Inflammatory Bowel Diseases: Chronic, non-specific inflammation of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT. Etiology may be genetic or environmental. This term includes CROHN DISEASE and ULCERATIVE COLITIS.Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A disorder with chronic or recurrent colonic symptoms without a clearcut etiology. This condition is characterized by chronic or recurrent ABDOMINAL PAIN, bloating, MUCUS in FECES, and an erratic disturbance of DEFECATION.Early Detection of Cancer: Methods to identify and characterize cancer in the early stages of disease and predict tumor behavior.Short Bowel Syndrome: A malabsorption syndrome resulting from extensive operative resection of the SMALL INTESTINE, the absorptive region of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT.Prostatic Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the PROSTATE.Colonic Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the COLON.Ovarian Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the OVARY. These neoplasms can be benign or malignant. They are classified according to the tissue of origin, such as the surface EPITHELIUM, the stromal endocrine cells, and the totipotent GERM CELLS.Breast Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the human BREAST.Lung Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the LUNG.Stomach Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the STOMACH.Crohn Disease: A chronic transmural inflammation that may involve any part of the DIGESTIVE TRACT from MOUTH to ANUS, mostly found in the ILEUM, the CECUM, and the COLON. In Crohn disease, the inflammation, extending through the intestinal wall from the MUCOSA to the serosa, is characteristically asymmetric and segmental. Epithelioid GRANULOMAS may be seen in some patients.Colitis, Ulcerative: Inflammation of the COLON that is predominantly confined to the MUCOSA. Its major symptoms include DIARRHEA, rectal BLEEDING, the passage of MUCUS, and ABDOMINAL PAIN.Neoplasm Metastasis: The transfer of a neoplasm from one organ or part of the body to another remote from the primary site.Neoplasm Invasiveness: Ability of neoplasms to infiltrate and actively destroy surrounding tissue.Neoplasms: New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.Pancreatic Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the PANCREAS. Depending on the types of ISLET CELLS present in the tumors, various hormones can be secreted: GLUCAGON from PANCREATIC ALPHA CELLS; INSULIN from PANCREATIC BETA CELLS; and SOMATOSTATIN from the SOMATOSTATIN-SECRETING CELLS. Most are malignant except the insulin-producing tumors (INSULINOMA).Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in neoplastic tissue.Mice, Nude: Mutant mice homozygous for the recessive gene "nude" which fail to develop a thymus. They are useful in tumor studies and studies on immune responses.Cancer Vaccines: Vaccines or candidate vaccines designed to prevent or treat cancer. Vaccines are produced using the patient's own whole tumor cells as the source of antigens, or using tumor-specific antigens, often recombinantly produced.Neoplasm Proteins: Proteins whose abnormal expression (gain or loss) are associated with the development, growth, or progression of NEOPLASMS. Some neoplasm proteins are tumor antigens (ANTIGENS, NEOPLASM), i.e. they induce an immune reaction to their tumor. Many neoplasm proteins have been characterized and are used as tumor markers (BIOMARKERS, TUMOR) when they are detectable in cells and body fluids as monitors for the presence or growth of tumors. Abnormal expression of ONCOGENE PROTEINS is involved in neoplastic transformation, whereas the loss of expression of TUMOR SUPPRESSOR PROTEINS is involved with the loss of growth control and progression of the neoplasm.Genetic Predisposition to Disease: A latent susceptibility to disease at the genetic level, which may be activated under certain conditions.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Colon: The segment of LARGE INTESTINE between the CECUM and the RECTUM. It includes the ASCENDING COLON; the TRANSVERSE COLON; the DESCENDING COLON; and the SIGMOID COLON.Colorectal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the COLON or the RECTUM or both. Risk factors for colorectal cancer include chronic ULCERATIVE COLITIS; FAMILIAL POLYPOSIS COLI; exposure to ASBESTOS; and irradiation of the CERVIX UTERI.Uterine Cervical Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the UTERINE CERVIX.Survival Analysis: A class of statistical procedures for estimating the survival function (function of time, starting with a population 100% well at a given time and providing the percentage of the population still well at later times). The survival analysis is then used for making inferences about the effects of treatments, prognostic factors, exposures, and other covariates on the function.Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Survival Rate: The proportion of survivors in a group, e.g., of patients, studied and followed over a period, or the proportion of persons in a specified group alive at the beginning of a time interval who survive to the end of the interval. It is often studied using life table methods.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Rectal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the RECTUM.Carcinoma: A malignant neoplasm made up of epithelial cells tending to infiltrate the surrounding tissues and give rise to metastases. It is a histological type of neoplasm but is often wrongly used as a synonym for "cancer." (From Dorland, 27th ed)Antineoplastic Agents: Substances that inhibit or prevent the proliferation of NEOPLASMS.Disease Progression: The worsening of a disease over time. This concept is most often used for chronic and incurable diseases where the stage of the disease is an important determinant of therapy and prognosis.Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols: The use of two or more chemicals simultaneously or sequentially in the drug therapy of neoplasms. The drugs need not be in the same dosage form.Risk: The probability that an event will occur. It encompasses a variety of measures of the probability of a generally unfavorable outcome.Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction: A variation of the PCR technique in which cDNA is made from RNA via reverse transcription. The resultant cDNA is then amplified using standard PCR protocols.Urinary Bladder Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the URINARY BLADDER.Drug Resistance, Neoplasm: Resistance or diminished response of a neoplasm to an antineoplastic agent in humans, animals, or cell or tissue cultures.Carcinoma, Squamous Cell: A carcinoma derived from stratified SQUAMOUS EPITHELIAL CELLS. It may also occur in sites where glandular or columnar epithelium is normally present. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung: A heterogeneous aggregate of at least three distinct histological types of lung cancer, including SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA; ADENOCARCINOMA; and LARGE CELL CARCINOMA. They are dealt with collectively because of their shared treatment strategy.National Cancer Institute (U.S.): Component of the NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH. Through basic and clinical biomedical research and training, it conducts and supports research with the objective of cancer prevention, early stage identification and elimination. This Institute was established in 1937.Cell Line, Tumor: A cell line derived from cultured tumor cells.RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Registries: The systems and processes involved in the establishment, support, management, and operation of registers, e.g., disease registers.Gene Expression Profiling: The determination of the pattern of genes expressed at the level of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION, under specific circumstances or in a specific cell.Receptors, Estrogen: Cytoplasmic proteins that bind estrogens and migrate to the nucleus where they regulate DNA transcription. Evaluation of the state of estrogen receptors in breast cancer patients has become clinically important.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Neoplasm Staging: Methods which attempt to express in replicable terms the extent of the neoplasm in the patient.Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays: In vivo methods of screening investigative anticancer drugs, biologic response modifiers or radiotherapies. Human tumor tissue or cells are transplanted into mice or rats followed by tumor treatment regimens. A variety of outcomes are monitored to assess antitumor effectiveness.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Tumor Markers, Biological: Molecular products metabolized and secreted by neoplastic tissue and characterized biochemically in cells or body fluids. They are indicators of tumor stage and grade as well as useful for monitoring responses to treatment and predicting recurrence. Many chemical groups are represented including hormones, antigens, amino and nucleic acids, enzymes, polyamines, and specific cell membrane proteins and lipids.Constipation: Infrequent or difficult evacuation of FECES. These symptoms are associated with a variety of causes, including low DIETARY FIBER intake, emotional or nervous disturbances, systemic and structural disorders, drug-induced aggravation, and infections.Colonoscopy: Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the luminal surface of the colon.Intestinal Mucosa: Lining of the INTESTINES, consisting of an inner EPITHELIUM, a middle LAMINA PROPRIA, and an outer MUSCULARIS MUCOSAE. In the SMALL INTESTINE, the mucosa is characterized by a series of folds and abundance of absorptive cells (ENTEROCYTES) with MICROVILLI.United StatesSurvivors: Persons who have experienced a prolonged survival after serious disease or who continue to live with a usually life-threatening condition as well as family members, significant others, or individuals surviving traumatic life events.Neoplasm Recurrence, Local: The local recurrence of a neoplasm following treatment. It arises from microscopic cells of the original neoplasm that have escaped therapeutic intervention and later become clinically visible at the original site.Intestinal Diseases: Pathological processes in any segment of the INTESTINE from DUODENUM to RECTUM.