Canada: The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.Ontario: A province of Canada lying between the provinces of Manitoba and Quebec. Its capital is Toronto. It takes its name from Lake Ontario which is said to represent the Iroquois oniatariio, beautiful lake. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p892 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p391)Disabled Persons: Persons with physical or mental disabilities that affect or limit their activities of daily living and that may require special accommodations.British Columbia: A province of Canada on the Pacific coast. Its capital is Victoria. The name given in 1858 derives from the Columbia River which was named by the American captain Robert Gray for his ship Columbia which in turn was named for Columbus. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p178 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p81-2)Alberta: A province of western Canada, lying between the provinces of British Columbia and Saskatchewan. Its capital is Edmonton. It was named in honor of Princess Louise Caroline Alberta, the fourth daughter of Queen Victoria. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p26 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p12)Quebec: A province of eastern Canada. Its capital is Quebec. The region belonged to France from 1627 to 1763 when it was lost to the British. The name is from the Algonquian quilibek meaning the place where waters narrow, referring to the gradually narrowing channel of the St. Lawrence or to the narrows of the river at Cape Diamond. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p993 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p440)Manitoba: A province of Canada, lying between the provinces of Saskatchewan and Ontario. Its capital is Winnipeg. Taking its name from Lake Manitoba, itself named for one of its islands, the name derived from Algonquian Manitou, great spirit. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p724 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p332)Nova Scotia: A province of eastern Canada, one of the Maritime Provinces with NEW BRUNSWICK; PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND; and sometimes NEWFOUNDLAND AND LABRADOR. Its capital is Halifax. The territory was granted in 1621 by James I to the Scotsman Sir William Alexander and was called Nova Scotia, the Latin for New Scotland. The territory had earlier belonged to the French, under the name of Acadia. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p871 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p384)Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Northwest Territories: A federally administered division of Canada. Its capital is Yellowknife. The former northern and eastern-most parts of the Territory comprise the new territory of Nunavut, effective April 1, 1999.Saskatchewan: A province of Canada, lying between the provinces of Alberta and Manitoba. Its capital is Regina. It is entirely a plains region with prairie in the south and wooded country with many lakes and swamps in the north. The name was taken from the Saskatchewan River from the Cree name Kisiskatchewani Sipi, meaning rapid-flowing river. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p1083 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p486)Homeless Persons: Persons who have no permanent residence. The concept excludes nomadic peoples.Nunavut: A self-governing territory formed from the central and eastern portions of the Northwest Territories. It was officially established April 1, 1999. The capital is Iqaluit.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.United StatesIncidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Yukon Territory: A territory of northwest Canada, bounded on the north by the Arctic Ocean, on the south by British Columbia, and on the west by Alaska. Its capital is Whitehorse. It takes its name from the Yukon River, the Indian yu-kun-ah, meaning big river. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p1367 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p608)Newfoundland and Labrador: Province of Canada consisting of the island of Newfoundland and an area of Labrador. Its capital is St. John's.Mentally Ill Persons: Persons with psychiatric illnesses or diseases, particularly psychotic and severe mood disorders.Disease Outbreaks: Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.Population Surveillance: Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.Inuits: Inuktitut-speakers generally associated with the northern polar region.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Visually Impaired Persons: Persons with loss of vision such that there is an impact on activities of daily living.HIV Infections: Includes the spectrum of human immunodeficiency virus infections that range from asymptomatic seropositivity, thru AIDS-related complex (ARC), to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).Mentally Disabled Persons: Persons diagnosed as having significantly lower than average intelligence and considerable problems in adapting to everyday life or lacking independence in regard to activities of daily living.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Prince Edward Island: An island in the Gulf of St. Lawrence constituting a province of Canada in the eastern part of the country. It is very irregular in shape with many deep inlets. Its capital is Charlottetown. Discovered by the French in 1534 and originally named Ile Saint-Jean, it was renamed in 1799 in honor of Prince Edward, fourth son of George III and future father of Queen Victoria. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p981 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p433)Age Distribution: The frequency of different ages or age groups in a given population. The distribution may refer to either how many or what proportion of the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Indians, North American: Individual members of North American ethnic groups with ancient historic ancestral origins in Asia.Arctic Regions: The Arctic Ocean and the lands in it and adjacent to it. It includes Point Barrow, Alaska, most of the Franklin District in Canada, two thirds of Greenland, Svalbard, Franz Josef Land, Lapland, Novaya Zemlya, and Northern Siberia. (Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p66)Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.New Brunswick: A province of eastern Canada, one of the Maritime Provinces with NOVA SCOTIA; PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND; and sometimes NEWFOUNDLAND AND LABRADOR. Its capital is Fredericton. It was named in honor of King George III, of the House of Hanover, also called Brunswick. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p828 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p375)Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.National Health Programs: Components of a national health care system which administer specific services, e.g., national health insurance.Single-Payer System: An approach to health care financing with only one source of money for paying health care providers. The scope may be national (the Canadian System), state-wide, or community-based. The payer may be a governmental unit or other entity such as an insurance company. The proposed advantages include administrative simplicity for patients and providers, and resulting significant savings in overhead costs. (From Slee and Slee, Health Care Reform Terms, 1993, p106)Sex Distribution: The number of males and females in a given population. The distribution may refer to how many men or women or what proportion of either in the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Health Services Accessibility: The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.Hospitalization: The confinement of a patient in a hospital.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Residence Characteristics: Elements of residence that characterize a population. They are applicable in determining need for and utilization of health services.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Seasons: Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Health Status: The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)GeeseEmigrants and Immigrants: People who leave their place of residence in one country and settle in a different country.Australia: The smallest continent and an independent country, comprising six states and two territories. Its capital is Canberra.Cost of Illness: The personal cost of acute or chronic disease. The cost to the patient may be an economic, social, or psychological cost or personal loss to self, family, or immediate community. The cost of illness may be reflected in absenteeism, productivity, response to treatment, peace of mind, or QUALITY OF LIFE. It differs from HEALTH CARE COSTS, meaning the societal cost of providing services related to the delivery of health care, rather than personal impact on individuals.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Rural Population: The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.Travel: Aspects of health and disease related to travel.Single Person: The unmarried man or woman.Emigration and Immigration: The process of leaving one's country to establish residence in a foreign country.Mass Screening: Organized periodic procedures performed on large groups of people for the purpose of detecting disease.Urban Population: The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.Wounds and Injuries: Damage inflicted on the body as the direct or indirect result of an external force, with or without disruption of structural continuity.Health Care Costs: The actual costs of providing services related to the delivery of health care, including the costs of procedures, therapies, and medications. It is differentiated from HEALTH EXPENDITURES, which refers to the amount of money paid for the services, and from fees, which refers to the amount charged, regardless of cost.Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Registries: The systems and processes involved in the establishment, support, management, and operation of registers, e.g., disease registers.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Influenza, Human: An acute viral infection in humans involving the respiratory tract. It is marked by inflammation of the NASAL MUCOSA; the PHARYNX; and conjunctiva, and by headache and severe, often generalized, myalgia.Risk: The probability that an event will occur. It encompasses a variety of measures of the probability of a generally unfavorable outcome.Health Care Surveys: Statistical measures of utilization and other aspects of the provision of health care services including hospitalization and ambulatory care.Demography: Statistical interpretation and description of a population with reference to distribution, composition, or structure.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Population Groups: Individuals classified according to their sex, racial origin, religion, common place of living, financial or social status, or some other cultural or behavioral attribute. (UMLS, 2003)Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Mortality: All deaths reported in a given population.