Common Bile Duct: The largest bile duct. It is formed by the junction of the CYSTIC DUCT and the COMMON HEPATIC DUCT.Common Bile Duct Neoplasms: Tumor or cancer of the COMMON BILE DUCT including the AMPULLA OF VATER and the SPHINCTER OF ODDI.Common Bile Duct Diseases: Diseases of the COMMON BILE DUCT including the AMPULLA OF VATER and the SPHINCTER OF ODDI.Bile Ducts: The channels that collect and transport the bile secretion from the BILE CANALICULI, the smallest branch of the BILIARY TRACT in the LIVER, through the bile ductules, the bile ducts out the liver, and to the GALLBLADDER for storage.Bile Duct Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the BILE DUCTS.Gallstones: Solid crystalline precipitates in the BILIARY TRACT, usually formed in the GALLBLADDER, resulting in the condition of CHOLELITHIASIS. Gallstones, derived from the BILE, consist mainly of calcium, cholesterol, or bilirubin.Cholangiopancreatography, Endoscopic Retrograde: Fiberoptic endoscopy designed for duodenal observation and cannulation of VATER'S AMPULLA, in order to visualize the pancreatic and biliary duct system by retrograde injection of contrast media. Endoscopic (Vater) papillotomy (SPHINCTEROTOMY, ENDOSCOPIC) may be performed during this procedure.Cholangiography: An imaging test of the BILIARY TRACT in which a contrast dye (RADIOPAQUE MEDIA) is injected into the BILE DUCT and x-ray pictures are taken.Bile: An emulsifying agent produced in the LIVER and secreted into the DUODENUM. Its composition includes BILE ACIDS AND SALTS; CHOLESTEROL; and ELECTROLYTES. It aids DIGESTION of fats in the duodenum.Bile Duct Diseases: Diseases in any part of the ductal system of the BILIARY TRACT from the smallest BILE CANALICULI to the largest COMMON BILE DUCT.Choledocholithiasis: Presence or formation of GALLSTONES in the COMMON BILE DUCT.Bile Ducts, Extrahepatic: Passages external to the liver for the conveyance of bile. These include the COMMON BILE DUCT and the common hepatic duct (HEPATIC DUCT, COMMON).Cholestasis: Impairment of bile flow due to obstruction in small bile ducts (INTRAHEPATIC CHOLESTASIS) or obstruction in large bile ducts (EXTRAHEPATIC CHOLESTASIS).Cholestasis, Extrahepatic: Impairment of bile flow in the large BILE DUCTS by mechanical obstruction or stricture due to benign or malignant processes.Cholecystectomy, Laparoscopic: Excision of the gallbladder through an abdominal incision using a laparoscope.Cholecystectomy: Surgical removal of the GALLBLADDER.Sphincterotomy, Endoscopic: Incision of Oddi's sphincter or Vater's ampulla performed by inserting a sphincterotome through an endoscope (DUODENOSCOPE) often following retrograde cholangiography (CHOLANGIOPANCREATOGRAPHY, ENDOSCOPIC RETROGRADE). Endoscopic treatment by sphincterotomy is the preferred method of treatment for patients with retained or recurrent bile duct stones post-cholecystectomy, and for poor-surgical-risk patients that have the gallbladder still present.Bile Acids and Salts: Steroid acids and salts. The primary bile acids are derived from cholesterol in the liver and usually conjugated with glycine or taurine. The secondary bile acids are further modified by bacteria in the intestine. They play an important role in the digestion and absorption of fat. They have also been used pharmacologically, especially in the treatment of gallstones.Bile Ducts, Intrahepatic: Passages within the liver for the conveyance of bile. Includes right and left hepatic ducts even though these may join outside the liver to form the common hepatic duct.Jaundice, Obstructive: Jaundice, the condition with yellowish staining of the skin and mucous membranes, that is due to impaired BILE flow in the BILIARY TRACT, such as INTRAHEPATIC CHOLESTASIS, or EXTRAHEPATIC CHOLESTASIS.Cholangiopancreatography, Magnetic Resonance: Non-invasive diagnostic technique for visualizing the PANCREATIC DUCTS and BILE DUCTS without the use of injected CONTRAST MEDIA or x-ray. MRI scans provide excellent sensitivity for duct dilatation, biliary stricture, and intraductal abnormalities.Sphincter of Oddi: The sphincter of the hepatopancreatic ampulla within the duodenal papilla. The COMMON BILE DUCT and main pancreatic duct pass through this sphincter.Cholangitis: Inflammation of the biliary ductal system (BILE DUCTS); intrahepatic, extrahepatic, or both.Cholelithiasis: Presence or formation of GALLSTONES in the BILIARY TRACT, usually in the gallbladder (CHOLECYSTOLITHIASIS) or the common bile duct (CHOLEDOCHOLITHIASIS).Cystic Duct: The duct that is connected to the GALLBLADDER and allows the emptying of bile into the COMMON BILE DUCT.Ampulla of Vater: A dilation of the duodenal papilla that is the opening of the juncture of the COMMON BILE DUCT and the MAIN PANCREATIC DUCT, also known as the hepatopancreatic ampulla.Pancreatic Ducts: Ducts that collect PANCREATIC JUICE from the PANCREAS and supply it to the DUODENUM.Biliary Tract Diseases: Diseases in any part of the BILIARY TRACT including the BILE DUCTS and the GALLBLADDER.Hepatic Duct, Common: Predominantly extrahepatic bile duct which is formed by the junction of the right and left hepatic ducts, which are predominantly intrahepatic, and, in turn, joins the cystic duct to form the common bile duct.Biliary Tract: The BILE DUCTS and the GALLBLADDER.Ligation: Application of a ligature to tie a vessel or strangulate a part.Gallbladder: A storage reservoir for BILE secretion. Gallbladder allows the delivery of bile acids at a high concentration and in a controlled manner, via the CYSTIC DUCT to the DUODENUM, for degradation of dietary lipid.Pancreatitis: INFLAMMATION of the PANCREAS. Pancreatitis is classified as acute unless there are computed tomographic or endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatographic findings of CHRONIC PANCREATITIS (International Symposium on Acute Pancreatitis, Atlanta, 1992). The two most common forms of acute pancreatitis are ALCOHOLIC PANCREATITIS and gallstone pancreatitis.Sphincterotomy, Transhepatic: Surgery of the smooth muscle sphincter of the hepatopancreatic ampulla to relieve blocked biliary or pancreatic ducts.Biliary Tract Surgical Procedures: Any surgical procedure performed on the biliary tract.Choledochal Cyst: A congenital anatomic malformation of a bile duct, including cystic dilatation of the extrahepatic bile duct or the large intrahepatic bile duct. Classification is based on the site and type of dilatation. Type I is most common.Biliary Fistula: Abnormal passage in any organ of the biliary tract or between biliary organs and other organs.Choledochostomy: Surgical formation of an opening (stoma) into the COMMON BILE DUCT for drainage or for direct communication with a site in the small intestine, primarily the DUODENUM or JEJUNUM.Adenoma, Bile Duct: A benign tumor of the intrahepatic bile ducts.Drainage: The removal of fluids or discharges from the body, such as from a wound, sore, or cavity.Endoscopes: Instruments for the visual examination of interior structures of the body. There are rigid endoscopes and flexible fiberoptic endoscopes for various types of viewing in ENDOSCOPY.Duodenoscopy: Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the luminal surface of the duodenum.Cholecystitis: Inflammation of the GALLBLADDER; generally caused by impairment of BILE flow, GALLSTONES in the BILIARY TRACT, infections, or other diseases.Imino AcidsGallbladder Diseases: