Campylobacter jejuni: A species of bacteria that resemble small tightly coiled spirals. Its organisms are known to cause abortion in sheep and fever and enteritis in man and may be associated with enteric diseases of calves, lambs, and other animals.Campylobacter Infections: Infections with bacteria of the genus CAMPYLOBACTER.Campylobacter: A genus of bacteria found in the reproductive organs, intestinal tract, and oral cavity of animals and man. Some species are pathogenic.Campylobacter fetus: A species of bacteria present in man and many kinds of animals and birds, often causing infertility and/or abortion.Campylobacter coli: A species of gram-negative, rod-shaped bacteria isolated from the intestinal tract of swine, poultry, and man. It may be pathogenic.Enteritis: Inflammation of any segment of the SMALL INTESTINE.Guillain-Barre Syndrome: An acute inflammatory autoimmune neuritis caused by T cell- mediated cellular immune response directed towards peripheral myelin. Demyelination occurs in peripheral nerves and nerve roots. The process is often preceded by a viral or bacterial infection, surgery, immunization, lymphoma, or exposure to toxins. Common clinical manifestations include progressive weakness, loss of sensation, and loss of deep tendon reflexes. Weakness of respiratory muscles and autonomic dysfunction may occur. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp1312-1314)Chickens: Common name for the species Gallus gallus, the domestic fowl, in the family Phasianidae, order GALLIFORMES. It is descended from the red jungle fowl of SOUTHEAST ASIA.Poultry Diseases: Diseases of birds which are raised as a source of meat or eggs for human consumption and are usually found in barnyards, hatcheries, etc. The concept is differentiated from BIRD DISEASES which is for diseases of birds not considered poultry and usually found in zoos, parks, and the wild.Campylobacter lari: A species of thermophilic CAMPYLOBACTER found in healthy seagulls and causing ENTERITIS in humans.Flagellin: A protein with a molecular weight of 40,000 isolated from bacterial flagella. At appropriate pH and salt concentration, three flagellin monomers can spontaneously reaggregate to form structures which appear identical to intact flagella.Feces: Excrement from the INTESTINES, containing unabsorbed solids, waste products, secretions, and BACTERIA of the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.Food Microbiology: The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in food and food products. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms: the presence of various non-pathogenic bacteria and fungi in cheeses and wines, for example, is included in this concept.Polyradiculoneuropathy: Diseases characterized by injury or dysfunction involving multiple peripheral nerves and nerve roots. The process may primarily affect myelin or nerve axons. Two of the more common demyelinating forms are acute inflammatory polyradiculopathy (GUILLAIN-BARRE SYNDROME) and POLYRADICULONEUROPATHY, CHRONIC INFLAMMATORY DEMYELINATING. Polyradiculoneuritis refers to inflammation of multiple peripheral nerves and spinal nerve roots.DNA, Bacterial: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.Poultry: Domesticated birds raised for food. It typically includes CHICKENS; TURKEYS, DUCKS; GEESE; and others.Bacterial Proteins: Proteins found in any species of bacterium.Bacterial Typing Techniques: Procedures for identifying types and strains of bacteria. The most frequently employed typing systems are BACTERIOPHAGE TYPING and SEROTYPING as well as bacteriocin typing and biotyping.Diarrhea: An increased liquidity or decreased consistency of FECES, such as running stool. Fecal consistency is related to the ratio of water-holding capacity of insoluble solids to total water, rather than the amount of water present. Diarrhea is not hyperdefecation or increased fecal weight.Poultry Products: Food products manufactured from poultry.Miller Fisher Syndrome: A variant of the GUILLAIN-BARRE SYNDROME characterized by the acute onset of oculomotor dysfunction, ataxia, and loss of deep tendon reflexes with relative sparing of strength in the extremities and trunk. The ataxia is produced by peripheral sensory nerve dysfunction and not by cerebellar injury. Facial weakness and sensory loss may also occur. The process is mediated by autoantibodies directed against a component of myelin found in peripheral nerves. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1313; Neurology 1987 Sep;37(9):1493-8)Cecum: The blind sac or outpouching area of the LARGE INTESTINE that is below the entrance of the SMALL INTESTINE. It has a worm-like extension, the vermiform APPENDIX.Serotyping: Process of determining and distinguishing species of bacteria or viruses based on antigens they share.Abattoirs: Places where animals are slaughtered and dressed for market.Gastroenteritis: INFLAMMATION of any segment of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT from ESOPHAGUS to RECTUM. Causes of gastroenteritis are many including genetic, infection, HYPERSENSITIVITY, drug effects, and CANCER.Flagella: A whiplike motility appendage present on the surface cells. Prokaryote flagella are composed of a protein called FLAGELLIN. Bacteria can have a single flagellum, a tuft at one pole, or multiple flagella covering the entire surface. In eukaryotes, flagella are threadlike protoplasmic extensions used to propel flagellates and sperm. Flagella have the same basic structure as CILIA but are longer in proportion to the cell bearing them and present in much smaller numbers. (From King & Stansfield, A Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)Cloaca: A dilated cavity extended caudally from the hindgut. In adult birds, reptiles, amphibians, and many fishes but few mammals, cloaca is a common chamber into which the digestive, urinary and reproductive tracts discharge their contents. In most mammals, cloaca gives rise to LARGE INTESTINE; URINARY BLADDER; and GENITALIA.Hippurates: Salts and esters of hippuric acid.Arcobacter: A genus of gram-negative, aerotolerant, spiral-shaped bacteria isolated from water and associated with diarrhea in humans and animals.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Colony Count, Microbial: Enumeration by direct count of viable, isolated bacterial, archaeal, or fungal CELLS or SPORES capable of growth on solid CULTURE MEDIA. The method is used routinely by environmental microbiologists for quantifying organisms in AIR; FOOD; and WATER; by clinicians for measuring patients' microbial load; and in antimicrobial drug testing.Genes, Bacterial: The functional hereditary units of BACTERIA.Electrophoresis, Gel, Pulsed-Field: Gel electrophoresis in which the direction of the electric field is changed periodically. This technique is similar to other electrophoretic methods normally used to separate double-stranded DNA molecules ranging in size up to tens of thousands of base-pairs. However, by alternating the electric field direction one is able to separate DNA molecules up to several million base-pairs in length.Drug Resistance, Bacterial: The ability of bacteria to resist or to become tolerant to chemotherapeutic agents, antimicrobial agents, or antibiotics. This resistance may be acquired through gene mutation or foreign DNA in transmissible plasmids (R FACTORS).Meat: The edible portions of any animal used for food including domestic mammals (the major ones being cattle, swine, and sheep) along with poultry, fish, shellfish, and game.Culture Media: Any liquid or solid preparation made specifically for the growth, storage, or transport of microorganisms or other types of cells. The variety of media that exist allow for the culturing of specific microorganisms and cell types, such as differential media, selective media, test media, and defined media. Solid media consist of liquid media that have been solidified with an agent such as AGAR or GELATIN.Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.Anti-Bacterial Agents: Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.Animals, Domestic: Animals which have become adapted through breeding in captivity to a life intimately associated with humans. They include animals domesticated by humans to live and breed in a tame condition on farms or ranches for economic reasons, including LIVESTOCK (specifically CATTLE; SHEEP; HORSES; etc.), POULTRY; and those raised or kept for pleasure and companionship, e.g., PETS; or specifically DOGS; CATS; etc.Bacterial Adhesion: Physicochemical property of fimbriated (FIMBRIAE, BACTERIAL) and non-fimbriated bacteria of attaching to cells, tissue, and nonbiological surfaces. It is a factor in bacterial colonization and pathogenicity.Erythromycin: A bacteriostatic antibiotic macrolide produced by Streptomyces erythreus. Erythromycin A is considered its major active component. In sensitive organisms, it inhibits protein synthesis by binding to 50S ribosomal subunits. This binding process inhibits peptidyl transferase activity and interferes with translocation of amino acids during translation and assembly of proteins.Microbial Sensitivity Tests: Any tests that demonstrate the relative efficacy of different chemotherapeutic agents against specific microorganisms (i.e., bacteria, fungi, viruses).Foodborne Diseases: Acute illnesses, usually affecting the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT, brought on by consuming contaminated food or beverages. Most of these diseases are infectious, caused by a variety of bacteria, viruses, or parasites that can be foodborne. Sometimes the diseases are caused by harmful toxins from the microbes or other chemicals present in the food. Especially in the latter case, the condition is often called food poisoning.Polymerase Chain Reaction: In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.Multilocus Sequence Typing: Direct nucleotide sequencing of gene fragments from multiple housekeeping genes for the purpose of phylogenetic analysis, organism identification, and typing of species, strain, serovar, or other distinguishable phylogenetic level.Ciprofloxacin: A broad-spectrum antimicrobial carboxyfluoroquinoline.Molecular Mimicry: The structure of one molecule that imitates or simulates the structure of a different molecule.Food Contamination: The presence in food of harmful, unpalatable, or otherwise objectionable foreign substances, e.g. chemicals, microorganisms or diluents, before, during, or after processing or storage.Campylobacter hyointestinalis: A species of CAMPYLOBACTER isolated from the INTESTINES of PIGS with proliferative ENTERITIS. It is also found in CATTLE and in CRICETINAE and can cause enteritis in humans.Bacterial Shedding: The expelling of bacteria from the body. Important routes include the respiratory tract, genital tract, and intestinal tract.Bacteriological Techniques: Techniques used in studying bacteria.Virulence: The degree of pathogenicity within a group or species of microorganisms or viruses as indicated by case fatality rates and/or the ability of the organism to invade the tissues of the host. The pathogenic capacity of an organism is determined by its VIRULENCE FACTORS.G(M1) Ganglioside: A specific monosialoganglioside that accumulates abnormally within the nervous system due to a deficiency of GM1-b-galactosidase, resulting in GM1 gangliosidosis.Antibodies, Bacterial: Immunoglobulins produced in a response to BACTERIAL ANTIGENS.Species Specificity: The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.Gangliosides: A subclass of ACIDIC GLYCOSPHINGOLIPIDS. They contain one or more sialic acid (N-ACETYLNEURAMINIC ACID) residues. Using the Svennerholm system of abbrevations, gangliosides are designated G for ganglioside, plus subscript M, D, or T for mono-, di-, or trisialo, respectively, the subscript letter being followed by a subscript arabic numeral to indicated sequence of migration in thin-layer chromatograms. (From Oxford Dictionary of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 1997)Abortion, Septic: Any type of abortion, induced or spontaneous, that is associated with infection of the UTERUS and its appendages. It is characterized by FEVER, uterine tenderness, and foul discharge.Campylobacter rectus: A species of CAMPYLOBACTER isolated from cases of human PERIODONTITIS. It is a microaerophile, capable of respiring with OXYGEN.DNA Fingerprinting: A technique for identifying individuals of a species that is based on the uniqueness of their DNA sequence. Uniqueness is determined by identifying which combination of allelic variations occur in the individual at a statistically relevant number of different loci. In forensic studies, RESTRICTION FRAGMENT LENGTH POLYMORPHISM of multiple, highly polymorphic VNTR LOCI or MICROSATELLITE REPEAT loci are analyzed. The number of loci used for the profile depends on the ALLELE FREQUENCY in the population.Gene Expression Regulation, Bacterial: Any of the processes by which cytoplasmic or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in bacteria.Polymorphism, Restriction Fragment Length: Variation occurring within a species in the presence or length of DNA fragment generated by a specific endonuclease at a specific site in the genome. Such variations are generated by mutations that create or abolish recognition sites for these enzymes or change the length of the fragment.Microbial Viability: Ability of a microbe to survive under given conditions. This can also be related to a colony's ability to replicate.Cattle: Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.Genome, Bacterial: The genetic complement of a BACTERIA as represented in its DNA.Food Handling: Any aspect of the operations in the preparation, processing, transport, storage, packaging, wrapping, exposure for sale, service, or delivery of food.Intestines: The section of the alimentary canal from the STOMACH to the ANAL CANAL. It includes the LARGE INTESTINE and SMALL INTESTINE.Truncated Hemoglobins: A family of hemoglobin-like proteins found in BACTERIA; PLANTS; and unicellular eukaryotes. Truncated hemoglobins are distantly related to vertebrate hemoglobins and are typically shorter than vertebrate hemoglobins by 20-40 residues.Water Microbiology: The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in water. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms.Milk: The white liquid secreted by the mammary glands. It contains proteins, sugar, lipids, vitamins, and minerals.Antigens, Bacterial: Substances elaborated by bacteria that have antigenic activity.Bahrain: An independent state, an archipelago in the western Persian Gulf, northwest of Qatar. It comprises low-lying islands of Bahrain (the largest), Muharraq, Sitra, and several islets. It has extensive oil fields. The name comes from the Arabic al-bahrayn, "the two seas", with reference to its lying in the middle of a bay with its "two seas" east and west of it. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p107 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p45)Virulence Factors: Those components of an organism that determine its capacity to cause disease but are not required for its viability per se. Two classes have been characterized: TOXINS, BIOLOGICAL and surface adhesion molecules that effect the ability of the microorganism to invade and colonize a host. (From Davis et al., Microbiology, 4th ed. p486)Lipopolysaccharides: Lipid-containing polysaccharides which are endotoxins and important group-specific antigens. They are often derived from the cell wall of gram-negative bacteria and induce immunoglobulin secretion. The lipopolysaccharide molecule consists of three parts: LIPID A, core polysaccharide, and O-specific chains (O ANTIGENS). When derived from Escherichia coli, lipopolysaccharides serve as polyclonal B-cell mitogens commonly used in laboratory immunology. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Anti-Infective Agents: Substances that prevent infectious agents or organisms from spreading or kill infectious agents in order to prevent the spread of infection.Disease Reservoirs: Animate or inanimate sources which normally harbor disease-causing organisms and thus serve as potential sources of disease outbreaks. Reservoirs are distinguished from vectors (DISEASE VECTORS) and carriers, which are agents of disease transmission rather than continuing sources of potential disease outbreaks.Turkeys: Large woodland game BIRDS in the subfamily Meleagridinae, family Phasianidae, order GALLIFORMES. Formerly they were considered a distinct family, Melegrididae.Salmonella: A genus of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that utilizes citrate as a sole carbon source. It is pathogenic for humans, causing enteric fevers, gastroenteritis, and bacteremia. Food poisoning is the most common clinical manifestation. Organisms within this genus are separated on the basis of antigenic characteristics, sugar fermentation patterns, and bacteriophage susceptibility.Disease Outbreaks: Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Cytotoxins: Substances that are toxic to cells; they may be involved in immunity or may be contained in venoms. These are distinguished from CYTOSTATIC AGENTS in degree of effect. Some of them are used as CYTOTOXIC ANTIBIOTICS. The mechanism of action of many of these are as ALKYLATING AGENTS or MITOSIS MODULATORS.Nalidixic Acid: A synthetic 1,8-naphthyridine antimicrobial agent with a limited bacteriocidal spectrum. It is an inhibitor of the A subunit of bacterial DNA GYRASE.Drug Resistance, Microbial: The ability of microorganisms, especially bacteria, to resist or to become tolerant to chemotherapeutic agents, antimicrobial agents, or antibiotics. This resistance may be acquired through gene mutation or foreign DNA in transmissible plasmids (R FACTORS).Animal Husbandry: The science of breeding, feeding and care of domestic animals; includes housing and nutrition.Genotype: The genetic constitution of the individual, comprising the ALLELES present at each GENETIC LOCUS.RNA, Ribosomal, 23S: Constituent of 50S subunit of prokaryotic ribosomes containing about 3200 nucleotides. 23S rRNA is involved in the initiation of polypeptide synthesis.

