell division - ... Errors in cell division cause aneuploidy, a form of genomic instability thought to drive tumour formation and propagation. ... Breaking apart the protein complexes has the potential to halt cell division in cancer with fewer side effects. The majority of ...
According to BBC news, researchers from Mayo Clinic may have found a way to not only stop the spread of cancerous cells, but ... A new study shows that some cancerous cells can be reverted to their original healthy state. ... New cancer treatment heals cancerous cells. August 25, 2015. By Andrew Pendergrast ... Until this study, researchers thought that cell adhesion was only used to connect cells, but in this instance, it acts as a ...
They found that during tumor development the way cells move can change from coordinated and collective to individual and ... They have just published their research findings in the journal Nature Cell Biology. ... researchers at Leipzig University have investigated the structure of tumor tissue and the behavior of tumor cells in detail, ... Cells that are more cancerous can move freely past others of their kind, while the epithelial cells are trapped by their ...
Just a handful of mutations - between one and ten - are required for the cancerous cells to emerge. Approximate number of ... Scientists figure out how many mutations it takes for healthy cells to turn cancerous. ...
So the bodys natural defenses dont strike haphazardly at healthy cells, but instead target only the cancerous cells that bear ... In Mice, Breast Cancer Vaccine Trains the Body to Fight Cancerous Cells. By Andrew Moseman , June 1, 2010 1:53 pm ... Cancer is an over-development of the bodys own cells. Trying to vaccinate against such cell over-growth would effectively be ... A 2003 study by Ling Zhang ahowed that molecular Iodine caused lung cancer cells to undergo programmed cell death (apoptosis). ...
... posted in Tissue and Cell Culture: Is there a general method to easily make cells cancerous? ... How to make normal cells cancerous. Started by Avio, Mar 19 2018 04:17 AM ... You can also do this by serial passage of primary cells, but it is very labour intensive and time consuming and has a low ...
Biomedical Imaging to Distinguish Normal, Precancerous and Cancerous Cells. *Estimating Clinically Significant Mold Spores in ... Biomedical Imaging to Distinguish Normal, Precancerous and Cancerous Cells. In the area of biomedical imaging, hyperspectral ... We were able to identify normal cervical cells with a specificity of 95.8%. With regard to LG precancerous cells and HG ... cervical cells and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) on liquid-based Papanicolaou (Pap) test slides.. The specificity for ...
  • It also provides evidence of the potentially carcinogenic downside to stem cell treatments, and suggests that nature has sought to balance stem cells' regenerative power against their potentially lethal potency. (scienceblog.com)
  • The ability of these GlyCl-expressing cells to radically change the shape, position, and quantity of a different cell type (melanocytes) revealed a new and potentially highly important cell type -- an instructor capability that can change the behavior of other cells a considerable distance away. (biologynews.net)
  • Such physicochemical differences could potentially be detected by an array-based "chemical nose" approach that relies on selective interactions between multiple reporter elements and the target cell. (pnas.org)
  • The TSRI team of scientists were wondering what applications these new cells could potentially be used for, and they decided to experiment with AML (Acute Myeloid Leukemia) cells. (snco.com)
  • In this article, we explain how to recognize potentially cancerous rashes. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • A growing body of evidence suggests that cancer is a stem-cell based disease. (nih.gov)
  • In addition to the clinical relevance, hidden within the complex mutational profiles are clues to the basic mechanisms governing stem cell fates. (springer.com)
  • It also suggests that the premature silencing of the Sept4/ARTS pathway at the stem cell level may herald cancer to come. (scienceblog.com)
  • Discovering this novel bioelectric signal and new cell type could be very important in efforts to understand the mechanisms that coordinate stem cell function within the host organism and prevent tumor growth. (biologynews.net)
  • Since H. pylori causes life-long infections, the constant increase in stem cell divisions may be enough to explain the increased risk of carcinogenesis observed. (scienceblog.com)
  • They found the stomach glands have two different stem cell types, one of which is pushed into overdrive by exposure to the bacteria, while the other is quieted. (scienceblog.com)
