Schools: Educational institutions.Education, Graduate: Studies beyond the bachelor's degree at an institution having graduate programs for the purpose of preparing for entrance into a specific field, and obtaining a higher degree.Education, Medical, Graduate: Educational programs for medical graduates entering a specialty. They include formal specialty training as well as academic work in the clinical and basic medical sciences, and may lead to board certification or an advanced medical degree.Foreign Medical Graduates: Physicians who hold degrees from medical schools in countries other than the ones in which they practice.Health Education: Education that increases the awareness and favorably influences the attitudes and knowledge relating to the improvement of health on a personal or community basis.Schools, Medical: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of medicine.Education, Medical: Use for general articles concerning medical education.Education, Medical, Continuing: Educational programs designed to inform physicians of recent advances in their field.Patient Education as Topic: The teaching or training of patients concerning their own health needs.Education, Dental: Use for articles concerning dental education in general.Curriculum: A course of study offered by an educational institution.Students: Individuals enrolled in a school or formal educational program.Education: Acquisition of knowledge as a result of instruction in a formal course of study.Education, Distance: Education via communication media (correspondence, radio, television, computer networks) with little or no in-person face-to-face contact between students and teachers. (ERIC Thesaurus, 1997)Schools, Dental: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of dentistry.Education, Medical, Undergraduate: The period of medical education in a medical school. In the United States it follows the baccalaureate degree and precedes the granting of the M.D.School Nursing: A nursing specialty concerned with health and nursing care given to primary and secondary school students by a registered nurse.Education, Continuing: Educational programs designed to inform individuals of recent advances in their particular field of interest. They do not lead to any formal advanced standing.Education, Nursing: Use for general articles concerning nursing education.Education, Pharmacy, Graduate: Educational programs for pharmacists who have a bachelor's degree or a Doctor of Pharmacy degree entering a specific field of pharmacy. They may lead to an advanced degree.Student Health Services: Health services for college and university students usually provided by the educational institution.School Health Services: Preventive health services provided for students. It excludes college or university students.Educational Status: Educational attainment or level of education of individuals.Education, Dental, Graduate: Educational programs for dental graduates entering a specialty. They include formal specialty training as well as academic work in the clinical and basic dental sciences, and may lead to board certification or an advanced dental degree.Education, Nursing, Graduate: Those educational activities engaged in by holders of a bachelor's degree in nursing, which are primarily designed to prepare them for entrance into a specific field of nursing, and may lead to board certification or a more advanced degree.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.United StatesInternship and Residency: Programs of training in medicine and medical specialties offered by hospitals for graduates of medicine to meet the requirements established by accrediting authorities.Teaching: The educational process of instructing.Career Choice: Selection of a type of occupation or profession.Education, Pharmacy: Formal instruction, learning, or training in the preparation, dispensing, and proper utilization of drugs in the field of medicine.Students, Medical: Individuals enrolled in a school of medicine or a formal educational program in medicine.Schools, Pharmacy: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of pharmacy.Professional Practice Location: Geographic area in which a professional person practices; includes primarily physicians and dentists.Competency-Based Education: Educational programs designed to ensure that students attain prespecified levels of competence in a given field or training activity. Emphasis is on achievement or specified objectives.Clinical Competence: The capability to perform acceptably those duties directly related to patient care.Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Program Evaluation: Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.School Admission Criteria: Requirements for the selection of students for admission to academic institutions.Sex Education: Education which increases the knowledge of the functional, structural, and behavioral aspects of human reproduction.Education, Special: Education of the individual who markedly deviates intellectually, physically, socially, or emotionally from those considered to be normal, thus requiring special instruction.Models, Educational: Theoretical models which propose methods of learning or teaching as a basis or adjunct to changes in attitude or behavior. These educational interventions are usually applied in the fields of health and patient education but are not restricted to patient care.Faculty: The teaching staff and members of the administrative staff having academic rank in an educational institution.Educational Measurement: The assessing of academic or educational achievement. It includes all aspects of testing and test construction.Students, Pharmacy: Individuals enrolled in a school of pharmacy or a formal educational program leading to a degree in pharmacy.Education, Professional: Formal education and training in preparation for the practice of a profession.Education, Nursing, Continuing: Educational programs designed to inform nurses of recent advances in their fields.