Diseases of the GALLBLADDER. They generally involve the impairment of BILE flow, GALLSTONES in the BILIARY TRACT, infections, neoplasms, or other diseases.Jaundice: A clinical manifestation of HYPERBILIRUBINEMIA, characterized by the yellowish staining of the SKIN; MUCOUS MEMBRANE; and SCLERA. Clinical jaundice usually is a sign of LIVER dysfunction.Lithotripsy: The destruction of a calculus of the kidney, ureter, bladder, or gallbladder by physical forces, including crushing with a lithotriptor through a catheter. Focused percutaneous ultrasound and focused hydraulic shock waves may be used without surgery. Lithotripsy does not include the dissolving of stones by acids or litholysis. Lithotripsy by laser is LITHOTRIPSY, LASER.Gallbladder Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the gallbladder.Pancreatic Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the PANCREAS. Depending on the types of ISLET CELLS present in the tumors, various hormones can be secreted: GLUCAGON from PANCREATIC ALPHA CELLS; INSULIN from PANCREATIC BETA CELLS; and SOMATOSTATIN from the SOMATOSTATIN-SECRETING CELLS. Most are malignant except the insulin-producing tumors (INSULINOMA).Adenomyoma: A benign neoplasm of muscle (usually smooth muscle) with glandular elements. It occurs most frequently in the uterus and uterine ligaments. (Stedman, 25th ed)Endoscopy: Procedures of applying ENDOSCOPES for disease diagnosis and treatment. Endoscopy involves passing an optical instrument through a small incision in the skin i.e., percutaneous; or through a natural orifice and along natural body pathways such as the digestive tract; and/or through an incision in the wall of a tubular structure or organ, i.e. transluminal, to examine or perform surgery on the interior parts of the body.Technetium Tc 99m Disofenin: A radiopharmaceutical used extensively in cholescintigraphy for the evaluation of hepatobiliary diseases. (From Int Jrnl Rad Appl Inst 1992;43(9):1061-4)Endoscopy, Digestive System: Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the digestive tract.Dilatation, Pathologic: The condition of an anatomical structure's being dilated beyond normal dimensions.Pancreaticoduodenectomy: The excision of the head of the pancreas and the encircling loop of the duodenum to which it is connected.Cholestasis, Intrahepatic: Impairment of bile flow due to injury to the HEPATOCYTES; BILE CANALICULI; or the intrahepatic bile ducts (BILE DUCTS, INTRAHEPATIC).Cholecystitis, Acute: Acute inflammation of the GALLBLADDER wall. It is characterized by the presence of ABDOMINAL PAIN; FEVER; and LEUKOCYTOSIS. Gallstone obstruction of the CYSTIC DUCT is present in approximately 90% of the cases.Sphincter of Oddi Dysfunction: Organic or functional motility disorder involving the SPHINCTER OF ODDI and associated with biliary COLIC. Pathological changes are most often seen in the COMMON BILE DUCT sphincter, and less commonly the PANCREATIC DUCT sphincter.Jejunostomy: Surgical formation of an opening through the ABDOMINAL WALL into the JEJUNUM, usually for enteral hyperalimentation.Cholecystolithiasis: Presence or formation of GALLSTONES in the GALLBLADDER.Duodenum: The shortest and widest portion of the SMALL INTESTINE adjacent to the PYLORUS of the STOMACH. It is named for having the length equal to about the width of 12 fingers.Bilirubin: A bile pigment that is a degradation product of HEME.Pancreatic Diseases: Pathological processes of the PANCREAS.Endosonography: Ultrasonography of internal organs using an ultrasound transducer sometimes mounted on a fiberoptic endoscope. In endosonography the transducer converts electronic signals into acoustic pulses or continuous waves and acts also as a receiver to detect reflected pulses from within the organ. An audiovisual-electronic interface converts the detected or processed echo signals, which pass through the electronics of the instrument, into a form that the technologist can evaluate. The procedure should not be confused with ENDOSCOPY which employs a special instrument called an endoscope. The "endo-" of endosonography refers to the examination of tissue within hollow organs, with reference to the usual ultrasonography procedure which is performed externally or transcutaneously.Intraoperative Period: The period during a surgical operation.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Liver: A large lobed glandular organ in the abdomen of vertebrates that is responsible for detoxification, metabolism, synthesis and storage of various substances.Duodenal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the DUODENUM.Cholecystostomy: Establishment of an opening into the gallbladder either for drainage or surgical communication with another part of the digestive tract, usually the duodenum or jejunum.Bile Reflux: Retrograde bile flow. Reflux of bile can be from the duodenum to the stomach (DUODENOGASTRIC REFLUX); to the esophagus (GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX); or to the PANCREAS.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Cholangiocarcinoma: A malignant tumor arising from the epithelium of the BILE DUCTS.Liver Cirrhosis, Experimental: Experimentally induced chronic injuries to the parenchymal cells in the liver to achieve a model for LIVER CIRRHOSIS.Lithotripsy, Laser: Fragmentation of CALCULI, notably urinary or biliary, by LASER.Intraoperative Care: Patient care procedures performed during the operation that are ancillary to the actual surgery. It includes monitoring, fluid therapy, medication, transfusion, anesthesia, radiography, and laboratory tests.Constriction, Pathologic: The condition of an anatomical structure's being constricted beyond normal dimensions.Catheterization: Use or insertion of a tubular device into a duct, blood vessel, hollow organ, or body cavity for injecting or withdrawing fluids for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes. It differs from INTUBATION in that the tube here is used to restore or maintain patency in obstructions.Liver Function Tests: Blood tests that are used to evaluate how well a patient's liver is working and also to help diagnose liver conditions.Duodenal Diseases: Pathological conditions in the DUODENUM region of the small intestine (INTESTINE, SMALL).Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Thoracic Duct: The largest lymphatic vessel that passes through the chest and drains into the SUBCLAVIAN VEIN.Calculi: An abnormal concretion occurring mostly in the urinary and biliary tracts, usually composed of mineral salts. Also called stones.Adenocarcinoma, Papillary: An adenocarcinoma containing finger-like processes of vascular connective tissue covered by neoplastic epithelium, projecting into cysts or the cavity of glands or follicles. It occurs most frequently in the ovary and thyroid gland. (Stedman, 25th ed)Liver Cirrhosis, Biliary: FIBROSIS of the hepatic parenchyma due to obstruction of BILE flow (CHOLESTASIS) in the intrahepatic or extrahepatic bile ducts (BILE DUCTS, INTRAHEPATIC; BILE DUCTS, EXTRAHEPATIC). Primary biliary cirrhosis involves the destruction of small intra-hepatic bile ducts and bile secretion. Secondary biliary cirrhosis is produced by prolonged obstruction of large intrahepatic or extrahepatic bile ducts from a variety of causes.Ascaridida: An order of nematodes of the subclass SECERNENTEA. Its organisms possess two or three pairs of dorsolateral