A phospholipid-interacting antimalarial drug (ANTIMALARIALS). It is very effective against PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM with very few side effects.
A group of SESQUITERPENES and their analogs that contain a peroxide group (PEROXIDES) within an oxepin ring (OXEPINS).
Agents used in the treatment of malaria. They are usually classified on the basis of their action against plasmodia at different stages in their life cycle in the human. (From AMA, Drug Evaluations Annual, 1992, p1585)
The geographical area of Asia comprising BORNEO; BRUNEI; CAMBODIA; INDONESIA; LAOS; MALAYSIA; the MEKONG VALLEY; MYANMAR (formerly Burma), the PHILIPPINES; SINGAPORE; THAILAND; and VIETNAM.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Vietnam" is not a medical term that can be defined in a medical context; it is a country located in Southeast Asia. If you have any questions related to medical conditions or terminology, I would be happy to help clarify those topics for you.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Laos" is not a medical term; it is the name of a country located in Southeast Asia, officially known as the Lao People's Democratic Republic. If you have any questions related to medical terminology or health-related topics, I would be happy to help with those!
Formerly known as Siam, this is a Southeast Asian nation at the center of the Indochina peninsula. Bangkok is the capital city.
Malaria caused by PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM. This is the severest form of malaria and is associated with the highest levels of parasites in the blood. This disease is characterized by irregularly recurring febrile paroxysms that in extreme cases occur with acute cerebral, renal, or gastrointestinal manifestations.
Tests that demonstrate the relative effectiveness of chemotherapeutic agents against specific parasites.
A form of PSYCHOTHERAPY that centers on the individuals as the experts in their own lives and views problems as separate from people. It is assumed that people have many skills, competencies, beliefs, values, commitments, and abilities that will assist them to reduce the influence of problems in their lives.
Exploitation through misrepresentation of the facts or concealment of the purposes of the exploiter.
A species of protozoa that is the causal agent of falciparum malaria (MALARIA, FALCIPARUM). It is most prevalent in the tropics and subtropics.
Diminished or failed response of an organism, disease or tissue to the intended effectiveness of a chemical or drug. It should be differentiated from DRUG TOLERANCE which is the progressive diminution of the susceptibility of a human or animal to the effects of a drug, as a result of continued administration.
Countries in the process of change with economic growth, that is, an increase in production, per capita consumption, and income. The process of economic growth involves better utilization of natural and human resources, which results in a change in the social, political, and economic structures.
The country is bordered by RUSSIA on the north and CHINA on the west, south, and east. The capita is Ulaanbaatar.
Single or multi-sheet notices made to attract attention to events, activities, causes, goods, or services. They are for display, usually in a public place and are chiefly pictorial.
Health care services related to human REPRODUCTION and diseases of the reproductive system. Services are provided to both sexes and usually by physicians in the medical or the surgical specialties such as REPRODUCTIVE MEDICINE; ANDROLOGY; GYNECOLOGY; OBSTETRICS; and PERINATOLOGY.
The practice of indulging in sexual relations for money.
An acute febrile disease transmitted by the bite of AEDES mosquitoes infected with DENGUE VIRUS. It is self-limiting and characterized by fever, myalgia, headache, and rash. SEVERE DENGUE is a more virulent form of dengue.
Composition of images of EARTH or other planets from data collected during SPACE FLIGHT by remote sensing instruments onboard SPACECRAFT. The satellite sensor systems measure and record absorbed, emitted, or reflected energy across the spectra, as well as global position and time.
The status of health in rural populations.
A protozoan disease caused in humans by four species of the PLASMODIUM genus: PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM; PLASMODIUM VIVAX; PLASMODIUM OVALE; and PLASMODIUM MALARIAE; and transmitted by the bite of an infected female mosquito of the genus ANOPHELES. Malaria is endemic in parts of Asia, Africa, Central and South America, Oceania, and certain Caribbean islands. It is characterized by extreme exhaustion associated with paroxysms of high FEVER; SWEATING; shaking CHILLS; and ANEMIA. Malaria in ANIMALS is caused by other species of plasmodia.
Species of tapeworm in the genus TAENIA, that infects cattle. It is acquired by humans through the ingestion of raw or insufficiently cooked beef.
Creating a representation of areas of the earth or other celestial bodies, for the purpose of visualizing spatial distributions of various information.
The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.
The geographic area of the Mekong Valley in general or when the specific country or countries are not indicated. Usually includes Cambodia, Indochina, and Laos.
The process of bargaining in order to arrive at an agreement or compromise on a matter of importance to the parties involved. It also applies to the hearing and determination of a case by a third party chosen by the parties in controversy, as well as the interposing of a third party to reconcile the parties in controversy.
Vaccines or candidate vaccines used to prevent infection with Japanese B encephalitis virus (ENCEPHALITIS VIRUS, JAPANESE).
Patient health knowledge related to medications including what is being used and why as well as instructions and precautions.
Monitoring of rate of occurrence of specific conditions to assess the stability or change in health levels of a population. It is also the study of disease rates in a specific cohort such as in a geographic area or population subgroup to estimate trends in a larger population. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)
The concentration of a compound needed to reduce population growth of organisms, including eukaryotic cells, by 50% in vitro. Though often expressed to denote in vitro antibacterial activity, it is also used as a benchmark for cytotoxicity to eukaryotic cells in culture.
Malaria caused by PLASMODIUM VIVAX. This form of malaria is less severe than MALARIA, FALCIPARUM, but there is a higher probability for relapses to occur. Febrile paroxysms often occur every other day.
A genus of trematode liver flukes of the family Opisthorchidae. It consists of the following species: O. felineus, O. noverca (Amphimerus noverca), and O. viverrini. The intermediate hosts are snails, fish, and AMPHIBIANS.
A republic of southeast Asia, northwest of Thailand, long familiar as Burma. Its capital is Yangon, formerly Rangoon. Inhabited by people of Mongolian stock and probably of Tibetan origin, by the 3d century A.D. it was settled by Hindus. The modern Burmese state was founded in the 18th century but was in conflict with the British during the 19th century. Made a crown colony of Great Britain in 1937, it was granted independence in 1947. In 1989 it became Myanmar. The name comes from myanma, meaning the strong, as applied to the Burmese people themselves. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p192 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p367)
The largest of the continents. It was known to the Romans more specifically as what we know today as Asia Minor. The name comes from at least two possible sources: from the Assyrian asu (to rise) or from the Sanskrit usa (dawn), both with reference to its being the land of the rising sun, i.e., eastern as opposed to Europe, to the west. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p82 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p34)
A subtype of INFLUENZA A VIRUS comprised of the surface proteins hemagglutinin 5 and neuraminidase 1. The H5N1 subtype, frequently referred to as the bird flu virus, is endemic in wild birds and very contagious among both domestic (POULTRY) and wild birds. It does not usually infect humans, but some cases have been reported.
The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.
Descriptions and evaluations of specific health care organizations.
An aminoquinoline that is given by mouth to produce a radical cure and prevent relapse of vivax and ovale malarias following treatment with a blood schizontocide. It has also been used to prevent transmission of falciparum malaria by those returning to areas where there is a potential for re-introduction of malaria. Adverse effects include anemias and GI disturbances. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopeia, 30th ed, p404)
That distinct portion of the institutional, industrial, or economic structure of a country that is controlled or owned by non-governmental, private interests.
Infestation with parasitic worms of the helminth class.
The presence of parasites (especially malarial parasites) in the blood. (Dorland, 27th ed)
Quinolines are heterocyclic aromatic organic compounds consisting of a two-nitrogened benzene ring fused to a pyridine ring, which have been synthesized and used as building blocks for various medicinal drugs, particularly antibiotics and antimalarials.
The prototypical antimalarial agent with a mechanism that is not well understood. It has also been used to treat rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and in the systemic therapy of amebic liver abscesses.
Hostile conflict between organized groups of people.
People who engage in occupational sexual behavior in exchange for economic rewards or other extrinsic considerations.
Agents destructive to parasitic worms. They are used therapeutically in the treatment of HELMINTHIASIS in man and animal.
Disorders related or resulting from use of amphetamines.
The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.
Infection of domestic and wild fowl and other BIRDS with INFLUENZA A VIRUS. Avian influenza usually does not sicken birds, but can be highly pathogenic and fatal in domestic POULTRY.
A situation in which the level of living of an individual, family, or group is below the standard of the community. It is often related to a specific income level.
Payment by individuals or their family for health care services which are not covered by a third-party payer, either insurance or medical assistance.
An inflammatory process involving the brain (ENCEPHALITIS) and meninges (MENINGITIS), most often produced by pathogenic organisms which invade the central nervous system, and occasionally by toxins, autoimmune disorders, and other conditions.
Persons trained to assist professional health personnel in communicating with residents in the community concerning needs and availability of health services.
A sequence-related subfamily of ATP-BINDING CASSETTE TRANSPORTERS that actively transport organic substrates. Although considered organic anion transporters, a subset of proteins in this family have also been shown to convey drug resistance to neutral organic drugs. Their cellular function may have clinical significance for CHEMOTHERAPY in that they transport a variety of ANTINEOPLASTIC AGENTS. Overexpression of proteins in this class by NEOPLASMS is considered a possible mechanism in the development of multidrug resistance (DRUG RESISTANCE, MULTIPLE). Although similar in function to P-GLYCOPROTEINS, the proteins in this class share little sequence homology to the p-glycoprotein family of proteins.