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Osteopathic Medicine: A medical discipline that is based on the philosophy that all body systems are interrelated and dependent upon one another for good health. This philosophy, developed in 1874 by Dr. Andrew Taylor Still, recognizes the concept of "wellness" and the importance of treating illness within the context of the whole body. Special attention is placed on the MUSCULOSKELETAL SYSTEM.Educational Technology: Systematic identification, development, organization, or utilization of educational resources and the management of these processes. It is occasionally used also in a more limited sense to describe the use of equipment-oriented techniques or audiovisual aids in educational settings. (Thesaurus of ERIC Descriptors, December 1993, p132)Problem-Based Learning: Instructional use of examples or cases to teach using problem-solving skills and critical thinking.Accreditation: Certification as complying with a standard set by non-governmental organizations, applied for by institutions, programs, and facilities on a voluntary basis.Computer-Assisted Instruction: A self-learning technique, usually online, involving interaction of the student with programmed instructional materials.Students, Dental: Individuals enrolled a school of dentistry or a formal educational program in leading to a degree in dentistry.Universities: Educational institutions providing facilities for teaching and research and authorized to grant academic degrees.Program Development: The process of formulating, improving, and expanding educational, managerial, or service-oriented work plans (excluding computer program development).Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Education, Dental, Continuing: Educational programs designed to inform dentists of recent advances in their fields.Training Support: Financial support for training including both student stipends and loans and training grants to institutions.Faculty, Medical: The teaching staff and members of the administrative staff having academic rank in a medical school.Certification: Compliance with a set of standards defined by non-governmental organizations. Certification is applied for by individuals on a voluntary basis and represents a professional status when achieved, e.g., certification for a medical specialty.Professional Competence: The capability to perform the duties of one's profession generally, or to perform a particular professional task, with skill of an acceptable quality.Health Promotion: Encouraging consumer behaviors most likely to optimize health potentials (physical and psychosocial) through health information, preventive programs, and access to medical care.Physical Education and Training: Instructional programs in the care and development of the body, often in schools. The concept does not include prescribed exercises, which is EXERCISE THERAPY.Education, Pharmacy, Continuing: Educational programs designed to inform graduate pharmacists of recent advances in their particular field.Faculty, Dental: The teaching staff and members of the administrative staff having academic rank in a dental school.Personnel Selection: The process of choosing employees for specific types of employment. The concept includes recruitment.Organizational Policy: A course or method of action selected, usually by an organization, institution, university, society, etc., from among alternatives to guide and determine present and future decisions and positions on matters of public interest or social concern. It does not include internal policy relating to organization and administration within the corporate body, for which ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION is available.Education, Veterinary: Use for general articles concerning veterinary medical education.Fellowships and Scholarships: Stipends or grants-in-aid granted by foundations or institutions to individuals for study.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Medically Underserved Area: A geographic location which has insufficient health resources (manpower and/or facilities) to meet the medical needs of the resident population.Education, Premedical: Preparatory education meeting the requirements for admission to medical school.Schools, Public Health: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of public health.Canada: The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Students, Nursing: Individuals enrolled in a school of nursing or a formal educational program leading to a degree in nursing.Physicians: Individuals licensed to practice medicine.Nutritional Sciences: The study of NUTRITION PROCESSES as well as the components of food, their actions, interaction, and balance in relation to health and disease.Teaching Materials: Instructional materials used in teaching.Vocational Education: Education for specific trades or occupations.History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.Science: The study of natural phenomena by observation, measurement, and experimentation.Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate: A four-year program in nursing education in a college or university leading to a B.S.N. (Bachelor of Science in Nursing). Graduates are eligible for state examination for licensure as RN (Registered Nurse).Specialization: An occupation limited in scope to a subsection of a broader field.CaliforniaRural Health Services: Health services, public or private, in rural areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.Schools, Nursing: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of nursing.Social Environment: The aggregate of social and cultural institutions, forms, patterns, and processes that influence the life of an individual or community.Peer Group: Group composed of associates of same species, approximately the same age, and usually of similar rank or social status.Rural Population: The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Dentists: Individuals licensed to practice DENTISTRY.Architecture as Topic: The art and science of designing buildings and structures. More generally, it is the design of the total built environment, including town planning, urban design, and landscape architecture.Mentors: Senior professionals who provide guidance, direction and support to those persons desirous of improvement in academic positions, administrative positions or other career development situations.Education, Public Health Professional: Education and training in PUBLIC HEALTH for the practice of the profession.Social Class: A stratum of people with similar position and prestige; includes social stratification. Social class is measured by criteria such as education, occupation, and income.Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Food Services: Functions, equipment, and facilities concerned with the preparation and distribution of ready-to-eat food.Health Behavior: Behaviors expressed by individuals to protect, maintain or promote their health status. For example, proper diet, and appropriate exercise are activities perceived to influence health status. Life style is closely associated with health behavior and factors influencing life style are socioeconomic, educational, and cultural.Family Practice: A medical specialty concerned with the provision of continuing, comprehensive primary health care for the entire family.Student Dropouts: Individuals who leave school, secondary or college, prior to completion of specified curriculum requirements.Students, Health Occupations: Individuals enrolled in a school or formal educational program in the health occupations.Academic Medical Centers: Medical complexes consisting of medical school, hospitals, clinics, libraries, administrative facilities, etc.Internet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.IndianaHealth Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Income: Revenues or receipts accruing from business enterprise, labor, or invested capital.Preceptorship: Practical experience in medical and health-related services that occurs as part of an educational program wherein the professionally-trained student works outside the academic environment under the supervision of an established professional in the particular field.Libraries, MedicalSmoking: Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.Community Dentistry: The practice of dentistry concerned with preventive as well as diagnostic and treatment programs in a circumscribed population.Schools, Nursery: Schools for children usually under five years of age.Education of Hearing Disabled: The teaching or training of those individuals with hearing disability or impairment.Medicine: The art and science of studying, performing research on, preventing, diagnosing, and treating disease, as well as the maintenance of health.Alcohol Drinking: Behaviors associated with the ingesting of alcoholic beverages, including social drinking.Attitude to Health: Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.Achievement: Success in bringing an effort to the desired end; the degree or level of success attained in some specified area (esp. scholastic) or in general.Parents: Persons functioning as natural, adoptive, or substitute parents. The heading includes the concept of parenthood as well as preparation for becoming a parent.Research: Critical and exhaustive investigation or experimentation, having for its aim the discovery of new facts and their correct interpretation, the revision of accepted conclusions, theories, or laws in the light of newly discovered facts, or the practical application of such new or revised conclusions, theories, or laws. (Webster, 3d ed)Specialty Boards: Organizations which certify physicians and dentists as specialists in various fields of medical and dental practice.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Dental Hygienists: Persons trained in an accredited school or dental college and licensed by the state in which they reside to provide dental prophylaxis under the direction of a licensed dentist.Professional Practice: The use of one's knowledge in a particular profession. It includes, in the case of the field of biomedicine, professional activities related to health care and the actual performance of the duties related to the provision of health care.Cooperative Behavior: The interaction of two or more persons or organizations directed toward a common goal which is mutually beneficial. An act or instance of working or acting together for a common purpose or benefit, i.e., joint action. (From Random House Dictionary Unabridged, 2d ed)Societies: Organizations composed of members with common interests and whose professions may be similar.Urban Population: The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.Schools, Health Occupations: Schools which offer training in the area of health.Schools, Veterinary: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of veterinary medicine.Dental Research: The study of laws, theories, and hypotheses through a systematic examination of pertinent facts and their interpretation in the field of dentistry. (From Jablonski, Illustrated Dictionary of Dentistry, 1982, p674)BrazilMinority Groups: A subgroup having special characteristics within a larger group, often bound together by special ties which distinguish it from the larger group.Pilot Projects: Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.Health Occupations: Professions or other business activities directed to the cure and prevention of disease. For occupations of medical personnel who are not physicians but who are working in the fields of medical technology, physical