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Receptor, erbB-2: A cell surface protein-tyrosine kinase receptor that is overexpressed in a variety of ADENOCARCINOMAS. It has extensive homology to and heterodimerizes with the EGF RECEPTOR, the ERBB-3 RECEPTOR, and the ERBB-4 RECEPTOR. Activation of the erbB-2 receptor occurs through heterodimer formation with a ligand-bound erbB receptor family member.Defecation: The normal process of elimination of fecal material from the RECTUM.Combined Modality Therapy: The treatment of a disease or condition by several different means simultaneously or sequentially. Chemoimmunotherapy, RADIOIMMUNOTHERAPY, chemoradiotherapy, cryochemotherapy, and SALVAGE THERAPY are seen most frequently, but their combinations with each other and surgery are also used.Odds Ratio: The ratio of two odds. The exposure-odds ratio for case control data is the ratio of the odds in favor of exposure among cases to the odds in favor of exposure among noncases. The disease-odds ratio for a cohort or cross section is the ratio of the odds in favor of disease among the exposed to the odds in favor of disease among the unexposed. The prevalence-odds ratio refers to an odds ratio derived cross-sectionally from studies of prevalent cases.Disease-Free Survival: Period after successful treatment in which there is no appearance of the symptoms or effects of the disease.Blotting, Western: Identification of proteins or peptides that have been electrophoretically separated by blot transferring from the electrophoresis gel to strips of nitrocellulose paper, followed by labeling with antibody probes.Neoplasm Transplantation: Experimental transplantation of neoplasms in laboratory animals for research purposes.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Cell Transformation, Neoplastic: Cell changes manifested by escape from control mechanisms, increased growth potential, alterations in the cell surface, karyotypic abnormalities, morphological and biochemical deviations from the norm, and other attributes conferring the ability to invade, metastasize, and kill.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)DNA, Neoplasm: DNA present in neoplastic tissue.Intestine, Large: A segment of the LOWER GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT that includes the CECUM; the COLON; and the RECTUM.Endometrial Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of ENDOMETRIUM, the mucous lining of the UTERUS. These neoplasms can be benign or malignant. Their classification and grading are based on the various cell types and the percent of undifferentiated cells.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Prostate-Specific Antigen: A glycoprotein that is a kallikrein-like serine proteinase and an esterase, produced by epithelial cells of both normal and malignant prostate tissue. It is an important marker for the diagnosis of prostate cancer.Intestinal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the INTESTINES.Chemotherapy, Adjuvant: Drug therapy given to augment or stimulate some other form of treatment such as surgery or radiation therapy. Adjuvant chemotherapy is commonly used in the therapy of cancer and can be administered before or after the primary treatment.RNA, Small Interfering: Small double-stranded, non-protein coding RNAs (21-31 nucleotides) involved in GENE SILENCING functions, especially RNA INTERFERENCE (RNAi). Endogenously, siRNAs are generated from dsRNAs (RNA, DOUBLE-STRANDED) by the same ribonuclease, Dicer, that generates miRNAs (MICRORNAS). The perfect match of the siRNAs' antisense strand to their target RNAs mediates RNAi by siRNA-guided RNA cleavage. siRNAs fall into different classes including trans-acting siRNA (tasiRNA), repeat-associated RNA (rasiRNA), small-scan RNA (scnRNA), and Piwi protein-interacting RNA (piRNA) and have different specific gene silencing functions.Smoking: Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.DNA Methylation: Addition of methyl groups to DNA. DNA methyltransferases (DNA methylases) perform this reaction using S-ADENOSYLMETHIONINE as the methyl group donor.Fluorouracil: A pyrimidine analog that is an antineoplastic antimetabolite. It interferes with DNA synthesis by blocking the THYMIDYLATE SYNTHETASE conversion of deoxyuridylic acid to thymidylic acid.Tamoxifen: One of the SELECTIVE ESTROGEN RECEPTOR MODULATORS with tissue-specific activities. Tamoxifen acts as an anti-estrogen (inhibiting agent) in the mammary tissue, but as an estrogen (stimulating agent) in cholesterol metabolism, bone density, and cell proliferation in the ENDOMETRIUM.Genotype: The genetic constitution of the individual, comprising the ALLELES present at each GENETIC LOCUS.Adenocarcinoma: A malignant epithelial tumor with a glandular organization.Tumor Suppressor Protein p53: Nuclear phosphoprotein encoded by the p53 gene (GENES, P53) whose normal function is to control CELL PROLIFERATION and APOPTOSIS. A mutant or absent p53 protein has been found in LEUKEMIA; OSTEOSARCOMA; LUNG CANCER; and COLORECTAL CANCER.Cell Survival: The span of viability of a cell characterized by the capacity to perform certain functions such as metabolism, growth, reproduction, some form of responsiveness, and adaptability.Esophageal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the ESOPHAGUS.Medical Oncology: A subspecialty of internal medicine concerned with the study of neoplasms.Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.Transplantation, Heterologous: Transplantation between animals of different species.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Cell Movement: The movement of cells from one location to another. Distinguish from CYTOKINESIS which is the process of dividing the CYTOPLASM of a cell.Neoplastic Stem Cells: Highly proliferative, self-renewing, and colony-forming stem cells which give rise to NEOPLASMS.Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Down-Regulation: A negative regulatory effect on physiological processes at the molecular, cellular, or systemic level. At the molecular level, the major regulatory sites include membrane receptors, genes (GENE EXPRESSION REGULATION), mRNAs (RNA, MESSENGER), and proteins.Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal: Antineoplastic agents that are used to treat hormone-sensitive tumors. Hormone-sensitive tumors may be hormone-dependent, hormone-responsive, or both. A hormone-dependent tumor regresses on removal of the hormonal stimulus, by surgery or pharmacological block. Hormone-responsive tumors may regress when pharmacologic amounts of hormones are administered regardless of whether previous signs of hormone sensitivity were observed. The major hormone-responsive cancers include carcinomas of the breast, prostate, and endometrium; lymphomas; and certain leukemias. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual 1994, p2079)Clinical Trials as Topic: Works about pre-planned studies of the safety, efficacy, or optimum dosage schedule (if appropriate) of one or more diagnostic, therapeutic, or prophylactic drugs, devices, or techniques selected according to predetermined criteria of eligibility and observed for predefined evidence of favorable and unfavorable effects. This concept includes clinical trials conducted both in the U.S. and in other countries.Kaplan-Meier Estimate: A nonparametric method of compiling LIFE TABLES or survival tables. It combines calculated probabilities of survival and estimates to allow for observations occurring beyond a measurement threshold, which are assumed to occur randomly. Time intervals are defined as ending each time an event occurs and are therefore unequal. (From Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1995)Cisplatin: An inorganic and water-soluble platinum complex. After undergoing hydrolysis, it reacts with DNA to produce both intra and interstrand crosslinks. These crosslinks appear to impair replication and transcription of DNA. The cytotoxicity of cisplatin correlates with cellular arrest in the G2 phase of the cell cycle.Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis: Hybridization of a nucleic acid sample to a very large set of OLIGONUCLEOTIDE PROBES, which have been attached individually in columns and rows to a solid support, to determine a BASE SEQUENCE, or to detect variations in a gene sequence, GENE EXPRESSION, or for GENE MAPPING.Antigens, Neoplasm: Proteins, glycoprotein, or lipoprotein moieties on surfaces of tumor cells that are usually identified by monoclonal antibodies. Many of these are of either embryonic or viral origin.Receptors, Progesterone: Specific proteins found in or on cells of progesterone target tissues that specifically combine with progesterone. The cytosol progesterone-receptor complex then associates with the nucleic acids to initiate protein synthesis. There are two kinds of progesterone receptors, A and B. Both are induced by estrogen and have short half-lives.Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic: Agents obtained from higher plants that have demonstrable cytostatic or antineoplastic activity.Polymorphism, Genetic: The regular and simultaneous occurrence in a single interbreeding population of two or more discontinuous genotypes. The concept includes differences in genotypes ranging in size from a single nucleotide site (POLYMORPHISM, SINGLE NUCLEOTIDE) to large nucleotide sequences visible at a chromosomal level.Genes, BRCA1: A tumor suppressor gene (GENES, TUMOR SUPPRESSOR) located on human CHROMOSOME 17 at locus 17q21. Mutations of this gene are associated with the formation of HEREDITARY BREAST AND OVARIAN CANCER SYNDROME. It encodes a large nuclear protein that is a component of DNA repair pathways.Mammography: Radiographic examination of the breast.Dose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.Cell Division: The fission of a CELL. It includes CYTOKINESIS, when the CYTOPLASM of a cell is divided, and CELL NUCLEUS DIVISION.Polymerase Chain Reaction: In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Colonic Diseases: Pathological processes in the COLON region of the large intestine (INTESTINE, LARGE).Neurogenic Bowel: Loss or absence of normal intestinal function due to nerve damage or birth defects. It is characterized by the inability to control the elimination of stool from the body.Liver Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the LIVER.Breast: In humans, one of the paired regions in the anterior portion of the THORAX. The breasts consist of the MAMMARY GLANDS, the SKIN, the MUSCLES, the ADIPOSE TISSUE, and the CONNECTIVE TISSUES.SEER Program: A cancer registry mandated under the National Cancer Act of 1971 to operate and maintain a population-based cancer reporting system, reporting periodically estimates of cancer incidence and mortality in the United States. The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program is a continuing project of the National Cancer Institute of the National Institutes of Health. Among its goals, in addition to assembling and reporting cancer statistics, are the monitoring of annual cancer incident trends and the promoting of studies designed to identify factors amenable to cancer control interventions. (From National Cancer Institute, NIH Publication No. 91-3074, October 1990)Anticarcinogenic Agents: Agents that reduce the frequency or rate of spontaneous or induced tumors independently of the mechanism involved.Antibodies, Monoclonal: Antibodies produced by a single clone of cells.Cell Proliferation: All of the processes involved in increasing CELL NUMBER including CELL DIVISION.Intestines: The section of the alimentary canal from the STOMACH to the ANAL CANAL. It includes the LARGE INTESTINE and SMALL INTESTINE.Tumor Burden: The total amount (cell number, weight, size or volume) of tumor cells or tissue in the body.Colitis: Inflammation of the COLON section of the large intestine (INTESTINE, LARGE), usually with symptoms such as DIARRHEA (often with blood and mucus), ABDOMINAL PAIN, and FEVER.Drug Screening Assays, Antitumor: Methods of investigating the effectiveness of anticancer cytotoxic drugs and biologic inhibitors. These include in vitro cell-kill models and cytostatic dye exclusion tests as well as in vivo measurement of tumor growth parameters in laboratory animals.Head and Neck Neoplasms: Soft tissue tumors or cancer arising from the mucosal surfaces of the LIP; oral cavity; PHARYNX; LARYNX; and cervical esophagus. Other sites included are the NOSE and PARANASAL SINUSES; SALIVARY GLANDS; THYROID GLAND and PARATHYROID GLANDS; and MELANOMA and non-melanoma skin cancers of the head and neck. (from Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 4th ed, p1651)Apoptosis: One of the mechanisms by which CELL DEATH occurs (compare with NECROSIS and AUTOPHAGOCYTOSIS). Apoptosis is the mechanism responsible for the physiological deletion of cells and appears to be intrinsically programmed. It is characterized by distinctive morphologic changes in the nucleus and cytoplasm, chromatin cleavage at regularly spaced sites, and the endonucleolytic cleavage of genomic DNA; (DNA FRAGMENTATION); at internucleosomal sites. This mode of cell death serves as a balance to mitosis in regulating the size of animal tissues and in mediating pathologic processes associated with tumor growth.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Neoplasms, Hormone-Dependent: Certain tumors that 1, arise in organs that are normally dependent on specific hormones and 2, are stimulated or caused to regress by manipulation of the endocrine environment.Abdominal Pain: Sensation of discomfort, distress, or agony in the abdominal region.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Molecular Targeted Therapy: Treatments with drugs which interact with or block synthesis of specific cellular components characteristic of the individual's disease in order to stop or interrupt the specific biochemical dysfunction involved in progression of the disease.Mouth Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the MOUTH.Gastrointestinal Agents: Drugs used for their effects on the gastrointestinal system, as to control gastric acidity, regulate gastrointestinal motility and water flow, and improve digestion.Cell Cycle: The complex series of phenomena, occurring between the end of one CELL DIVISION and the end of the next, by which cellular material is duplicated and then divided between two daughter cells. The cell cycle includes INTERPHASE, which includes G0 PHASE; G1 PHASE; S PHASE; and G2 PHASE, and CELL DIVISION PHASE.Radiotherapy: The use of IONIZING RADIATION to treat malignant NEOPLASMS and some benign conditions.Promoter Regions, Genetic: DNA sequences which are recognized (directly or indirectly) and bound by a DNA-dependent RNA polymerase during the initiation of transcription. Highly conserved sequences within the promoter include the Pribnow box in bacteria and the TATA BOX in eukaryotes.Carcinoma, Small Cell: An anaplastic, highly malignant, and usually bronchogenic carcinoma composed of small ovoid cells with scanty neoplasm. It is characterized by a dominant, deeply basophilic nucleus, and absent or indistinct nucleoli. (From Stedman, 25th ed; Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 3d ed, p1286-7)Paclitaxel: A cyclodecane isolated from the bark of the Pacific yew tree, TAXUS BREVIFOLIA. It stabilizes MICROTUBULES in their polymerized form leading to cell death.Gastrointestinal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT, from the MOUTH to the ANAL CANAL.Biopsy: Removal and pathologic examination of specimens in the form of small pieces of tissue from the living body.Up-Regulation: A positive regulatory effect on physiological processes at the molecular, cellular, or systemic level. At the molecular level, the major regulatory sites include membrane receptors, genes (GENE EXPRESSION REGULATION), mRNAs (RNA, MESSENGER), and proteins.Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced: Tumors, cancer or other neoplasms produced by exposure to ionizing or non-ionizing radiation.Neoplasms, Second Primary: Abnormal growths of tissue that follow a previous neoplasm but are not metastases of the latter. The second neoplasm may have the same or different histological type and can occur in the same or different organs as the previous neoplasm but in all cases arises from an independent oncogenic event. The development of the second neoplasm may or may not be related to the treatment for the previous neoplasm since genetic risk or predisposing factors may actually be the cause.Gastrointestinal Transit: Passage of food (sometimes in the form of a test meal) through the gastrointestinal tract as measured in minutes or hours. The rate of passage through the intestine is an indicator of small bowel function.Cell Growth Processes: Processes required for CELL ENLARGEMENT and CELL PROLIFERATION.American Cancer Society: A voluntary organization concerned with the prevention and treatment of cancer through education and research.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor: A cell surface receptor involved in regulation of cell growth and differentiation. It is specific for EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR and EGF-related peptides including TRANSFORMING GROWTH FACTOR ALPHA; AMPHIREGULIN; and HEPARIN-BINDING EGF-LIKE GROWTH FACTOR. The binding of ligand to the receptor causes activation of its intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity and rapid internalization of the receptor-ligand complex into the cell.MicroRNAs: Small double-stranded, non-protein coding RNAs, 21-25 nucleotides in length generated from single-stranded microRNA gene transcripts by the same RIBONUCLEASE III, Dicer, that produces small interfering RNAs (RNA, SMALL INTERFERING). They become part of the RNA-INDUCED SILENCING COMPLEX and repress the translation (TRANSLATION, GENETIC) of target RNA by binding to homologous 3'UTR region as an imperfect match. The small temporal RNAs (stRNAs), let-7 and lin-4, from C. elegans, are the first 2 miRNAs discovered, and are from a class of miRNAs involved in developmental timing.Bone Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer located in bone tissue or specific BONES.Genital Neoplasms, Female: Tumor or cancer of the female reproductive tract (GENITALIA, FEMALE).Prostate: A gland in males that surrounds the neck of the URINARY BLADDER and the URETHRA. It secretes a substance that liquefies coagulated semen. It is situated in the pelvic cavity behind the lower part of the PUBIC SYMPHYSIS, above the deep layer of the triangular ligament, and rests upon the RECTUM.Neoplasms, Glandular and Epithelial: Neoplasms composed of glandular tissue, an aggregation of epithelial cells that elaborate secretions, and of any type of epithelium itself. The concept does not refer to neoplasms located in the various glands or in epithelial tissue.Transfection: The uptake of naked or purified DNA by CELLS, usually meaning the process as it occurs in eukaryotic cells. It is analogous to bacterial transformation (TRANSFORMATION, BACTERIAL) and both are routinely employed in GENE TRANSFER TECHNIQUES.Precancerous Conditions: Pathological processes that tend eventually to become malignant. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Tumor Suppressor Proteins: Proteins that are normally involved in holding cellular growth in check. Deficiencies or abnormalities in these proteins may lead to unregulated cell growth and tumor development.RNA Interference: A gene silencing phenomenon whereby specific dsRNAs (RNA, DOUBLE-STRANDED) trigger the degradation of homologous mRNA (RNA, MESSENGER). The specific dsRNAs are processed into SMALL INTERFERING RNA (siRNA) which serves as a guide for cleavage of the homologous mRNA in the RNA-INDUCED SILENCING COMPLEX. DNA METHYLATION may also be triggered during this process.Neovascularization, Pathologic: A pathologic process consisting of the proliferation of blood vessels in abnormal tissues or in abnormal positions.