caudal papillae.Neoplasms, Multiple Primary: Two or more abnormal growths of tissue occurring simultaneously and presumed to be of separate origin. The neoplasms may be histologically the same or different, and may be found in the same or different sites.Pancreas: A nodular organ in the ABDOMEN that contains a mixture of ENDOCRINE GLANDS and EXOCRINE GLANDS. The small endocrine portion consists of the ISLETS OF LANGERHANS secreting a number of hormones into the blood stream. The large exocrine portion (EXOCRINE PANCREAS) is a compound acinar gland that secretes several digestive enzymes into the pancreatic ductal system that empties into the DUODENUM.Lithiasis: A condition characterized by the formation of CALCULI and concretions in the hollow organs or ducts of the body. They occur most often in the gallbladder, kidney, and lower urinary tract.Surgical Instruments: Hand-held tools or implements used by health professionals for the performance of surgical tasks.Neoplasms: New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.Hepatopulmonary Syndrome: A syndrome characterized by the clinical triad of advanced chronic liver disease, pulmonary vascular dilatations, and reduced arterial oxygenation (HYPOXEMIA) in the absence of intrinsic cardiopulmonary disease. This syndrome is common in the patients with LIVER CIRRHOSIS or portal hypertension (HYPERTENSION, PORTAL).Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Laparoscopy: A procedure in which a laparoscope (LAPAROSCOPES) is inserted through a small incision near the navel to examine the abdominal and pelvic organs in the PERITONEAL CAVITY. If appropriate, biopsy or surgery can be performed during laparoscopy.Colic: A clinical syndrome with intermittent abdominal pain characterized by sudden onset and cessation that is commonly seen in infants. It is usually associated with obstruction of the INTESTINES; of the CYSTIC DUCT; or of the URINARY TRACT.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Intraoperative Complications: Complications that affect patients during surgery. They may or may not be associated with the disease for which the surgery is done, or within the same surgical procedure.Pancreatitis, Chronic: INFLAMMATION of the PANCREAS that is characterized by recurring or persistent ABDOMINAL PAIN with or without STEATORRHEA or DIABETES MELLITUS. It is characterized by the irregular destruction of the pancreatic parenchyma which may be focal, segmental, or diffuse.Ursodeoxycholic Acid: An epimer of chenodeoxycholic acid. It is a mammalian bile acid found first in the bear and is apparently either a precursor or a product of chenodeoxycholate. Its administration changes the composition of bile and may dissolve gallstones. It is used as a cholagogue and choleretic.Diverticulum: A pouch or sac developed from a tubular or saccular organ, such as the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT.Adenoma, Villous: An adenoma of the large intestine. It is usually a solitary, sessile, often large, tumor of colonic mucosa composed of mucinous epithelium covering delicate vascular projections. Hypersecretion and malignant changes occur frequently. (Stedman, 25th ed)Anastomosis, Roux-en-Y: A Y-shaped surgical anastomosis of any part of the digestive system which includes the small intestine as the eventual drainage site.Preoperative Care: Care given during the period prior to undergoing surgery when psychological and physical preparations are made according to the special needs of the individual patient. This period spans the time between admission to the hospital to the time the surgery begins. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Liver Diseases: Pathological processes of the LIVER.Bile Canaliculi: Minute intercellular channels that occur between liver cells and carry bile towards interlobar bile ducts. Also called bile capillaries.Cholecystography: Radiography of the gallbladder after ingestion of a contrast medium.Cholagogues and Choleretics: Gastrointestinal agents that stimulate the flow of bile into the duodenum (cholagogues) or stimulate the production of bile by the liver (choleretic).Anastomosis, Surgical: Surgical union or shunt between ducts, tubes or vessels. It may be end-to-end, end-to-side, side-to-end, or side-to-side.Postcholecystectomy Syndrome: Abdominal symptoms after removal of the GALLBLADDER. The common postoperative symptoms are often the same as those present before the operation, such as COLIC, bloating, NAUSEA, and VOMITING. There is pain on palpation of the right upper quadrant and sometimes JAUNDICE. The term is often used, inaccurately, to describe such postoperative symptoms not due to gallbladder removal.Liver Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the LIVER.Early Detection of Cancer: Methods to identify and characterize cancer in the early stages of disease and predict tumor behavior.Immunohistochemistry: Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.Fascioliasis: Liver disease caused by infections with parasitic flukes of the genus FASCIOLA, such as FASCIOLA HEPATICA.Carcinoid Tumor: A usually small, slow-growing neoplasm composed of islands of rounded, oxyphilic, or spindle-shaped cells of medium size, with moderately small vesicular nuclei, and covered by intact mucosa with a yellow cut surface. The tumor can occur anywhere in the gastrointestinal tract (and in the lungs and other sites); approximately 90% arise in the appendix. It is now established that these tumors are of neuroendocrine origin and derive from a primitive stem cell. (From Stedman, 25th ed & Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 3d ed, p1182)Adenocarcinoma: A malignant epithelial tumor with a glandular organization.Salivary Ducts: Any of the ducts which transport saliva. Salivary ducts include the parotid duct, the major and minor sublingual ducts, and the submandibular duct.Cholangitis, Sclerosing: Chronic inflammatory disease of the BILIARY TRACT. It is characterized by fibrosis and hardening of the intrahepatic and extrahepatic biliary ductal systems leading to bile duct strictures, CHOLESTASIS, and eventual BILIARY CIRRHOSIS.Portal Vein: A short thick vein formed by union of the superior mesenteric vein and the splenic vein.Ovarian Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the OVARY. These neoplasms can be benign or malignant. They are classified according to the tissue of origin, such as the surface EPITHELIUM, the stromal endocrine cells, and the totipotent GERM CELLS.Iatrogenic Disease: Any adverse condition in a patient occurring as the result of treatment by a physician, surgeon, or other health professional, especially infections acquired by a patient during the course of treatment.Technetium Tc 99m Lidofenin: A nontoxic radiopharmaceutical that is used in RADIONUCLIDE IMAGING for the clinical evaluation of hepatobiliary disorders in humans.Lung Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the LUNG.Bile Pigments: Linear TETRAPYRROLES that give a characteristic color to BILE including: BILIRUBIN; BILIVERDIN; and bilicyanin.Ultrasonography: The visualization of deep structures of the body by recording the reflections or echoes of ultrasonic pulses directed into the tissues. Use of ultrasound for imaging or diagnostic purposes employs frequencies ranging from 1.6 to 10 megahertz.Stents: Devices that provide support for tubular structures that are being anastomosed or for body cavities during skin grafting.Cysts: Any fluid-filled closed cavity or sac that is lined by an EPITHELIUM. Cysts can be of normal, abnormal, non-neoplastic, or neoplastic tissues.