  • Assessing and optimizing photodynamic detection for cancer stem cell detection is vital to the approach's success. (technologynetworks.com)
  • We were able to boost fluorescence accumulation in the highly tumorigenic low-fluorescence glioma stem cell subpopulation using a clinically approved iron chelator," co-corresponding author Kouichi Tabu says. (technologynetworks.com)
  • Wang is a professor at the Institute of Bioscience and Technology and director of the Texas A&M Center for Cancer and Stem Cell Biology. (tamu.edu)
  • McKeehan is a Distinguished Professor at the Institute of Bioscience and Technology and at the Center for Cancer and Stem Cell Biology. (tamu.edu)
  • Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation ( HSCT ) is the transplantation of multipotent hematopoietic stem cells , usually derived from bone marrow, peripheral blood, or umbilical cord blood. (wikipedia.org)
  • Other conditions treated with stem cell transplants include sickle-cell disease , myelodysplastic syndrome , neuroblastoma , lymphoma , Ewing's sarcoma , desmoplastic small round cell tumor , chronic granulomatous disease , Hodgkin's disease and Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome . (wikipedia.org)
  • In 2006 a total of 50,417 first hematopoietic stem cell transplants were reported as taking place worldwide, according to a global survey of 1327 centers in 71 countries conducted by the Worldwide Network for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 2014, according to the World Marrow Donor Association (WMDA), stem cell products provided for unrelated transplantation worldwide had increased to 20,604 (4,149 bone marrow donations, 12,506 peripheral blood stem cell donations, and 3,949 cord blood units). (wikipedia.org)
  • Stem Cell Res. (springer.com)
  • Treatment options for patients with myelodysplasia include supportive care, drug therapy and chemotherapy with stem cell transplant. (reference.com)
  • When peripheral nerves are severed, Schwann cells at the injury site begin to proliferate and exhibit stem cell-like gene expression patterns. (the-scientist.com)
  • Recently there has been an increase in the number of unregulated clinics advertising rapid recovery with the use of stem cell therapies. (miamiherald.com)
  • Provenge takes a somewhat similar approach to the new breast cancer treatment in that it trains the body's immune system to fight cancerous cells. (discovermagazine.com)
  • Immune cell deficiencies happen when the body does not product the sufficient number of white blood cells-the cells vital for fighting infections. (snco.com)
  • The scientists initially were looking for ways to create antibodies that, when applied to immature cells found in bone marrow, would transform the cells into mature cells and therefore increase the number of mature white blood cells in immune cell deficient patients. (snco.com)
  • Dendritic cells are a vital type of cell that helps support the body's immune system. (snco.com)
  • The need to eliminate negative regulators of immune response is well recognized ( 8 ), and the pioneering use of CTLA-4 blockade ( 2 , 3 ) or combined CTLA-4 blockade and Treg cells depletion ( 11 ) may have a synergistic effect in enabling the development of sufficient numbers of lethal and tumor-recognizing antitumor T cells. (aacrjournals.org)
  • The breast stroma is composed of cellular components such as fibroblasts, immune cells and endothelial cells and the extracellular matrix (ECM) as well as entrapped growth factors within the ECM. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Thankfully, as our immune system lets normal cells move along and perform important biological functions, mutated cells are recognized and destroyed. (unc.edu)
  • Immunotherapy tries to reset our immune response to recognize these hijacker cancer cells. (unc.edu)
  • Tumor suppressor genes are then inactivated in cancer cells, resulting in the loss of normal functions in those cells, such as accurate DNA replication, control over the cell cycle, orientation and adhesion within tissues, and interaction with protective cells of the immune system. (phys.org)
  • Time-lapse imaging shows the immune cells transferring chemical signals during pigment pattern formation in developing zebrafish. (the-scientist.com)
  • A new approach to immunotherapy finds that the immune-cell clonotypes that come to the rescue start out at very low frequencies. (the-scientist.com)
  • Scientists understand new details about the development of Th17, a type of immune cell that is believed to play a complex role in cancer, and is also implicated in autoimmune diseases. (newswise.com)