therapy, etc., ALLIED HEALTH OCCUPATIONS is available.Needs Assessment: Systematic identification of a population's needs or the assessment of individuals to determine the proper level of services needed.Public Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Audiovisual Aids: Auditory and visual instructional materials.Mainstreaming (Education): Most frequently refers to the integration of a physically or mentally disabled child into the regular class of normal peers and provision of the appropriately determined educational program.North CarolinaEmployment: The state of being engaged in an activity or service for wages or salary.Adolescent Behavior: Any observable response or action of an adolescent.TexasCareer Mobility: The upward or downward mobility in an occupation or the change from one occupation to another.Physicians, Women: Women licensed to practice medicine.Interprofessional Relations: The reciprocal interaction of two or more professional individuals.Motivation: Those factors which cause an organism to behave or act in either a goal-seeking or satisfying manner. They may be influenced by physiological drives or by external stimuli.Health Education, Dental: Education which increases the awareness and favorably influences the attitudes and knowledge relating to the improvement of dental health on a personal or community basis.Credentialing: The recognition of professional or technical competence through registration, certification, licensure, admission to association membership, the award of a diploma or degree, etc.Professional Role: The expected function of a member of a particular profession.Cultural Diversity: Coexistence of numerous distinct ethnic, racial, religious, or cultural groups within one social unit, organization, or population. (From American Heritage Dictionary, 2d college ed., 1982, p955)Architectural Accessibility: Designs for approaching areas inside or outside facilities.Health Manpower: The availability of HEALTH PERSONNEL. It includes the demand and recruitment of both professional and allied health personnel, their present and future supply and distribution, and their assignment and utilization.Great BritainLicensure, Medical: The granting of a license to practice medicine.Physiology: The biological science concerned with the life-supporting properties, functions, and processes of living organisms or their parts.Administrative Personnel: Individuals responsible for the development of policy and supervision of the execution of plans and functional operations.Internship, Nonmedical: Advanced programs of training to meet certain professional requirements in fields other than medicine or dentistry, e.g., pharmacology, nutrition, nursing, etc.African Americans: Persons living in the United States having origins in any of the black groups of Africa.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Learning: Relatively permanent change in behavior that is the result of past experience or practice. The concept includes the acquisition of knowledge.Pharmacists: Those persons legally qualified by education and training to engage in the practice of pharmacy.Residence Characteristics: Elements of residence that characterize a population. They are applicable in determining need for and utilization of health services.Ethnic Groups: A group of people with a common cultural heritage that sets them apart from others in a variety of social relationships.Library Surveys: Collection and analysis of data pertaining to operations of a particular library, library system, or group of independent libraries, with recommendations for improvement and/or ordered plans for further development.Staff Development: The process by which the employer promotes staff performance and efficiency consistent with management goals and objectives.Forecasting: The prediction or projection of the nature of future problems or existing conditions based upon the extrapolation or interpretation of existing scientific data or by the application of scientific methodology.Communication: The exchange or transmission of ideas, attitudes, or beliefs between individuals or groups.Social Marketing: Use of marketing principles also used to sell products to consumers to promote ideas, attitudes and behaviors. Design and use of programs seeking to increase the acceptance of a social idea or practice by target groups, not for the benefit of the marketer, but to benefit the target audience and the general society.IllinoisInterpersonal Relations: The reciprocal interaction of two or more persons.Anatomy: A branch of biology dealing with the structure of organisms.Malaysia: A parliamentary democracy with a constitutional monarch in southeast Asia, consisting of 11 states (West Malaysia) on the Malay Peninsula and two states (East Malaysia) on the island of BORNEO. It is also called the Federation of Malaysia. Its capital is Kuala Lumpur. Before 1963 it was the Union of Malaya. It reorganized in 1948 as the Federation of Malaya, becoming independent from British Malaya in 1957 and becoming Malaysia in 1963 as a federation of Malaya, Sabah, Sarawak, and Singapore (which seceded in 1965). The form Malay- probably derives from the Tamil malay, mountain, with reference to its geography. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p715 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p329)Clinical Clerkship: Undergraduate education programs for second- , third- , and fourth-year students in health sciences in which the students receive clinical training and experience in teaching hospitals or affiliated health centers.