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Carcinoma: A malignant neoplasm made up of epithelial cells tending to infiltrate the surrounding tissues and give rise to metastases. It is a histological type of neoplasm but is often wrongly used as a synonym for "cancer." (From Dorland, 27th ed)Incidental Findings: Unanticipated information discovered in the course of testing or medical care. Used in discussions of information that may have social or psychological consequences, such as when it is learned that a child's biological father is someone other than the putative father, or that a person tested for one disease or disorder has, or is at risk for, something else.Dilatation: The act of dilating.Video-Assisted Surgery: Endoscopic surgical procedures performed with visualization via video transmission. When real-time video is combined interactively with prior CT scans or MRI images, this is called image-guided surgery (see SURGERY, COMPUTER-ASSISTED).Neoplasm Invasiveness: Ability of neoplasms to infiltrate and actively destroy surrounding tissue.Duodenal Obstruction: Hindrance of the passage of luminal contents in the DUODENUM. Duodenal obstruction can be partial or complete, and caused by intrinsic or extrinsic factors. Simple obstruction is associated with diminished or stopped flow of luminal contents. Strangulating obstruction is associated with impaired blood flow to the duodenum in addition to obstructed flow of luminal contents.Colonic Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the COLON.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Hemobilia: Hemorrhage in or through the BILIARY TRACT due to trauma, inflammation, CHOLELITHIASIS, vascular disease, or neoplasms.Stomach Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the STOMACH.Mixed Tumor, Malignant: A malignant tumor composed of more than one type of neoplastic tissue. (Dorland, 27th ed)Breast Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the human BREAST.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Hepatic Artery: A branch of the celiac artery that distributes to the stomach, pancreas, duodenum, liver, gallbladder, and greater omentum.Digestive System Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.Wolffian Ducts: A pair of excretory ducts of the middle kidneys (MESONEPHROI) of an embryo, also called mesonephric ducts. In higher vertebrates, Wolffian ducts persist in the male forming VAS DEFERENS, but atrophy into vestigial structures in the female.Taurocholic Acid: The product of conjugation of cholic acid with taurine. Its sodium salt is the chief ingredient of the bile of carnivorous animals. It acts as a detergent to solubilize fats for absorption and is itself absorbed. It is used as a cholagogue and cholerectic.Amylases: A group of amylolytic enzymes that cleave starch, glycogen, and related alpha-1,4-glucans. (Stedman, 25th ed) EC 3.2.1.-.Pancreatic Pseudocyst: Cyst-like space not lined by EPITHELIUM and contained within the PANCREAS. Pancreatic pseudocysts account for most of the cystic collections in the pancreas and are often associated with chronic PANCREATITIS.Foreign-Body Migration: Migration of a foreign body from its original location to some other location in the body.Manometry: Measurement of the pressure or tension of liquids or gases with a manometer.Prostatic Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the PROSTATE.Acute Disease: Disease having a short and relatively severe course.Liver Cirrhosis: Liver disease in which the normal microcirculation, the gross vascular anatomy, and the hepatic architecture have been variably destroyed and altered with fibrous septa surrounding regenerated or regenerating parenchymal nodules.Biliary Tract Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer in the BILIARY TRACT including the BILE DUCTS and the GALLBLADDER.Neoplasm Metastasis: The transfer of a neoplasm from one organ or part of the body to another remote from the primary site.Digestive System Fistula: An abnormal passage communicating between any components of the digestive system, or between any part of the digestive system and surrounding organ(s).Pancreatectomy: Surgical removal of the pancreas. (Dorland, 28th ed)Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Rats, Sprague-Dawley: A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.Reoperation: A repeat operation for the same condition in the same patient due to disease progression or recurrence, or as followup to failed previous surgery.Neoplasm Proteins: Proteins whose abnormal expression (gain or loss) are associated with the development, growth, or progression of NEOPLASMS. Some neoplasm proteins are tumor antigens (ANTIGENS, NEOPLASM), i.e. they induce an immune reaction to their tumor. Many neoplasm proteins have been characterized and are used as tumor markers (BIOMARKERS, TUMOR) when they are detectable in cells and body fluids as monitors for the presence or growth of tumors. Abnormal expression of ONCOGENE PROTEINS is involved in neoplastic transformation, whereas the loss of expression of TUMOR SUPPRESSOR PROTEINS is involved with the loss of growth control and progression of the neoplasm.Biopsy: Removal and pathologic examination of specimens in the form of small pieces of tissue from the living body.Mullerian Ducts: A pair of ducts near the WOLFFIAN DUCTS in a developing embryo. In the male embryo, they degenerate with the appearance of testicular ANTI-MULLERIAN HORMONE. In the absence of anti-mullerian hormone, mullerian ducts give rise to the female reproductive tract, including the OVIDUCTS; UTERUS; CERVIX; and VAGINA.Skin Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the SKIN.Pancreatic Fistula: Abnormal passage communicating with the PANCREAS.Neoplasms, Cystic, Mucinous, and Serous: Neoplasms containing cyst-like formations or producing mucin or serum.Recurrence: The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.Bacterial Translocation: The passage of viable bacteria from the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT to extra-intestinal sites, such as the mesenteric lymph node complex, liver, spleen, kidney, and blood. Factors that promote bacterial translocation include overgrowth with gram-negative enteric bacilli, impaired host immune defenses, and injury to the INTESTINAL MUCOSA resulting in increased intestinal permeability. Bacterial translocation from the lung to the circulation is also possible and sometimes accompanies MECHANICAL VENTILATION.Methods: A series of steps taken in order to conduct research.Abdominal Pain: Sensation of discomfort, distress, or agony in the abdominal region.Digestive System Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the digestive system or its parts.Biliary Atresia: Progressive destruction or the absence of all or part of the extrahepatic BILE DUCTS, resulting in the complete obstruction of BILE flow. Usually, biliary atresia is found in infants and accounts for one third of the neonatal cholestatic JAUNDICE.Hypertension, Portal: Abnormal increase of resistance to blood flow within the hepatic PORTAL SYSTEM, frequently seen in LIVER CIRRHOSIS and conditions with obstruction of the PORTAL VEIN.