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Health Policy: Decisions, usually developed by government policymakers, for determining present and future objectives pertaining to the health care system.Odds Ratio: The ratio of two odds. The exposure-odds ratio for case control data is the ratio of the odds in favor of exposure among cases to the odds in favor of exposure among noncases. The disease-odds ratio for a cohort or cross section is the ratio of the odds in favor of disease among the exposed to the odds in favor of disease among the unexposed. The prevalence-odds ratio refers to an odds ratio derived cross-sectionally from studies of prevalent cases.Delivery of Health Care: The concept concerned with all aspects of providing and distributing health services to a patient population.Smoking: Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.Public Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.Physicians: Individuals licensed to practice medicine.Refugees: Persons fleeing to a place of safety, especially those who flee to a foreign country or power to escape danger or persecution in their own country or habitual residence because of race, religion, or political belief. (Webster, 3d ed)Income: Revenues or receipts accruing from business enterprise, labor, or invested capital.Comorbidity: The presence of co-existing or additional diseases with reference to an initial diagnosis or with reference to the index condition that is the subject of study. Comorbidity may affect the ability of affected individuals to function and also their survival; it may be used as a prognostic indicator for length of hospital stay, cost factors, and outcome or survival.Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome: An acquired defect of cellular immunity associated with infection by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), a CD4-positive T-lymphocyte count under 200 cells/microliter or less than 14% of total lymphocytes, and increased susceptibility to opportunistic infections and malignant neoplasms. Clinical manifestations also include emaciation (wasting) and dementia. These elements reflect criteria for AIDS as defined by the CDC in 1993.Transgendered Persons: Persons having a sense of persistent identification with, and expression of, gender-coded behaviors not typically associated with one's anatomical sex at birth, and with or without a desire to undergo SEX REASSIGNMENT PROCEDURES.Aging: The gradual irreversible changes in structure and function of an organism that occur as a result of the passage of time.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Physician's Practice Patterns: Patterns of practice related to diagnosis and treatment as especially influenced by cost of the service requested and provided.Dementia: An acquired organic mental disorder with loss of intellectual abilities of sufficient severity to interfere with social or occupational functioning. The dysfunction is multifaceted and involves memory, behavior, personality, judgment, attention, spatial relations, language, abstract thought, and other executive functions. The intellectual decline is usually progressive, and initially spares the level of consciousness.Health Services: Services for the diagnosis and treatment of disease and the maintenance of health.Health Services Needs and Demand: Health services required by a population or community as well as the health services that the population or community is able and willing to pay for.Health Expenditures: The amounts spent by individuals, groups, nations, or private or public organizations for total health care and/or its various components. These amounts may or may not be equivalent to the actual costs (HEALTH CARE COSTS) and may or may not be shared among the patient, insurers, and/or employers.Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.Zoonoses: Diseases of non-human animals that may be transmitted to HUMANS or may be transmitted from humans to non-human animals.North AmericaPublic Opinion: The attitude of a significant portion of a population toward any given proposition, based upon a measurable amount of factual evidence, and involving some degree of reflection, analysis, and reasoning.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Confidence Intervals: A range of values for a variable of interest, e.g., a rate, constructed so that this range has a specified probability of including the true value of the variable.Geriatric Assessment: Evaluation of the level of physical, physiological, or mental functioning in the older population group.Ethnic Groups: A group of people with a common cultural heritage that sets them apart from others in a variety of social relationships.Health Services Research: The integration of epidemiologic, sociological, economic, and other analytic sciences in the study of health services. Health services research is usually concerned with relationships between need, demand, supply, use, and outcome of health services. The aim of the research is evaluation, particularly in terms of structure, process, output, and outcome. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Environmental Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents in the environment or to environmental factors that may include ionizing radiation, pathogenic organisms, or toxic chemicals.Attitude to Health: Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.EuropeDiabetes Mellitus: A heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by HYPERGLYCEMIA and GLUCOSE INTOLERANCE.AlaskaVeterinarians: Individuals with a degree in veterinary medicine that provides them with training and qualifications to treat diseases and injuries of animals.Nursing Homes: Facilities which provide nursing supervision and limited medical care to persons who do not require hospitalization.Educational Status: Educational attainment or level of education of individuals.Costs and Cost Analysis: Absolute, comparative, or differential costs pertaining to services, institutions, resources, etc., or the analysis and study of these costs.Employment: The state of being engaged in an activity or service for wages or salary.Rural Health Services: Health services, public or private, in rural areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.Cause of Death: Factors which produce cessation of all vital bodily functions. They can be analyzed from an epidemiologic viewpoint.Vaccination: Administration of vaccines to stimulate the host's immune response. This includes any preparation intended for active immunological prophylaxis.