  • Although the GCs are important for humoral defenses, their importance in the immune system program is usually counterbalanced by the truth that the bulk of B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas (B-NHLs) occur from GC W cells. (biomaterials-2011-dfg-nsf-conference.com)
  • We show that we can use a small concentration of nanoparticles to kill the cancer cells," said Qun Zhao, lead author and assistant professor of physics in the Franklin College of Arts and Sciences. (innovations-report.com)
  • The biodegradable nanoparticles filled with a DNA-encoded enzyme, herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSVtk), proved to be potent in killing brain cancer cells. (jhu.edu)
  • Albumin coated silver nanoparticles (ASNPs) were synthesized, and their anti-cancerous effects were evaluated against MDA-MB 231, a human breast cancer cell line. (uio.no)
  • The discovery that nanoparticles (NPs) can be selective to certain cells based only on their physical and chemical properties has profound implications for NP-based therapies because cell type specificity of drug carriers could alter patient outcomes in the clinic," commented corresponding author Daniel Siegwart (University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, TX, USA). (oncology-central.com)
  • Cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A (CIP2A) is a recently characterized human oncoprotein. (uta.fi)
  • Experiments involving SFN treatment with or without functional inhibition of HDAC6 (with the HDAC6 inhibitor tubacin) were carried out and their effect on cell migration was investigated. (uea.ac.uk)
  • Ubiquitin-mediated degradation of an inhibitor of noncanonical NF-κB signaling promotes cell survival. (sciencemag.org)
  • Breaking apart the protein complexes has the potential to halt cell division in cancer with fewer side effects. (warwick.ac.uk)
  • So the body's natural defenses don't strike haphazardly at healthy cells, but instead target only the cancerous cells that bear the protein. (discovermagazine.com)
  • However, they were surprised to find that a much larger part of the network is involved in modulating the expression of genes not directly related to DNA repair, such as genes involved in cell growth and division, protein degradation, responses to stres s, and other metabolic functions. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Although butyrate increased H3 histone deacetylation and p21 tumor suppressor expression in both cell types, p21 protein level was greater with intense expression around the nuclei in HCT116 cells when compared with that in NCM460 cells. (mdpi.com)
  • Protein and Cell, 5 (8). (whiterose.ac.uk)
  • Keratinizing means that the squamous cells grow into masses (nests) of cells that contain keratin (a tough, fibrous protein). (cancer.ca)
  • Everolimus targets mTOR, a protein that acts as an important regulator of tumor cell division, blood vessel growth and cell metabolism(8). (drugs.com)
  • In this study we evaluated the expression of GHRH and its receptors in a variety of cancer and non-cancerous cell lines and studied the effect of GHRH antagonists and agonists on the proliferative cell nuclear antigen, cyclin D3, tumor suppressor protein p53 and carboxyl-terminal-binding protein (CtBP1). (elsevier.com)
  • GHRH also upregulates CtBP1 protein expression and its antagonists downregulate it in LNCaP prostate cancer cells. (elsevier.com)
  • The identification of the ARTS gene and its role in cancer cell death provides a potential target for new therapeutic approaches. (scienceblog.com)
  • In these experiments, a specific gene in a cell was disrupted, causing it to become cancerous. (innovations-report.com)
  • A 2008 paper by Bernard A. Eskin MD showed that Iodine actually altered gene expression in breast cancer cells, inducing programmed cell death. (discovermagazine.com)
  • The discovery by Ideker's group of a huge network of transcription factor-gene interactions was made possible by new biotechnology tools that provide comprehensive analysis of cells, like a passerby suddenly being able to monitor all the telephone calls made within a city. (bio-medicine.org)
  • An oncogene is a special type of gene that is capable of transforming host cells and triggering carcinogenesis. (encyclopedia.com)
  • oncogene A dominant mutant allele of a cellular gene (a proto-oncogene ) that disrupts cell growth and division and is capable of transforming a normal cell into a cancerous cell. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Drug exposure can cause significant changes in gene expression without affecting growth or survival in some cell lines, highlighting strategies to better evaluate drug effectiveness. (newswise.com)