A species of gram-negative, aerobic bacteria that causes MELIOIDOSIS. It has been isolated from soil and water in tropical regions, particularly Southeast Asia.
Proteins found in any species of protozoan.
Powdered or cut pieces of leaves of NICOTIANA TABACUM which are inhaled through the nose, chewed, or stored in cheek pouches. It includes any product of tobacco that is not smoked.
A protozoan parasite that causes vivax malaria (MALARIA, VIVAX). This species is found almost everywhere malaria is endemic and is the only one that has a range extending into the temperate regions.
Includes the spectrum of human immunodeficiency virus infections that range from asymptomatic seropositivity, thru AIDS-related complex (ARC), to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).
A genus of protozoa that comprise the malaria parasites of mammals. Four species infect humans (although occasional infections with primate malarias may occur). These are PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM; PLASMODIUM MALARIAE; PLASMODIUM OVALE, and PLASMODIUM VIVAX. Species causing infection in vertebrates other than man include: PLASMODIUM BERGHEI; PLASMODIUM CHABAUDI; P. vinckei, and PLASMODIUM YOELII in rodents; P. brasilianum, PLASMODIUM CYNOMOLGI; and PLASMODIUM KNOWLESI in monkeys; and PLASMODIUM GALLINACEUM in chickens.
Federal, state, or local government organized methods of financial assistance.
An alkaloid derived from the bark of the cinchona tree. It is used as an antimalarial drug, and is the active ingredient in extracts of the cinchona that have been used for that purpose since before 1633. Quinine is also a mild antipyretic and analgesic and has been used in common cold preparations for that purpose. It was used commonly and as a bitter and flavoring agent, and is still useful for the treatment of babesiosis. Quinine is also useful in some muscular disorders, especially nocturnal leg cramps and myotonia congenita, because of its direct effects on muscle membrane and sodium channels. The mechanisms of its antimalarial effects are not well understood.
An abnormal elevation of body temperature, usually as a result of a pathologic process.
Collection, analysis, and interpretation of data about the frequency, distribution, and consequences of disease or health conditions, for use in the planning, implementing, and evaluating public health programs.
Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.
A family of diphenylenemethane derivatives.
Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.
Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
Sesquiterpenes are a class of terpenes consisting of three isoprene units, forming a 15-carbon skeleton, which can be found in various plant essential oils and are known for their diverse chemical structures and biological activities, including anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, and cytotoxic properties.
The science dealing with the earth and its life, especially the description of land, sea, and air and the distribution of plant and animal life, including humanity and human industries with reference to the mutual relations of these elements. (From Webster, 3d ed)
Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).
Programs of surveillance designed to prevent the transmission of disease by any means from person to person or from animal to man.
Domesticated birds raised for food. It typically includes CHICKENS; TURKEYS, DUCKS; GEESE; and others.
Insects that transmit infective organisms from one host to another or from an inanimate reservoir to an animate host.
The concept concerned with all aspects of providing and distributing health services to a patient population.
Health services, public or private, in rural areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.
Single preparations containing two or more active agents, for the purpose of their concurrent administration as a fixed dose mixture.
An acute viral infection in humans involving the respiratory tract. It is marked by inflammation of the NASAL MUCOSA; the PHARYNX; and conjunctiva, and by headache and severe, often generalized, myalgia.
A genus of mosquitoes (CULICIDAE) frequently found in tropical and subtropical regions. YELLOW FEVER and DENGUE are two of the diseases that can be transmitted by species of this genus.
The genetic constitution of the individual, comprising the ALLELES present at each GENETIC LOCUS.
EPIDEMIOLOGIC STUDIES based on the detection through serological testing of characteristic change in the serum level of specific ANTIBODIES. Latent subclinical infections and carrier states can thus be detected in addition to clinically overt cases.
The functional hereditary units of protozoa.
Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.
The seeking and acceptance by patients of health service.
The reduction or regulation of the population of mosquitoes through chemical, biological, or other means.
A broad class of substances containing carbon and its derivatives. Many of these chemicals will frequently contain hydrogen with or without oxygen, nitrogen, sulfur, phosphorus, and other elements. They exist in either carbon chain or carbon ring form.
Size and composition of the family.
A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.
The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.
The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Cambodia" is not a medical term that can be defined in a medical context. It is the name of a country located in Southeast Asia, known officially as the Kingdom of Cambodia. If you have any questions related to health, medicine, or science, I'd be happy to try and help answer those for you.
Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.
In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.
Excrement from the INTESTINES, containing unabsorbed solids, waste products, secretions, and BACTERIA of the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.
Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.
I'm afraid there seems to be a misunderstanding - "Africa" is not a medical term and does not have a medical definition. Africa is the world's second-largest and second-most populous continent, consisting of 54 countries with diverse cultures, peoples, languages, and landscapes. If you have any questions related to medical topics or definitions, I would be happy to help answer those for you!
The constant presence of diseases or infectious agents within a given geographic area or population group. It may also refer to the usual prevalence of a given disease with such area or group. It includes holoendemic and hyperendemic diseases. A holoendemic disease is one for which a high prevalent level of infection begins early in life and affects most of the child population, leading to a state of equilibrium such that the adult population shows evidence of the disease much less commonly than do children (malaria in many communities is a holoendemic disease). A hyperendemic disease is one that is constantly present at a high incidence and/or prevalence rate and affects all groups equally. (Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 3d ed, p53, 78, 80)
A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.
Genotypic differences observed among individuals in a population.
A measure of the quality of health care by assessment of unsuccessful results of management and procedures used in combating disease, in individual cases or series.
Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.
A set of statistical methods used to group variables or observations into strongly inter-related subgroups. In epidemiology, it may be used to analyze a closely grouped series of events or cases of disease or other health-related phenomenon with well-defined distribution patterns in relation to time or place or both.
The integration of epidemiologic, sociological, economic, and other analytic sciences in the study of health services. Health services research is usually concerned with relationships between need, demand, supply, use, and outcome of health services. The aim of the research is evaluation, particularly in terms of structure, process, output, and outcome. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)
MYCOBACTERIUM infections of the lung.
A method of data collection and a QUALITATIVE RESEARCH tool in which a small group of individuals are brought together and allowed to interact in a discussion of their opinions about topics, issues, or questions.
Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.
Diseases due to or propagated by sexual contact.
Therapy with two or more separate preparations given for a combined effect.
Simultaneous resistance to several structurally and functionally distinct drugs.
Sexual activities of humans.
An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.
Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.
An infant during the first month after birth.
A variety of simple repeat sequences that are distributed throughout the GENOME. They are characterized by a short repeat unit of 2-8 basepairs that is repeated up to 100 times. They are also known as short tandem repeats (STRs).
Any part or derivative of any protozoan that elicits immunity; malaria (Plasmodium) and trypanosome antigens are presently the most frequently encountered.
Men and women working in the provision of health services, whether as individual practitioners or employees of health institutions and programs, whether or not professionally trained, and whether or not subject to public regulation. (From A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, 1976)
Any of the infectious diseases of man and other animals caused by species of MYCOBACTERIUM.
Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)
The frequency of different ages or age groups in a given population. The distribution may refer to either how many or what proportion of the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.
Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.
Ribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of viruses.
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.
Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.
Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.
Immunoglobulins produced in response to VIRAL ANTIGENS.
An immunoassay utilizing an antibody labeled with an enzyme marker such as horseradish peroxidase. While either the enzyme or the antibody is bound to an immunosorbent substrate, they both retain their biologic activity; the change in enzyme activity as a result of the enzyme-antibody-antigen reaction is proportional to the concentration of the antigen and can be measured spectrophotometrically or with the naked eye. Many variations of the method have been developed.
The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.
The ratio of two odds. The exposure-odds ratio for case control data is the ratio of the odds in favor of exposure among cases to the odds in favor of exposure among noncases. The disease-odds ratio for a cohort or cross section is the ratio of the odds in favor of disease among the exposed to the odds in favor of disease among the unexposed. The prevalence-odds ratio refers to an odds ratio derived cross-sectionally from studies of prevalent cases.
Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.
Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.
The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.