  • A Colorado State University atmospheric scientist is helping the physically isolated Inuit people on Canada s Baffin Island with a groundbreaking weather model that quickly identifies and predicts dangerous snow and wind conditions. (phys.org)
  • The island, west of Greenland on the extreme northeastern edge of Canada, gets daily incoming flights that carry supplies, but the Inuit population relies largely on the land and sea including whale and seal hunting for survival, said Liston, who has visited the island four times in the past two years. (phys.org)
  • In Canada , the NSF team has spent the past two years meeting with key Inuit leaders, particularly elders who lived in igloos and skin shelters before a change in Canadian law brought them to the individual hamlets they now live in. (phys.org)
  • Across the Canadian Arctic in 2007- 2008, 63% of Inuit households were found to be food insecure, with almost half (29%) severely food insecure (3). (arctichealth.org)
  • Statistics Canada, Frayne said, will compare death rates in the first three months of 2020 with those in the first three months of 2019. (ottawacitizen.com)
  • When researchers took into account some of these factors -- age, gender, route of HIV infection, co-infection with hepatitis C virus, combination of drugs used in regimens, initial CD4+ cell count and viral load -- they found that Indigenous people with HIV had a risk of death that was two and a half times greater than that of white people with HIV. (thebodypro.com)
  • The number of people living with HIV (including AIDS) continues to rise, from an estimated 64,000 in 2008 to 71,300 in 2011 (an 11.4% increase) (Table 1, Figure 1). (drugwarfacts.org)
  • The increase in the number of people living with HIV is due to the fact that new infections continue at a not insignificant rate which is greater than HIV-related deaths, as new treatments have improved survival. (drugwarfacts.org)
  • People living with HIV (PWH) are often co-infected with HBV and HCV, leading to increased risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). (natap.org)
  • Despite the tremendous improvements in survival, some groups of people living with HIV (PLHIV) continue to have lower survival rates than the overall HIV-positive population. (ubc.ca)
  • Virtual house calls: Can video conferencing help people with dementia in rural communities? (alzheimer.ca)
  • The answers may lie in two research projects funded by the Alzheimer Society Research Program (ASRP) investigating the potential benefits of video-linking people with dementia and their caregivers to health-care professionals in urban centres. (alzheimer.ca)
  • It's an advance that could address an urgent shortage of long-term care beds as the number of aging Canadians with Alzheimer's disease and dementia rises. (alzheimer.ca)
  • British trials have shown that cognitive rehabilitation can help people with dementia manage memory lapses, but requires weekly sessions with a trained professional. (alzheimer.ca)
  • Help change the lives of Canadians with dementia for the better. (alzheimer.ca)
  • Here we expand the currently recognized spectrum of human disease by describing an unusual case of pathologically proven cerebral B . procyonis infection, which caused no apparent symptoms, in an elderly patient from British Columbia, Canada, with Alzheimer dementia. (cdc.gov)
  • Guidelines recommend patients with moderate-severe dementia not drive, but not all people with mild dementia should be barred from driving. (cfp.ca)
  • 9 A checklist of considerations for driving safety in dementia has been published in Canadian Family Physician . (cfp.ca)
  • In May 1918, the majority of Canadian women over the age of 21 became eligible to vote in federal elections. (britannica.com)
  • To this end, we work to ensure that all eligible Canadians can exercise their democratic rights to vote and to be a candidate in federal elections. (elections.ca)
  • While her challenge was pending, in April 2013, Nell Toussaint's application for permanent residency in Canada was successful and she became eligible for health care coverage as a result. (amnesty.ca)
  • So a person who has avoided their obligations in the past with no down payment borrows 127000 from a company at 9.15%, and pays for three years but is now not eligible for renewal from that same company or another company for some reason? (blogspot.com)
  • This article presents research that focuses on asthma as a particular health challenge facing Aboriginal people in Canada, and it offers ways forward for culturally appropriate, community-led support for Aboriginal children with asthma and their families. (cdc.gov)
  • Review, Network Spring 2006: The current HIV epidemic is increasingly affecting Aboriginal people and women. (cwhn.ca)
  • Therefore, peritoneal dialysis (PD) might be particularly attractive to Aboriginal people with ESRD, as it would enable them to continue residing in their local communities rather than relocating to a region served by a hemodialysis unit. (asnjournals.org)
  • Two former civilian employees with the Vancouver police department have testified detectives refused to investigate missing persons complaints involving street workers or homeless people. (huffingtonpost.ca)
  • But as Beaudry said from Vancouver this week: 'To me, what sets a mountain town apart is the people. (piquenewsmagazine.com)
  • VANCOUVER - Two new cases of measles were reported in British Columbia on Sunday, with one of them prompting officials in Alberta and the Northwest Territories to warn the person may have exposed others to the infection as they travelled. (ohscanada.com)