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Aspirations (Psychology): Strong desires to accomplish something. This usually pertains to greater values or high ideals.Physicians, Family: Those physicians who have completed the education requirements specified by the American Academy of Family Physicians.Societies, Dental: Societies whose membership is limited to dentists.Attitude: An enduring, learned predisposition to behave in a consistent way toward a given class of objects, or a persistent mental and/or neural state of readiness to react to a certain class of objects, not as they are but as they are conceived to be.International Educational Exchange: The exchange of students or professional personnel between countries done under the auspices of an organization for the purpose of further education.Specialties, Dental: Various branches of dental practice limited to specialized areas.Job Satisfaction: Personal satisfaction relative to the work situation.General Practice, Dental: Nonspecialized dental practice which is concerned with providing primary and continuing dental care.Community-Institutional Relations: The interactions between members of a community and representatives of the institutions within that community.Odds Ratio: The ratio of two odds. The exposure-odds ratio for case control data is the ratio of the odds in favor of exposure among cases to the odds in favor of exposure among noncases. The disease-odds ratio for a cohort or cross section is the ratio of the odds in favor of disease among the exposed to the odds in favor of disease among the unexposed. The prevalence-odds ratio refers to an odds ratio derived cross-sectionally from studies of prevalent cases.Biological Science Disciplines: All of the divisions of the natural sciences dealing with the various aspects of the phenomena of life and vital processes. The concept includes anatomy and physiology, biochemistry and biophysics, and the biology of animals, plants, and microorganisms. It should be differentiated from BIOLOGY, one of its subdivisions, concerned specifically with the origin and life processes of living organisms.Poverty: A situation in which the level of living of an individual, family, or group is below the standard of the community. It is often related to a specific income level.Self Care: Performance of activities or tasks traditionally performed by professional health care providers. The concept includes care of oneself or one's family and friends.Demography: Statistical interpretation and description of a population with reference to distribution, composition, or structure.IndiaAustralia: The smallest continent and an independent country, comprising six states and two territories. Its capital is Canberra.American Medical Association: Professional society representing the field of medicine.Periodontics: A dental specialty concerned with the histology, physiology, and pathology of the tissues that support, attach, and surround the teeth, and of the treatment and prevention of disease affecting these tissues.Alcoholic Intoxication: An acute brain syndrome which results from the excessive ingestion of ETHANOL or ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES.Smoke-Free Policy: Prohibition against tobacco smoking in specific areas to control TOBACCO SMOKE POLLUTION.Facility Design and Construction: Architecture, exterior and interior design, and construction of facilities other than hospitals, e.g., dental schools, medical schools, ambulatory care clinics, and specified units of health care facilities. The concept also includes architecture, design, and construction of specialized contained, controlled, or closed research environments including those of space labs and stations.Library Services: Services offered to the library user. They include reference and circulation.Societies, Medical: Societies whose membership is limited to physicians.General Surgery: A specialty in which manual or operative procedures are used in the treatment of disease, injuries, or deformities.
  • There may be times you will need to be seen in person and our team will create a plan for you to be seen on campus at one of our additional health center locations. (bentley.edu)
  • said Heidi A. Tissenbaum, PhD, professor of molecular, cellular & cancer biology and the program in molecular medicine at UMass Medical School, and principal investigator of the study. (eurekalert.org)
  • The UMass Medical School of Medicine was founded in 1962 with the mission to advance the health and well-being of the people of the commonwealth and the world through pioneering education, research, and health care delivery with our clinical partners. (umassmed.edu)
  • UMass Medical School is accredited by the Commission on Institutions of Higher Education of the New England Association of Schools and Colleges, inc. (umassmed.edu)
  • On the strength of these findings, we're already moving into pre-clinical development," said Beth A. McCormick, PhD, vice chair and professor of microbiology & physiological systems at UMass Medical School and a lead author of the study in Nature Communications . (brightsurf.com)
  • UMass Medical School is a special place for learning. (umassmed.edu)
  • Philanthropy is essential to the work being done at UMass Medical School to advance the health and well-being of the people of the commonwealth and the world through pioneering advances in education, research and health care delivery. (umassmed.edu)
  • In a memo to the UMass Medical School community, Chancellor Michael F. Collins and Dean Terence R. Flotte say racism is a public health crisis and outline changes underway at UMMS. (umassmed.edu)
  • UMass Medical School conferred 56 degrees to the Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences Class of 2020 in a first-of-its-kind virtual Commencement ceremony, viewed via YouTube, FaceBook and Zoom. (umassmed.edu)
  • In a video recorded on Monday, March 23, Chancellor Michael F. Collins is urging members of the UMass Medical School community to continue working closely together, even as many do their jobs from home. (umassmed.edu)