Enhancing health programme efficiency: a Cambodian case study. (1/469)

In 1995, the Cambodian Urban Health Care Association (CUHCA) was set up as facilitator between private health care providers and patients, guaranteeing good quality health care and fair pricing to patients and providing training and logistic support to providers. Providers were engaged on a fee-for-service basis and competition encouraged. CUHCA's objectives followed the same line of thought as the 1993 World Development Report, aiming at influencing the unregulated private health care market through competition mechanisms. But soon after the start of the project the basic problem was recognized to be not the absence of effective government regulation but rather that consumers lack the requisite knowledge to make good choices in the market for health services. CUHCA had not adequately addressed the demand for health services. The original supply-side strategy of improving health services by increasing competition was a failure. In order to improve CUHCA's health programme efficiency the association's objectives were subsequently redefined and its functioning reorganized. CUHCA now tries to educate consumers and provides good quality services so that consumers will be able to act on the basis of their newly acquired knowledge. CUHCA's health centres serve as model clinics for first-line health care. Community educators organize information, education and communication (IEC) activities. Staff help school teachers to improve formal health education in schools and CUHCA assists local leaders in sanitation development. Only full-time personnel are employed, encouraging team spirit and communication with the target population. Salaries are based on team performance. The CUHCA programme demonstrates that, depending on the market situation, health programme models need to address both the supply and the demand for services in order to be efficient. Where consumers lack essential knowledge to make appropriate choices in the health service market, interventions should focus on health education and social marketing and provide models of quality care catering to informed consumer choice.  (+info)