  • A spokesman with the Vancouver International Airport said the first case arrived on a Philippine Airlines flight from Manila on Feb. 11, and another person with measles departed Vancouver on an Air Canada flight to Edmonton the following day. (ohscanada.com)
  • Damien Healy, a spokesman for N.W.T. Health and Social Services, confirmed in an email that it was the same person who flew from Vancouver to Edmonton. (ohscanada.com)
  • The agency said one of the people lives in the Vancouver Coastal Health area while the other was passing through Vancouver's airport on the way to Edmonton and later to the N.W.T. It said earlier in the day on Twitter the two news cases were not related to others connected to schools in the region. (ohscanada.com)
  • Hanganu believes people with these symptoms are at risk of Parkinson's, even if they haven't yet been diagnosed with the illness. (parkinson.ca)
  • Amnesty believes that the SADC-PF's July 24 motion brings the region closer to addressing the cycle of human rights violations against persons with albinism. (amnesty.ca)
  • The Canadian Psychiatric Association (CPA) believes Canadians should have timely access to care that is evidence-based and commensurate with the severity and duration of their medical condition. (cpa-apc.org)
  • Top of the list is discriminatory treatment of women, people with mental illnesses and First Nations inmates. (rabble.ca)
  • Wetherell includes analysis of First Nations people in the region, the scope of newcomer settler societies, especially with the impact of farming on regional wildlife, the natural history of animals, and the conservation history of wildlife protection in western Canada. (jhu.edu)
  • Having been found to be in breach of its obligations the current Canadian government should live up to its stated commitment to human rights, to the rights of migrants and to United Nations mechanisms through which States are held accountable. (amnesty.ca)
  • In Canada, it is estimated that about 251,000 persons in Canada have hepatitis C (4), but close to 44% of that population is unaware of their hepatitis C infection (5,6). (erudit.org)
  • People who injected drugs had higher HCC risk compared with men who had sex with men (aIRR: 2.0, 95% CI: 1.3-2.9), even after controlling for viral hepatitis co-infection. (natap.org)
  • Sonia joined PwC Canada over 25 years ago. (pwc.com)
  • Qualified persons included those of at least 30 years of age who owned property worth at least $4,000 and who resided in the province of their appointment. (britannica.com)
  • Betty Sigfusson has been a member of Team Diabetes for more than 10 years, encouraging others to get active while fundraising for Diabetes Canada. (diabetes.ca)
  • Georgia Joorisity has been a Diabetes Canada volunteer for seven years and is passionate about improving the lives of those with diabetes. (diabetes.ca)
  • Debbie Sissmore has been a volunteer spokesperson for Diabetes Canada for six years, talking to the public and media about living a healthy, active life with type 1 diabetes. (diabetes.ca)
  • The study aims to contribute to new insight and increased understanding with regards to the health, well-being, and health behaviours of young people (aged 11 to 15 years) and their social settings and conditions, especially the school environment. (canada.ca)
  • Reports of drinking beer at least once a week by girls and boys in Grades 6 and 8 have declined over the five Canadian HBSC survey years. (canada.ca)
  • Grand Challenges Canada will launch four more Grand Challenges over the next few years, the next one hopes to create a new class of point-of-care diagnostics. (marsdd.com)
  • As a result, millions of U.S. citizens have been buying medicines from Canada safely for years. (peoplespharmacy.com)
  • In recent years, Amnesty International has been a global leader in spotlighting and advocating on issues of persons with albinism. (amnesty.ca)
  • He has more than 35 years of mining and geological experience gained across Canada, the United States, and South America. (canadianminingjournal.com)
  • Over the years, we have progressively introduced different voting options and services to accommodate the needs of all Canadians. (elections.ca)
  • Of 109,283 HIV patients with 723,441 person-years (pys) of follow-up, 20% were HCV co-infected, 6% HBV co-infected, 2% triple-infected, 451 developed HCC. (natap.org)
  • Notwithstanding his pacifist beliefs, there is no indication he ever objected to let alone spoke out against the mass internment of thousands of Ukrainians in Canada during the War years. (mondialisation.ca)
  • At Migration Concerns Canada Inc, Mr. Khalid Naseer is a member in good standings of the Immigration Consultants of Canada Regulatory Council (ICCRC) and is working as an immigration counsel for the past ten years. (canadianculture.com)
  • Studies done in the past 35 years have found that, in general, Indigenous people in Canada have shorter life spans than non-Indigenous people. (thebodypro.com)
  • After 10 years, Give Green Canada (G2) is winding down at Tides Canada. (tidescanada.org)
  • The overall crude mortality rate was 28.57 per 1000 person-years, the SMR was 3.22 and the life expectancy was 34.53 years. (ubc.ca)
  • Eighty per cent of people die within two to five years of being diagnosed with ALS because the disease has no effective treatment or cure. (als.ca)
  • Mortality was particularly higher in younger people with MS (18-39 years of age). (mssociety.ca)
  • Please note that some content on this website contains language, information and images related to sexuality and drug use, and may not be intended for people of all ages. (catie.ca)
  • The Specialist, Person-Centred Experience, is the content lead responsible for subject matter and plays a key leadership role in the successful delivery of the Patient Experience and Survivorship Initiatives as well as contributing to the overall work of the Person-Centred Portfolio. (ohpe.ca)