... a yellowing of the skin and eyes caused by obstruction of the bile duct), weight loss, and acute pancreatitis. These signs and ... Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms without an associated invasive cancer can be further subcategorized into three groups ... The most common symptoms include abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. The most common signs patients have when they come to ... Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) is a type of tumor that can occur within the cells of the pancreatic duct. IPMN ...
Serous cystic neoplasms can come to clinical attention in a variety of ways. The most common symptoms are very non-specific and ... a yellowing of the skin and eyes caused by obstruction of the bile duct), or weight loss. These signs and symptoms are not ... Indian J Cancer. 41 (4): 159-61. PMID 15659868. Galanis C, Zamani A, Cameron JL, et al. (July 2007). "Resected serous cystic ... such as the intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm and the mucinous cystic neoplasm), serous cystic neoplasms are almost ...
Most gastrinomas are found in the gastrinoma triangle; this is bound by the junction of cystic and common bile ducts, junction ... Generalized cancer symptoms. Fasting serum gastrin In case of moderate hypergastrinemia, a secretin stimulation test can help ... Pancreatic Endocrine Neoplasms webpage Surgery Questions on gastrinoma Gastrinoma Triangle. ...
... can also form from other structures within the liver such as the bile duct, blood vessels and immune cells. Cancer ... Less common types include mucinous cystic neoplasm and intraductal papillary biliary neoplasm. The diagnosis may be supported ... ovarian cancer, lung cancer, renal cancer, prostate cancer. Because liver cancer is an umbrella term for many types of cancer, ... Liver cancer, also known as hepatic cancer and primary hepatic cancer, is cancer that starts in the liver. Cancer which has ...
Patient information on extrahepatic bile duct tumors, from the National Cancer Institute. Cancer.Net: Bile Duct Cancer The ... Distal cholangiocarcinomas (those arising from the common bile duct) are generally treated surgically with a Whipple procedure ... Cholangiocarcinoma is a relatively rare neoplasm that is classified as an adenocarcinoma (a cancer that forms glands or ... Cholangiocarcinoma, also known as bile duct cancer, is a form of cancer that is composed of mutated epithelial cells (or cells ...
... gastrointestinal Colon cancer Extrahepatic bile duct cancer Gallbladder cancer Gastric (stomach) cancer Gastrointestinal ... For some common cancers, the English organ name is used. For example, the most common type of breast cancer is called ductal ... Marginal zone B-cell lymphoma Mast cell leukemia Mediastinal large B cell lymphoma Multiple myeloma/plasma cell neoplasm ... Hepatocellular cancer Pancreatic cancer, islet cell Rectal cancer Bladder cancer Cervical cancer Endometrial cancer ...
... an abnormal yellowing of the skin and eyes often caused by blockage of the bile ducts) are more likely to have a pancreatic ... ". "Pancreatic Cancer FAQs". "Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasms of the Pancreas". Birkmeyer JD, Stukel TA, Siewers AE, ... The most common include CT scan (computerized axial tomography), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography ... while patients with pancreatic cancer may have elevated levels of the cancer marker CA19-9. Often called the gold standard, ...
... common bile duct, urinary bladder of infants and young children or the vagina in females, typically younger than age 8. The ... Neoplasms of the Vulva and Vagina. in Holland-Frei Cancer Medicine - 6th Ed. Kufe, DW et al. editors. BC Decker Inc., Hamilton ... in Holland-Frei Cancer Medicine - 6th Ed. Kufe, DW et al. editors. BC Decker Inc., Hamilton, Ontario, 2003. Piver M, Rose P ( ... For botryoid rhabdomyosarcoma of the vagina, the most common clinical finding is vaginal bleeding but vaginal bleeding is not ...
This results when a cancer in the head of the pancreas obstructs the common bile duct as it runs through the pancreas. ... Small precancerous neoplasms for many pancreatic cancers are being detected at greatly increased rates by modern medical ... Kidney cancer is by far the most common cancer to spread to the pancreas, followed by colorectal cancer, and then cancers of ... Pancreatic cancer is the fifth most common cause of death from cancer in the United Kingdom, and the fourth most common in the ...
Bile acids, at high levels in the colons of humans eating a high fat diet, also cause DNA damage and contribute to colon cancer ... are common precursors to development of the disordered and improperly proliferating clone of tissue in a malignant neoplasm. ... Discrete localized enlargements of normal structures (ureters, blood vessels, intrahepatic or extrahepatic biliary ducts, ... ICD-10 classifies neoplasms into four main groups: benign neoplasms, in situ neoplasms, malignant neoplasms, and neoplasms of ...
... gastric cancer, bile duct cancer, pancreatic cancer, small intestine cancer and colon cancer. In the colon, a field defect ... which may be benign neoplasms) or else a malignant neoplasm (cancer). These neoplasms are also indicated, in the diagram below ... A common cytotoxic chemotherapy used in a variety of cancers, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), targets the TYMS pathway and resistance ... The monoclonal model of cancer and the cancer stem-cell model are not mutually exclusive. Cancer stem cell arises by clonal ...
Other primary sites that have been reported include colon, rectum, stomach, gallbladder, bile ducts, small intestine, urinary ... This disease is most commonly caused by an appendiceal primary cancer (cancer of the appendix); mucinous tumors of the ovary ... For example, neoplasms characterized by high-grade features, invasive glands and or signet ring cells, are termed ... Since the mucus tends to pool at the bottom of the abdominal cavity, it is common to remove the ovaries, fallopian tubes, ...