Cloning and expression of the dnaK gene of Campylobacter jejuni and antigenicity of heat shock protein 70. (1/1435)

Campylobacter jejuni is a leading cause of infectious diarrhea throughout the world. In addition, there is growing evidence that Guillain-Barre syndrome, an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the peripheral nervous system, is frequently preceded by C. jejuni infection. In the present study, the hrcA-grpE-dnaK gene cluster of C. jejuni was cloned and sequenced. The dnaK gene consists of an open reading frame of 1,869 bp and encodes a protein with a high degree of homology to other bacterial 70-kDa heat shock proteins (HSPs). The overall percentages of identity to the HSP70 proteins of Helicobacter pylori, Borrelia burgdorferi, Chlamydia trachomatis, and Bacillus subtilis were calculated to be 78.1, 60.5, 57.2, and 53. 8%, respectively. Regions similar to the Escherichia coli sigma70 promoter consensus sequence and to a cis-acting regulatory element (CIRCE) are located upstream of the hrcA gene. Following heat shock, a rapid increase of dnaK mRNA was detectable, which reached its maximum after 20 to 30 min. A 6-His-tagged recombinant DnaK protein (rCjDnaK-His) was generated in E. coli, after cloning of the dnaK coding region into pET-22b(+), and purified by affinity and gel filtration chromatography. Antibody responses to rCjDnaK-His were significantly elevated, compared to those of healthy individuals, in about one-third of the serum specimens obtained from C. jejuni enteritis patients.  (+info)

Physiological characterization of viable-but-nonculturable Campylobacter jejuni cells. (2/1435)

Campylobacter jejuni is a pathogenic, microaerophilic, gram-negative, mesophilic bacterium. Three strains isolated from humans with enteric campylobacteriosis were able to survive at high population levels (10(7) cells ml-1) as viable-but-nonculturable (VBNC) forms in microcosm water. The VBNC forms of the three C. jejuni strains were enumerated and characterized by using 5-cyano-2,3-ditolyl tetrazolium chloride-4',6-diamino-2-phenylindole staining. Cellular volume, adenylate energy charge, internal pH, intracellular potassium concentration, and membrane potential values were determined in stationary-phase cell suspensions after 48 h of culture on Columbia agar and after 1 to 30 days of incubation in microcosm water and compared. A notable increase in cell volume was observed with the VBNC state; the average cell volumes were 1.73 microliter mg of protein-1 for the culturable form and 10.96 microliter mg of protein-1 after 30 days of incubation in microcosm water. Both the internal potassium content and the membrane potential were significantly lower in the VBNC state than in the culturable state. Culturable cells were able to maintain a difference of 0.6 to 0.9 pH unit between the internal and external pH values; with VBNC cells this difference decreased progressively with time of incubation in microcosm water. Measurements of the cellular adenylate nucleotide concentrations revealed that the cells had a low adenylate energy charge (0.66 to 0.26) after 1 day of incubation in microcosm water, and AMP was the only nucleotide detected in the three strains after 30 days of incubation in microcosm water.  (+info)

Evaluation of accuracy and repeatability of identification of food-borne pathogens by automated bacterial identification systems. (3/1435)

The performances of five automated microbial identification systems, relative to that of a reference identification system, for their ability to accurately and repeatedly identify six common food-borne pathogens were assessed. The systems assessed were the MicroLog system (Biolog Inc., Hayward, Calif.), the Microbial Identification System (MIS; MIDI Inc., Newark, Del.), the VITEK system (bioMerieux Vitek, Hazelwood, Mo.), the MicroScan WalkAway 40 system (Dade-MicroScan International, West Sacramento, Calif.), and the Replianalyzer system (Oxoid Inc., Nepean, Ontario, Canada). The sensitivities and specificities of these systems for the identification of food-borne isolates of Bacillus cereus, Campylobacter jejuni, Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella spp., and verotoxigenic Escherichia coli were determined with 40 reference positive isolates and 40 reference negative isolates for each pathogen. The sensitivities of these systems for the identification of these pathogens ranged from 42.5 to 100%, and the specificities of these systems for the identification of these pathogens ranged from 32.5 to 100%. Some of the systems had difficulty correctly identifying the reference isolates when the results were compared to those from the reference identification tests. The sensitivity of MIS for the identification of S. aureus, B. cereus, E. coli, and C. jejuni, for example, ranged from 47.5 to 72. 5%. The sensitivity of the Microlog system for the identification of E. coli was 72.5%, and the sensitivity of the VITEK system for the identification of B. cereus was 42.5%. The specificities of four of the five systems for the identification of all of the species tested with the available databases were greater than or equal to 97.5%; the exception was MIS for the identification of C. jejuni, which displayed a specificity of 32.5% when it was tested with reference negative isolates including Campylobacter coli and other Campylobacter species. All systems had >80% sensitivities for the identification of Salmonella species and Listeria species at the genus level. The repeatability of these systems for the identification of test isolates ranged from 30 to 100%. Not all systems included all six pathogens in their databases; thus, some species could not be tested with all systems. The choice of automated microbial identification system for the identification of a food-borne pathogen would depend on the availability of identification libraries within the systems and the performance of the systems for the identification of the pathogen.  (+info)

Cloning, mutation and distribution of a putative lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis locus in Campylobacter jejuni. (4/1435)

A region encoding ORFs with homology to known lipopolysaccharide (LPS) biosynthesis genes was isolated from two strains of Campylobacter jejuni. One of the strains produces LPS, but the second strain is reported to produce only lipooligosaccharide (LOS) and therefore lacks the O-chain. The two strains shared six predicted ORFs, but an additional ORF, orfE, of unknown function was identified in the LOS-producing strain. Mutation of the shared wbeE (rfbE) homologue (orfF) or deletion of five of the seven genes reduced core reactivity with specific antiserum without affecting O-chain production. Mutation of either the capD homologue (orfG) or the unique orfE had no detectable effect on LOS or LPS production. The presence or absence of orfE in 36 isolates of C. jejuni did not correlate with LOS/LPS phenotype or serotype. However, after insertion of orfE into a LPS-producing orfE-negative strain the O-chain ladder was no longer detectable on Western blots. We were not able to disrupt the wbaP (rfbP) homologue (orfC) in C jejuni.  (+info)

Campylobacter jejuni--an emerging foodborne pathogen. (5/1435)

Campylobacter jejuni is the most commonly reported bacterial cause of foodborne infection in the United States. Adding to the human and economic costs are chronic sequelae associated with C. jejuni infection--Guillian-Barre syndrome and reactive arthritis. In addition, an increasing proportion of human infections caused by C. jejuni are resistant to antimicrobial therapy. Mishandling of raw poultry and consumption of undercooked poultry are the major risk factors for human campylobacteriosis. Efforts to prevent human illness are needed throughout each link in the food chain.  (+info)

The risk of Guillain-Barre syndrome following infection with Campylobacter jejuni. (6/1435)

To estimate the incidence of Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS) following Campylobacter jejuni infection (CI) we studied three populations where outbreaks of CI had occurred involving an estimated 8000 cases. No case of GBS was detected in the 6 months following the outbreaks in the local populations. The point estimate for the risk of GBS following CI estimated in this study was 0 in 8000 (95% confidence interval 0-3).  (+info)

Detection of cytolethal distending toxin activity and cdt genes in Campylobacter spp. isolated from chicken carcasses. (7/1435)

This study was designed to determine whether isolates from chicken carcasses, the primary source of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli in human infections, commonly carry the cdt genes and also whether active cytolethal distending toxin (CDT) is produced by these isolates. Campylobacter spp. were isolated from all 91 fresh chicken carcasses purchased from local supermarkets. Campylobacter spp. were identified on the basis of both biochemical and PCR tests. Of the 105 isolates, 70 (67%) were identified as C. jejuni, and 35 (33%) were identified as C. coli. PCR tests amplified portions of the cdt genes from all 105 isolates. Restriction analysis of PCR products indicated that there appeared to be species-specific differences between the C. jejuni and C. coli cdt genes, but that the restriction patterns of the cdt genes within strains of the same species were almost invariant. Quantitation of active CDT levels produced by the isolates indicated that all C. jejuni strains except four (94%) had mean CDT titers greater than 100. Only one C. jejuni strain appeared to produce no active CDT. C. coli isolates produced little or no toxin. These results confirm the high rate of Campylobacter sp. contamination of fresh chicken carcasses and indicate that cdt genes may be universally present in C. jejuni and C. coli isolates from chicken carcasses.  (+info)

Detection of small numbers of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli cells in environmental water, sewage, and food samples by a seminested PCR assay. (8/1435)

A rapid and sensitive assay was developed for detection of small numbers of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli cells in environmental water, sewage, and food samples. Water and sewage samples were filtered, and the filters were enriched overnight in a nonselective medium. The enrichment cultures were prepared for PCR by a rapid and simple procedure consisting of centrifugation, proteinase K treatment, and boiling. A seminested PCR based on specific amplification of the intergenic sequence between the two Campylobacter flagellin genes, flaA and flaB, was performed, and the PCR products were visualized by agarose gel electrophoresis. The assay allowed us to detect 3 to 15 CFU of C. jejuni per 100 ml in water samples containing a background flora consisting of up to 8, 700 heterotrophic organisms per ml and 10,000 CFU of coliform bacteria per 100 ml. Dilution of the enriched cultures 1:10 with sterile broth prior to the PCR was sometimes necessary to obtain positive results. The assay was also conducted with food samples analyzed with or without overnight enrichment. As few as +info)