  • VA Central Western Massachusetts Healthcare System and UMass Medical School will build a new, community-based outpatient clinic for veterans, projected to open in 2021, on the campus of UMass Medical School in Worcester. (umassmed.edu)
  • The mission of UMass Medical School is to serve the people of the Commonwealth through national distinction in health sciences education, research and public service. (harringtonhospital.org)
  • The collaboration with UMass Medical School will also focus on developing the next generation of gene therapy vectors to allow novel delivery approaches for treatment of retinal diseases. (biospace.com)
  • We find the science behind the next generation gene delivery technology and 'minigenes' at UMass Medical School very intriguing," stated Kourous Rezaei, M.D., Chief Medical Officer of Ophthotech. (biospace.com)
  • MAYWOOD, Ill. - Vitamin D may play a vital role in the prevention and treatment of diseases associated with aging, according to researchers at Loyola University Chicago Marcella Niehoff School of Nursing (MNSON) . (healthcanal.com)
  • Regent University is a Christian learning community comprised of seven graduate schools (Business &a. (graduateguide.com)
  • This page contains resources and communications for the Johns Hopkins community about prevention and preparedness efforts-from class changes to campus access to HR guidance. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • The campus community reflects and is a part of a society comprising all races, creeds, and social circumstances. (americasjobexchange.com)
  • This system, which confers many responsibilities as well as freedoms upon students, strives to create an atmosphere of mutual trust and respect among all members of the campus and medical community. (ucdenver.edu)
  • During this era of community fragmentation, social alienation and exclusion, and economic degeneration of the poor and the middle class, the need for skilled professionals in social and community development, policy analysis, and policy advocacy has never been greater. (umaryland.edu)
  • In his second year of medical school, Mendez was selected as a Chicago Area Schweitzer Fellow and began working on a community-based project that combined his passion for community empowerment with preventative medicine. (newswise.com)
  • The Grammar School, today the private Rutgers Preparatory School , was a part of the college community until 1959. (wikipedia.org)
  • Other college admissions information sources, like Holyoke Community College options , promote the use of standardized tests in admissions decisions because there are substantial differences in course difficulty among US schools. (paramediccertificate.net)
  • The campus is honing its six-year-old academic focus on "environmental liberal arts" and exploring a deeper emphasis on environmental studies that tap into the current interest in the environment and community sustainability. (pressherald.com)
  • Don't forget that many campus services are available to you at little or no cost - career counseling , recreation facilities , community service projects , sporting events , and arts and music productions . (otterbein.edu)
  • The unit included nurses like Nina Rusk Carson, 35N, 51G, former dean of women at Emory and a chief nurse in maxillofacial surgery at the time of the war's outbreak. (wikipedia.org)
  • Researchers seeking cures to diseases of the eye have led the way in innovation in gene therapy," said Terence R. Flotte, MD, executive deputy chancellor, provost and dean of the school of medicine at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, and a specialist in the field of gene therapy who was the first to use adeno-associated virus as a vehicle to deliver corrective genes in humans. (biospace.com)
  • 1908 - Alberta Dozier (later Williamson) became superintendent of the hospital and director of the nursing school, serving in both roles until 1923. (wikipedia.org)
  • We recently named him president of that company and have since named other MSOE graduates to leadership roles in my other business. (msoe.edu)
  • The freshman class entering in Fall 2019 had middle 50% ACT score ranges between 25 and 30, middle 50% range on the SAT Verbal between 570 and 660, middle 50% range on the SAT Math between 560 and 660, and an average GPA of 3.72. (princetonreview.com)
  • In partnership with Temple University, St. Luke's created the Lehigh Valley's first and only regional medical school campus. (prweb.com)
  • WORCESTER, MA - A study of long-lived mutant C. elegans by scientists at the University of Massachusetts Medical School shows that the genetically altered worms spend a greater portion of their life in a frail state and exhibit less activity as they age then typical nematodes. (eurekalert.org)
  • Scientists at the University of Massachusetts Medical School have found that the Salmonella protein SipA naturally reduces a well-known drug resistant molecule found in many different types of cancer cells. (brightsurf.com)
  • We are very pleased to have been chosen by the University of Massachusetts Medical School as a training site for their medical students," said Edward Moore, president and chief executive officer of Harrington Hospital. (harringtonhospital.org)
  • The synergy between Dr. Gao's highly recognized team of experts in gene therapy at the University of Massachusetts Medical School and Ophthotech's clinical expertise has the potential to fulfill of our commitment to advance innovative solutions for the treatment of retinal diseases. (biospace.com)
  • As president of Loyola's chapter of the Latino Medical Student Association (LMSA), Mendez helped reinstate the chapter that has now become a vibrant part of the medical school culture. (newswise.com)
  • Inova Fairfax Medical Campus is an independent academic medical center and serves as a regional medical school campus. (lasdignas.org)