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Diet: Regular course of eating and drinking adopted by a person or animal.Digestive System Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the digestive system or its parts.Confidence Intervals: A range of values for a variable of interest, e.g., a rate, constructed so that this range has a specified probability of including the true value of the variable.Gene Silencing: Interruption or suppression of the expression of a gene at transcriptional or translational levels.Capsule Endoscopy: Non-invasive, endoscopic imaging by use of VIDEO CAPSULE ENDOSCOPES to perform examination of the gastrointestinal tract, especially the small bowel.Tumor Cells, Cultured: Cells grown in vitro from neoplastic tissue. If they can be established as a TUMOR CELL LINE, they can be propagated in cell culture indefinitely.Mice, SCID: Mice homozygous for the mutant autosomal recessive gene "scid" which is located on the centromeric end of chromosome 16. These mice lack mature, functional lymphocytes and are thus highly susceptible to lethal opportunistic infections if not chronically treated with antibiotics. The lack of B- and T-cell immunity resembles severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) syndrome in human infants. SCID mice are useful as animal models since they are receptive to implantation of a human immune system producing SCID-human (SCID-hu) hematochimeric mice.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Germ-Line Mutation: Any detectable and heritable alteration in the lineage of germ cells. Mutations in these cells (i.e., "generative" cells ancestral to the gametes) are transmitted to progeny while those in somatic cells are not.Genes, Tumor Suppressor: Genes that inhibit expression of the tumorigenic phenotype. They are normally involved in holding cellular growth in check. When tumor suppressor genes are inactivated or lost, a barrier to normal proliferation is removed and unregulated growth is possible.DeoxycytidineSkin Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the SKIN.China: A country spanning from central Asia to the Pacific Ocean.Genes, Neoplasm: Genes whose abnormal expression, or MUTATION are associated with the development, growth, or progression of NEOPLASMS.Neoplasm Grading: Methods which attempt to express in replicable terms the level of CELL DIFFERENTIATION in neoplasms as increasing ANAPLASIA correlates with the aggressiveness of the neoplasm.Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.JapanTissue Array Analysis: The simultaneous analysis of multiple samples of TISSUES or CELLS from BIOPSY or in vitro culture that have been arranged in an array format on slides or microchips.Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic: Antimetabolites that are useful in cancer chemotherapy.Gene Expression: The phenotypic manifestation of a gene or genes by the processes of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION and GENETIC TRANSLATION.Intestinal Perforation: Opening or penetration through the wall of the INTESTINES.HT29 Cells: Human colonic ADENOCARCINOMA cells that are able to express differentiation features characteristic of mature intestinal cells such as the GOBLET CELLS.Immunoenzyme Techniques: Immunologic techniques based on the use of: (1) enzyme-antibody conjugates; (2) enzyme-antigen conjugates; (3) antienzyme antibody followed by its homologous enzyme; or (4) enzyme-antienzyme complexes. These are used histologically for visualizing or labeling tissue specimens.Drug Administration Schedule: Time schedule for administration of a drug in order to achieve optimum effectiveness and convenience.Flow Cytometry: Technique using an instrument system for making, processing, and displaying one or more measurements on individual cells obtained from a cell suspension. Cells are usually stained with one or more fluorescent dyes specific to cell components of interest, e.g., DNA, and fluorescence of each cell is measured as it rapidly transverses the excitation beam (laser or mercury arc lamp). Fluorescence provides a quantitative measure of various biochemical and biophysical properties of the cell, as well as a basis for cell sorting. Other measurable optical parameters include light absorption and light scattering, the latter being applicable to the measurement of cell size, shape, density, granularity, and stain uptake.DNA-Binding Proteins: Proteins which bind to DNA. The family includes proteins which bind to both double- and single-stranded DNA and also includes specific DNA binding proteins in serum which can be used as markers for malignant diseases.Postmenopause: The physiological period following the MENOPAUSE, the permanent cessation of the menstrual life.Colectomy: Excision of a portion of the colon or of the whole colon. (Dorland, 28th ed)Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Genes, p53: Tumor suppressor genes located on the short arm of human chromosome 17 and coding for the phosphoprotein p53.Receptors, Androgen: Proteins, generally found in the CYTOPLASM, that specifically bind ANDROGENS and mediate their cellular actions. The complex of the androgen and receptor migrates to the CELL NUCLEUS where it induces transcription of specific segments of DNA.Signal Transduction: The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.Mice, Inbred BALB CRectum: The distal segment of the LARGE INTESTINE, between the SIGMOID COLON and the ANAL CANAL.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized: Antibodies from non-human species whose protein sequences have been modified to make them nearly identical with human antibodies. If the constant region and part of the variable region are replaced, they are called humanized. If only the constant region is modified they are called chimeric. INN names for humanized antibodies end in -zumab.Taxoids: A group of diterpenoid CYCLODECANES named for the taxanes that were discovered in the TAXUS tree. The action on MICROTUBULES has made some of them useful as ANTINEOPLASTIC AGENTS.HCT116 Cells: Human COLORECTAL CARCINOMA cell line.Palliative Care: Care alleviating symptoms without curing the underlying disease. (Stedman, 25th ed)MCF-7 Cells: An estrogen responsive cell line derived from a patient with metastatic human breast ADENOCARCINOMA (at the Michigan Cancer Foundation.)Thyroid Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the THYROID GLAND.RNA, Neoplasm: RNA present in neoplastic tissue.Gastrointestinal Motility: The motor activity of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT.Neoplasms, Multiple Primary: Two or more abnormal growths of tissue occurring simultaneously and presumed to be of separate origin. The neoplasms may be histologically the same or different, and may be found in the same or different sites.
3.1 Reconstructive surgery after cancer treatment. *3.2 McIndoe surgical technique. *3.3 Bowel vaginoplasty ... Bowel vaginoplasty[edit]. Bowel vaginoplasty is a commonly used method to create an artificial vagina in male-to-female ... Reconstructive surgery after cancer treatment[edit]. Radiological cancer treatment can result in the destruction or alteration ...
Haslam SZ, Osuch JR (1 January 2006). Hormones and Breast Cancer in Post-Menopausal Women. IOS Press. p. 69. ISBN 978-1-58603- ... Reduce bowel motility. *Increase cholesterol in bile. *Melanin *Increase pheomelanin, reduce eumelanin ... Kleinberg DL (February 1998). "Role of IGF-I in normal mammary development". Breast Cancer Research and Treatment. 47 (3): 201- ... Estrogens are implicated in various estrogen-dependent conditions, such as ER-positive breast cancer, as well as a number of ...
In serous ovarian cancer, miR-31 is frequently deleted and is the most underexpressed microRNA in this cancer type. It has been ... Inflamm Bowel Dis. 17 (1): 221-31. doi:10.1002/ibd.21359. PMC 3006011 . PMID 20848542. Cottonham CL, Kaneko S, Xu L (2010). " ... O'Day, E; Lal, A (2010). "MicroRNAs and their target gene networks in breast cancer". Breast cancer research : BCR. 12 (2): 201 ... Conversely, in gastric cancer miR-31 levels have been found to be significantly lower in tumour cells relative to healthy cells ...
"Lara: living with Ehler-Danlos Syndrome". Bowel & Cancer Research. Retrieved 2018-01-17. "About the Ehlers-Danlos Society , The ... "Lara: living with Ehler-Danlos Syndrome". Bowel & Cancer Research. Retrieved 2018-01-17. "Lara's mission against pain". www. ...
Bowel Cancer Australia; Lifeline's Stress Down Day; Tristan Jepson Memorial Foundation; Blue September; National Breast Cancer ...
"Bowel Cancer Research". Bowel & Cancer Research. Retrieved 2016-06-08. ... He is a former board member of Bowel & Cancer Research, but stepped down in 2010 to become its first patron. http://www. ...
"Bowel Cancer Australia launches Love My Family Campaign featuring Lara Bingle" (PDF). Bowel Cancer Australia. 5 June 2009. ... Since 2009, Bingle has been an Ambassador for Bowel Cancer Australia. On 4 June 2010, Bingle officially launched the 2010, " ... Rose, Danny (13 September 2009). "Bingle fronts bowel cancer campaign". Nine News. nineMSN. Archived from the original on 29 ... Her father died in May 2008 from liver and pancreatic cancer. Bingle has been featured on the cover of Australian Harper's ...
Lee W, Lockhart AC, Kim RB, Rothenberg ML (2005). "Cancer pharmacogenomics: powerful tools in cancer chemotherapy and drug ... "Pharmacogenetics in inflammatory bowel disease". World J. Gastroenterol. 12 (23): 3657-67. doi:10.3748/wjg.v12.i23.3657. PMC ... Krynetski E, Evans WE (2003). "Drug methylation in cancer therapy: lessons from the TPMT polymorphism". Oncogene. 22 (47): 7403 ... "Pharmacogenomics in drug-metabolizing enzymes catalyzing anticancer drugs for personalized cancer chemotherapy". Curr. Drug ...
In cancer[edit]. The benefit of TPN to cancer patients is largely debated, and studies to date have generally showed minimal ... including bowel obstruction,[4] short bowel syndrome,[4] gastroschisis,[4] prolonged diarrhea regardless of its cause,[4] very ... such as in short bowel syndrome.[21] In newborn infants with short bowel syndrome with less than 10% of expected intestinal ... "Bowel Obstruction". Women's Health. Retrieved 30 March 2014.. *^ Tucker, RA; Jenkins, HL (1984). "Acalculous cholecystitis and ...