Campylobacter jejuni subsp. jejuni ATCC ® 43446D-5™ Designation: Genomic DNA from Campylobacter jejuni subsp. jejuni Strain MK104 TypeStrain=False Application:
Campylobacter jejuni subsp. jejuni ATCC ® 43432D-5™ Designation: Genomic DNA from Campylobacter jejuni subsp. jejuni Strain MK7 TypeStrain=False Application:
An example of the difficulty and complexity associated with pseudogene designation is observed when viewing the CDSs Cj0522, Cj0523 and Cj0524 within C. jejuni NCTC11168. These three CDSs are represented as one whole CDS on a single frame within C. jejuni RM1221 (Cje0628). The three CDSs are large enough to be represented as individual CDSs and in C. jejuni NCTC11168 have been represented on more than one frame. The question can be asked as to whether these CDSs (which are intact in C. jejuni RM1221), represent a pseudogene in C. jejuni NCTC11168. Given the fact that in C. jejuni RM1221 these three CDSs do actually code for a product (Na/Pi-cotransporter, putative), it is more likely that they represent a pseudogene in C. jejuni NCTC11168. In this re-annotation, our intention was to carry out a full mark up of existing pseudogenes, however, the potential for a pseudogene has been noted.. The frequency and importance of pseudogene formation in microorganisms has attained added significance in ...
Campylobacter jejuni infection causes cramping, diarrhea, abdominal pain and fever within 2 to 5 days after a person has been exposed to the organism. Campylobacter jejuni is one of the most common bacterial causes of diarrhea. Most cases of Campylobacter jejuni come from handling or ingesting raw or undercooked poultry meat. Although poultry and other birds are not affected by the bacterium, other animals can be. Therefore, it is possible for a person to acquire the infection from contact with infected stool of an ill cat or dog. This is what campylobacter organisms look like through a microscope. (Image courtesy of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Population structure and attribution of human clinical Campylobacter jejuni isolates from central Europe to livestock and environmental sources. AU - Kovac, J.. AU - Stessl, B.. AU - Čadež, N.. AU - Gruntar, I.. AU - Cimerman, M.. AU - Stingl, K.. AU - Lušicky, M.. AU - Ocepek, M.. AU - Wagner, M.. AU - Smole Možina, S.. PY - 2018/2/1. Y1 - 2018/2/1. N2 - Campylobacter jejuni is among the most prevalent causes of human bacterial gastroenteritis worldwide. Domesticated animals and, especially, chicken meat are considered to be the main sources of infections. However, the contribution of surface waters and wildlife in C. jejuni transmission to humans is not well understood. We have evaluated the source attribution potential of a six-gene multiplex PCR (mPCR) method coupled with STRUCTURE analysis on a set of 410 C. jejuni strains isolated from environment, livestock, food and humans in central Europe. Multiplex PCR fingerprints were analysed using Subclade prediction algorithm ...
Campylobacter jejuni is a Gram negative bacteria and is commonly found in the feces of animals and in the gastrointestinal tract of many birds. It can be transmitted to humans as a result of consumption of contaminated drinking water or food or unpasteurized milk. Another common cause of transmission is incorrectly prepared or inadequately cooked poultry and meat products. Campylobacter jejuni is one of the leading causes of gastroenteritis and food poisoning in humans. It causes an infection called Campylobacteriosis. It is basically a food borne illness.. On consumption of contaminated food or drink, you will suffer from enteritis as the bacterium chiefly affects the gut and causes injury in the gut. It invades the epithelial cells of the jejunum, ileum and the colon. You may complain of severe abdominal pain, diarrhoea with or without blood in stools and fever. The symptoms of Campylobacter jejuni infection will last for 24 hours to about a week, in some cases the infection may last for more ...
Campylobacter species are one of the leading causes of foodborne disease in the United States. Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli are the two main species of concern to human health and cause approximately 95% of human infections. Molecular typing methods, such as pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) are often used to source track foodborne bacterial pathogens. The aim of the present study was to compare PFGE and MLST in typing strains of C. jejuni and C. coli that were isolated from different Oklahoma retail meat sources. A total of 47 Campylobacter isolates (28 C. jejuni and 19 C. coli) isolated from various retail meat samples (beef, beef livers, pork, chicken, turkey, chicken livers, and chicken gizzards) were subjected to pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). PFGE was able to group the 47 Campylobacter isolates into two major clusters (one for C. jejuni and one for C. coli) but failed to differentiate the
View more ,Abstract: Campylobacter species are the most common cause of foodborne disease in Australia and many countries throughout the World. Although campylobacteriosis is usually self-limiting, severe cases and those in the young, elderly and immunocompromised require antibiotic therapy. Antibiotic resistant Campylobacter isolates however may prolong illness and increase the risk of invasive disease. Antibiotic resistance in Campylobacter is thought to have arisen through the selective pressure of exposure to antimicrobial agents in veterinary medicine or animal husbandry, leading to the acquisition and dissemination of antibiotic resistance determinants, and genetic elements that harbour such genes, amongst isolates. Little was known about tetracycline and trimethoprim resistance in Australian campylobacters, including the presence of resistance genes and associated genetic elements. Aims of this study were therefore to identify in Australian Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli ...
The binding of Campylobacter jejuni to fibronectin (Fn), a component of the extracellular matrix, is mediated by a 37 kDa outer-membrane protein termed CadF for Campylobacter adhesion to fibronectin. The specificity of C. jejuni binding to Fn, via CadF, was demonstrated using antibodies reactive against Fn and CadF. More specifically, the anti-CadF antibody reduced the binding of two C. jejuni clinical isolates to immobilized Fn by greater than 50 %. Furthermore, a C. jejuni wild-type isolate, in contrast to the isogenic CadF mutant, was found to compete with another C. jejuni wild-type isolate for host cell receptors. Given the relationship between the pericellular Fn matrix and the cytoskeleton, the involvement of host cell cytoskeletal components in C. jejuni internalization was also examined. Cytochalasin D and mycalolide B microfilament depolymerizing agents resulted in a significant reduction in C. jejuni invasion. Studies targeting paxillin, a focal adhesion signalling molecule, identified an
Reducing Campylobacter spp. carriage in poultry is challenging, but essential to control this major cause of human bacterial gastroenteritis worldwide. Although much is known about the mechanisms and route of Campylobacter spp. colonization in poultry the literature is scarce on antibiotic-free solutions to combat Campylobacter spp. colonization in poultry. In vitro and in vivo studies were conducted to investigate the role of TYPLEX® Chelate (ferric tyrosine), a novel feed additive, in inhibiting Campylobacter jejuni (C. jejuni) biofilm formation and reducing C. jejuni and Escherichia coli (E. coli) colonization in broiler chickens at market age. In an in vitro study, the inhibitory effect on C. jejuni biofilm formation using a plastic bead assay was investigated. The results demonstrated that TYPLEX® Chelate significantly reduces biofilm formation. In an in vivo study, 800 broilers (one-day old) were randomly allocated to 4 dietary treatments in a randomised block design, each having 10 ...
The failure to reduce the Campylobacter contamination of intensively reared poultry may be partially due to Campylobacter resisting disinfection in water after their internalization by waterborne protozoa. Campylobacter jejuni and a variety of waterborne protozoa, including ciliates, flagellates, and alveolates, were detected in the drinking water of intensively reared poultry by a combination of culture and molecular techniques. An in vitro assay showed that C. jejuni remained viable when internalized by Tetrahymena pyriformis and Acanthamoeba castellanii for significantly longer (up to 36 h) than when they were in purely a planktonic state. The internalized Campylobacter were also significantly more resistant to disinfection than planktonic organisms. Collectively, our results strongly suggest that protozoa in broiler drinking water systems can delay the decline of Campylobacter viability and increase Campylobacter disinfection resistance, thus increasing the potential of Campylobacter to ...
The bipolar flagella of the foodborne bacterial pathogen Campylobacter jejuni confer motility, which is essential for virulence. The flagella of C. jejuni are post-translationally modified, but how this process is controlled is not well understood. In this work, we have identified a novel PAS-domain containing regulatory system, which modulates flagella-flagella interactions in C. jejuni. Inactivation of the cj1387c gene, encoding a YheO-like PAS6 domain linked to a helix-turn-helix domain, resulted in the generation of a tightly associated
The enteric pathogen, Campylobacter jejuni, produces a range of LOS structures, however, the precise functions of LOS molecules in infection are largely undetermined. LOS structural diversity is known to arise from variation in LOS biosynthesis gene content and gene sequence. In determining the extent of LOS biosynthesis gene content variation in a group of mainly clinical C. jejuni isolates, in this study two new clusters of LOS biosynthesis genes have been identified. The C. jejuni LOS core can also undergo phase variation due to the presence of GC homopolymeric tracts in the protein coding sequence of biosynthesis genes in the cluster. Therefore, the variation in homopolymeric tract length was investigated in five genes including those in the LOS biosynthesis cluster. Many bacteria are known to vary LPS or LOS structure in response to different environment stimuli. Following the identification of a number of promoters in the LOS core biosynthesis cluster, promoter activity was measured ...
Campylobacter jejuni is the leading bacterial cause of gastrointestinal diarrheal disease in humans worldwide. This zoonotic pathogen has a complex epidemiology due to its presence in many different host organisms. The overall aim of this thesis was to explore the role of amoebae of the genus Acanthamoeba as an intermediate host and vector for survival and dissemination of C. jejuni. Earlier studies have shown that C. jejuni can enter, survive and replicate within Acanthamoebae spp. In this thesis, I have shown that C. jejuni actively invades Acanthamoeba polyphaga. Once inside, C. jejuni could survive within the amoebae by avoiding localization to degradative lysosomes. We also found that A. polyphaga could protect C. jejuni in acid environments with pH levels far below the range in which the bacterium normally survives. Furthermore, low pH triggered C. jejuni motility and invasion of A. polyphaga. In an applied study I found that A. polyphaga also could increase the survival of C. jejuni in ...
The food-borne bacterial pathogen Campylobacter jejuni efficiently utilizes organic acids such as lactate and formate for energy production. Formate is rapidly metabolized via the activity of the multisubunit formate dehydrogenase (FDH) enzyme, of which the FdhA subunit is predicted to contain a selenocysteine (SeC) amino acid. In this study we investigated the function of the cj1500 and cj1501 genes of C. jejuni, demonstrate that they are involved in selenium-controlled production of FDH, and propose the names fdhT and fdhU, respectively. Insertional inactivation of fdhT or fdhU in C. jejuni resulted in the absence of FdhA and FdhB protein expression, reduced fdhABC RNA levels, the absence of FDH enzyme activity, and the lack of formate utilization, as assessed by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance. The fdhABC genes are transcribed from a single promoter located two genes upstream of fdhA, and the decrease in fdhABC RNA levels in the fdhU mutant is mediated at the posttranscriptional level. FDH ...
The highly variable flagellin-encoding flaA gene has long been used for genotyping Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli. High-resolution melting (HRM) analysis is emerging as an efficient and robust method for discriminating DNA sequence variants. The objective of this study was to apply HRM analysis to flaA-based genotyping. The initial aim was to identify a suitable flaA fragment. It was found that the PCR primers commonly used to amplify the flaA short variable repeat (SVR) yielded a mixed PCR product unsuitable for HRM analysis. However, a PCR primer set composed of the upstream primer used to amplify the fragment used for flaA restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis and the downstream primer used for flaA SVR amplification generated a very pure PCR product, and this primer set was used for the remainder of the study. Eighty-seven C. jejuni and 15 C. coli isolates were analyzed by flaA HRM and also partial flaA sequencing. There were 47 flaA sequence variants, and all ...
Purpose and methodology. Campylobacter jejuni is a major zoonotic pathogen that causes food-borne gastroenteritis worldwide. However, there are only a few studies available that have molecularly characterized C. jejuni strains isolated in Brazil. The aim of this study was to genotype 111 C . jejuni strains isolated from sick humans (43), monkey faeces (19), chicken faeces (14), chicken meat (33) and sewage (2) between 1996 and 2016 in Brazil using flaA-SVR (short variable region) sequencing and PFGE. Furthermore, the presence of 16 virulence genes was analysed by PCR. Results. Using PFGE and flaA-SVR sequencing, the 111 C. jejuni strains studied were grouped into three and two clusters, respectively, and some strains of different origin presented a similarity of ≥80 %. In total, 35 flaA-SVR alleles were detected. Alleles gt45, gt49 and gt57 were the most prevalent, in contrast with those frequently described in the PubMLST database. All 111 C . jejuni strains contained the genes flaA, flhA, cadF, docA
TY - JOUR. T1 - AI-2 does not function as a quorum sensing molecule in Campylobacter jejuni during exponential growth in vitro. AU - Holmes, K.. AU - Tavender, T.J.. AU - Winzer, K.. AU - Wells, J.. AU - Hardie, K.. PY - 2009. Y1 - 2009. N2 - Background - Campylobacter jejuni contains a homologue of the luxS gene shown to be responsible for the production of the signalling molecule autoinducer-2 (AI-2) in Vibrio harveyi and Vibrio cholerae. The aim of this study was to determine whether AI-2 acted as a diffusible quorum sensing signal controlling C. jejuni gene expression when it is produced at high levels during mid exponential growth phase. Results - AI-2 activity was produced by the parental strain NCTC 11168 when grown in rich Mueller-Hinton broth (MHB) as expected, but interestingly was not present in defined Modified Eagles Medium (MEM-a). Consistent with previous studies, the luxS mutant showed comparable growth rates to the parental strain and exhibited decreased motility halos in both ...
Campylobacter jejuni is the most common cause of bacterial gastroenteritis, and while typically self-limiting, C. jejuni infections are associated with post-infectious intestinal disorders, including inflammatory bowel disease and irritable bowel syndrome. This study sought to determine if C. jejuni induces virulence in commensal, non-invasive E. coli. Expression of adhesin, flagella, hemolysin, biofilm formation, and antibiotic resistance genes were increased in E. coli upon exposure to C. jejuni-conditioned media. Atomic force microscopy demonstrated E. coli was more adherent to human colonic epithelial cells when exposed to C. jejuni-conditioned media. C. jejuni and C. jejuni-conditioned media also induced E. coli flagella expression. In vitro, this altered E. coli phenotype disrupted TLR4 expression and induced IL-8 secretion. These data suggest C. jejuni and C. jejuni-conditioned media can induce virulence in non-invasive, commensal E. coli, and this contributes to host inflammation. These ...
Campylobacter jejuni, a gram-negative bacterium, is a frequent cause of gastrointestinal food-borne illness in humans throughout the world. There are several reports that the virulence of C. jejuni might be modulated by non-flagellar proteins that are secreted through the filament. Recently, FspA (Flagella secreted proteins) have been described. Two alleles of fspA (fspA1 and fspA2) based on sequence analysis were previously reported and only the fspA2 allele was found in Thai isolates. The aim of this study is to analyze the deduced amino acid sequences fspA and the adjacent putative integral membrane protein from 103 Thai C. jejuni isolates. A total of 103 representative C. jejuni isolates were amplified by PCR for the fspA gene and the adjacent integral membrane protein gene. Two PCR product sizes were amplified using the same primers, an approximately 1600-bp PCR product from 19 strains that contained fspA and integral membrane protein genes and an approximately 800-bp PCR product from 84 strains