... also EATL is the most common neoplasm.[7] Esophageal cancer[edit]. Squamous carcinoma of the esophagus is more prevalent in ... Diseases of the pancreas, gall bladder, bile duct[edit]. Primary biliary cirrhosis. CD is prevalent in primary biliary ... Cancers[edit]. GSE, particularly coeliac disease, increases the risk of cancers of specific types.[113] There are two ... GSE associated cancers are invariably associated with advanced coeliac disease, however, in de-novo EATL, the cancer is ...
bile duct: Cholangiocarcinoma. *Klatskin tumor. *gallbladder: Gallbladder cancer. Pancreas. *exocrine pancreas: Adenocarcinoma ... Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. By using this site, ... cystic neoplasms: Serous microcystic adenoma. *Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm. *Mucinous cystic neoplasm ...
bile duct: Cholangiocarcinoma. *Klatskin tumor. *gallbladder: Gallbladder cancer. Pancreas. *exocrine pancreas: Adenocarcinoma ... Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. By using this site, ... cystic neoplasms: Serous microcystic adenoma. *Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm. *Mucinous cystic neoplasm ... Napoleon Bonaparte and many members of his family are thought to have died from this type of cancer, although it is believed by ...
... common bile duct - comorbidity - compassionate use trial - complementary and alternative medicine - complete blood count (CBC ... cancer induction - Cancer Information Service - cancer of unknown primary origin - Cancer stem cell - cancer vaccine - Cancer. ... neoplasm - nephrotomogram - nephrotoxic - nephroureterectomy - nerve block - nerve grafting - nerve-sparing radical ... bilateral cancer - bilateral nephrectomy - bilateral prophylactic mastectomy - bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy - bile duct - ...
It also receives bile and pancreatic juice through the pancreatic duct, controlled by the sphincter of Oddi. The primary ... Neoplasms (cancers) Adenocarcinoma Carcinoid Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) Lymphoma Sarcoma Leiomyoma Metastatic tumors ... A few of them are listed below, some of which are common, with up to 10% of people being affected at some time in their lives, ... Pancreatic lipase works with the help of the salts from the bile secreted by the liver and stored in the gall bladder. Bile ...
Radiation of the head and neck presents a risk factor for thyroid cancer, and cancer is more common in women than men, ... The most common neoplasm affecting the thyroid gland is a benign adenoma, usually presenting as a painless mass in the neck. ... A persistent thyroglossal duct is the most common clinically significant congenital disorder of the thyroid gland. A persistent ... perhaps by increasing the rate of secretion of cholesterol in bile. Cardiovascular. The hormones increase the rate and strength ...
bile duct: Cholangiocarcinoma. *Klatskin tumor. *gallbladder: Gallbladder cancer. Pancreas. *exocrine pancreas: Adenocarcinoma ... Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. By using this site, ... This article about a neoplasm is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.. *v ... Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Digestive_system_neoplasm&oldid=898746878" ...
Prognosis and treatment is the same as for the most common type of ovarian cancer, which is epithelial ovarian cancer.[5][6] ... bile duct: Cholangiocarcinoma. *Klatskin tumor. *gallbladder: Gallbladder cancer. Pancreas. *exocrine pancreas: Adenocarcinoma ... cystic neoplasms: Serous microcystic adenoma. *Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm. *Mucinous cystic neoplasm ... "Gynecologic Cancer Treatment - Primary Peritoneal Cancer - Dana-Farber Cancer Institute".. *^ Burger RA, Sill MW, Monk BJ, ...
bile duct: Cholangiocarcinoma. *Klatskin tumor. *gallbladder: Gallbladder cancer. Pancreas. *exocrine pancreas: Adenocarcinoma ... Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. By using this site, ... cystic neoplasms: Serous microcystic adenoma. *Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm. *Mucinous cystic neoplasm ... A biopsy will reveal them to be hamartomas; the possibility that they progress to cancer is generally considered to be low,[5] ...
As the duodenum rotates to the right, it carries with it the ventral pancreatic bud and common bile duct. Upon reaching its ... In the United States pancreatic cancer is the fourth most common cause of deaths due to cancer. The disease occurs more often ... Patil TB, Shrikhande SV, Kanhere HA, Saoji RR, Ramadwar MR, Shukla PJ (2006). "Solid pseudopapillary neoplasm of the pancreas: ... The intercalated ducts drain into larger ducts within the lobule, and finally interlobular ducts. The ducts are lined by a ...
Bile ducts: 2. Intrahepatic bile ducts, 3. Left and right hepatic ducts, 4. Common hepatic duct, 5. Cystic duct, 6. Common bile ... Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is the most common form of pancreatic cancer, and is cancer arising from the exocrine digestive part ... "Solid pseudopapillary neoplasm of the pancreas: a single institution experience of 14 cases". HPB. 8 (2): 148-50. doi:10.1080/ ... The intercalated ducts drain into larger ducts within the lobule, and finally interlobular ducts. The ducts are lined by a ...
bile duct: Cholangiocarcinoma. *Klatskin tumor. *gallbladder: Gallbladder cancer. Pancreas. *exocrine pancreas: Adenocarcinoma ... Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. By using this site, ... cystic neoplasms: Serous microcystic adenoma. *Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm. *Mucinous cystic neoplasm ... AMHR2 (Persistent Müllerian duct syndrome II). *TGF beta receptors: Endoglin/Alk-1/SMAD4 (Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia ...
bile duct: Cholangiocarcinoma. *Klatskin tumor. *gallbladder: Gallbladder cancer. Pancreas. *exocrine pancreas: Adenocarcinoma ... The most common originating sites of carcinoid is the small bowel, particularly the ileum; carcinoid tumors are the most common ... cystic neoplasms: Serous microcystic adenoma. *Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm. *Mucinous cystic neoplasm ... The next most common affected area is the respiratory tract, with 28% of all cases - per PAN-SEER data (1973 - 1999). The ...
Common bile duct *Choledocholithiasis. *Biliary dyskinesia. *Sphincter of Oddi dysfunction. Pancreatic. *Pancreatitis *Acute ... Neoplasms and cancer. *Inflammatory bowel disease. *Gluten sensitivity. *Other. *Symptoms and signs *eponymous ... ಪಠ್ಯವು Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License ನಡಿ ಲಭ್ಯವಿದೆ; ಮತ್ತಷ್ಟು ಷರತ್ತುಗಳು ಅನ್ವಯಿಸಬಹುದು. ಹೆಚ್ಚಿನ ವಿವರಗಳಿಗೆ ಬಳಕೆಯ ...