Infliximab and semen quality in men with Inflammatory bowel disease. Inflam Bowel Dis. Apr;11(4):395-99, 2005 , Walsh TJ, ... Cryptorchidism: prepubertal orchidopexy may prevent testis cancer J Urol. 178:1440-6; discussion 1446, 2007 , Walsh TJ, Davies ... testis cancer and stem cell science, and has developed several techniques for evaluating and treating male infertility. While ...
Cancer Excessive consumption of red processed meat is known to increase the risk of bowel cancer and some other cancers. ... "Bowel cancer risk factors". Cancer Research UK. 17 December 2013. Retrieved 12 September 2016. American Institute for Cancer ... "Red and processed meat consumption and the risk of lung cancer: a dose-response meta-analysis of 33 published studies". Int J ... Research (2007). Food, Nutrition, Physical Activity, and the Prevention of Cancer: a Global Perspective. p. 116. ISBN 978-0- ...
She had undergone multiple surgeries to treat bowel cancer and was left with multiple dense and inoperable bowel adhesions that ... She was 30 years old when she died of bowel cancer. The film premiered at the Sydney Film Festival in 2014 where it won the ... "She didn't actually want to die when she had cancer. She wanted to die after she had cancer treatment," he said.[9] ... On 1 August 2014, after euthanasia advocate Max Bromson, 66,[46] who suffered from terminal bone cancer, ended his life with ...
Efthymiou, M.; Taylor, A. C. F.; Kamm, M. A. (2011). "Cancer surveillance strategies in ulcerative colitis: The need for ... modernization". Inflammatory Bowel Diseases. 17 (8): 1800-1813. doi:10.1002/ibd.21540. PMID 21089179. Jichlinski, P.; Lovisa, B ...
"Ginger 'could halt bowel cancer'". BBC News. October 29, 2003. Jeong, C.-H.; Bode, A. M.; Pugliese, A.; Cho, Y.-Y.; Kim, H.-G ... but are cytotoxic towards a range of cancer cell lines including blood cancer and lung cancer. Gingerol has been investigated ... 2009). "[6]-Gingerol Suppresses Colon Cancer Growth by Targeting Leukotriene A4 Hydrolase". Cancer Research. 69 (13): 5584-91. ... Lee, H; Seo, E; Kang, N; Kim, W (2008). "[6]-Gingerol inhibits metastasis of MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells". The Journal ...
In 2008 Cox survived bowel cancer. "On This Day" (PDF). melbourneobserver.com.au. 11 March 2009. Archived from the original ( ...
He had been suffering bowel cancer. New York Times, "One Family Still at Home in Zimbabwe", 9 August 2002, Harvey Araton Tennis ...
"George Alagiah diagnosed with bowel cancer". 17 April 2014 - via www.bbc.co.uk. "Latest from medics - I'm making encouraging ... On 17 April 2014 it was announced that Alagiah was being treated for colorectal cancer. A statement from the BBC said: "He is ... External link in ,title= (help) "BBC newsreader George Alagiah 'clear of cancer' and back to work". BBC News. 9 November 2015. ... Sporn, Natasha (15 January 2018). "BBC newsreader George Alagiah to undergo more treatment as cancer returns". London Evening ...
The family suffered additional strain as his father became bedridden with bowel cancer. ...
"Fact Sheet: Cancer of the Lung and Bronchus". National Cancer Institute, SEER Program. Retrieved February 24, 2012. Martin LW, ... Within the small bowel, the jejunum seems to be a preferred site for metastasis of GCCL. GCCL also often metastasizes to bone, ... Travis WD, Travis LB, DeVesa SS (1995). "Lung Cancer". Cancer. 75: 191-202. doi:10.1002/1097-0142(19950101)75:1+. 3.0.CO;2-Y. ... About 1% of lung cancers are sarcomas, germ cell tumors, and hematopoietic tumors, while 99% of lung cancers are carcinoma. ...
In September 2011, it was announced that Waddell had been diagnosed with bowel cancer. Son Dan has written a novel about his ... His favourite number was 180 He succumbed to bowel cancer on 11 August 2012, the day after his 72nd birthday. Following his ... Waddell's last interview came in June 2012, where he discussed his life, darts commentary, pool commentary and his bowel cancer ... In September 2011, Waddell was diagnosed with bowel cancer. Despite this diagnosis and undergoing treatment, he managed to come ...
He died of bowel cancer aged 83. In 2005, the year following his death, he was voted 38th in De Grootste Belg, a Flemish ...
"70p antimalarial drug could treat bowel cancer". Daily Telegraph. 29 September 2015. Retrieved 8 March 2016. "Painkiller tapped ... This fits in with the goal of providing evidence-based information concerning cancer and cancer treatments. An example of this ... The vision of the ACF is to expand the amount of possible treatment options for cancer. The mission of the Anticancer Fund is ... For example, the ACF is partaking in the CUSP9 trials, which focuses on the re-purposing of drugs for the treatment of cancer. ...
... and colorectal cancer may lead to narrowing or blockages in the bowel, affecting bowel habits. Masses in breasts or testicles ... lung cancer, lymphoma, pancreatic cancer, prostate cancer, skin cancer, and thyroid cancer as well as other cancer types.[145] ... colorectal cancer, lung cancer and cervical cancer.[11] If skin cancer other than melanoma were included in total new cancer ... The most common types of cancer in males are lung cancer, prostate cancer, colorectal cancer and stomach cancer.[19] In females ...
Preventable colorectal cancers. 41,400. 1.7%. Colorectal cancer (bowel cancer, colon cancer) caused 51,783 deaths in the US in ... "Colorectal Cancer Statistics". Retrieved January 12, 2015.. *^ Carol A. Burke; Laura K. Bianchi. "Colorectal Neoplasia". ... Accordingly, the tabulated figure assumes that 80 percent of the fatal cancers could have been prevented. ... 2011.[11] About 80 percent[12] of colorectal cancers begin as benign growths, commonly called polyps, which can be easily ...
Previous history of cancer. Cancer Unintentional weight loss Loss of bladder or bowel control. Cauda. equina. syndrome ... or loss of bowel control.[14] It may also be useful in those with spinal stenosis.[15] In the absence of these issues, there is ... ovarian cancer, or uterine fibroids.[28] Nearly half of all pregnant women report pain in the lower back or sacral area during ... a history of cancer or significant muscle weakness may indicate a more serious underlying problem and is classified as needing ...
In 2008, Malone was diagnosed with bowel cancer. Following intensive treatment with chemotherapy, he is in remission. "Steve ... Malone Reflects on His Successful Battle Against Cancer". CricketArchive. Retrieved 10 June 2012. Steve Malone at Cricinfo ...
Blood Cancer Journal. July 2015, 5 (7): e330. PMC 4526784. PMID 26230954. doi:10.1038/bcj.2015.58 (英语).. ... cells are activated in inflammatory bowel diseases. Clinical and Experimental Immunology. May 2014, 176 (2): 266-74. PMC ... Cancer Research. February 2012, 72 (4): 917-27. PMC 3288154. PMID 22186141. doi:10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-11-1620.. ...
"When @NHS tweeted live from bowel cancer surgery.." Twitter. Retrieved 5 March 2017. "NHS / Shafi's story". Twitter. Retrieved ... and also works with liver surgeons to perform simultaneous laparoscopic liver and bowel resections for cancer. His other ... He was part of the Cancer 2020 5 Year Forward View Task force 2015. He is a member of the court of examiners and is an ... "Watch a cancer operation at any angle via Google Cardboard". CNET. Retrieved 21 January 2017. McCormick, Rich (14 April 2016 ...
Irritable Bowel Syndrome Symptoms - Ways To Ease A Bad IBS Attack. Find Out About The Different Foods That Can Make IBS More ... Forget the stories you hear about Irritable Bowel Syndrome causing bowel cancer. ... Irritable Bowel Syndrome: If you have stomach pain such like cramp and see change in bowel movement this could indicate IBS. ... Likely causes of Irritable Bowel Syndrome. There is no known true cause and neither can it be prevented, nonetheless, you can ...
Neuro Acupuncture Treatment and IBS Irritable Bowel Syndrome Herbal Herbs Alternative Medicine Treatment on IBS Irritable Bowel ... IBS Irritable Bowel Syndrome Treatment of Alternative IBS Irritable Bowel Syndrome Alternative ... Syndrome Treatment Medical Center IBS Irritable Bowel Syndrome Remedies ... Although IBS Irritable Bowel Syndrome can be a distressing condition, it seldom causes bowel cancer or bowel damage. The ...
... a general term for cancer that begins in the large bowel. Bowel cancer is sometimes called colon or rectal cancer. ... Bowel cancer is a general term for cancer that begins in the large bowel. Depending on where the cancer starts, bowel cancer is ... Read more about the causes of bowel cancer.. Bowel cancer screening. To detect cases of bowel cancer sooner, the NHS offers two ... Read about diagnosing bowel cancer.. Causes of bowel cancer. Its not known exactly what causes bowel cancer, but there are a ...