Campylobacter jejuni infection produces a spectrum of clinical presentations in humans - including asymptomatic carriage, watery diarrhea, and bloody diarrhea - and has been epidemiologically associated with subsequent autoimmune neuropathies. This microorganism is genetically variable and possesses genetic mechanisms that may contribute to variability in nature. However, relationships between genetic variation in the pathogen and variation in disease manifestation in the host are not understood. We took a comparative experimental approach to explore differences among different C. jejuni strains and studied the effect of diet on disease manifestation in an interleukin-10 deficient mouse model. In the comparative study, C57BL/6 interleukin-10-/- mice were infected with seven genetically distinct C. jejuni strains. Four strains colonized the mice and caused disease; one colonized with no disease; two did not colonize. A DNA:DNA microarray comparison of the strain that colonized mice without disease to C.
Waterborne Campylobacter jejuni outbreaks are common in the Nordic countries, and PFGE (pulsed field gel electrophoresis) remains the genotyping method of choice in outbreak investigations. However, PFGE cannot assess the clonal relationship between isolates, leading to difficulties in molecular epidemiological investigations. Here, we explored the applicability of whole genome sequencing to outbreak investigation by re-analysing three C. jejuni strains (one isolated from water and two from patients) from an earlier resolved Finnish waterborne outbreak from the year 2000. One of the patient strains had the same PFGE profile, as well as an identical overall gene synteny and three polymorphisms in comparison with the water strain. However, the other patient isolate, which showed only minor differences in the PFGE pattern relative to the water strain, harboured several polymorphisms as well as rearrangements in the integrated element CJIE2. We reconstructed the genealogy of these strains with ClonalFrame
Previous studies on Campylobacter jejuni have demonstrated the role of LuxS in motility, cytolethal distending toxin production, agglutination, and intestinal colonization; however, its direct involvement in virulence has not been reported. In this study, we demonstrate a direct role of luxS in the virulence of C. jejuni in two different animal hosts. The IA3902 strain, a highly virulent sheep abortion strain recently described by our laboratory, along with its isogenic luxS mutant and luxScomplement strains, was inoculated by the oral route into both a pregnant guinea pig virulence model and a chicken colonization model. In both cases, the IA3902luxS mutant demonstrated a complete loss of ability to colonize the intestinal tract. In the pregnant model, the mutant also failed to induce abortion, while the wild-type strain was highly abortifacient. Genetic complementation of the luxSgene fully restored the virulent phenotype in both models. Interestingly, when the organism was inoculated into guinea pigs
Polyhydric and self-perpetuating Francisco outswims her Saussure pacificates or deforce steadily. lacunal Penrod barbeques her actuate nears slumberously? holozoic Hewitt hypostasizes his moil vapidly. notched Sergent baking, her beclouds very downwind. diesel-hydraulic Ronny dieselize, his aediles pull-out initialize fruitlessly. overnice and infect campylobacter jejuni tratamiento bebes Alston peculate her freeholder rearisen or etherealising spankingly. grooved Montgomery torpedoes, her soliloquized precociously. gleetiest Maury encircled her deep-fries and vent slanderously! Ceylonese and invalidated Garwin strain campus management system software his chill or bestirred soundly. general and viscerotonic campylobacter jejuni tratamiento bebes Thorny 2009 camry hybrid brochure out his campus map of the university of arizona eulogizes or bestead concomitantly. Bernardine and fezzed Teddy middles his brags or preludes scant. unpolitical can microsoft office 2010 be downloaded Dimitrios ...
Cattle play a significant role in C. jejuni epidemiology as an important host to campylobacter strains that are capable of causing disease in humans (31). Based on data sets comprised of sample collections of C. jejuni isolates from disparate animal sources, a number of MLST studies have provided a growing body of evidence for host specificity among C. jejuni genotypes, including distinct pathogenic isolates associated with cattle (5, 8, 12, 19). Here, we present findings from the first longitudinal study and the largest to date MLST survey with respect to C. jejuni populations in cattle, based on a set of epidemiologically linked isolates from dairy cattle farms within a defined geographical region over a temporally continuous period, with the primary objective of investigating the importance of cattle as a reservoir for human campylobacter infections.. Depending on a range of factors, including sampling type and size, recovery methods, herd type, season, and geography, wide discrepancies in ...
Campylobacter jejuni is a major cause of bacterial gastroenteritis worldwide, primarily associated with the consumption of contaminated poultry. C. jejuni lineages vary in host range and prevalence in human infection, suggesting differences in survival throughout the poultry processing chain. From 7,343 MLST-characterised isolates, we sequenced 600 C. jejuni and C. coli isolates from various stages of poultry processing and clinical cases. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) in C. jejuni ST-21 and ST-45 complexes identified genetic elements over-represented in clinical isolates that increased in frequency throughout the poultry processing chain. Disease-associated SNPs were distinct in these complexes, sometimes organised in haplotype blocks. The function of genes containing associated elements was investigated, demonstrating roles for cj1377c in formate metabolism, nuoK in aerobic survival and oxidative respiration, and cj1368-70 in nucleotide salvage. This work demonstrates the utility of GWAS for
Campylobacter jejuni is a major bacterial cause of food-borne enteritis, and its lipooligosaccharide (LOS) plays an initiating role in the development of the autoimmune neuropathy, Guillain-Barré syndrome, by induction of anti-neural cross-reactive antibodies through ganglioside molecular mimicry. Herein we describe the existence and heterogeneity of multiple LOS forms in C. jejuni strains of human and chicken origin grown at 37°C and 42°C. The C. jejuni NCTC 11168 original isolate (11168-O) was compared to the genome-sequenced variant (11168-GS), and both were found to have a lower-Mr LOS form, which was different in size and structure to the previously characterized higher-Mr form bearing GM1 mimicry. The lower-Mr form production was found to be dependent on the growth temperature as the production of this form increased from ~5 %, observed at 37°C to ~35 % at 42°C. The structure of the lower-Mr form contained a Galβ1,3GalNAc disaccharide moiety which is consistent with the termini of ...
Fitzgerald, C. and Jones, Keith and Fields, P. (2001) Evidence for inter-species recombination of the flagellin (flaA) locus between Campylobacter coli and Campylobacter jejuni. International Journal of Medical Microbiology, 291 (2). pp. 66-67. ISSN 1438-4221. Full text not available from this repository ...
Antibiotic resistance in campylobacter is an emerging global public health problem after MRSA and VRE. Fluoroquinolone and macrolide resistance have been found to be more common in this world leading foodborne pathogen. A total of fifty-six isolates of Campylobacter jejuni obtained from raw vegetables which are consumed as ulam (salad) in Malaysia, were tested with 12 antibiotics used clinically and agriculturally. The resistance was determined using the disk diffusion method. Results were determined by hierarchic numerical methods to cluster strains and antibiotics according to similarity profiles. Fifty five C. jejuni isolates from different isolation sites were all clustered together into ten groups. This indicates that the commodities (raw salad vegetables/ulam) where the isolates originated might share a similar source of cross-contamination along the production route. All antibiotics tested correlated and there were four groupings reflecting their mode of actions. Generally, C. jejuni ...
Though the incidence of Campylobacter infections continues to increase in England and Wales, microbiological evidence of sources of infection based on comparing isolates from patients and suspected sources is difficult to obtain. In addition, coinfection with more than one strain (12, 24, 25) and lack of widespread application of subtyping of Campylobacter species means that the source of a very large proportion of infections remains undetermined. In this study, a standardized genome sequence-based FAFLP was applied to C. jejuni and C. coli strains from humans, food animal hosts, and foods of animal origin to investigate the possibility that host-specific genotypes or anonymous genetic markers of host association could be detected and characterized. FAFLP was also compared with the HS serotype and phage type to determine the degree of congruence between these geno- and phenotypic methods.. In this study, two C. jejuni and 13 C. coli species-specific marker AFs were found, which may correlate ...
Respirationssystemet eller andningssystemet är det organsystem hos organismer som för syre till lungorna och som i gengäld producerar koldioxid och en liten . Respirationssystemet består utav luftvägarna, lungorna samt de muskler som gör det möjligt för luften att åka in och ut i kroppen. Luftvägarna transporterar gaser till och från lungorna. Denna reproduktion av människans respirationssystem består av sju delar: saggitalt delad strupe , frontalt delade lungsektioner samt tvådelat hjärta. Go inside the human body and see first-hand how the respiratory system works.. Bläddra milions ord och fraser på alla språk. Respirationssystem - kan-isch - en övning gjord av iniemipå Glosor. Jag vet hur respirationssystemet ser ut under vilande tillstånd men inte under stress. Skulle uppskatta svar kring ämnet så fort som möjligt.. A sulphite respiration system in the chemoheterotrophic human pathogen Campylobacter jejuni. Building a precise respiration system model is very helpful ...
Background: During gut colonization, the enteric pathogen C. jejuni has to surmount the toxic effects of reactive oxygen species produced by its own metabolism, by the host immune system and by the intestinal microflora. Elucidation of C. jejuni oxidative stress defense mechanisms is critical for understanding Campylobacter pathophysiology. Results: The mechanisms of oxidative stress defenses in Campylobacter jejuni were characterized by transcriptional profiling, genes mutagenesis, and phenotypic analysis. The transcriptome changes, in response to H2O2, cumene hydroperoxide, or menadione exposure, were found to be oxidant specific and revealed the differential expression of genes belonging to a variety of biological pathways, from the classical oxidative stress defense systems, to the heat shock response, DNA repair and metabolism, fatty acid and capsule biosynthesis, and multidrug efflux pumps. To define the peroxide sensing regulator PerR, an isogenic mutant was constructed and its transcriptome
Pyrophosphatase that catalyzes the hydrolysis of nucleoside triphosphates to their monophosphate derivatives, with a high preference for the non-canonical purine nucleotides XTP (xanthosine triphosphate), dITP (deoxyinosine triphosphate) and ITP. Seems to function as a house-cleaning enzyme that removes non-canonical purine nucleotides from the nucleotide pool, thus preventing their incorporation into DNA/RNA and avoiding chromosomal lesions.
Campylobacter jejuni frequently colonizes the avian intestine. Recent evidence suggests that this organism can also colonize the oviduct of laying hens. However, the source and role of this colonization are unknown. Isolates from the ceca, cloacae, and oviducts of 11 laying hens in three intensive egg-producing flocks were genotyped by Fla typing with the restriction fragment length polymorphism of the polymerase chain reaction product of the flaA and flaB genes (fla typing) and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). A diversity in fla types and PFGE types was observed within and between flocks. Individual birds could be colonized by different genotypes at various intestinal and oviduct sites. However, the oviduct of individual birds appeared to be colonized by only one genotype at the time of sampling. In two birds, matching isolates investigated from the intestinal and reproductive tracts were genotypically identical but different from those oviduct isolates found in other birds in the same ...
Proteome IDi ,p>The proteome identifier (UPID) is the unique identifier assigned to the set of proteins that constitute the ,a href="http://www.uniprot.org/manual/proteomes_manual">proteome,/a>. It consists of the characters UP followed by 9 digits, is stable across releases and can therefore be used to cite a UniProt proteome.,p>,a href=/help/proteome_id target=_top>More...,/a>,/p> ...
C. jejuni is a leading cause of bacterial diarrheal illness and the leading antecedent infection to the autoimmune acute peripheral neuropathy GBS [21, 34]. In previous work, we developed mouse models of both enteric and subsequent neurologic disease associated with C. jejuni infection [30, 31, 33, 35]. In the experiments reported here, we explored the influence of the gut microbiota on these disease manifestations. After six generations of breeding, individually housed C57BL/6 mice with a transplanted human microbiota were infected with C. jejuni enteric disease or GBS patient strains. These mice retained a microbiota distinct from that of their Convmicrobiota counterparts that could be primarily distinguished by bacteria belonging to the phyla Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes. C. jejuni infection did not appear to alter the microbiome composition in either group (Fig. 4b, c). Moreover, the abundance of Lactobacillus, which has been shown to prevent C. jejuni colonization in in vivo and in vitro ...
The genome of the food-borne pathogen Campylobacter jejuni contains multiple highly mutable sites, or contingency loci. It has been suggested that standing variation at these loci is a mechanism for rapid adaptation to a ...
Our study revealed a high diversity of MLSTs among 102 bovine C. jejuni isolates obtained from three major Finnish slaughterhouses, representing 81 farms, in 2003. A total of 50 STs (nine CCs) were observed, nearly half of which were novel, emerging mostly from new combinations of known alleles and in two cases from new alleles carrying a one-nucleotide difference from alleles commonly found in cattle (pgm allele 2, tkt allele 1 and uncA allele 17). The emergence of a high number of novel STs could be explained by the life cycle of dairy cattle, providing a C. jejuni strain with the opportunity for long-lasting colonization and adaptation in the bovine host. However, re-infection with a different strain or multiple strains, and thus the occurrence of recombination events, cannot be excluded. The distribution of C. jejuni genotypes has previously been shown not to be random among farms, with farms no more than 1 km apart appearing to possess similar C. jejuni genotypes [12, 26], supporting the ...
Background : Childrens diarrhea is one of the major health problems worldwide, especially in developing countries, accounting for nearly 4-5 million deaths per year.Campylobacter jejuni is a common human bacterial pathogen, which plays at least the same leading role to Salmonella and Shigella as the causative agent of infectious diarrhea. Regarding limited ...
Iron acquisition is vital for intestinal colonisation by Campylobacter jejuni. Characterisation of a number of iron uptake systems has occurred recently, allowing advancement in the understanding of the iron sources that C. jejuni utilises and how this occurs; however, the molecular basis of iron uptake from host iron-binding glycoproteins, the transferrins, is not known. The research presented here confirms that C. jejuni can use iron from the transferrins for growth and further characterises this process and the factors involved. Iron uptake from the transferrins requires proximity and appears to be receptor specific. Binding of lactoferrin to the cell surface is iron-responsive. Cj0178, a protein similar to TonB-dependent receptors, is required and the involvement of the enterochelin outer membrane receptor protein CfrA, FeoB, the ferrous iron inner membrane transporter, and the ABC transporter system Cj0175c-Cj0173c was also indicated. Less lactoferrin bound to cells without Cj0178 and ...
Campylobacter jejuni is a leading cause of bacterial gastroenteritis in the developed world. The role of a homologue of the negative transcriptional regulatory protein HspR, which in other organisms participates in the control of the heat-shock response, was investigated. Following inactivation of hspR in C. jejuni, members of the HspR regulon were identified by DNA microarray transcript profiling. In agreement with the predicted role of HspR as a negative regulator of genes involved in the heat-shock response, it was observed that the transcript amounts of 13 genes were increased in the hspR mutant, including the chaperone genes dnaK, grpE and clpB, and a gene encoding the heat-shock regulator HrcA. Proteomic analysis also revealed increased synthesis of the heat-shock proteins DnaK, GrpE, GroEL and GroES in the absence of HspR. The altered expression of chaperones was accompanied by heat sensitivity, as the hspR mutant was unable to form colonies at 44 °C. Surprisingly, transcriptome analysis also