  • As compared to HIV-monoinfected persons, PWH co-infected with HBV and/or HCV had substantially greater age-related cumulative incidence of HCC in all 3 periods (Figure). (natap.org)
  • The Catalyst Canada Honours recognize innovative organizational initiatives that address the recruitment, development and advancement of all women in business. (pwc.com)
  • Michael O'Brien, in his 1993 booklet The Family and the New Totalitarianism, warned his Canadian readers of a new form of totalitarianism that they might not recognize as such. (crisismagazine.com)
  • It's incredibly powerful when you've been called a freak your whole life to then find yourself being desired," explains Rebecca Hammond, a researcher currently working on Trans PULSE , a large community-based project examining the challenges trans people face in accessing health and social services. (thebody.com)
  • Five focus groups were conducted with 22 recruited community health care professionals and school personnel in 5 Mi'kmaq communities in Unama'ki (Cape Breton), Nova Scotia, Canada, through a community-based participatory research design. (cdc.gov)
  • The number of reported Canadian cases of COVID-19 by regional health authority focusing on the parts of each authority where people actually live. (canadiangeographic.ca)
  • The Alberta bishops warned that some jurisdictions in Canada undermine the conscience rights of doctors and other health-care workers opposed to suicide. (ncregister.com)
  • Since 1965, Parkinson Canada has worked to provide support services and education to people living with Parkinson's disease, their families, and the health care professionals who treat them. (parkinson.ca)
  • Public Health Agency of Canada. (catie.ca)
  • Production of this Web site has been made possible through a financial contribution from the Public Health Agency of Canada . (catie.ca)
  • Factors associated with the sexual behavior of Canadian Aboriginal young people and their implications for health promotion. (nih.gov)
  • We conducted a secondary analysis of data from the 2003 British Columbia Adolescent Health Survey, a cross-sectional survey of young people in grades 7 through 12. (nih.gov)
  • The World Health Organisation (WHO) estimates that about 130 to 150 million people are chronically infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV), with 1.75 million people being newly infected every year, and a whopping 350,000 die each year of hepatitis C related liver disease (1,2). (erudit.org)
  • The short version is that people-centred health is a radical idea that health, healthcare and our health system should put people first. (fcpp.org)
  • It is based on the reality that each person manages and is responsible for their own health. (fcpp.org)
  • More specifically people centred means taking each piece of the health system puzzle and ensuring it is responsive to and respectful of the needs, the values and the perspectives of the patients. (fcpp.org)
  • FC: Why is our present healthcare system not a people-centred health system? (fcpp.org)
  • As this increasingly informed public begins to realize that the first priority of the current system is not the health of the people then they will demand change and the stakeholders will have to listen. (fcpp.org)
  • FC: When you say people should be controlling the money that pays for healthcare, what's your view on health savings accounts? (fcpp.org)
  • Thus a people-centred, funding model must be congruent with the answers to the five questions: What is health, what is the purpose of the health system, what are the principles of health, what type of working model best supports an informed client, and how do you manage a people-centred system? (fcpp.org)
  • I believe a health savings account approach could achieve the objectives of a people-centred System. (fcpp.org)
  • The Public Health Agency of Canada says 100 more people have become ill from Salmonella contamination linked to a recall of U.S.-grown onions, bringing the total number of confirmed cases to 339. (canadianmanufacturing.com)
  • We encourage you to follow the advice of the Government of Canada and local health authorities to stay safe and well during these challenging times. (cdss.ca)
  • Covid-19 has been reported in children and young people of all ages according to the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health (RCPCH). (childcarecanada.org)
  • Amnesty International and ESCR-Net welcome a ground-breaking decision of the UN Human Rights Committee, which, in upholding a complaint against Canada for breaching the right to life and non-discrimination, ruled that protecting the right to life requires states to ensure that people who lack a regular immigration status - also known as irregular migrants - have access to essential health care services. (amnesty.ca)
  • In the context of this case, as a minimum, States have an obligation to provide all persons with access to existing health care services that are reasonably available and accessible, where a lack of this access would expose a person to a reasonably foreseeable risk that can result in loss of life. (amnesty.ca)
  • The Committee directed Canada to review its national legislation to ensure that irregular migrants have access to essential health care in the circumstances outlined above. (amnesty.ca)
  • However, a team of Indigenous and non-Indigenous researchers has reviewed health-related information collected from HIV-positive people by clinics in B.C., Ontario and Quebec through a collaboration with the Canadian HIV Observational Cohort (CANOC). (thebodypro.com)
  • The team called for "immediate action" to identify the causes of death in order to find ways to improve the health of Indigenous HIV-positive people. (thebodypro.com)