When you first see your GP, theyll ask about your symptoms and whether you have a family history of bowel cancer. ... Cancer Research UK has more information about bowel cancer stages.. Bowel cancer screening. In England, everyone aged 60 to 74 ... Macmillan Cancer Support: diagnosing colon cancer Further tests. If a diagnosis of bowel cancer is confirmed, further testing ... Bowel cancer is also staged numerically. The four main stages are:. *stage 1 - the cancer is still contained within the lining ...
http://www.mediafire.com/file/jmkgf3w3fyor2yb/Bowel_Cancer_Australia_Bowel_Cancer_The_Facts.pdf/file. .header { height: 70px; ...
A study looking at antibiotics and bowel cancer concludes that the drugs might increase the risk of colon cancer, but lower the ... Antibiotics and bowel cancer: Study finds link. Written by Tim Newman on August 21, 2019. - Fact checked by Carolyn Robertson ... They also collected information about 137,077 people who did not develop bowel cancer who they matched by age and sex. ... Colon cancer is the third most common cause of cancer-related death in the United States. In this article, learn about the ...
On AUG 8 she had a PETCT which confirmed NED and her CA came in at 12 Early OCT she began having Bowel issues where she had... ... cancer recurrence that presses on the bowel or grows into the bowel Usually the cause of the blockage is clear from context, ... Women who experience ovarian cancer can commonly develop blockages or obstructions in any parts of the bowel (except it is rare ... lack of bowel movements Many blockages can be managed without surgery with resting the bowel, IV hydration, and sometimes ...
Learn about bowel resection as a treatment for cancer. ... A bowel resection is a type of surgery to remove part of the ... Why a bowel resection is done. A bowel resection is done to:* treat cancer in the small intestine, colon, rectum or anus ... To find a cancer organization in your country, visit Union for International Cancer Control or International Cancer Information ... Cancer information / Diagnosis and treatment / Tests and procedures / Bowel resection Select the text below and copy the link. ...
Some cancers or cancer treatments can cause a bowel perforation, which is a hole in the small intestine or colon. Learn about ... To find a cancer organization in your country, visit Union for International Cancer Control or International Cancer Information ... Taking action against all cancers. The latest Canadian Cancer Statistics report found that of all newly diagnosed cancers in ... Cancer information / Diagnosis and treatment / Managing side effects / Bowel perforation Select the text below and copy the ...
Taking a long-term course of antibiotics in adulthood may increase the risk of bowel cancer later in life, according to a ... Antibiotics and bowel cancer. Some studies have also hinted that antibiotic usage could be linked with bowel cancer, but ... With the exception of skin cancers, bowel cancer is the third most common cancer in the U.S. ... This is backed up by earlier research that found lower levels of certain bacteria and higher levels of others in bowel cancer ...
If you or someone close to you has been diagnosed with cancer, youre not alone. Find out what to expect, get information, ... Below the stomach is the small bowel which is a long tube that is concertinaed in the abdomen and leads to the large bowel. ... Macmillan Cancer Support 2019 © Macmillan Cancer Support, registered charity in England and Wales (261017), Scotland (SC039907 ... Macmillan Cancer Support 2019 © Macmillan Cancer Support, registered charity in England and Wales (261017), Scotland (SC039907 ...
Bowel Cancer News and Research. RSS Bowel Cancer or colorectal cancer is cancer that occurs in the colon or rectum. Sometimes ... Bowel cancer on the rise among younger Australians Bowel cancer screening often begins after the age of fifty. New statistics ... Bowel (colorectal) cancer is the third most commonly occurring cancer in men and the second most commonly occurring cancer in ... of bowel cancer tumors University of Otago scientists have discovered a way to view the immune cell "landscape" of bowel cancer ...
... the increased risk of cancer in inflammatory bowel disease is confined to colorectal cancer. In Crohns disease 12 cases of ... 58 cases of cancer were detected compared with 47.1 expected (SIR 1.2, 95% CI 0.9 to 1.6). After excluding colorectal cancer ... There is an increased risk of cancer in both ulcerative colitis and Crohns disease. In 3121 patients with ulcerative colitis, ... Pharmacological therapy with sulfasalazine entailed a strong protective effect against colorectal cancer (relative risk of 0.34 ...
Cancer of the small bowel is rare. You will need tests to diagnose small bowel cancer. ... The small bowel is between the stomach and the large bowel. ... What is small bowel cancer?. Cancers in the small bowel are ... Secondary cancer in the small bowel. Occasionally, a small bowel cancer may be a secondary cancer. This means it has spread ... Types of small bowel cancer. There are four main types of small bowel cancer. They are named after the cells where they develop ...
The latest bowel cancer risk factors statistics for the UK for Health Professionals. See data for factors associated with ... Breast cancer. Lung cancer. Prostate cancer. Bowel cancer. Select a cancer type ... border="0" />Statistics by cancer type. " border="0" />Bowel cancer statistics. " border="0" />Bowel cancer risk ... Lifetime risk of bowel cancer The estimated lifetime risk of being diagnosed with bowel cancer is 1 in 15 (7%) for males, and 1 ...
... disease and may lead scientists to look at new ideas in the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases and even bowel cancer," ... parasitic worms has led to a surprising new discovery about the immune system that could help in the treatment of bowel cancer ...
The latest bowel cancer mortality statistics for the UK for Health Professionals. See data for sex, age, trends over time and ... Breast cancer. Lung cancer. Prostate cancer. Bowel cancer. Select a cancer type ... Bowel cancer mortality by sex and UK region Bowel cancer is the second most common cause of cancer death in the UK (2014), ... Bowel cancer mortality in Europe and worldwide Bowel cancer (C18-C21) is the second most common cause of cancer death in Europe ...
... in the case of bowel obstruction due to cancer cells that attach themselves to the outside of the intestines and prevent them ... bowel obstruction in people with recurrent cancers. Ovarian cancer commonly will recur in the abdomen. It is common to ... How effective octreotide can be (for treatment and symptomatic relief) in the case of bowel obstruction due to cancer cells ... Many of these blockages or obstructions in women with ovarian cancer are not surgically resectable. This is because the cancer ...
What is bowel cancer?. Almost all bowel cancers occur in the large bowel where mutations in the cells lining the gut can turn ... Working after having bowel cancer. Cancer is expensive for families. People diagnosed with bowel cancer may need to return to ... Bowel Cancer - also known as colon and colorectal cancer - is the second most common cancer (after lung cancer) that kills ... She survived advanced bowel cancer and is founder of Lynns Bowel Cancer Campaign. ...
... the second most common type of cancer affecting both men and women in Australia - is cancer that starts in the large bowel ( ... Bowel cancer. Bowel cancer is the second most common type of cancer affecting both men and women in Australia. Bowel cancer is ... Bowel cancer is one of the most curable cancers when detected early. Screening for bowel cancer (testing for cancer when it is ... Bowel cancer (updated 5 Jun 2015). http://www.cancer.org.au/about-cancer/types-of-cancer/bowel-cancer/ (accessed Jun 2015).. 2 ...
Regular doses of worms really do rid people of inflammatory bowel disease. The first trials of the treatment, carried out in ... REGULAR doses of worms really do rid people of inflammatory bowel disease. The first trials of the treatment have been a ... Vaccine, checkpoint drugs combination shows promise for pancreatic cancers JOHNS HOPKINS MEDICINE ... both incurable and potentially serious diseases collectively known as inflammatory bowel disease. In many of the volunteers the ...
Learn about innovative treatments for cancers that affect the small intestine, including carcinoid tumors and GIST, at Mayo ... Liver cancer, Neuroendocrine carcinoma, Pancreatic cancer, Rectal cancer, Small bowel cancer, Stomach cancer more ... Anal cancer, Cancer of unknown origin, Cholangiocarcinoma, Colon cancer, Esophageal cancer, Gallbladder cancer, ... Pancreatic cancer, Pituitary tumor, Rectal cancer, Small bowel cancer, Spinal cord tumor, Spinal tumor, Stomach cancer more ...
Learn about innovative treatments for cancers that affect the small intestine, including carcinoid tumors and GIST, at Mayo ... Small bowel cancer is an uncommon type of cancer that occurs in the small intestine. Your small intestine, which is also called ... What treatment options are best for you depend on the type of small bowel cancer you have and its stage. ... the small bowel, is a long tube that carries digested food between your stomach and your large intestine (colon). ...
Gastroenterologists Dr Jeff Butterworth and Dr David Maxton explain everything you need to know about bowel cancer, including ... Bowel cancer is the fourth most common cancer in the UK, with around 42,00o people being diagnosed every year. Its slightly ... What is bowel cancer?. The term bowel cancer is usually taken to mean cancer of the large bowel or colon. The colon or large ... bowel cancer thus includes the terms colorectal cancer, colonic cancer and rectal cancer. ...