The duct formed by the union of the hepatic and cystic ducts Explanation of Common bile duct neoplasms ... Find out information about Common bile duct neoplasms. ... Related to Common bile duct neoplasms: Bile duct cancer. common ... common bile duct. (redirected from Common bile duct neoplasms). Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical. ... Common bile duct neoplasms , Article about Common bile duct neoplasms by The Free Dictionary https://encyclopedia2. ...
... but its recognition may help identify the cause of certain clinical conditions and prevent bile duct injury during surgery if ... eg.(cancer,cancers)(cervical,cervix)!("Squamous cell carcinoma",SCC). will return records where either the words cancer or ... item_headline "kidney cancer" @item_description (trial,trials). this searches for the phrase kidney cancer in the title as ... but its recognition may help identify the cause of certain clinical conditions and prevent bile duct injury during surgery if ...
... is a common option. Thus diabetes mellitus and hepatitis, for example, might belong more appropriately elsewhere, though not if ... distal common bile duct cancers, duodenal cancers, intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm, and neuroendocrine tumours [20-23]. ... ampullary cancers, distal common bile duct cancers, and duodenal cancers and distal pancreatectomy for cancers of the body and ... The major indication for pancreatic resection is pancreatic cancer, the seventh most common cause of cancer-related mortality ...
One case of common bile duct cancer mimicking cystic neoplasm of the pancreas, arising 9 years after excision of a choledochal ... some 4 cm in maximum diameter and intimately related to the common bile duct via a thin pathway (Figs. 1 and 2). The bile duct ... 8. Watanabe Y, Toki A, Todani T. Bile duct cancer developed after cyst excision for choledochal cyst. J Hepatobiliary Pancreat ... Congenital bile duct cysts: Classification, operative procedures, and review of thirty-seven cases including cancer arising ...
Global: Cancer diseases Anatomical: Gastrointestinal diseases Liver diseases See all MalaCards categories (disease lists) ... MalaCards based summary : Common Bile Duct Neoplasm, is also known as common bile duct neoplasms. Affiliated tissues include ... MalaCards integrated aliases for Common Bile Duct Neoplasm:. Name: Common Bile Duct Neoplasm 12 17 ... Search GEO for disease gene expression data for Common Bile Duct Neoplasm. ...
Accumulating bile acids from cholestasis lead to reduced pH, increased apoptosis and activation of ERK1/2, Akt and NF-κB ... leading to the activation of common intracellular pathways that result in reactive cell proliferation, genetic/epigenetic ... Intraductal papillary neoplasms of the bile duct: stepwise progression to carcinoma involves common molecular pathways. Mod ... arising between the second order bile ducts and the insertion of the cystic duct into the common bile duct) and distal ...
... ductal obstruction of the pancreas or common bile duct (e.g. from neoplasm); and/or cystic fibrosis (an inherited disease in ... J Pancreas (Online) 2002; 3(5):116-125), and it may be caused by diseases and conditions such as pancreatic cancer, pancreatic ... In addition, 25 μl bile salts (80 mM Bile salts, bile salt mixture from Solvay Pharmaceuticals, batch 176.01-PA-7374, dissolved ... 1999): "Studies on nutrient digestibilities (pre-caecal and total) in pancreatic duct-ligated pigs and the effects of enzyme ...
GNAS and KRAS mutations are common in intraductal papillary neoplasms of the bile duct.. Sasaki M1, Matsubara T, Nitta T, Sato ... GNAS and KRAS Mutations are Common in Intraductal Papillary Neoplasms of the Bile Duct ... GNAS and KRAS Mutations are Common in Intraductal Papillary Neoplasms of the Bile Duct ... GNAS and KRAS Mutations are Common in Intraductal Papillary Neoplasms of the Bile Duct ...
Bile Duct Cancer - MedlinePlus Health Information. Miscellaneous. *NCI CPTAC Assay Portal. *NCI CPTAC Assay Portal ... Intraductal papillary neoplasms of the bile duct: stepwise progression to carcinoma involves common molecular pathways.. ... Intraductal papillary neoplasms of the bile duct from 45 patients were graded and subtyped using mucin markers and CDX2. In ... Intraductal papillary neoplasms of the bile duct are still poorly characterized regarding (1) their molecular alterations ...
... duct cancer.. * A histologic study confirmed a signet ring cell neoplasm of the distal common bile duct. ... Common Bile Duct Neoplasms / diagnosis. Common Bile Duct Neoplasms / drug therapy. Common Bile Duct Neoplasms / mortality. ... Bile Duct Neoplasms / pathology. Bile Ducts, Extrahepatic / pathology. Bile Ducts, Intrahepatic / pathology. Common Bile Duct ... MeSH-major] Bile Duct Neoplasms / diagnosis. Bile Duct Neoplasms / therapy. Bile Ducts, Extrahepatic. Bile Ducts, Intrahepatic ...
... distal common bile duct, periampullary region and duodenum, and is... ... neuroendocrine and malignant intraductal papillary-mucinous neoplasms, cancers of the distal common bile duct (CBD), Vaterian ... Bile collection found 4 days after PD for distal common bile duct (CBD) cholangiocarcinoma in an 83-year-old woman with biliary ... distal common bile duct, periampullary region and duodenum, and is also performed to manage selected benign tumours and ...
... hydatid cyst and intraductal papillary neoplasm of the bile duct. Affecting middle-aged female population, BMCN presents ... It can cause diagnostic dilemmas with most common differentials being complex hepatic cyst, ... Biliary mucinous cystic neoplasm (BMCN) is a rare intrahepatic neoplasm comprising approximately 5% of cystic liver lesions. ...
One major complication that occurred was perforation of the common hepatic duct with leakage of bile, which was managed by ... Department of Pathology, National Institute for Cancer Research, Genoa, Italy.. PMID. 8674921 ... BACKGROUND: Nonsurgical pathologic confirmation of malignant bile duct strictures is desirable for defining subsequent ... prospectively evaluated the yields of endoscopic retrograde brush cytology and biopsy for the diagnosis of malignant bile duct ...