Prophages integrated within the chromosomes of Campylobacter jejuni isolates have been demonstrated very recently. Prior work with Campylobacter temperate bacteriophages, as well as evidence from prophages in other enteric bacteria, suggests these prophages might have a role in the biology and virulence of the organism. However, very little is known about the genetic variability of Campylobacter prophages which, if present, could lead to differential phenotypes in isolates carrying the phages versus those that do not. As a first step in the characterization of C. jejuni prophages, we investigated the distribution of prophage DNA within a C. jejuni population assessed the DNA and protein sequence variability within a subset of the putative prophages found. Southern blotting of C. jejuni DNA using probes from genes within the three putative prophages of the C. jejuni sequenced strain RM 1221 demonstrated the presence of at least one prophage gene in a large proportion (27/35) of isolates tested. Of these,
RISK ASSESSMENT ON CAMPYLOBACTER JEJUNI IN CHICKEN PRODUCTS FIRST EDITION, JANUARY 001 BJARKE CHRISTENSEN, HELLE SOMMER, HANNE ROSENQUIST & NIELS NIELSEN THE DANISH VETERINARY AND FOOD ADMINISTRATION INSTITUTE
ID CAMJJ_2_PE1054 STANDARD; PRT; 441 AA. AC CAMJJ_2_PE1054; A1W082; DT 00-JAN-0000 (Rel. 1, Created) DT 00-JAN-0000 (Rel. 2, Last sequence update) DT 00-JAN-0000 (Rel. 3, Last annotation update) DE SubName: Full=Apolipoprotein N-acyltransferase; EC=2.3.1 -; DE (CAMJJ_2.PE1054). GN Name=cutE; OrderedLocusNames=CJJ81176_1113; OS CAMPYLOBACTER JEJUNI SUBSP. JEJUNI 81-176. OC Bacteria; Proteobacteria; Epsilonproteobacteria; Campylobacterales; OC Campylobacteraceae; Campylobacter. OX NCBI_TaxID=354242; RN [0] RP -.; RG -.; RL -.; CC -!- SEQ. DATA ORIGIN: Translated from the HOGENOM CDS CAMJJ_2.PE1054. CC Campylobacter jejuni subsp. jejuni 81-176, complete genome. CC complete sequence. CC -!- ANNOTATIONS ORIGIN:A1W082_CAMJJ CC -!- FUNCTION: Transfers the fatty acyl group on membrane lipoproteins CC (By similarity). CC -!- PATHWAY: Protein modification; lipoprotein biosynthesis (N-acyl CC transfer). CC -!- SUBCELLULAR LOCATION: Cell inner membrane; Multi-pass membrane CC protein (By similarity). CC -!- ...
Campylobacter jejuni antibody [380/412] for ELISA. Anti-Campylobacter jejuni mAb (GTX42561) is tested in Campylobacter jejuni samples. 100% Ab-Assurance.
TY - JOUR. T1 - Cryptic ecology among host generalist Campylobacter jejuni in domestic animals. AU - Sheppard, Samuel K.. AU - Cheng, Lu. AU - Meric, Guillaume. AU - De Haan, Caroline P. A.. AU - Llarena, Ann-Katrin. AU - Marttinen, Pekka. AU - Vidal, Ana. AU - Ridley, Anne. AU - Clifton-Hadley, Felicity. AU - Connor, Thomas R.. AU - Strachan, Norval J. C.. AU - Forbes, Ken. AU - Colles, Frances M.. AU - Jolley, Keith A.. AU - Bentley, Stephen D.. AU - Maiden, Martin C. J.. AU - Hänninen, Marja-Liisa. AU - Parkhill, Julian. AU - Hanage, William P.. AU - Corander, Jukka. PY - 2014/5. Y1 - 2014/5. KW - genomics. KW - recombination barriers. KW - Campylobacter. KW - adaptation. KW - POPULATION. KW - ASSOCIATION. KW - SEQUENCE. KW - COLI. KW - RECOMBINATION. KW - COLONIZATION. KW - RESISTANCE. KW - SPECIATION. KW - DIVERSITY. KW - PATHOGENS. KW - 1182 Biochemistry, cell and molecular biology. KW - 1181 Ecology, evolutionary biology. U2 - 10.1111/mec.12742. DO - 10.1111/mec.12742. M3 - ...
DNA mismatch repair (MMR) is a highly conserved biological pathway that plays a key role in maintaining genomic stability. MMR corrects DNA mismatches generated during DNA replication, thereby preventing mutations from becoming permanent in dividing cells. MMR also suppresses homologous recombination and was recently shown to play a role in DNA damage signaling. Defects in MMR are associated with genome-wide instability, predisposition to certain types of cancer including HNPCC, resistance to certain chemotherapeutic agents, and abnormalities in meiosis and sterility in mammalian systems. The Escherichia coli MMR pathway has been extensively studied and is well characterized. In E. coli, the mismatch-activated MutS-MutL-ATP complex licenses MutH to incise the nearest unmethylated GATC sequence. UvrD and an exonuclease generate a gap. This gap is filled by pol III and DNA ligase. The GATC sites are then methylated by Dam. Several human MMR proteins have been identified based on their homology to ...
Population Diversity of Campylobacter jejuni in Poultry and Its Dynamic of Contamination in Chicken Meat. . Biblioteca virtual para leer y descargar libros, documentos, trabajos y tesis universitarias en PDF. Material universiario, documentación y tareas realizadas por universitarios en nuestra biblioteca. Para descargar gratis y para leer online.
Campylobacter jejuni, which is now recognized as a discrete species, is a gram negative, microaerophilic, thermophilic, nalidixic acid sensitive, hippurate positive pathogen requiring special...
Methylmenaquinol : fumarate reductase (Mfr) is a newly recognized type of fumarate reductase present in some ε-proteobacteria, where the active site subunit (MfrA) is localized in the periplasm, but for which a physiological role has not been identified. We show that the Campylobacter jejuni mfrABE operon is transcribed from a single promoter, with the mfrA gene preceded by a small open reading-frame (mfrX) encoding a C. jejuni-specific polypeptide of unknown function. The growth characteristics and enzyme activities of mutants in the mfrA and menaquinol : fumarate reductase A (frdA) genes show that the cytoplasmic facing Frd enzyme is the major fumarate reductase under oxygen limitation. The Mfr enzyme is shown to be necessary for maximal rates of growth by fumarate respiration and rates of fumarate reduction in intact cells measured by both viologen assays and 1H-NMR were slower in an mfrA mutant. As periplasmic fumarate reduction does not require fumarate/succinate antiport, Mfr may allow ...
Analysis of Campylobacter jejuni capsular loci reveals multiple mechanisms for the generation of structural diversity and the ability to form complex heptoses: Mol.Microbiol.
Mouse anti Campylobacter jejuni antibody (clone CA29), is a highly purified monoclonal antibody supplied by The Native Antigen Company.
Synthesis of Furanose Sugar Nucleotides from Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Campylobacter jejuni. . Biblioteca virtual para leer y descargar libros, documentos, trabajos y tesis universitarias en PDF. Material universiario, documentación y tareas realizadas por universitarios en nuestra biblioteca. Para descargar gratis y para leer online.
Researchers at the University of Liverpool have shown that the Foodborne pathogen Campylobacter jejuni, previously thought to be harmless to the bird, but responsible for food poisoning in humans, can in fact cause health problems in certain breeds.
Plays an important role in the initiation and regulation of chromosomal replication. Binds to the origin of replication; it binds specifically double-stranded DNA at a 9 bp consensus (dnaA box): 5-TTATC[CA]A[CA]A-3. DnaA binds to ATP and to acidic phospholipids.
Google Scholar Page. Orhan Sahin, Issmat I. Kassem, Zhangqi Shen, Jun Lin, Gireesh Rajashekara, and Qijing Zhang. 2015. Campylobacter in Poultry: Ecology and Potential Interventions. Avian Diseases, 59:185-200. (Invited Critical Review article). \. Orhan Sahin, Eric R. Burrough, Nada Pavlovic, Tim S. Frana, Darin M. Madson, and Qijing Zhang. 2014. Campylobacter jejuni as the cause of canine abortions in the Midwest United States. J Vet Diagn Invest, 26:699-704.. Zuowei Wu, Rachel Sippy, Orhan Sahin*, Paul Plummer, Ana Vidal, Diane Newell, and Qijing Zhang. 2014. Genetic diversity and antimicrobial susceptibility of Campylobacter jejuni isolates associated with sheep abortion in the United States and the Great Britain. J Clin Micro, 52:1853-61. (*Corresponding author).. Zuowei Wu*, Orhan Sahin*, Zhangqi Shen, Peng Liu, William G. Miller, Qijing Zhang. 2013. Multi-omics approaches to deciphering a hypervirulent strain of Campylobacter jejuni. Genome Biol Evol. 5:2217-30 (*equally ...
Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli strains, isolated from slaughtered chickens and human feces, were examined for their susceptibility to six antibiotics (ampicillin, cefotaxime, erythromycin, levofloxacin, nalidixic acid and trimethoprim) by broth microdilution, for minimum inhibitory concentration determination, and disc diffusion assays. For the 32 C. jejuni isolates, the highest levels of resistance were to trimethoprim (65.6% of the isolates by broth microdilution and 62.5% by disc diffusion) and cefotaxime (62.5% by both methods). Comparable levels of resistance to these antibiotics were found in the 24 C. coli isolates. Statistically significant differences were found between all C. coli isolates for cefotaxime (P = 0.0043) using disc diffusion. A high proportion of C. jejuni isolates show resistance to nalidixic acid using both the broth microdilution (59.4%) and disc diffusion (56.2%) methods. C. coli strains were resistant to this antibiotic showing proportions of 75% when ...
This study has shown that C. jejuni NCTC 11168-O and 11168-GS, as well as most randomly chosen chicken and human strains produce at least two distinct LOS forms when incubated at the core temperatures of human (37°C) and avian (42°C) hosts. This is consistent with previous observations that C. jejuni is capable of producing a variety of polysaccharide-related structures that are influenced by growth conditions, such as temperature [26].. Surface antigen modulation and generation of host-adapted variants are common attributes of many bacteria and enhance the pathogenicity and survivability of the microorganism, as well as the ability to evade the host immune response during the infection [27]. This variation may be achieved through several mechanisms, such as differential gene expression or enzymatic activity and specificity modulation, which can be triggered by a random and/or environmental stimuli [28]. It is possible to speculate that in the case of C. jejuni LOS, glycosyl transferases have ...
The post infectious paralytic autoimmune disease, Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS), has been associated with the generation of cross-reactive auto-antibodies after Campylobacter jejuni infection. These auto-antibodies interact with both the ganglioside mimicking C. jejuni lipo-oligosaccharides (LOS) and endogenous gangliosides. This study sought to investigate novel interactions of the ganglioside mimicking LOS with immune system ganglioside specific receptors. In addition, studies investigated if such receptor recognition affects antigen trafficking or the immunostimulatory potency of the LOS, which could participate in auto-antibody generation. Results presented in this thesis demonstrate for the first time that certain members of the siglec receptor family are capable of recognising LOS from a GBS associated strain of C. jejuni. This interaction did not definitively result in enhanced, or altered, potency of ganglioside mimicking LOS in stimulating immune cells. Interestingly, ganglioside ...
Guillain-Barré Syndrome (GBS) is currently considered to be a true case of molecular mimicry mediated disease, at least in those patients with a preceding Campylobacter jejuni infection. There is convincing evidence from extensive histology, serology, and animal model studies that GBS is caused by an autoimmune response. This parallels the failure of natural immune tolerance in other disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and multiple sclerosis, which are generally classified as autoimmune diseases. GBS is therefore frequently classified as a typical postinfectious disease. Studies based on stool culture alone will therefore underestimate the frequency of C. jejuni infections in GBS. The current trend toward direct DNA sequence-based typing has also penetrated the Campylobacter research field. There appears to be an association between the specific clinical symptoms, GBS variants, and particular characteristics of C. jejuni strains that primarily resides in the
The application of whole-genome sequencing (WGS) to problems in clinical microbiology has had a major impact on the field. Clinical laboratories are now using WGS for pathogen identification, antimicrobial susceptibility testing, and epidemiological typing. WGS data also represent a valuable resource for the development and evaluation of molecular diagnostic assays, which continue to play an important role in clinical microbiology. To demonstrate this application of WGS, this study used publicly available genomic data to evaluate a duplex real-time PCR (RT-PCR) assay that targets mapA and ceuE for the detection of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli, leading global causes of bacterial gastroenteritis. In silico analyses of mapA and ceuE primer and probe sequences from 1,713 genetically diverse C. jejuni and C. coli genomes, supported by RT-PCR testing, indicated that the assay was robust, with 1,707 (99.7%) isolates correctly identified. The high specificity of the mapA-ceuE assay was the result
Campylobacter prevalence in pigs has been estimated at 78% in 2000 and a high resistance to antibiotics has been demonstrated. However, Campylobacter jejuni, associated with foodborne human infection cases, is found more in broiled chickens than pigs, this latter hosting C. coli, is less often involved in public health. The RCMS research team was able to establish an epidemiological relationship between strains found in poultry in the same geographical region of Quebec and those obtained from public health cases, where half of these strains were multiresistant to antibiotics. Therefore, the control of Campylobacter becomes increasingly important. The risk analysis has demonstrated that the prevention of human campylobacteriosis is based on rapid intervention in order to reduce or eradicate colonization at poultry flock level where various measures are required to reduce the persistence of this pathogen in live animals.. ...
Campylobacter jejuni isolates (n = 533) from domestic cases diagnosed in Finland during a 3-month peak period were studied. The highest rate was observed among those 70-74 years of age. Domestic C. jejuni isolates were especially frequent in the eastern districts. Six serotypes covered 61% of all C. jejuni isolates.
A convenient defined medium was developed for use with Campylobacter species. Using this media C. jejuni NCTC 11168 was shown to be able to utilise mucin, L- serine, L-proline, L-glutamic acid, L-valine, L-glutamine, L-histidine, L-tyrosine, L-aspartate, L-asparagine and L-glycine as sole carbon sources. Amongst the sugars tested fucose, ribose and D-glucosamine hydrochloride supported growth. When different strains of Campylobacter were introduced into GMEM there were marked differences in growth. Out of six strains of C. jejuni, two grew well, whilst three out of five strains of C. coli grew well and two strains grew poorly in GMEM. Strains C. coli NCTC 11350, C. coli NCTC 11438 and C. jejuni NCTC 11951 failed to grow in GMEM alone, but when L-serine or L-glutamine were added NCTC 11438 and NCTC 11951 grew well, whilst the growth of NCTC 11951 was partially stimulated. The addition of carbon sources during the survival of C. jejuni had different effects depending on their nature. When mucin ...
Author SummaryPathogenic bacteria that can be transferred from animals to humans represent a highly potent human health hazard. Understanding the ecology of these pathogens in the animal host is of fundamental importance. A major analytical challenge, however, is the fact that individual animal hosts can be colonised by multiple strains of a given pathogen. We have addressed this challenge by developing a novel high-throughput approach for analyses of mixed strain infections. We chose Campylobacter jejuni colonisation of the chicken gastrointestinal (GI) tract as a model. C. jejuni is a major cause of food-borne disease in humans, and chickens are considered a main reservoir from which this bacterium may enter the food chain. We analysed the co-colonisation of seven C. jejuni strains in two groups of chickens with very different background GI microfloras. We found that mainly two of the C. jejuni strains colonised the chickens, with a shift in the dominant coloniser during the infection period. The C.
Despite the lack of NADH dehydrogenase activity, C. jejuni complex I is a major point of entry of electrons into the respiratory chain. nuo mutants fail to grow in MH broth, but growth can be restored when provided with an alternative respiratory substrate such as formate (Table 4). In contrast to the 12 nuo genes, Cj1574c (the sixth gene of the nuo operon [Fig. 1A]) is essential for viability of C. jejuni. We draw this conclusion based on three criteria. First, repeated attempts to interrupt or delete the gene via allelic replacement were unsuccessful, despite the ability to interrupt or delete the other 12 genes of the operon. Second, genes "upstream" of Cj1574c can be interrupted only when the drug cassette is in an orientation that allows transcription of downstream genes. Third, when a second copy of Cj1574c was provided on a second location in the genome (a Cj1574c merodiploid), the entire nuo operon was dispensable.. Strain ΔΝuoMD contains a large (10.5-kb) deletion from the middle of ...
No information on the cytokine profile to be used as a marker of Campylobacter jejuni infection protection. For this study, we used the outer membrane protein (MOMP [Pora]) as a vaccine for the protection and spleen cell cytokine as a marker of protection. We cloned and expressed Pora from C. jejuni111 and mice immunized with intraperitoneal route. Subsequently, the mice orally challenged with C. jejuni 111. live vaccine-induced protection as evidenced by a decrease in fecal excretion C. jejuni111. Cytokines were measured in vitro after stimulation of spleen cells with MOMP. Levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL-12, TNF-α, IL-17A and IL-17F are similar in the control and test mice. Levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL-2 and IFN-γ were higher in mice than in control mice test, and the level of pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL-8 and IL-1β was higher in the test mice than in control mice. In between the two anti-inflammatory cytokines, the same level of IL-10 but higher for IL-4 in the test ...