Mental health care in Cambodia. (2/469)

An effort is being made in Cambodia to involve grass-roots personnel in the integration of the care of the mentally ill into a broad framework of health services. This undertaking is examined with particular reference to the work of the Transcultural Psychosocial Organization.  (+info)

Cervical cancer screening among Cambodian-American women. (3/469)

Southeast Asian women have higher invasive cervical cancer incidence rates and lower Pap testing frequencies than most other racial/ethnic groups in the United States. However, there is little information about the cervical cancer screening behavior of Cambodian-American women. Cambodian residents of Seattle were surveyed in person during late 1997 and early 1998. The PRECEDE model was used to guide the development of items that assessed predisposing, reinforcing, and enabling factors associated with cervical cancer screening participation. The estimated overall survey response was 72%. Four hundred thirteen women completed our questionnaire. Approximately one-quarter (24%) of the respondents had never had a Pap test, and over one-half (53%) had not been screened recently. The following variables were positively associated with a history of at least one Pap smear: younger age, greater number of years since immigration, belief about Pap testing for postmenopausal women, prenatal care in the United States, and physician recommendation. Women who believed in karma were less likely to have ever been screened for cervical cancer than those who did not. Six variables independently predicted recent screening: age; beliefs about regular checkups, cervical cancer screening for sexually inactive women, and the prolongation of life; having a female doctor; and a previous physician recommendation for Pap testing. The study findings indicate that culturally specific approaches might be effective in modifying the cervical cancer screening behavior of immigrant women. Programs targeting Cambodian-Americans are likely to be more effective if they are multifaceted and simultaneously address predisposing, reinforcing, and enabling factors.  (+info)