... are four to five times at higher risk of being diagnosed with prostate cancer, according to researchers including one of Indian ... Inflammatory bowel disease ups prostate cancer risk: Study. Inflammatory bowel disease ups prostate cancer risk: Study. Source ... "If a man with inflammatory bowel disease has an elevated PSA, it may be an indicator of prostate cancer," Kundu added. ... According to the Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR), prostate cancer is the second leading cancer among males in large ...
  • Exclusion criteria included "alarm symptoms" (weight loss in the previous year, blood in stools, and colorectal cancer in first-degree relatives), ingested antibiotics, proton pump inhibitors, probiotics or any other drugs that affect gastric empting within 1 month before inclusion in the study, and any test that required cleansing of the bowel within 1 week of the study. (biomedcentral.com)
  • University of Otago scientists have discovered a way to view the immune cell "landscape" of bowel cancer tumours, paving the way towards more individualised medicine and treatment for many other diseases in future. (news-medical.net)
  • Tumours in the bowel can be detected, but biopsy samples cannot be taken. (mydr.com.au)
  • Two kinds of microbes that are found in colon tumours have been shown to cause cancers in mice. (newscientist.com)
  • When the two species were put into mice predisposed to get bowel cancer, they dramatically increased the number of tumours that formed. (newscientist.com)
  • In precancerous and cancerous bowel tumours, we see a lot of out-of-control budding, and many buds associated with a single crypt, suggesting the genes that exert control over the budding process may have been 'lost', initiating bowel cancer development. (eurekalert.org)
  • The study, published in the British Journal of Cancer , measured the proportion of the enzymes responsible for the metabolism of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids in tumours found in bowel cancer patients, and compared it to the patient's survival. (abdn.ac.uk)
  • To begin with surgery wasn't an option but I had rounds of chemotherapy and radiation treatment and responded well, and six weeks ago I had part of my liver and the bowel tumours were removed. (sirbobbyrobsonfoundation.org.uk)
  • The findings bring cancer therapy one step closer to the promise of targeted treatments for patients, based on the genetic characteristics of their tumours. (bionews.org.uk)
  • These probiotics could be used as prevention and to clean up the cancer cells remaining after surgical removal of tumours, the researchers said. (hindustantimes.com)
  • The GSTP gene, which helps to protect the human body from harmful chemicals such as tobacco smoke, may also play a role in protection against the development of bowel cancer, say UK researchers. (bionews.org.uk)
  • Hospital surveillance should be advised for sufferers of ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease with a history of more than eight years, and for people with a history of bowel cancer or polyp removal. (personneltoday.com)
  • A growth known as a polyp can turn into bowel cancer. (vic.gov.au)
  • Bowel cancer usually starts as a benign polyp that grows to become cancerous. (cancernz.org.nz)
  • A polyp is a mushroom-like growth that occurs inside the bowel. (cancernz.org.nz)
  • In some people there are no symptoms until a polyp has changed into a cancer. (beatingbowelcancer.org)
  • According to my oncologist, if I had been screened in accordance with the Cancer Council's repeated recommendations to the Australian Government (every two years after turning 50 years of age), it's highly likely that my cancer would have been detected as a pre-cancerous polyp. (mamamia.com.au)
  • Most cases begin as a small polyp on the inner lining of the bowel which, if left untreated, can grow through the bowel wall and spread to other organs. (bionews.org.uk)
  • Bowel cancer is currently the UK's second biggest cancer killer but it doesn't have to be that way because it can be successfully treated in nine out of ten cases if caught at an early stage. (saga.co.uk)
  • Denmark's five-year survival rate for ovarian cancer was marginally lower than the UK's - 36.1 per cent compared with 36.4 per cent - but 41.9 per cent of those diagnosed in Canada lived five years. (dailymail.co.uk)
  • The charity provides support and information for bowel cancer patients and their families through the UK's only nurse-led specialist helpline for bowel cancer, their online forum and booklets and fact sheets. (wikipedia.org)
  • Professor Nic Jones, Cancer Research UK's chief scientist, said: "This fascinating research provides an invaluable insight into how aspirin is working in bowel cancer cells. (healthcanal.com)
  • It's staggering that bowel cancer stubbornly remains the UK's second biggest cancer killer. (huffingtonpost.co.uk)
  • Researchers have found that bowel cancer cells have a mechanism by which they can switch off some key molecules on their surfaces and thus escape being recognised and killed by the immunotherapy agents. (news-medical.net)
  • Australian researchers have found that cells containing cancer could soon be detected using a simple test. (news-medical.net)
  • Early detection and a healthy lifestyle can prevent the cancer, the researchers said. (sify.com)
  • Although the researchers say that the findings were observational and no firm conclusions can be drawn, they conclude that it provides the first evidence that omega-3 fatty acids could impact bowel cancer survival. (telegraph.co.uk)
  • T he researchers looked at nearly 200,000 people from two large cohort studies which monitored diet and cancer prevalence. (telegraph.co.uk)
  • Researchers have found genes linked to bowel cancer, and these genes affect races in different ways. (emaxhealth.com)
  • The population-based study was led by researchers from the University of Melbourne and the Cancer Council Victoria, and published in the prestigious Medical Journal of Australia Saturday. (redorbit.com)
  • Melbourne researchers have challenged conventional thinking on how the bowel lining develops and, in the process, suggested a new mechanism for how bowel cancer starts. (eurekalert.org)
  • The researchers produced evidence that stem cells are responsible for maintaining and regenerating the 'crypts' that are a feature of the bowel lining, and believe these stem cells are involved in bowel cancer development, a controversial finding as scientists are still divided on the stem cells' existence. (eurekalert.org)
  • Professor Burgess said the research, combined with recent studies from institute researchers Dr Michael Buchert and Associate Professor Matthias Ernst, provided strong evidence that crypt-generating stem cells were responsible for driving bowel cancer growth. (eurekalert.org)
  • The researchers found that taking 300mg of aspirin - the equivalent of one pill - a day for five years reduced the incidence of bowel cancer by 74% in the subsequent 10 to 15 years. (medindia.net)
  • The results, published today (29 August) in Cell Reports give scientists a better picture of the cellular processes behind bowel cancer, and could enable researchers to predict which drugs would be effective in treating different bowel cancer patients. (eurekalert.org)
  • The researchers analysed 9,000 proteins for each of 50 bowel cancer cell lines. (eurekalert.org)
  • Late diagnosis and differences in treatment compared with other countries are blamed by researchers, who included Government cancer 'tsar' Professor Sir Michael Richards. (dailymail.co.uk)
  • Researchers have found that people with a certain type of bacteria in their gut may be at a greater risk of developing bowel cancer. (wn.com)
  • Researchers have developed a rapid and infallible test for bowel cance. (bio-medicine.org)
  • The researchers think it may best be employed in conjunction with sigmoidoscopy, to pick up more early cancers. (bio-medicine.org)
  • By studying cancer cell lines, mice and samples from patients, the researchers were able to show that aspirin was blocking mTOR by measuring levels of proteins that it controls. (healthcanal.com)
  • A group of international researchers have become the first to link the cumulative effects of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in genes responsible for the production of oestrogen, to a woman's risk of developing common breast and uterine cancers. (bionews.org.uk)
  • But we know that bowel cancer can be beaten if we - the NHS, government, doctors, nurses, health professionals, charities, scientists, researchers, and even the public - act now to diagnose more people early and deliver the best possible care and treatment. (huffingtonpost.co.uk)
  • Women in England are more likely to be diagnosed with bowel cancer at a later stage than men, putting them at a higher risk of dying from the disease, say researchers. (boots.com)
  • A simple online calculator could offer family GPs a powerful new tool in tackling two of the most deadly forms of cancer, say researchers. (nottingham.ac.uk)
  • A full blood count may detect iron-deficiency anaemia , which can be caused by bleeding from bowel cancer. (mydr.com.au)
  • The report says that this test kit is easy to use and is potentially life-saving as it can detect the cancer early when chances of the treatment being successful is higher. (news-medical.net)
  • Bowel cancer symptoms can be difficult to detect as they don't necessarily make you feel unwell. (express.co.uk)
  • Cancer biomarkers have changed the way we detect and treat tumors. (hindawi.com)
  • Pancreatic cancer in its earliest stages presents with abdominal pain, nausea, loss of appetite, weight loss, fatigue, weakness, and jaundice or yellowing of the skin or eyes. (healthcentral.com)
  • The research, published in the January edition of the British Journal of General Practice (BJGP), used patient data from 564 GPs practices to develop the algorithm and test its success at predicting which patients were likely to have pancreatic cancer, based on a combination of symptoms such as weight loss, appetite loss, and abdominal pain and risk factors such as age, chronic pancreatitis, smoking and diabetes. (nottingham.ac.uk)
  • Elevated PSA levels may indicate prostate cancer -- a non-cancerous condition such as prostatitis, or an enlarged prostate. (sify.com)