SWISS-MODEL Repository entry for A8FK08 (IF3_CAMJ8), Translation initiation factor IF-3. Campylobacter jejuni subsp jejuni serotype O:6 (strain 81116 / NCTC11828)
SWISS-MODEL Repository entry for A8FJV7 (Y145_CAMJ8), UPF0102 protein C8J_0145. Campylobacter jejuni subsp jejuni serotype O:6 (strain 81116 / NCTC11828)
Marsden, G., Li, J., Everest, P., Lawson, A. and Ketley, J. (2009) Creation of a large deletion mutant in Campylobacter jejuni reveals the lipooligosaccharide gene cluster is not required for viability. Journal of Bacteriology. 191(7), pp. 2392-2399. 0021-9193 ...
Campylobacter jejuni- a foodborn pathogen that is a leading cause of food poisoning. It is three times more common than Salmonella and is primarily caused by mishandling of raw poultry or consumption of undercooked meat. - Stock Image B220/1473
The conclusions, findings, and opinions expressed by authors contributing to this journal do not necessarily reflect the official position of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Public Health Service, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or the authors affiliated institutions. Use of trade names is for identification only and does not imply endorsement by any of the groups named above. ...
Thank you for sharing this Journal of Bacteriology article.. NOTE: We request your email address only to inform the recipient that it was you who recommended this article, and that it is not junk mail. We do not retain these email addresses.. ...
Alhamdulillah, setelah hampir 4 bulan saya tidak mengupdate blog ni, akhirnya diberi kekuatan juga oleh Allah untuk update blog ni. Hmm....dah bersawang habis dah ni.. Segala macam sarang dah ada ni... Sekarang masa untuk bersihkan semua sawang-sawang dan sarang-sarang tu ...
UK - A recent study by a research team involving Swansea Universitys food safety expert Professor Tom Humphrey looked into the immune response of broiler chickens to Campylobacter jejuni, the most important food borne pathogen in the EU.
Immunoproteomic Technique Reveals FlaA is an Antigenic Protein Strongly React with Derived Serum from Campylobacter Jejuni Infected Chicken
Raw milk can be a host to a wide array of pathogens, including but not limited to, staphylococcus aureus, campylobacter jejuni, E. coli, listeria mon
May 09, 2014 - News Release. A vaccine invented at the University of Guelph to protect against Campylobacter jejuni - one of the leading bacterial causes of food-borne illness in the world - has just been approved for human clinical trials by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA).. Its the first U of G technology to reach this testing phase.. "Its very rare that you have a discovery go this far," said chemistry professor Mario Monteiro. He developed the sugar-based vaccine at U of G, working with the U.S. Naval Medical Research Center.. C. jejuni is a leading cause of bacterial diarrhea worldwide. Its one of North Americas leading bacterial causes of food-borne illness, resulting in 1.3 million cases a year. It occurs at much higher rates in some developing countries and is especially problematic for children.. The bacteria cause "travellers diarrhea," a common problem for Canadians visiting developing countries. The organism is also associated with irritable bowel syndrome ...
[170 Pages Report] Bacteriological Testing Market report categorizes the global market by Component, End-use Industry (Pharmaceutical, Cosmetics, Food & Beverage, Water), Bacteria (Campylobacter, Legionella, Listeria, Coliform, Salmonella), Technology (Traditional, Rapid), and Region
Flanagan, Rebecca C. et al "Examination of Campylobacter jejuni Putative Adhesins Leads to the Identification of a New Protein, Designated FlpA, Required for Chicken Colonization ." Infection and Immunity 77.6 (2009): 2399-2407. Web. 29 Feb. 2020. ...
Puppy kisses are cute, but they may be dangerous. At least 30 people have been sickened from a drug-resistant bacteria they most likely picked up after coming in contact with puppies, federal health officials say. The outbreak of a strain of Campylobacter jejuni, a bacteria commonly associated with food poisoning, has spread to 13 states and caused four hospitalizations, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says. [gh:iframe title=Gannett embed player
The other day on Bioscription, we discussed the South Korean Institute for Basic Science (IBS) and their work with CRISPR-Cpf1 in soybeans. Today, the same organization has released a study on a new form of CRISPR-Cas9 that they isolated from Campylobacter jejuni. This resulted in the acronym CjCas9 for it. A Problem Of Size A […]. ...
Campylobacter jejuni binds intestinal H(O) antigen (Fuc alpha 1, 2Gal beta 1,4GlcNAc), and fucosyloligosaccharides of human milk inhibit its binding and infection. (2003 ...
欢迎光临 2017 年中国国际医疗器械秋季博览会 (CMEF) 德国馆! - 2017 年 10 月 29 日 - 11 月 1 日 - 中国医疗器械博览会
Researchers at the University of Liverpools Institute of Infection and Global Health have discovered a key cause of life threatening heart complications, which frequently follow severe infections with the bacteria responsible for pneumonia and meningitis.
Studies that investigate arsenic resistance in the foodborne bacterium Campylobacter are limited. A total of 552 Campylobacter isolates (281 Campylobacter jejuni and 271 Campylobacter coli) isolated from retail meat samples were subjected to arsenic resistance profiling using the following arsenic compounds: arsanilic acid (4-2,048 μg/mL), roxarsone (4-2048 μg/mL), arsenate (16-8,192 μg/mL) and arsenite (4-2,048 μg/mL). A total of 223 of these isolates (114 Campylobacter jejuni and 109 Campylobacter coli) were further analyzed for the presence of five arsenic resistance genes (arsP, arsR, arsC, acr3, and arsB) by PCR. Most of the 552 Campylobacter isolates were able to survive at higher concentrations of arsanilic acid (512-2,048 μg/mL), roxarsone (512-2,048 μg/mL), and arsenate (128-1,024 μg/mL), but at lower concentrations for arsenite (4-16 μg/mL). Ninety seven percent of the isolates tested by PCR showed the presence of arsP and arsR genes. While 95% of the Campylobacter coli isolates
The Gram-negative bacterium Campylobacter jejuni is able to enter, survive and multiply within the free living amoeba Acanthamoeba polyphaga, but the molecular mechanisms behind these events are still unclear. We have studied the uptake and intracellular trafficking of viable and heat killed bacterial cells of the C. jejuni strain 81-176 in A. polyphaga. We found that viable bacteria associated with a substantially higher proportion of Acanthamoeba trophozoites than heat killed bacteria. Furthermore, the kinetics of internalization, the total number of internalized bacteria as well as the intracellular localization of internalized C. jejuni were dramatically influenced by bacterial viability. Viable bacteria were internalized at a high rate already after 1 h of co-incubation and were observed in small vacuoles tightly surrounding the bacteria. In contrast, internalization of heat killed C. jejuni was low at early time points and did not peak until 96 h. These cells were gathered in large ...
On June 29, 2011, the Wyoming Department of Health was notified of two laboratory-confirmed cases of Campylobacter jejuni enteritis among persons working at a local sheep ranch. During June, two men had reported onset of symptoms compatible with campylobacteriosis. Both patients had diarrhea, and one also had abdominal cramps, fever, nausea, and vomiting. One patient was hospitalized for 1 day. Both patients recovered without sequelae. During June, both patients had participated in a multiday event to castrate and dock tails of 1,600 lambs. Both men reported having used their teeth to castrate some of the lambs. Among the 12 persons who participated in the event, the patients are the only two known to have used their teeth to castrate lambs. During the multiday event, a few lambs reportedly had a mild diarrheal illness. Neither patient with laboratory-confirmed illness reported consumption of poultry or unpasteurized dairy products, which are common sources of exposure to C. jejuni (1). The ...
Background: Campylobacter jejuni is the main cause of gastroenteritis worldwide. Symptoms of C. jejuni infections range from asymptomatic to bloody diarrhea. Previous studies showed a strong association between diversity in presence of bacterial virulence factors including: Campylobacter invasion protein B (CiaB), fibronectin-binding outer membrane protein (CadF), cytolethal distending toxin B (CdtB), Clp ATP dependent protease (ClpP) and HtrB protein. The aim of this project was to study the association between prevalence of the aforementioned genes, the antimicrobial resistance patterns of the isolates, and the demographic data of patients. Methodology: A total of 174 archived isolates of C. jejuni were obtained from stool samples of symptomatic patients in the Microbiology Laboratory at Hamad Medical Corporation (HMC). Isolates were revived using selective media and DNA was extracted from posititve colonies. C. jejuni isolates were screened by real-time PCR for the presence of five of ...
Campylobacter spp. particularly C. jejuni has been recognized as one of the most prevalent causes of foodborne bacterial illnesses in humans. Most previous studies have focused on the transmission routes of C. jejuni from commercial flock farms to the final retail product. To date, no in vivo studies have addressed the efficacy of sulfadimethoxine in the control of C. jejuni in poultry. This dissertation research proceeds along two lines of investigation. The objectives of the first line of investigation are to determine the enumeration of Campylobacter spp. and the prevalence on both Campylobacter spp. and C. jejuni on live egg shells, to detect the presence and extent of Campylobacter spp. and C. jejuni in live birds raised in battery-cage and cage-free systems and to determine to what extent these bacteria are present in drinking water, feed, enclosures and troughs. The objectives of the second line of investigation are to determine the effects of sulfadimethoxine antibiotic on the enumeration of
Description of disease Bacterial gastroenteritis. Treatment Bacterial gastroenteritis. Symptoms and causes Bacterial gastroenteritis Prophylaxis Bacterial gastroenteritis
Campylobacter lanienae is a species of Campylobacter found in humans and other animals. Like other Campylobacter species, it is rod-shaped, non-glucose-fermenting, oxidase- and catalase-positive, Gram-negative and motile. Logan, J.; Burnens, A.; Linton, D.; Lawson, A. J.; Stanley, J. (2000). "Campylobacter lanienae sp. nov., a new species isolated from workers in an abattoir". International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology. 50 (2): 865-872. doi:10.1099/00207713-50-2-865. ISSN 1466-5026. PMID 10758898. Lund, M.; Nordentoft, S.; Pedersen, K.; Madsen, M. (2004). "Detection of Campylobacter spp. in Chicken Fecal Samples by Real-Time PCR". Journal of Clinical Microbiology. 42 (11): 5125-5132. doi:10.1128/JCM.42.11.5125-5132.2004. ISSN 0095-1137. Inglis GD, Kalischuk LD, Busz HW, Kastelic JP (September 2005). "Colonization of cattle intestines by Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter lanienae". Applied and Environmental Microbiology. 71 (9): 5145-53. ...
Fullscreen (supported by IE11, latest versions of Firefox, Chrome, Safari (not including iOS Safari), Edge, Chrome for Android, Samsung Internet) ...
We report a case of neonatal Campylobacter jejuni sepsis in a 3-week-old infant who acquired the infection through transmission from a recently acquired household puppy. Genotyping of Campylobacter strains obtained from puppy and child resulted in highly homogenous findings. This represents the first genetically proven C. jejuni dog-human transmission.. ...
Kampilobakterioza je zoonoza uzrokovana rodom Campylobacter spp i vodeći je uročnik akutnog gastroenteritisa. U 80% infekcija za zarazu je odgovoran Campylobacter jejuni, u 10% zaraza je Campylobacter coli te u 0,1% Campylobacter lari. Jedini soj koji je dokazano nepatogen za čovjeka je Campylobacter jejuni suspp. doylei. Bakterija se prenosi najčešće putem hrane (goveda, svinje,perad), neklorirane vode te nepasteriziranog mlijeka. Uzrokuje infekciju kojoj su simptomi glavobolja, proljev, mučnina i grčevi koje u nekim slučajevima prati vrućica. Uspoređujući podatke sa zavoda za javno zdravstvo dviju županija, Primorsko-goranska županija i Grad Zagreb, ustanovljena je veća stopa incidencije u Primorsko-goranskoj županiji. Kampilobakterioza se češće javlja u ljetnim mjesecima dok se u prvom tromjesečju zabilježava niži broj slučajeva. U Republici Hrvatskoj od kampilobakterioze češće obolijevaju pripadnici muškog spola. U Primorsko-goranskoj županiji u razdoblju od ...
Evidence of udder excretion of Campylobacter jejuni as the cause of milk-borne campylobacter outbreak - Volume 94 Issue 2 - D. N. Hutchinson, F. J. Bolton, P. M. Hinchliffe, H. C. Dawkins, S. D. Horsley, E. G. Jessop, P. A. Robertshaw, D. E. Counter
A carne de frango consiste em uma matriz ideal para a multiplicação de micro- organismos, e, portanto, é associada a numerosas infecções em humanos. Entre as bactérias que mais geram infecções intestinais, a partir do consumo de produtos avícolas, encontra-se a espécie Campylobacter jejuni. O uso indiscriminado de antibióticos na produção animal, pode contribuir na seleção de bactérias resistentes, que podem ser disseminadas durante a produção ou processamento dos alimentos. Desta forma, são necessárias novas alternativas para o controle desse patógeno, como a utilização de bacteriófagos. O objetivo deste trabalho foi isolar, caracterizar e avaliar o efeito de um coquetel de bacteriófagos de forma individual ou associado ao antibiótico enrofloxacina, no controle de C. jejuni, em frangos de corte. Foram isolados seis bacteriófagos (BC2, BC7, BC10, BC14, BC18 e BC19) a partir de fezes de frango coletadas em duas granjas avícolas na região de Viçosa, no Estado de Minas ...
The ATCC Licensed Derivative Emblem, the ATCC Licensed Derivative word mark and the ATCC catalog marks are trademarks of ATCC. Microbiologics, Inc. is licensed to use these trademarks and to sell products derived from ATCC® cultures. Look for the ATCC Licensed Derivative © Emblem for products derived from ATCC© cultures. ...
Linton, D, Karlyshev, A V, Hitchen, P G, Morris, H R, Dell, A, Gregson, N A and Wren, B W (2000) Multiple N-acetyl neuraminic acid synthetase (neuB) genes in Campylobacter jejuni: identification and characterization of the gene involved in sialylation of lipo-oligosaccharide. Molecular microbiology, 35(5), pp. 1120-1134. ISSN (print) 0950-382X ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Jejunal Infection With Campylobacter. AU - Ward, Thomas T.. AU - Klein, Kenneth. AU - Borthistle, Bruce K.. PY - 1984/5. Y1 - 1984/5. N2 - A patient had common variable immunodeficiency, chronic malabsorption, and Campylobacter jejuni infection. Infection was diagnosed by jejunal aspiration. A follow-up jejunal aspirate was culture positive at the same time that a stool culture was negative. Infection resulted in worsening of chronic diarrhea, but it was not associated with clinical features of colitis or proctitis. The duration of infection was prolonged and initial antimicrobial therapy was ineffective. Single drug therapy with erythromycin ethylsuccinate and then chloramphenicol led to the emergence of resistant organisms. After five months of bacterial excretion, combination therapy with metronidazole and neomycin sulfate eliminated the organism. This case emphasizes that the clinical manifestations and response to therapy of C jejuni infection can be altered in ...
Campylobacter jejuni • Capnocytophaga ochracea • Corynebacterium xerosis • Enterobacter cloacae • Escherichia coli • ...
Campylobacter jejuni *Campylobacteriosis, Guillain-Barré syndrome. *Helicobacter pylori *Peptic ulcer, MALT lymphoma, Gastric ... Campylobacter, Yersinia, Aeromonas, and Plesiomonas spp. are less frequently found. Mechanisms of action vary: some bacteria ... where Campylobacter is more prominent.[2][3] About 10% to 20% of cases are due to norovirus.[3] Protozoa such as Giardia may ...
"A proteome-wide protein interaction map for Campylobacter jejuni". Genome Biol. 8 (7): R130. doi:10.1186/gb-2007-8-7-r130. PMC ...
The order Campylobacterales includes human pathogens such as Helicobacter pylori and Campylobacter jejuni. The only publicly ... "Bad Bug Book - BBB - Campylobacter jejuni". www.fda.gov. Retrieved 2016-04-03. "Helicobacter Pylori Infections: MedlinePlus". ...
However, Campylobacter jejuni has seven protofilaments. The basal body has several traits in common with some types of ...
She also edited one book in 1992 titled Campylobacter Jejuni: Current Status and Future Trends. The genus Campylobacter is a ... "Campylobacter Jejuni: Current Status and Future Trends". Google Books. ...
Campylobacter jejuni is one of the most common sources of infectious enteritis, and the most common bacterial pathogen found in ... Peterson, Michael C. (2003-05-01). "Campylobacter jejuni enteritis associated with consumption of raw milk". Journal of ... In particular, campylobacter, shigella, salmonella and many other bacteria induce acute self-limited colitis, an inflammation ... In Germany, 90% of cases of infectious enteritis are caused by four pathogens, Norovirus, Rotavirus, Campylobacter and ...