Sexual behaviour of commercial sex workers and their clients in Cambodia. Japan-Cambodia Collaborating Research Group. (4/469)

OBJECTIVE: This study surveyed the sexual behaviour of commercial sex workers and their clients in an attempt to identify factors of transmission of STDs (including HIV/AIDS) and to control their epidemics in Cambodia and South-East Asia. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SETTING: Trained questioners asked items of the questionnaires to each objective subject in December 1996. Data were analysed to show the descriptive status by risk group of each person. PARTICIPANTS: 200 direct commercial sex workers, 220 indirect commercial sex workers, and 211 clients in Phnom Penh. RESULTS: Prostitution was widely accepted by both young males and females, and this was an easy way for young girls to obtain money. Although commercial sex workers and clients were knowledgeable about prevention methods against STDs, they seldom used condoms. Some commercial sex workers had been infected with STDs many times, and many of them incompletely treated the diseases by themselves. Social support from governmental and non-governmental organisation was poor. CONCLUSIONS: It is very important to support both commercial sex workers in practicing preventive methods against STDs and also visiting physicians when they notice symptoms of STDs. It is strongly recommended that not only governmental but also non-governmental organisations should be more active in this area.  (+info)

Circumstances around weapon injury in Cambodia after departure of a peacekeeping force: prospective cohort study. (5/469)

OBJECTIVE: To examine the circumstances surrounding weapon injury and combatant status of those injured by weapons. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. SETTING: Northwestern Cambodia after departure of United Nations peacekeeping force. SUBJECTS: 863 people admitted to hospital for weapon injuries over 12 months. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Annual incidence of weapon injury by time period; proportions of injuries inflicted as a result of interfactional combat (combat injuries) and outside such combat (non-combat injuries) by combatant status and weapon type. RESULTS: The annual incidence of weapon injuries was higher than the rate observed before the peacekeeping operation. 30% of weapon injuries occurred in contexts other than interfactional combat. Most commonly these were firearm injuries inflicted intentionally on civilians. Civilians accounted for 71% of those with non-combat injuries, 42% of those with combat related injuries, and 51% of those with weapon injuries of either type. CONCLUSIONS: The incidence of weapon injuries remained high when the disarmament component of a peacekeeping operation achieved only limited success. Furthermore, injuries occurring outside the context of interfactional combat accounted for a substantial proportion of all weapon injuries, were experienced disproportionately by civilians, and were most likely to entail the intentional use of a firearm against a civilian.  (+info)

Foci of Schistosomiasis mekongi, Northern Cambodia: II. Distribution of infection and morbidity. (6/469)

In the province of Kracheh, in Northern Cambodia, a baseline epidemiological survey on Schistosoma mekongi was conducted along the Mekong River between December 1994 and April 1995. The results of household surveys of highly affected villages of the East and the West bank of the river and of school surveys in 20 primary schools are presented. In household surveys 1396 people were examined. An overall prevalence of infection of 49.3% was detected by a single stool examination with the Kato-Katz technique. The overall intensity of infection was 118.2 eggs per gram of stool (epg). There was no difference between the population of the east and west shore of the Mekong for prevalence (P = 0.3) or intensity (P = 0.9) of infection. Severe morbidity was very frequent. Hepatomegaly of the left lobe was detected in 48.7% of the population. Splenomegaly was seen in 26.8% of the study participants. Visible diverted circulation was found in 7.2% of the population, and ascites in 0.1%. Significantly more hepatomegaly (P = 0.001), splenomegaly (P = 0. 001) and patients with diverted circulation (P = 0.001) were present on the west bank of the Mekong. The age group of 10-14 years was most affected. The prevalence of infection in this group was 71.8% and 71.9% in the population of the West and East of the Mekong, respectively. The intensity of infection was 172.4 and 194.2 epg on the West and the East bank, respectively. In the peak age group hepatomegaly reached a prevalence of 88.1% on the west and 82.8% on the east bank. In the 20 schools 2391 children aged 6-16 years were examined. The overall prevalence of infection was 40.0%, ranging from 7.7% to 72.9% per school. The overalls mean intensity of infection was 110.1 epg (range by school: 26.7-187.5 epg). Both prevalence (P = 0.001) and intensity of infection (P = 0.001) were significantly higher in schools on the east side of the Mekong. Hepatomegaly (55.2%), splenomegaly (23.6%), diverted circulation (4. 1%), ascites (0.5%), reported blood (26.7%) and mucus (24.3%) were very frequent. Hepatomegaly (P = 0.001), splenomegaly (P = 0.001), diverted circulation (P = 0.001) and blood in stool (P = 0.001) were significantly more frequent in schools of the east side of the Mekong. Boys suffered more frequently from splenomegaly (P = 0.05), ascites (P = 0.05) and bloody stools (P = 0.004) than girls. No difference in sex was found for the prevalence and intensity of infection and prevalence of hepatomegaly. On the school level prevalence and intensity of infection were highly associated (r = 0. 93, P = 0.0001). The intensity of infection was significantly associated only with the prevalence of hepatomegaly (r = 0.44, P = 0. 05) and blood in stool (r = 0.40, P = 0.02). This comprehensive epidemiological study documents for the first time the public health importance of schistosomiasis mekongi in the Province of Kracheh, Northern Cambodia and points at key epidemiological features of this schistosome species, in particular the high level of morbidity associated with infection.  (+info)