Common Bile Duct Neoplasms / diagnosis. Common Bile Duct Neoplasms / therapy. Cyclooxygenase Inhibitors / therapeutic use. ... Title] Adenomyoma of the common hepatic duct mimicking bile duct cancer: report of a case. ... Bile Duct Neoplasms / diagnosis. Bile Duct Neoplasms / pathology. Bile Duct Neoplasms / surgery. Bile Ducts, Intrahepatic / ... Bile Duct Neoplasms / genetics. Bile Duct Neoplasms / metabolism. Bile Duct Neoplasms / pathology. Bile Ducts, Intrahepatic / ...
topic_facet:Common Bile Duct Neoplasms topic_facet:Cancer building:Clendening History of Medicine Library (Kansas City) ... Ampulla of Vater (1) Bile ducts (1) Cancer Common Bile Duct Neoplasms Pancreas (1) Pancreatic Neoplasms (1) ... Color atlas of surgery for pancreatic and associated carcinomata : (Whipples procedure and operations for neoplasms of the ... Suggested Topics: Common Bile Duct Neoplasms * Suggested Topics: Cancer * Library: Clendening History of Medicine Library ( ...
Bile ducts Cancer (1) Common Bile Duct Neoplasms Pancreas Pancreatic Neoplasms (1) ... topic_facet:Common Bile Duct Neoplasms topic_facet:Pancreas topic_facet:Bile ducts building:Clendening History of ... Color atlas of surgery for pancreatic and associated carcinomata : (Whipples procedure and operations for neoplasms of the ...
Common Bile Duct Neoplasms/genetics*. *DNA Mutational Analysis. *Female. *Genetic Markers. *Germ-Line Mutation ... Detection of homozygous deletions in the genomic DNAs of pancreatic cancer xenograft PX30 and biliary cancer xenograft PX115 by ... Germline mutation of STK11/LKB1 in patient PJS1 and loss of the wild-type allele of STK11/LKB1 in the pancreatic cancer of the ... B: DNA from normal tissue of a non-Peutz-Jeghers patient (lane 1), cancer of patient PJS1 (lane 2), and polyps of patient PJS1 ...
Pancreatic duct, Common bile duct, Uncinate process Pancreatic pathology, Acute pancreatitis: diffuse , Acute pancreatitis: ... Cystic pancreatic neoplasms, Islet cell tumors, Lymphoma Sonography of the spleen, Normal spleen, Wandering spleen, ... Pancreatic cancer, Pancreatic duct, Common bile duct, Uncinate process Pancreatic pathology, Acute pancreatitis: diffuse , ... common bile duct, crus of the diaphragm, cystic pancreatic neoplasm, cystic splenic mass, cystic splenic metastases, ...
Board Subjects: Common Bile Duct Neoplasms ,Surgery ,Common Bile Duct ,Cholangitis ,Jaundice Citation: M. Mokhtari , Papillary ... Papillary carcinoma is rare as it represents only 5% of carcinomas of the common bile duct. The long prodromal phase is ... Papillary carcinoma: a rare cancer of the biliary duct Mokhtari M.; Affiliation. Isfahan University of Medical Sciences ; , ... a rare cancer of the biliary duct, Rev. Marocaine Med. Sante. 1986; 8 (1): 79-82 Abstract English ...
A histologic study confirmed a signet ring cell neoplasm of the distal common bile duct. Because the upper resection margin was ... Computed tomography and positron emission tomography suggested the presence of distal extrahepatic bile-duct cancer. He ... Bile Ducts, Extrahepatic , Carcinoma, Signet Ring Cell , Chemoradiotherapy , Common Bile Duct , Humans , Jaundice , Middle Aged ... Signet Ring Cell Carcinoma of the Extrahepatic Bile Duct Eun-Young LEE; Chan KIM; Min-Joo KIM; Jung-Yeop PARK; Seung-Woo PARK; ...
Common Bile Duct Neoplasms/surgery , Endoscopy/methods , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local , ... Computed tomography and positron emission tomography suggested the presence of distal extrahepatic bile-duct cancer. He ... Bile Ducts, Extrahepatic , Carcinoma, Signet Ring Cell , Chemoradiotherapy , Common Bile Duct , Humans , Jaundice , Middle Aged ... A histologic study confirmed a signet ring cell neoplasm of the distal common bile duct. Because the upper resection margin was ...
Intracholecystic papillary neoplasm of the gallbladder protruding into the common bile duct.. Gastrointest Endosc. 2018 Feb 23 ... Risk of colorectal cancer in chronic liver diseases; a systematic review and meta-analysis.. Gastrointest Endosc. 2016 Dec 20. ... Do we really need a fully covered self-expanding metal stent for the treatment of difficult common bile duct stones?. ... Pancreatic techniques for common bile duct cannulation in ERCP.. Gastrointest Endosc. 2019;90:168-169.. PubMed Text format June ...
... a yellowing of the skin and eyes caused by obstruction of the bile duct), weight loss, and acute pancreatitis. These signs and ... Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms without an associated invasive cancer can be further subcategorized into three groups ... The most common symptoms include abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. The most common signs patients have when they come to ... Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) is a type of tumor that can occur within the cells of the pancreatic duct. IPMN ...
Gallstone removal during ERCP from the common bile duct. First a generous sphincterotomy was performed and then the stones were ... PANCREATIC CANCER T4.... 17510 views ChristosKaralis. * 05:32. CYSTIC NEOPLASM OF THE.... 18020 views ChristosKaralis ... ERCP. Sphincterotomy. Ampulla Of Vater. Common Bile Duct Stones Removal. Christos Karalis. ... Gallstone removal during ERCP from the common bile duct. First a generous sphincterotomy was performed and then the stones were ...
Periampullary carcinoma includes neoplasms arising from head of pancreas, distal common bile duct, duodenum and ampulla of ... including 114 pancreatic cancers, 82 distal bile duct cancers, 54 ampullary cancers, and 6 duodenal cancers, and 112 ... abrupt narrowing of distal common bile duct (CBD), dilated intrahepatic bile duct (IHD), dilated pancreatic duct (PD), ... High-grade PanINs were found more commonly in pancreatic cancers than in distal bile duct, ampullary, and duodenal cancers both ...
  • BACKGROUND/AIMS: We aimed to investigate the incidence of second primary pancreatic cancer (PC) after colorectal cancer (CRC) and to identify risk factors associated with subsequent PC. (bvsalud.org)
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  • We examined the status of GNAS mutation at codon 201 and KRAS mutation at codon 12&13, degree of mucin production and immunohistochemical expressions of MUC mucin core proteins in 29 patients (M/F = 15/14) with IPNB in intrahepatic and perihilar bile ducts (perihilar IPNB) and 6 patients (M/F = 5/1) with IPNB in distal bile ducts (distal IPNB). (cdc.gov)
  • The macroscopic appearance of the major duodenal papilla influences bile duct cannulation: a prospective multicenter study by the Scandinavian Association for Digestive Endoscopy study group for ERCP. (amedeo.com)