  • Thanks to the participation and advice from Indigenous people, the research team developed what they called an "Indigenous Health Epidemiology Model" -- a framework that unites Indigenous and epidemiological perspectives. (thebodypro.com)
  • The dataset that the research team used was CANOC, which collects health-related data from many clinics in several provinces across Canada. (thebodypro.com)
  • Alberta Health Services said in a news release that an individual with a lab-confirmed case of measles who arrived on the Air Canada flight then rode in an airport shuttle to a hotel in nearby Leduc. (ohscanada.com)
  • The health agency said that person visited a Walmart in Leduc later that day, and left Edmonton on a Canadian North flight for Inuvik, N.W.T., on Feb. 13. (ohscanada.com)
  • Frankly, people shouldn't be getting measles in the 21st century in British Columbia and we have the means to deal with that," B.C. Health Minister Adrian Dix said at a news conference Sunday where he stressed the need for people to be immunized. (ohscanada.com)
  • Health officials in both Alberta and the Northwest Territories advised people who aren't vaccinated for measles and who may have been on board flights, in shuttles, at stores or hotels where the affected person was present to monitor themselves for symptoms. (ohscanada.com)
  • Furthermore, the observed health disparity held when adjusted for demographic, socioeconomic, and behavioural factors in Canada. (thevarsity.ca)
  • Paul Kim, a U of T medical student, recently published a paper in Health Equity about the social determinants of health disparities that affect Indigenous people in Canada. (thevarsity.ca)
  • He discussed his findings with The Varsity , highlighting the need for Canadians, especially those in health care, to understand the historical context that underpins the health outcomes for Indigenous people seen today. (thevarsity.ca)
  • Mental illness costs Canada over $50 billion annually in health-care costs, lost productivity and reductions in health-related quality of life. (cpa-apc.org)
  • There are 7.5 million Canadians who live with a mental health problem or illness, which is twice the number of people in all age groups with heart disease or type-2 diabetes. (cpa-apc.org)
  • People who use illicit drugs (PWUD) are vulnerable to an array of health-related harms. (springer.com)
  • Part One explores mental health promotion for people with mental illness. (cwhn.ca)
  • She understands the needs and aspirations of young people living with diabetes and speaks passionately on their behalf. (diabetes.ca)
  • Macadamian was selected as a Top Employer for Young People based on Mediacorp's evaluation of the programs we have to attract and retain younger workers. (prweb.com)
  • White Feather books encourage young people to learn about Native history, including dark episodes with lasting impacts. (tradebit.com)
  • So we hire, train and develop young people with a broad skill-set, a willingness to learn, and always with a high level to achieve. (huffingtonpost.ca)
  • Almost half of Grade 6 to 10 young people in Canada are physically inactive, with the problem being particularly worrisome in girls and older students. (canada.ca)
  • Young people living with both parents are less likely to be involved with bullying. (canada.ca)
  • Young people who report having peers with higher levels of pro-social attitudes are much less likely to be involved in bullying. (canada.ca)
  • Problems of inactivity, poor nutrition, and obesity are particularly apparent in young people from homes with the lowest level of family affluence . (canada.ca)
  • Young people from families with greater affluence report higher rates of serious injury, as well as higher rates of bullying. (canada.ca)
  • What do we conclude for Canadian young people? (canada.ca)
  • Sexual behavior change interventions for Aboriginal young people must move beyond the individual and incorporate interpersonal and structural dimensions. (nih.gov)
  • Young people living on land reserves need special attention. (nih.gov)
  • Young people today are sophisticated users of the Internet, using this medium with ease and enthusiasm. (gc.ca)
  • That's why the Asia Pacific Privacy Authorities (APPA) forum , which includes the Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada, has made Privacy Resources for Young People the theme of Privacy Awareness Week 2012, April 29 - May 5. (gc.ca)
  • Since 2008 our Office has been developing a variety of tools designed to teach young people about the relevance and importance of privacy when using modern technologies. (gc.ca)
  • Dans cet article, je soutiens que la position du gouvernement du Canada contre le dépistage du virus de l'hépatite C (VHC) et le financement public de son traitement est éthiquement injustifiable. (erudit.org)
  • Most Canadians fail to see the new and oncoming totalitarianism because it is fed to them in the deceptive context of diversity and inclusivity. (crisismagazine.com)
  • In this article, I argue that the Canadian government's position against screening for hepatitis C virus (HCV) and publicly funding HCV treatment is ethically unjustifiable. (erudit.org)
  • The most common ways that people become infected were through receiving blood transfusions in Canada before 1992 and before blood was effectively screened for hepatitis C, or receiving a blood transfusion in a country where procedures for screening blood are insufficient. (erudit.org)
  • Caring for the dying does not include killing them or helping them kill themselves," Bishop Douglas Crosby of Hamilton, the president of the Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops, told the Canadian Parliament on Jan. 20. (ncregister.com)
  • Elections Canada is an independent, non-partisan agency that reports directly to the Parliament of Canada. (elections.ca)
  • Following each election, the Chief Electoral Officer of Canada reports to Parliament and makes recommendations on how to further improve the electoral system. (elections.ca)