Rehabilitating health services in Cambodia: the challenge of coordination in chronic political emergencies. (7/469)

The end of the Cold War brought with it opportunities to resolve a number of conflicts around the world, including those in Angola, Cambodia, El Salvador and Mozambique. International political efforts to negotiate peace in these countries were accompanied by significant aid programmes ostensibly designed to redress the worst effects of conflict and to contribute to the consolidation of peace. Such periods of political transition, and associated aid inflows, constitute an opportunity to improve health services in countries whose health indicators have been among the worst in the world and where access to basic health services is significantly diminished by war. This paper analyzes the particular constraints to effective coordination of health sector aid in situations of 'post'-conflict transition. These include: the uncertain legitimacy and competence of state structures; donor choice of implementing channels; and actions by national and international political actors which served to undermine coordination mechanisms in order to further their respective agendas. These obstacles hindered efforts by health professionals to establish an effective coordination regime, for example, through NGO mapping and the establishment of aid coordinating committees at national and provincial levels. These technical measures were unable to address the basic constitutional question of who had the authority to determine the distribution of scarce resources during a period of transition in political authority. The peculiar difficulties of establishing effective coordination mechanisms are important to address if the long-term effectiveness of rehabilitation aid is to be enhanced.  (+info)

Cross-sectional study on risk factors of HIV among female commercial sex workers in Cambodia. (8/469)

To describe epidemiological features on HIV prevalence among female commercial sex workers (CSWs), a cross-sectional study on sexual behaviour and serological prevalence was carried out in Cambodia. The CSWs were interviewed on their demographic characters and behaviour and their blood samples were taken for testing on sexually transmitted diseases, including HIV, Chlamydia trachomatis, syphilis, and hepatitis B. Associations between risk factors and HIV seropositivity were analysed. High seroprevalence of HIV and Chlamydia trachomatis IgG antibody (CT-IgG-Ab) was shown among the CSWs (54 and 81.7%, respectively). Univariate logistic regression analyses showed an association between HIV seropositivity and age, duration of prostitution, the number of clients per day and CT-IgG-Ab. Especially, high-titre chlamydial seropositivity showed a strong significant association with HIV prevalence. In multiple logistic regression analyses, CT-IgG-Ab with higher titre was significantly independently related to HIV infection. These suggest that existence of Chlamydia trachomatis is highly related to HIV prevalence.  (+info)

Mefloquine is an antimalarial medication that is used to prevent and treat malaria caused by the Plasmodium falciparum parasite. It works by interfering with the growth of the parasite in the red blood cells of the body. Mefloquine is a synthetic quinoline compound, and it is available under the brand name Lariam, among others.

Mefloquine is typically taken once a week, starting one to two weeks before traveling to an area where malaria is common, and continuing for four weeks after leaving the area. It may also be used to treat acute malaria infection in conjunction with other antimalarial medications.

It's important to note that mefloquine has been associated with serious neuropsychiatric side effects, including anxiety, depression, hallucinations, and seizures. Therefore, it is usually reserved for use in situations where other antimalarial drugs cannot be used or have failed. Before taking mefloquine, individuals should discuss their medical history and potential risks with their healthcare provider.

Artemisinins are a class of antimalarial drugs derived from the sweet wormwood plant (Artemisia annua). They are highly effective against Plasmodium falciparum, the most deadly species of malaria parasite. Artemisinins have become an essential component in the treatment of malaria and are often used in combination therapy regimens to reduce the risk of drug resistance.

The artemisinin compounds contain a unique peroxide bridge that is responsible for their antimalarial activity. They work by generating free radicals that can damage the parasite's membranes, leading to its rapid death. Artemisinins have a fast action and can significantly reduce the parasite biomass in the first few days of treatment.

Some commonly used artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs) include:

* Artemether-lumefantrine (Coartem)
* Artesunate-amodiaquine (Coarsucam)
* Artesunate-mefloquine (Artequin)
* Dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (Eurartesim, Duo-Cotecxin)

Artemisinins have also shown potential in treating other conditions, such as certain types of cancer and viral infections. However, more research is needed to establish their safety and efficacy for these indications.