  • CUZD1 appears to be one of the relatively few biomarkers that serve as both cancer biomarker and autoantigen of autoantibodies in an autoimmune disease unrelated to cancerous organs. (hindawi.com)
  • In fact, virtually all cancer biomarkers lack specificity to a particular tumor type and may be found in a variety of cancerous and noncancerous conditions. (hindawi.com)
  • The two commonly found species, Escherichia coli and Bacteroides fragilis, together cause DNA damage that could lead to cancer-causing mutations, although it has not yet been shown they do the same in people. (newscientist.com)
  • This new study shows that one of gene mutations linked to bowel cancer affects Europeans more than Japanese. (emaxhealth.com)
  • Scientists from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute investigated the role proteins play in predicting how common mutations affect proteins in the cancer cells and also whether such proteins are important in predicting the cancer's response to treatment. (eurekalert.org)
  • The numbers appear in the latest issue of the journal of Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention. (news-medical.net)
  • The Mayo Clinic Cancer Center receives funding from the National Cancer Institute and is designated as a comprehensive cancer center - recognition for an institution's scientific excellence and multidisciplinary resources focused on cancer prevention, diagnosis and treatment. (mayoclinic.org)
  • We know spinach might not top your list of favourite foods, but it contains folic acid, which is important in the prevention of cancer. (nationalarchives.gov.uk)
  • Learn all about the early signs, symptoms, prevention and treatment of small intestine cancer. (medindia.net)
  • Thank you for sharing this Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention article. (aacrjournals.org)
  • Message Body (Your Name) thought you would be interested in this article in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention. (aacrjournals.org)
  • Bowel cancer is a disease where we know we can make a real difference through targeted research and COLO-SPEED is something we believe will be a world-leading model for prevention and early diagnosis research. (sirbobbyrobsonfoundation.org.uk)
  • More than 1,000 scientists are working to investigate the mechanisms of cancer development, identify cancer risk factors and develop new strategies for better cancer prevention, more precise diagnosis and effective treatment of cancer patients. (healthcanal.com)
  • We recommend that anyone considering taking aspirin for cancer prevention should discuss doing so with their GP. (healthcanal.com)
  • Early detection is crucial and any measures that increase the chances of cancer being picked up as quickly as possible are to be welcomed," said Dr Fiona Reddington, head of Population, Prevention and Behavioural Research at Cancer Research UK, commenting on the trial. (pharmatimes.com)
  • changed bowel habits, colon cancer? (healthboards.com)
  • If you receive a negative result but notice unusual changes in your bowel habits or bleeding from the bowel, visit your doctor. (vic.gov.au)
  • Q: I have noticed a couple of episodes of blood on the toilet paper and my bowel habits are not as regular as they were before. (spirehealthcare.com)
  • If the changes in your bowel habits persist for more than 6 weeks, you get intermittent rectal bleeding, lose weight for no obvious reason, are found to be anaemic or have a strong family history - I would highly recommend you contact your GP or a specialist in bowel diseases. (spirehealthcare.com)
  • And what I mean by that is it's important that people understand what's happening in their own body, not to feel embarrassed and to bring to their doctor's attention any changes in bowel habits. (sirbobbyrobsonfoundation.org.uk)
  • In 2015 there were 188 new cases of bowel cancer diagnosed in ACT residents (56% in males and 44% in females). (act.gov.au)
  • Dr Lesley Walker, from Cancer Research UK, said: "We can now begin to explain some of the difference in rates of bowel cancer between populations through specific genes. (emaxhealth.com)
  • Dr Andrew Chan, from Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, writing in the Lancet, said the findings were "convincing evidence" that aspirin can reduce the incidence of bowel cancer. (medindia.net)
  • it includes regimens that are considered by the authors and editors to be commonly used and important for the care of patients with bowel cancer. (uptodate.com)
  • If replicated by other studies, our results support the clinical recommendation of increasing marine omega-3 fatty acids among patients with bowel cancer," said lead researcher Dr Andrew Chan, Clinical and Translational Epidemiology Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston. (telegraph.co.uk)
  • New figures from Cancer Research UK show that people who are obese now outnumber people who smoke two to one in the UK, and excess weight causes more cases of certain cancers than smoking, as the charity urges Government action to tackle obesity. (news-medical.net)
  • The contribution CottonSofts has made over the past three years has been a huge help for our charity in its efforts to increase the rate of bowel cancer survivors. (voxy.co.nz)
  • One of the flagship initiatives across the month, being run by the charity Bowel Cancer UK, is called Never2Young. (aviva.co.uk)
  • The charity also works tirelessly to raise public awareness of bowel cancer and campaign to ensure Governments and health services provide the highest quality care and treatments. (wikipedia.org)
  • The charity is involved each year with Bowel Cancer Awareness Month, which takes place in April. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bowel cancer can be treated using a combination of different treatments, depending on where the cancer is in your bowel and how far it has spread. (www.nhs.uk)
  • Scientists have used artificial intelligence to recognize patterns in breast cancer - and uncovered five new types of the disease each matched to different personalized treatments. (news-medical.net)
  • We continue our series on cancer, with an explanation of symptoms and treatments of bowel cancer, which is curable if caught early. (personneltoday.com)
  • There are many common treatments that people go through in order to get rid of cancer. (emaxhealth.com)
  • One of the most important ways Cancer Research UK helps to improve treatments and make them kinder is by investigating exactly who will or won t benefit. (leeds.ac.uk)
  • It confirms that this common cancer is actually composed of five different subtypes that may require different drug treatments, and surprisingly suggests that proteins may be more predictive for drug sensitivity than we have previously thought. (eurekalert.org)
  • Cardio-Oncology Cancer treatments save lives, but some can damage your heart or blood vessels. (cardiosmart.org)
  • Individualizing quality-of-life outcomes reporting: how localized prostate cancer treatments affect patients with different levels of baseline urinary, bowel, and sexual function. (springer.com)
  • Quality of life impact of treatments for localized prostate cancer: cohort study with a 5 year follow-up. (springer.com)
  • If your symptoms suggest you may have bowel cancer or the diagnosis is uncertain, you'll be referred to your local hospital for a simple examination called a flexible sigmoidoscopy. (www.nhs.uk)
  • It's better for your lower bowel to be as empty as possible when sigmoidoscopy is performed, so you may be asked to carry out an enema - a simple procedure to flush your bowels - at home beforehand. (www.nhs.uk)
  • The Cancer Council Victoria is calling on people to get themselves tested for the disease, which kills about 1,300 people in the state each year. (abc.net.au)
  • For the most recent period, up to 2007, the UK had the worst bowel, lung and breast cancer five-year survival rates of any of the six countries. (dailymail.co.uk)
  • It says the survival 'deficit' - the difference between UK survival rates and the best-performing countries - for bowel cancer is generally around 10 per cent, but for pensioners it hit 10-15 per cent. (dailymail.co.uk)
  • Survival rates for bowel cancer are lower in the UK than in many other European countries and there is variation in the quality of care, depending on where you're treated. (huffingtonpost.co.uk)
  • Best treatment for every patient - along with later diagnosis, less effective treatment is the other major cause of poorer bowel cancer survival rates. (huffingtonpost.co.uk)
  • The UK has one of the poorest survival rates for bowel cancer in Europe, which is thought to be largely due to late presentation, delays in diagnosis and delays in treatment. (nottingham.ac.uk)
  • Although the five-year survival rates for earlier stages of this cancer are relatively good, at later stages survival goes down and the risk of cancer recurrence goes up considerably. (hindustantimes.com)
  • They also showed a statistically significant increase in colon cancer risk, particularly in the proximal colon, for antibiotics that target anaerobic bacteria rather than aerobic bacteria. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • A third species of bacteria has also been implicated in bowel cancer previously . (newscientist.com)
  • Weighing in on the findings, Katie Patrick, health information officer, from Cancer Research UK, said: "The colon is home to trillions of microbes and how the bacteria in our gut might affect bowel cancer risk is a fascinating area of research. (express.co.uk)
  • People who have a certain type of bacteria in their guts may be at greater risk of developing bowel cancer. (wn.com)
  • Certain strains of gut bacteria could raise the risk of bowel cancer, a study has claimed. (wn.com)
  • Bacteria in the gut might influence the chance of developing bowel cancer, research suggests, in the latest study to link human health to the microbes within. (wn.com)
  • Could the bacteria in our gut help treat cancer? (medicalxpress.com)
  • For the study, published in the journal Nature Biomedical Engineering, the team developed a cancer-targeting system by engineering a form of E.coli Nissle - a harmless type of bacteria found in the gut. (hindustantimes.com)
  • That same result could occur if a perfor-ated bowel allows bacteria to leak into the nearby abdominal cavity. (readersdigest.ca)