  • The Privacy Commissioner of Canada is an Agent of Parliament whose mission is to protect and promote privacy rights. (gc.ca)
  • The Lexpert/American Lawyer Guide to the Leading 500 Lawyers in Canada identifies the "Most Frequently Recommended" lawyers, based on peer surveys in approximately 35 practice areas. (canadianlawyermag.com)
  • Memorial University will be home to seven new Canada Research Chairs, including Dr. Thormod Johansen, who is coming to Canada from Norway where he worked as an advisor and senior engineer for a number of petroleum companies, and specialized in developing simulation software. (mun.ca)
  • As Canada Research Chair in Petroleum Reservoir Engineering and Characterization at Memorial University, he will work on the development of new simulation methodologies and tools that apply to the entire lifecycle of an oil or gas field, from discovery to abandonment. (mun.ca)
  • and Dr. Paul V. R. Snelgrove, Canada Research Chair in Boreal and Cold Ocean Systems, Dr. Neil Bose, Canada Research Chair in Offshore and Underwater Vehicles Design, Dr. Dale Corbett, Canada Research Chair in Stroke and Neuroplasticity and Dr. Rangaswamy Seshadri, Canada Research Chair in Asset Integrity Management. (mun.ca)
  • Dr. Bertolo's focus as the Canada Research Chair in Metabolism and Nutrition, will be to improve understanding of the role of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) in whole body amino acid metabolism. (mun.ca)
  • Dr. Neil Bose's vision as Canada Research Chair in Offshore and Underwater Vehicles Design is to build strongly interrelated research teams in both underwater vehicle design and offshore vehicle design. (mun.ca)
  • Dr. Dale Corbett, Canada Research Chair in Stroke and Neuroplasticity, will investigate novel combinations of intensive rehabilitation and drug therapy to enhance the repair processes of the brain. (mun.ca)
  • For more information on Memorial's new Canada Research Chairs, or on the chairs program, see www.chairs.gc.ca/ . (mun.ca)
  • The bishop said the Canadian government should prioritize palliative care, fund further research and education in pain relief and advance suicide-prevention programs. (ncregister.com)
  • Liston is part of a four-person NSF team led by Shari Gearheard, an Arctic geographer and research scientist at the University of Colorado National Snow and Ice Data Center, who lives on the island. (phys.org)
  • When people ask what will happen to their corpses if they're donated to a "body farm" for research, Dr. Shari Forbes provides them with as much, or as little detail, as they wish. (lfpress.com)
  • Therefore, more research will be needed to find out exactly why HIV-positive Indigenous people are dying prematurely. (thebodypro.com)
  • Finally, this study paves a path for further research to assess ICU admissions in people not only in Manitoba but across the county. (mssociety.ca)
  • You will probably find that the people react to your cancer diagnosis in different ways. (cancer.ca)
  • When all the interesting people leave, then we ll find out that Whistler s not that special. (piquenewsmagazine.com)
  • Q. How can I find reliable Canadian online pharmacies? (peoplespharmacy.com)
  • But how can people find reliable Canadian online pharmacies? (peoplespharmacy.com)
  • Read our Privacy policy and Terms and conditions of use to find out more about your privacy and rights when using the priv.gc.ca website or contacting the Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada. (gc.ca)
  • Also, they are using someone with nothing down on possible interest only payments with a history of non-payment and comparing them to a problem where people using non-traditional lenders with more than 20% down are hard to track so you can't find the total of 'the problem' when the example person obviously had to pay the largest CMHC insurance available. (blogspot.com)
  • Despite facing the highest number of attacks on persons with albinism, SADC member states have not yet successfully developed a coordinated approach in cross border collaboration for combatting and responding to attacks against persons with albinism. (amnesty.ca)
  • The results of the online survey have been statistically weighted according to the most current education, age, gender and region Census data to ensure samples representative of the entire adult population of Canada. (bacontoday.com)
  • The risk of reinfection is relatively low for the general population (1.1%), except for persons with HIV coinfection which increases the risk to about 21.7% (9). (erudit.org)
  • What makes this history all the more outrageous is the notion that the Canadian population were quite comfortable with this state of affairs. (mondialisation.ca)
  • Older people are at an increased risk of nail alterations, including normal age-related changes and disorders that more commonly affect this specific population. (cfp.ca)
  • Australia, New Zealand, Canada, and the USA differ in how they define indigenous, their method of operationalising the definitions, and how they adjust the death and population statistics to allow for known problems. (aihw.gov.au)
  • In Canada, by contrast, major system changes would be required to obtain national data on the population and deaths of all the indigenous subgroups. (aihw.gov.au)
  • Researchers also noted that people with MS were younger on average than the general population when admitted to the ICU. (mssociety.ca)
  • Amnesty has pressed governments in the Southern African region to address failures which leave people with albinism at the mercy of criminal gangs. (amnesty.ca)
  • This type of slavery affects people who are illegally recruited by individuals, governments or political parties and forced to work - usually under threat of violence or other penalties. (partnersinternational.ca)