Antimalarials are a class of drugs that are used for the prevention, treatment, and elimination of malaria. They work by targeting the malaria parasite at various stages of its life cycle, particularly the erythrocytic stage when it infects red blood cells. Some commonly prescribed antimalarials include chloroquine, hydroxychloroquine, quinine, mefloquine, and artemisinin-based combinations. These drugs can be used alone or in combination with other antimalarial agents to increase their efficacy and prevent the development of drug resistance. Antimalarials are also being investigated for their potential use in treating other diseases, such as autoimmune disorders and cancer.

Southeast Asia is a geographical region that consists of the countries that are located at the southeastern part of the Asian continent. The definition of which countries comprise Southeast Asia may vary, but it generally includes the following 11 countries:

* Brunei
* Cambodia
* East Timor (Timor-Leste)
* Indonesia
* Laos
* Malaysia
* Myanmar (Burma)
* Philippines
* Singapore
* Thailand
* Vietnam

Southeast Asia is known for its rich cultural diversity, with influences from Hinduism, Buddhism, Islam, and Christianity. The region is also home to a diverse range of ecosystems, including rainforests, coral reefs, and mountain ranges. In recent years, Southeast Asia has experienced significant economic growth and development, but the region still faces challenges related to poverty, political instability, and environmental degradation.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Vietnam" is not a medical term. It is the name of a country located in Southeast Asia. If you have any questions about medical conditions or terminology, I would be happy to help clarify those for you.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Laos" is not a medical term. It is the name of a country, the Lao People's Democratic Republic, located in Southeast Asia. If you have any questions about medical terms or health-related topics, I'd be happy to try and help answer them!

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Thailand" is not a medical term. It is a country located in Southeast Asia. If you have any questions about medical terms or concepts, I would be happy to help answer those for you!

Malaria, Falciparum is defined as a severe and often fatal form of malaria caused by the parasite Plasmodium falciparum. It is transmitted to humans through the bites of infected Anopheles mosquitoes. This type of malaria is characterized by high fever, chills, headache, muscle and joint pain, and vomiting. If left untreated, it can cause severe anemia, kidney failure, seizures, coma, and even death. It is a major public health problem in many tropical and subtropical regions of the world, particularly in Africa.

Parasitic sensitivity tests, also known as parasite drug susceptibility tests, refer to laboratory methods used to determine the effectiveness of specific antiparasitic medications against a particular parasitic infection. These tests help healthcare providers identify which drugs are most likely to be effective in treating an individual's infection and which ones should be avoided due to resistance or increased risk of side effects.

There are several types of parasitic sensitivity tests, including:

1. In vitro susceptibility testing: This involves culturing the parasite in a laboratory setting and exposing it to different concentrations of antiparasitic drugs. The growth or survival of the parasite is then observed and compared to a control group that was not exposed to the drug. This helps identify the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the drug, which is the lowest concentration required to prevent the growth of the parasite.
2. Molecular testing: This involves analyzing the genetic material of the parasite to detect specific mutations or gene variations that are associated with resistance to certain antiparasitic drugs. This type of testing can be performed using a variety of methods, including polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA sequencing.
3. Phenotypic testing: This involves observing the effects of antiparasitic drugs on the growth or survival of the parasite in a laboratory setting. For example, a parasite may be grown in a culture medium and then exposed to different concentrations of a drug. The growth of the parasite is then monitored over time to determine the drug's effectiveness.

Parasitic sensitivity tests are important for guiding the treatment of many parasitic infections, including malaria, tuberculosis, and leishmaniasis. These tests can help healthcare providers choose the most effective antiparasitic drugs for their patients, reduce the risk of drug resistance, and improve treatment outcomes.

Narrative therapy is not a medical concept per se, but rather a form of psychotherapy with a focus on helping individuals, couples, or families to understand and resolve their problems by constructing and reconstructing their personal stories. It emphasizes the role of language and storytelling in shaping people's experiences and perceptions of themselves and their issues.

In narrative therapy, the therapist helps the client to identify and externalize their problems as separate from their identity, allowing them to view the issue objectively and gain a sense of control over it. The client is then encouraged to construct alternative narratives or storylines that highlight their strengths, values, and competencies, empowering them to find new solutions and ways of being in the world.

While narrative therapy may not have a formal medical definition, it can be used as an adjunctive treatment for various mental health conditions, including depression, anxiety, trauma, and relational difficulties.

In the context of medical law and ethics, fraud refers to a deliberate and intentional deception or misrepresentation of facts, motivated by personal gain, which is made by a person or entity in a position of trust, such as a healthcare professional or organization. This deception can occur through various means, including the provision of false information, the concealment of important facts, or the manipulation of data.

Medical fraud can take many forms, including:

1. Billing fraud: This occurs when healthcare providers submit false claims to insurance companies or government programs like Medicare and Medicaid for services that were not provided, were unnecessary, or were more expensive than the services actually rendered.
2. Prescription fraud: Healthcare professionals may engage in prescription fraud by writing unnecessary prescriptions for controlled substances, such as opioids, for their own use or to sell on the black market. They may also alter prescriptions or use stolen identities to obtain these drugs.
3. Research fraud: Scientists and researchers can commit fraud by manipulating or falsifying data in clinical trials, experiments, or studies to support predetermined outcomes or to secure funding and recognition.
4. Credentialing fraud: Healthcare professionals may misrepresent their qualifications, licenses, or certifications to gain employment or admitting privileges at healthcare facilities.
5. Identity theft: Stealing someone's personal information to obtain medical services, prescription medications, or insurance benefits is another form of medical fraud.