  • Besides, transformed cells (TC) were merely mediators for the expression of the TGF-β1 gene, and they did not play any other role, the company argued. (koreabiomed.com)
  • Now scientists at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have demonstrated that these supporting cells are indeed key players in the ultimate development and aggressiveness of cancer. (medindia.net)
  • Previous research had already shown the scientists that, in healthy cells, these telomeres are organised in a well defined structure, which changes during the cell cycle. (innovations-report.com)
  • The scientists studied biological changes that cells usually undergo as cancer develops. (medicalxpress.com)
  • Over the past several decades, scientists have discovered many parts of the DNA-damage-repair machinery, but what has been missing until now is a 'systems biology' approach that explains how all the parts function together to enable a cell to repair its DNA while under routine assault. (bio-medicine.org)
  • The scientists employed Raman spectroscopy as a potential solution since it is a non-invasive method that does not need any sample preparation or staining to find out slight differences in the molecular composition of complex samples like cells. (azooptics.com)
  • For the new research, the scientists employed a line-scan Raman microscope that enabled them to quickly capture Raman signals from a whole cell volume. (azooptics.com)
  • According to scientists at Oxford University, increasing the supply of oxygen to cancer cells might help in making cancer chemotherapy effective. (onlinecancerguide.com)
  • The scientists took blood samples from patients who had high levels of AML cells within their blood. (snco.com)
  • The scientists were excited by this new discovery and decided to see what would happen if they exposed the blood samples for an even longer period of time to the new antibody cells. (snco.com)
  • In addition, scientists noted the NK cells only targeted AML cells, a condition scientists refer to as fratricide. (snco.com)
  • In a phase 1B study the scientists studied people who already had histological changes in the cells of the esophagus and at high risk for developing the disease. (emaxhealth.com)
  • Each cell type has unique molecular signatures that distinguish between healthy and diseased tissues ( 1 ). (pnas.org)
  • This paper shows that visible-light ptychography can be used to distinguish quantitatively between healthy and tumorous unstained cells. (hud.ac.uk)
  • Then she found another lump, this time they are saying they have found pre cancerous cells. (medhelp.org)
  • The predominant genetic changes found in hPSC lines involve changes in chromosome number and structure (particularly of chromosomes 1, 12, 17 and 20), reminiscent of the changes observed in cancer cells. (springer.com)
  • After testing three potential mechanisms, they found that transport of serotonin (a neurotransmitter that can be modulated to regulate mood, appetite and other functions) across the cell surface was the likely messenger. (biologynews.net)
  • However, mechanisms other than using MTIs would have to be found, given that microtubules perform many important functions in healthy cells and so inhibiting them could be highly toxic to the body. (riken.jp)
  • They found that during tumor development the way cells move can change from coordinated and collective to individual and chaotic behavior. (medicalxpress.com)
  • Found in ascitic fluid (body cavity fluid), these cells may have originated from a diseased organ such as the liver or an ovary. (sciencephoto.com)
  • The LD50 of ASNPs against MDA-MB 231 (5 μM), was found to be 30 times higher than that for white normal blood cells (152 μM). (uio.no)
  • Chavez said he was 'receiving complementary treatments to combat the different types of cells found,' and that his condition continued 'evolving satisfactorily. (cnn.com)
  • Hamartomas are disorganized collections of cells that can be found in many different parts of the body, including the lungs. (livestrong.com)
  • Structures found only in plant cells are plastids. (answers.com)
  • It is characteristically found in cancer cells, or cells that have been exposed to increased risk factors. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 2014, a study was published in In Vivo, the journal and it showed that the presence of macrophages as well as natural killer cells, which are also referred to as NK cells, both of which are a type of white blood cell called lymphocytes that are able to naturally kill cancer cells before they are able to proliferate, was increased by alpha phellandrene. (whybiotech.com)