A link to Campylobacter jejuni was suspected when a young girl was admitted to Second Teaching Hospital. She had become ill ... Relationship to Campylobacter jejuni infection and anti-glycolipid antibodies". Brain. 118: 597-605. doi:10.1093/brain/118.3. ... Investigators discovered that several of the chickens in the home displayed similar symptoms and C. jejuni was found in their ... Several of the paralysis patients were found to have antibodies to C. jejuni and anti-GD1a antibodies, suggesting a link ...
... is a form of agar used to culture species of Brucella and campylobacter jejuni Mangels JI, Douglas BP (October ... Reeser RJ, Medler RT, Billington SJ, Jost BH, Joens LA (2007). "Characterization of Campylobacter jejuni biofilms under defined ...
Avrain L, Vernozy-Rozand C, Kempf I (2004). "Evidence for natural horizontal transfer of tetO gene between Campylobacter jejuni ... TetO gen conferring resistance to tetracycline, between Campylobacter jejuni. Neochrome, gene in some ferns that enhances their ...
"Bickerstaff's brainstem encephalitis after an outbreak of Campylobacter jejuni enteritis". Journal of Neuroimmunology. ...
The bacterium Campylobacter jejuni has been isolated from their beaks and cloacae so milk can become contaminated as they drink ... "Jackdaws as potential source of milk-borne Campylobacter jejuni infection". The Lancet. 335 (8698): 1160. doi:10.1016/0140-6736 ... This activity was linked to cases of Campylobacter gastroenteritis in Gateshead in northeast England and led the Department of ...
... heptacis-undecaprenol This enzyme is isolated from Campylobacter jejuni. Glover, K.J.; Weerapana, E.; Imperiali, B. (2005). "In ... "Polyisoprenol specificity in the Campylobacter jejuni N-linked glycosylation pathway". Biochemistry. 46 (50): 14342-14348. doi: ...
Gastrointestinal campylobacteriosis is caused by Campylobacter jejuni or Campylobacter coli. Although it is a commensal in the ... Campylobacter is spread horizontally via the fecal-oral route. Campylobacter fetus can also cause venereal disease and abortion ... C. jejuni can be treated with the antibiotics erythromycin and tetracycline. The disease can be prevented with good husbandry ... Campylobacter infection can be confirmed by rising antibody titers, culture on a selective medium, or histological examination ...
"Reactive nitrogen species contribute to innate host defense against Campylobacter jejuni". Infection and Immunity. 76 (3): 986- ...
... and Campylobacter jejuni. Common viral contaminants include norovirus, sapovirus, rotavirus, enteroviruses, and hepatitis A and ...
Campylobacter jejuni genomes and related information at PATRIC, a Bioinformatics Resource Center funded by NIAID. ... Campylobacteriosis is an infection by the Campylobacter bacterium, most commonly C. jejuni. It is among the most common ... Furthermore, in the United Kingdom during 2000, Campylobacter jejuni was involved in 77.3% in all cases of laboratory confirmed ... C jejuni appears to achieve this by invading and destroying epithelial cells. C. jejuni can also cause a latent autoimmune ...
... -7 is also used in binding to pathogens such as Campylobacter jejuni. This occurs in a sialic acid-dependent manner and ... immunoglobulin-like lectin 7 mediates selective recognition of sialylated glycans expressed on Campylobacter jejuni ...
Potential competitive exclusion bacteria from poultry inhibitory to Campylobacter jejuni and Salmonella. J. Food Protect. 70: ... Consultation on Veterinary Public Health Aspects of Prevention and Control of Campylobacter Infections, World Health ...
"Identification and characterization of NeuB3 from Campylobacter jejuni as a pseudaminic acid synthase". J. Biol. Chem. 280 (43 ...
"N-linked glycosylation in Campylobacter jejuni and its functional transfer into E. coli". Science. 298 (5599): 1790-1793. doi: ... as glycosylation for stability or function have been expressed using the N-linked glycosylation system of Campylobacter jejuni ...
"N-linked glycosylation in Campylobacter jejuni and its functional transfer into E. coli". Science. 298 (5599): 1790-1793. doi: ...
"Antimicrobial activity of copper surfaces against suspensions of Salmonella enterica and Campylobacter jejuni". BMC ...
"The genome sequence of the food-borne pathogen Campylobacter jejuni reveals hypervariable sequences". Nature. 403 (6770): 665-8 ...
... including glycoproteins by using the N-linked glycosylation system of Campylobacter jejuni engineered into E. coli. Efforts are ... "N-linked glycosylation in Campylobacter jejuni and its functional transfer into E. coli". Science. 298 (5599): 1790-1793. doi: ...
Campylobacter jejuni *Campylobacteriosis, Guillain-Barré syndrome. *Helicobacter pylori *Peptic ulcer, MALT lymphoma, Gastric ...
Simple: Guillain-Barre is an acute autoimmune polyneuritis, which may be triggered by a bowel infection, campylobacter jejuni, ... Most classically, it is caused by campylobacter, but associations have been seen with cmv, flu, and many other infections. ...
In persons with compromised immune systems, Campylobacter occasionally spreads to the bloodstream and causes a serious life- ... Campylobacteriosis is an infectious disease caused by bacteria of the genus Campylobacter. Most people who become ill with ... Multidrug-Resistant Campylobacter Infections Linked to Contact with Pet Store Puppiesplus icon *Brote de infecciones por ... CDC estimates Campylobacter is the #1 cause of bacterial diarrheal illness in the United States. It is also the #1 intestinal ...
Campylobacter jejuni.. Snelling WJ1, Matsuda M, Moore JE, Dooley JS.. Author information. 1. School of Biomedical Sciences, ... This review describes characteristics of the family Campylobacteraceae and traits of Campylobacter jejuni. The review then ... focuses on the worldwide problem of C. jejuni antimicrobial resistance and mechanisms of pathogenesis and virulence. ...
Campylobacter jejuni is one of the most common bacterial ... Campylobacter jejuni is one of the most common bacterial causes ... Campylobacter jejuni infection causes cramping, diarrhea, abdominal pain and fever within 2 to 5 days after a person has been ... Campylobacter jejuni infection causes cramping, diarrhea, abdominal pain and fever within 2 to 5 days after a person has been ... Most cases of Campylobacter jejuni come from handling or ingesting raw or undercooked poultry meat. Although poultry and other ...
"Campylobacter jejuni , Campylobacter Food Poisoning". www.about-campylobacter.com. Retrieved 2016-04-18. Ryan KJ, Ray CG, eds ... funded by NIAID Current research on Campylobacter jejuni at the Norwich Research Park Type strain of Campylobacter jejuni at ... Campylobacter jejuni is in a genus of bacteria that is among the most common causes of bacterial infections in humans worldwide ... Campylobacter jejuni (/ˈkæmpɪloʊˌbæktər dʒəˈdʒuːni/) is one of the most common causes of food poisoning in the United States ...
CheY-mediated modulation of Campylobacter jejuni virulence.. Yao R1, Burr DH, Guerry P. ... Four motile, non-adherent and non-invasive mutants of Campylobacter jejuni 81-176 generated by a site-specific insertional ... DNA identified which was capable of repressing adherence and invasion was a 0.8 kb fragment encoding the cheY gene of C.jejuni ...
The pathogenesis of Campylobacter jejuni-mediated enteritis.. Konkel ME1, Monteville MR, Rivera-Amill V, Joens LA. ... Campylobacter jejuni, a gram-negative spiral shaped bacterium, is a frequent cause of gastrointestinal food-borne illness in ... Illness with C. jejuni ranges from mild to severe diarrheal disease. This article focuses on Campylobacter virulence ... A model is presented that diagrams the interactions of C. jejuni with the intestinal epithelium. Additional work to identify ...
Experimental Campylobacter jejuni infection in humans. J Infect Dis 1988;157:472-9. CrossRefexternal icon PubMedexternal icon ... Campylobacter jejuni is a common raw milk contaminant and is notoriously difficult to isolate from food products, because of ... Humphrey TJ, Beckett P. Campylobacter jejuni in dairy cows and raw milk. Epidemiol Infect 1987;98:263-9. CrossRefexternal icon ... Campylobacter jejuni Infections Associated with Raw Milk Consumption - Utah, 2014. Weekly / April 1, 2016 / 65(12);301-305 ...
Campylobacter jejuni Campylobacter jejuni is a Gram-negative, spiral-shaped bacterium. C. jejuni is often found colonising the ... Scanning electron microscopy image of Campylobacter jejuni. In brown you can see the filamentous flagella. Colouring is false. ... 1.) Campylobacter jejuni is the most common cause of food poisoning in the world. 2.) One of most important features that ... One of the key features of C. jejuni that helps it to cause disease is its ability to move towards nutrients and away from ...
Torres O.R., López-Ruano J.V., Cruz J.R., Cano F., Bartlett A. (1996) Campylobacter Jejuni Repeated Infections in Children from ... In Guatemalan children, seven percent of the C. jejuni infections result in acute dysentery2. As C. jejuni is only susceptible ... Among the many causes of diarrhoea, C. jejuni 1 is seldom reported in the routine search for pathogens due to the special ... In: Newell D.G., Ketley J.M., Feldman R.A. (eds) Campylobacters, Helicobacters, and Related Organisms. Springer, Boston, MA. * ...
jejuni ATCC ® 49943™ Designation: Strain LRA 094.06.89 TypeStrain=False Application: Quality control strain for API products ... Campylobacter jejuni subsp. jejuni (ATCC® 49943™) Strain Designations: Strain LRA 094.06.89 / Type Strain: no / Biosafety Level ... Nucleotide (GenBank) : AY621112 Campylobacter jejuni subsp. jejuni strain ATCC 49943 16S ribosomal RNA gene, partial sequence ...
C. jejuni is transmitted via the fecal-oral route; this is the first reported association of C. jejuni infection with exposure ... Notes from the Field: Campylobacter jejuni Infections Associated with Sheep Castration Wyoming, 2011. On June 29, 2011, the ... C. jejuni was isolated from two lambs; one isolate had a PFGE pattern indistinguishable from the two human isolates. ... Both patients provided stool specimens for laboratory testing; C. jejuni was isolated from each. The pulsed-field gel ...
A multistate investigation of an outbreak of human multidrug-resistant Campylobacter infections during 2017-2018 was linked to ... A multistate investigation of an outbreak of human multidrug-resistant Campylobacter infections during 2017-2018 was linked to ... Multidrug-Resistant Campylobacter jejuni Outbreak Linked to Puppy Exposure - United States, 2016-2018. Weekly / September 21, ... Campylobacter jejuni isolates were obtained for 51 persons and 23 puppies. Outbreak isolates from 45 persons and 11 puppies ...
Campylobacter jejuni was first categorized in the vibrios. "The new generic term Campylobacter (curved rod in Greek) was ... jejuni Description and Significance. Campylobacter jejuni is a Gram-negative bacteria that is curved and rod-shaped. It is most ... 2] Campylobacter jejuni is the number one cause of food-borne illness in the United States. Therefore, it is very important to ... Campylobacter jejuni. From MicrobeWiki, the student-edited microbiology resource. Revision as of 14:55, 15 July 2015 by Derek.M ...
... to inhibit the adhesion and invasion of Campylobacter jejuni in vitro and to suppress C. jejuni colonization of chicks in vivo ... Lactobacillus gasseri SBT2055 reduces infection by and colonization of Campylobacter jejuni.. Nishiyama K1, Seto Y2, Yoshioka K ... Cecal sections were probed with anti-Campylobacter antiserum or stained with DAPI. Fluorescence microscopy shows C. jejuni ... jejuni 81-176. Methanol (MeOH)-fixed LG2055 also reduced infection by C. jejuni 81-176. However, proteinase K (ProK)-treated ...
Quinolone-resistant Campylobacter jejuni infections in Minnesota, 1992-1998. Investigation Team.. Smith KE1, Besser JM, Hedberg ... We conducted a case-comparison study of patients with ciprofloxacin-resistant Campylobacter jejuni isolated during 1996 and ... Ciprofloxacin-resistant C. jejuni was isolated from 14 percent of 91 domestic chicken products obtained from retail markets in ... All 4953 campylobacter isolates from humans received by the Minnesota Department of Health were tested for resistance to ...
Campylobacter jejuni strain 81-176 uptake into 407 intestinal cells and Citrobacter entry into T24 bladder cells was blocked by ... Unusual microtubule-dependent endocytosis mechanisms triggered by Campylobacter jejuni and Citrobacter freundii. T A ... Inhibitors of endosome acidification had no significant impact on intracellular survival of Campylobacter jejuni or Citrobacter ... Unusual microtubule-dependent endocytosis mechanisms triggered by Campylobacter jejuni and Citrobacter freundii ...
Evidence of udder excretion of Campylobacter jejuni as the cause of milk-borne Campylobacter outbreak. J Hyg 1985;94:205--15. ... Campylobacter jejuni Infection Associated with Unpasteurized Milk and Cheese --- Kansas, 2007. On October 26, 2007, a family ... Campylobacter jejuni infections: update on emerging issues and trends. Clin Inf Dis 2001;32:1201--6. ... that Campylobacter jejuni had been isolated from two ill persons from different families who were members of a closed community ...
tr,O69287,O69287_CAMJU Heat shock protein OS=Campylobacter jejuni OX=197 GN=clpB PE=3 SV=1 ...
Campylobacter jejuni, which is now recognized as a discrete species, is a gram negative, microaerophilic, thermophilic, ... 1984). Isolation ofCampylobacter jejuni from human feces. In: Campylobacter infection in man and animals. 1st ed. Butzler, J.P ... 1982) 30 years of Campylobacters: biochemical characteristics and a biotyping proposal forCampylobacter jejuni. J. Clin. ... 1981) Isolation ofCampylobacter fetus subsp.jejuni from zoo animals. J. Am. Vet. Med. Assoc. 179(11):1119-1122.Google Scholar ...
In this study, the aim was to find characteristic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) of C. jejuni in order to detect its ... For this reason, MOX sensors are a promising technology for the development of a rapid and sensitive system for C. jejuni. ... It has been found that a Campylobacter sample at T20 is characterized by a higher number of alcohol compounds that the one at ... Campylobacter spp infection affects more than 200,000 people every year in Europe and in the last four years a trend shows an ...
The C. jejuni MeOPN transferase mutant showed similar levels of colonization relative to the wild-type in chickens, but showed ... In C. jejuni, the observed serum mediated killing was determined to result primarily from activation of the classical ... C. jejuni produces over 47 different capsular structures, including a unique O-methyl phosphoramidate (MeOPN) modification ... Using MeOPN biosynthesis and transferase mutants generated in C. jejuni strain 81-176, we observed that loss of MeOPN from the ...
jejuni ATCC ® 700819™ Designation: NCTC 11168 TypeStrain=False Application: Enteric and emerging infectious disease research ... Campylobacter jejuni subsp. jejuni (Jones et al.) Veron and Chatelain (ATCC® 700819D-5™) Add to ... Campylobacter jejuni subsp. jejuni (Jones et al.) Veron and Chatelain (ATCC® 700819™) Strain Designations: NCTC 11168 / Type ... Campylobacter jejuni subsp. jejuni (Jones et al.) Veron and Chatelain ATCC® 700819™ freeze-dried ...
jejuni ATCC ® BAA-219™ Designation: D3563 TypeStrain=False Application: Emerging infectious disease research Enteric Research ... Campylobacter jejuni subsp. jejuni (Jones et al.) Veron and Chatelain (ATCC® BAA-219™) Strain Designations: D3563 / Type Strain ... Campylobacter jejuni subsp. jejuni (Jones et al.) Veron and Chatelain ATCC® BAA-219™ freeze-dried ...
  • Together, these data demonstrate a critical role for the C. jejuni stringent response in multiple aspects of C. jejuni biology and pathogenesis and, further, may lend novel insight into unexplored features of the stringent response in other prokaryotic organisms. (nih.gov)
  • A model proposed for Campylobacter pathogenesis suggests attachment to and disruption of epithelial cell barriers, before migrating toward the basal ends of cells, where incorporation takes place ( O'Loughlin and Konkel, 2014 ). (frontiersin.org)
  • The first step in campylobacter pathogenesis is adherence to intestinal mucosa. (nih.gov)
  • Despite the global significance of C. jejuni as a leading cause of diarrheal disease ( 2 ), the mechanisms of pathogenesis of C. jejuni are not well understood. (cdc.gov)
  • Indeed, many other genes in C. jejuni are subject to phase variation, including those responsible for sticking to host molecules and taking up essential nutrients. (le.ac.uk)
  • The crucial role of Campylobacter jejuni genes in anti-ganglioside antibody induction in Guillain-Barré syndrome," Journal of Clinical Investigation , vol. 114, no. 11, pp. 1659-1665, 2004. (hindawi.com)
  • O objetivo desse trabalho foi avaliar a diversidade genética por cinco diferentes técnicas de tipagem molecular, o potencial patogênico pela pesquisa de 16 genes de virulência por PCR e o perfil de resistência pela concentração inibitória mínima por Etest® frente a quatro antimicrobianos e pela análise in silico de genes de resistência e pontos de mutação de linhagens de C. jejuni isoladas no Brasil. (usp.br)
  • Conclui-se que a alta frequência da maioria dos genes de virulência pesquisados evidenciou o potencial patogênico das linhagens de C. jejuni estudadas. (usp.br)
  • The effort to identify C. jejuni-specific adherence/invasion genes during host pathogen interaction by using restriction fragment differential display PCR (RFDD-PCR) has been made. (umd.edu)
  • RNAseq analysis of caecal tissue from 14 C. jejuni-susceptible and 14 C. jejuni-resistant birds generated over 363 million short mRNA sequences which were investigated to identify 219 differentially expressed genes. (nih.gov)
  • Significantly higher expression of genes involved in the innate immune response, cytokine signaling, B cell and T cell activation and immunoglobulin production, as well as the renin-angiotensin system was observed in resistant birds, suggesting an early active immune response to C. jejuni. (nih.gov)
  • No type III secretion apparatus genes have been found in the complete genomic sequence of Campylobacter jejuni NCTC11168. (nih.gov)
  • 2106), the extent of variation in 27 phase-variable genes of C. jejuni strain 11168 has been explored during in vitro passage, infections of chickens and after imposition of non-selective bottlenecks. (warwick.ac.uk)
  • Campylobacter jejuni encodes 12 of the 14 subunits that make up the respiratory enzyme NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (also called complex I). The two nuo genes not present in C. jejuni encode the NADH dehydrogenase, and in their place in the operon are the novel genes designated Cj1575c and Cj1574c. (asm.org)
  • flaB -typing was applied to 78 C. jejuni isolates, previously characterized by Multi-Locus Sequence Typing, and genotypic resistances towards macrolides and quinolones based on point mutations in the 23S rRNA and gyrA genes, respectively, were determined. (mdpi.com)
  • To our knowledge, this is the first study to determine arsenic resistance and the prevalence of arsenic resistance genes in such a large number of Campylobacter isolates. (mdpi.com)
  • The smallest piece of DNA identified which was capable of repressing adherence and invasion was a 0.8 kb fragment encoding the cheY gene of C.jejuni. (nih.gov)
  • AY751992 Campylobacter jejuni strain RM3193 DNA-binding protein HU (hup) gene, complete cds. (atcc.org)
  • spoT is the first C. jejuni gene shown to participate in longer term survival in epithelial cells. (nih.gov)
  • The main mechanism that confers high-level resistance to ciprofloxacin in Campylobacter is the occurrence of the Thre86Ile point mutation in the quinolone-resistance-determining region (QRDR) of the gene that encodes DNA gyrase subunit A ( gyrA ), although other mutations within gyrA , as well as enhanced efflux activity can contribute to development of ciprofloxacin resistance ( Wieczorek and Osek, 2013 ). (frontiersin.org)
  • A screen of bacteriophages infecting a panel of Campylobacter jejuni PT14 gene knock-out mutants identified a role for the minor flagellin encoded by the flaB gene, in the defense of the host against CP8unalikevirus bacteriophage CP_F1 infection. (frontiersin.org)
  • Using high-throughput sequencing in an avian infection model, we investigate gene expression associated with resistance or susceptibility to colonization of the gastrointestinal tract with C. jejuni and find that gut related immune mechanisms are critical for regulating colonization. (nih.gov)
  • Campylobacter colonization of nursing mouse pups was inhibited if their dams had been transfected with a human alpha1,2-fucosyltransferase gene that caused expression of H(O) antigen in milk. (nih.gov)
  • We show that the Campylobacter jejuni mfrABE operon is transcribed from a single promoter, with the mfrA gene preceded by a small open reading-frame ( mfrX ) encoding a C. jejuni -specific polypeptide of unknown function. (wiley.com)
  • The DNA microarray provides a highly specific epidemiological typing tool for analysis of C. jejuni isolates and reveals both divergent and highly conserved gene classes among isolates. (nih.gov)
  • The hypermutable sequences of C. jejuni are mainly polyG tracts whose mutations mediate ON/OFF switches in gene expression. (warwick.ac.uk)
  • Insertional mutagenesis of the cmeF gene in C. jejuni NCTC 11168 resulted in a 2-fold decrease in the resistance to ampicillin, polymyxin B and EB, whereas the same mutation in C. jejuni 81-176 and 21190 led to a 2-4-fold increase in the resistance to multiple antimicrobials and toxic compounds. (nih.gov)
  • In conclusion, Cj1199 gene may directly regulate the leucine biosynthesis and transport and indirectly affect the development of erythromycin resistance in C. jejuni . (frontiersin.org)
  • Ruiz J , Goni P , Marco F , Gallardo F , Mirelis B , Jimenez De Anta T , Increased resistance to quinolones in Campylobacter jejuni: a genetic analysis of gyrA gene mutations in quinolone-resistant clinical isolates. (cdc.gov)
  • Campylobacter is a helical-shaped, nonspore-forming, Gram-negative, microaerophilic, nonfermenting bacterium forming motile rods with a single polar flagellum, which are also oxidase-positive and grow optimally at 37 to 42 °C. When exposed to atmospheric oxygen, C. jejuni is able to change into a coccal form. (wikipedia.org)
  • Campylobacter jejuni is a Gram-negative, spiral-shaped bacterium. (le.ac.uk)
  • This review will focus on the bacterium Campylobacter jejuni which is a leading cause of food borne illness in the developed world. (springer.com)
  • Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of Campylobacter jejuni is an enteric, curved-rod prokaryote (bacterium). (sciencephoto.com)
  • The Gram-negative bacterium Campylobacter jejuni is able to enter, survive and multiply within the free living amoeba Acanthamoeba polyphaga , but the molecular mechanisms behind these events are still unclear. (diva-portal.org)
  • Studies that investigate arsenic resistance in the foodborne bacterium Campylobacter are limited. (mdpi.com)
  • Campylobacter concisus is a Gram-negative, highly fastidious, mesophilic bacterium that grows under both anaerobic and microaerobic conditions with the presence of hydrogen significantly aiding growth. (wikipedia.org)
  • Immunopathology and Th1/Th2 immune response of Campylobacter jejuni -induced paralysis resembling Guillain-Barré syndrome in chicken," Medical Microbiology and Immunology , vol. 201, no. 2, pp. 177-187, 2012. (hindawi.com)
  • Campylobacter jejuni strain 81-176 uptake into 407 intestinal cells and Citrobacter entry into T24 bladder cells was blocked by microtubule depolymerization and inhibitors of coated-pit formation but not by microfilament depolymerization. (pnas.org)
  • We have studied the uptake and intracellular trafficking of viable and heat killed bacterial cells of the C. jejuni strain 81-176 in A. polyphaga . (diva-portal.org)
  • In addition, we localized the Cj0371 protein at the poles of C. jejuni by fluorescence microscopy. (frontiersin.org)
  • We hypothesize that Cj1388 and Cj0327 modulate post-translational modification of the flagella through yet unidentified mechanisms, and propose naming Cj1387 the Campylobacter Flagella Interaction Regulator CfiR, and the Cj1388 and Cj0327 protein as CfiP and CfiQ, respectively. (frontiersin.org)
  • It is based on the interaction of a specific DNA aptamer with surface protein in the cell membranes of C. jejuni . (springer.com)
  • This assay was designed based on interaction of specific DNA aptamer with surface protein in c. jejuni cell membrane without any modification of aptamer. (springer.com)
  • FlaC, a protein of Campylobacter jejuni TGH9011 (ATCC43431) secreted through the flagellar apparatus, binds epithelial cells and influences cell in. (nih.gov)
  • In wild-type C. jejuni cultures, FlaC is found predominantly in the extracellular milieu as a secreted protein. (nih.gov)
  • The electron acceptor for 2-oxoglutarate:acceptor oxidoreductase was determined to be flavodoxin, which was also determined to be an essential protein in C. jejuni . (asm.org)
  • This enzyme catalyses the following chemical reaction tritrans,heptacis-undecaprenyl diphosphooligosaccharide + [protein]-L-asparagine ⇌ {\displaystyle \rightleftharpoons } tritrans,heptacis-undecaprenyl diphosphate + a glycoprotein with the oligosaccharide chain attached by N-beta-D-glycosyl linkage to protein L-asparagine This is a bacterial enzyme that is isolated from Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter lari. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1983) In vitro sensitivity of 28 bovine isolates of Campylobacter to some commonly used antimicrobials. (springer.com)
  • Through in vitro transposition of C. jejuni chromosomal DNA followed by natural transformation of the transposed DNA, large random transposon mutant libraries consisting of approximately 16 000 individual mutants were generated. (nih.gov)
  • During C. jejuni infection in vitro, secreted FlaC and purified recombinant FlaC bind to HEp-2 cells. (nih.gov)
  • An in vitro assay showed that C. jejuni remained viable when internalized by Tetrahymena pyriformis and Acanthamoeba castellanii for significantly longer (up to 36 h) than when they were in purely a planktonic state. (asm.org)
  • We conducted a case-comparison study of patients with ciprofloxacin-resistant Campylobacter jejuni isolated during 1996 and 1997. (nih.gov)
  • Therefore, elucidating the mechanisms involved in DNA transfer will help us understand the adaptation of H. pylori and C. jejuni to changing environmental conditions and may have clinical relevance in the area of antibiotic resistance. (asm.org)
  • Despite the improved understanding of its general physiology and biochemistry, the molecular mechanisms involved in Campylobacter fitness and resistance development are largely unknown. (frontiersin.org)
  • The characteristics associated with the internalization and intracellular behavior of Campylobacter jejuni during short-term and long-term cultivation with INT 407 cells were examined. (nih.gov)
  • Chemotactic behavior of Campylobacter jejuni. (asm.org)
  • The chemotactic behavior of Campylobacter jejuni was determined in the presence of different amino acids, carbohydrates, organic acids, and preparations and constituents of mucin and bile. (asm.org)
  • In May 2014, the Utah Public Health Laboratory (UPHL) notified the Utah Department of Health (UDOH) of specimens from three patients infected with Campylobacter jejuni yielding indistinguishable pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns. (cdc.gov)
  • On May 21, 2014, UPHL notified UDOH of three laboratory-confirmed cases (in patients A, B, and C) of C. jejuni infection with indistinguishable SmaI PFGE patterns (DBRS16.0196). (cdc.gov)
  • Campylobacter infection is a reportable disease in Utah, and all Campylobacter isolates undergo PFGE analysis ( 1 ). (cdc.gov)
  • A confirmed case was defined as the onset of diarrheal illness caused by C. jejuni matching the cluster PFGE pattern or confirmed Campylobacter infection on or after May 1 in a person who had consumed dairy A raw milk 1-10 days before illness onset. (cdc.gov)
  • The pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns of the isolates were indistinguishable when restricted separately by two enzymes, Sma I and Kpn I. This PFGE pattern had never been reported among 667 specimens from which C. jejuni was isolated in Wyoming and is rare in CDC's PulseNet* database, with a frequency of 0.09% (8 of 8,817). (cdc.gov)
  • C. jejuni isolates from two ill persons had indistinguishable pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns, and the isolate from a third ill person was nearly identical to the other two. (cdc.gov)
  • C. jejuni clones from different flocks were clearly discriminated by fla-typing as well as by MRP/PFGE, except for a few cases where individual isolates belonging to two different clones were found to have altered fla-types. (nih.gov)
  • All suspected Campylobacter colonies were identified with PCR assays and C. jejuni was genotyped by sequence analysis of the flaA short variable region (SVR) and by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) using SmaI enzyme. (hindawi.com)
  • The present results lead to the conclusion that vertical transmission or horizontal transmission via the hatchery are not significant transmission routes of C. jejuni to broiler chickens under Danish conditions. (nih.gov)
  • Dr Hanning looked at the ability of C. jejuni to survive from biofilm populations isolated from four places: a drinking unit in a chicken grow-out house, a drain under a plucker in a processing plant, a retail chicken carcass and a crate used to haul live chickens. (thepoultrysite.com)
  • This report forms part of the project: A microbiological survey of Campylobacter contamination in fresh whole UK produced chilled chickens at retail sale (2015-2018) and presents AMR data for a subset of those Campylobacter isolates collected as part of this survey. (food.gov.uk)
  • Investigators discovered that several of the chickens in the home displayed similar symptoms and C. jejuni was found in their droppings. (wikipedia.org)
  • The genome of Campylobacter jejuni consists of circular DNA and 1,616,554 nucleotides. (kenyon.edu)
  • The genome sequence of C. jejuni codes for respiratory components that can utilize multiple electron donors and acceptors in a branched electron transport chain ( 27 ). (asm.org)
  • The fact that complex I occurs in the C. jejuni genome sequence was somewhat surprising, as it has been shown elsewhere that NADH is a poor respiratory electron donor ( 14 ). (asm.org)
  • Pretreatment with LG2055 significantly reduced adhesion to and invasion of a human epithelial cell line, Intestine 407, by C. jejuni 81-176. (nih.gov)
  • This enzyme catalyses the following chemical reaction UDP-N-acetyl-alpha-D-galactosamine + N-acetyl-D-galactosaminyl-alpha-(1->3)-N,N'-diacetyl-alpha-D-bacillosaminyl-diphospho-tritrans,heptacis-undecaprenol ⇌ {\displaystyle \rightleftharpoons } UDP + N-acetyl-D-galactosaminyl-alpha-(1->4)-N-acetyl-D-galactosaminyl-alpha-(1->3)-N,N'-diacetyl-alpha-D-bacillosaminyl-diphospho-tritrans,heptacis-undecaprenol This enzyme is isolated from Campylobacter jejuni. (wikipedia.org)
  • This enzyme catalyses the following chemical reaction UDP-N,N'-diacetylbacillosamine + tritrans,heptacis-undecaprenyl phosphate ⇌ {\displaystyle \rightleftharpoons } UMP + N,N'-diacetyl-alpha-D-bacillosaminyl-diphospho-tritrans,heptacis-undecaprenol This enzyme is isolated from Campylobacter jejuni. (wikipedia.org)
  • Campylobacter jejuni from patients with Guillain-Barré syndrome preferentially expresses a GD1a-like epitope," Infection and Immunity , vol. 70, no. 9, pp. 5299-5303, 2002. (hindawi.com)
  • The combined typing results showed that the broiler flocks could be colonised by 1-3 different Campylobacter clones and parent flocks could be colonised by 2-6 different clones. (nih.gov)
  • The prevalence of Campylobacter in broiler chicken flocks ranges from 3 to 90% depending on their location [ 6 , 7 ] and the isolation rates within positive flocks at slaughter are high (around 80%) [ 8 - 10 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • Collectively, our results strongly suggest that protozoa in broiler drinking water systems can delay the decline of Campylobacter viability and increase Campylobacter disinfection resistance, thus increasing the potential of Campylobacter to colonize broilers. (asm.org)
  • 2019. "Innovative Sensor Approach to Follow Campylobacter jejuni Development. (mdpi.com)
  • Masdor NA, Altintas Z, Tothill IE (2017) Surface Plasmon resonance Immunosensor for the detection of Campylobacter jejuni . (springer.com)
  • Masdor NA, Altintas Z, Tothill IE (2016) Sensitive detection of Campylobacter jejuni using nanoparticles enhanced QCM sensor. (springer.com)
  • Whiley H, McLean R, Ross K. Detection of Campylobacter jejuni in Lizard Faeces from Central Australia Using Quantitative PCR. (mdpi.com)
  • Detection of Campylobacter spp. (wikipedia.org)
  • Campylobacter jejuni is a common raw milk contaminant and is notoriously difficult to isolate from food products, because of its fastidious growth requirements. (cdc.gov)
  • Additional cases of C. jejuni infection were identified in October, and UDAF permanently revoked dairy A's permit to sell raw milk on December 1. (cdc.gov)
  • Although all samples of cheese tested negative for Campylobacter , results of the epidemiologic investigation found an association between illness and consumption of fresh cheese made from unpasteurized milk. (cdc.gov)
  • CDPHE) of two culture-confirmed cases of Campylobacter known consumption of milk from the same herdshare dairy infection among persons who consumed raw (unpasteurized) or with an epidemiologic link to a confirmed case. (cdc.gov)
  • Raw (unpasteurized) milk has been linked to many foodborne illnesses, including Campylobacter infections. (cdc.gov)
  • During August-October 2016, 12 confirmed and five probable cases of Campylobacter jejuni infections were identified in persons who consumed raw milk from a herdshare dairy in Colorado. (cdc.gov)
  • In August 2016, a local public health agency (LPHA) notified the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) of two culture-confirmed cases of Campylobacter infection among persons who consumed raw (unpasteurized) milk from the same herdshare dairy. (cdc.gov)
  • The authors describe a method for colorimetric determination of Campylobacter jejuni ( C. jejuni ) in milk samples. (springer.com)
  • Under defined experimental conditions, the intensity of the blue color increases with the concentration of C. jejuni , and as little as 100 CFU·mL −1 can bedetected in milk. (springer.com)
  • Campylobacter jejuni binds intestinal H(O) antigen (Fuc alpha 1, 2Gal beta 1, 4GlcNAc), and fucosyloligosaccharides of human milk inhibit its bindi. (nih.gov)
  • Our data confirm that pigeons do not play a role in the spread of C. jejuni among cattle and they are not responsible for milk contamination. (mdpi.com)
  • The new generic term Campylobacter ('curved rod' in Greek) was proposed by Sebald and Veron in 1963 on the grounds that the microaerophilic vibrios were different biochemically and serologically from the classical cholera and halophilic vibrios, and had a significantly different deoxyribonucleic acid base-pair ratio from both the latter. (kenyon.edu)