Medical fraud not only has severe legal consequences for those found guilty but also undermines the trust between patients and healthcare providers, jeopardizes patient safety, and contributes to rising healthcare costs.

'Plasmodium falciparum' is a specific species of protozoan parasite that causes malaria in humans. It is transmitted through the bites of infected female Anopheles mosquitoes and has a complex life cycle involving both human and mosquito hosts.

In the human host, the parasites infect red blood cells, where they multiply and cause damage, leading to symptoms such as fever, chills, anemia, and in severe cases, organ failure and death. 'Plasmodium falciparum' malaria is often more severe and life-threatening than other forms of malaria caused by different Plasmodium species. It is a major public health concern, particularly in tropical and subtropical regions of the world where access to prevention, diagnosis, and treatment remains limited.

Drug resistance, also known as antimicrobial resistance, is the ability of a microorganism (such as bacteria, viruses, fungi, or parasites) to withstand the effects of a drug that was originally designed to inhibit or kill it. This occurs when the microorganism undergoes genetic changes that allow it to survive in the presence of the drug. As a result, the drug becomes less effective or even completely ineffective at treating infections caused by these resistant organisms.

Drug resistance can develop through various mechanisms, including mutations in the genes responsible for producing the target protein of the drug, alteration of the drug's target site, modification or destruction of the drug by enzymes produced by the microorganism, and active efflux of the drug from the cell.

The emergence and spread of drug-resistant microorganisms pose significant challenges in medical treatment, as they can lead to increased morbidity, mortality, and healthcare costs. The overuse and misuse of antimicrobial agents, as well as poor infection control practices, contribute to the development and dissemination of drug-resistant strains. To address this issue, it is crucial to promote prudent use of antimicrobials, enhance surveillance and monitoring of resistance patterns, invest in research and development of new antimicrobial agents, and strengthen infection prevention and control measures.

The term "developing countries" is a socio-economic classification used to describe nations that are in the process of industrialization and modernization. This term is often used interchangeably with "low and middle-income countries" or "Global South." The World Bank defines developing countries as those with a gross national income (GNI) per capita of less than US $12,695.

In the context of healthcare, developing countries face unique challenges including limited access to quality medical care, lack of resources and infrastructure, high burden of infectious diseases, and a shortage of trained healthcare professionals. These factors contribute to significant disparities in health outcomes between developing and developed nations.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Mongolia" is not a medical term. It is the name of a country located in Central Asia. If you have any questions about medical conditions or terminology, I would be happy to help clarify those for you.

I'm happy to help, but I must clarify that "Posters as Topic" is not a medical term or concept. However, if you are referring to "poster" in the context of medical education and conferences, then a medical definition would be:

A 'medical poster' is a graphical presentation of research findings or clinical cases, displayed on a large board or panel, typically during medical conferences, meetings, or educational settings. These posters are designed to provide a concise overview of the study, including background information, methods, results, and conclusions. Medical posters serve as an opportunity for healthcare professionals, researchers, and students to share their work with others in the field, engage in discussions, and receive feedback.

Reproductive health services refer to the provision of health care services that aim to enhance reproductive health and well-being. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), reproductive health is a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being in all matters relating to the reproductive system and its functions and processes.

Reproductive health services may include:

1. Family planning: This includes counseling, education, and provision of contraceptives to prevent unintended pregnancies and promote planned pregnancies.
2. Maternal and newborn health: This includes antenatal care, delivery services, postnatal care, and newborn care to ensure safe pregnancy and childbirth.
3. Sexual health: This includes counseling, testing, and treatment for sexually transmitted infections (STIs), including HIV/AIDS, and education on sexual health and responsible sexual behavior.
4. Infertility services: This includes diagnosis and treatment of infertility, including assisted reproductive technologies such as in vitro fertilization (IVF).
5. Abortion services: This includes safe abortion services, post-abortion care, and counseling to prevent unsafe abortions and reduce maternal mortality and morbidity.
6. Menstrual health: This includes providing access to menstrual hygiene products, education on menstrual health, and treatment of menstrual disorders.
7. Adolescent reproductive health: This includes providing age-appropriate sexual and reproductive health education, counseling, and services to adolescents.

Reproductive health services aim to promote sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR), which include the right to access information, education, and services; the right to make informed choices about one's own body and reproduction; and the right to be free from discrimination, coercion, and violence in relation to one's sexuality and reproduction.

Prostitution is not typically defined in medical terms, but it is a social and legal issue. However, in the context of public health, prostitution might be defined as the act or practice of engaging in sexual activity for payment, which can carry significant risks to physical and mental health, including exposure to sexually transmitted infections (STIs), violence, and psychological trauma.

Prostitution is often associated with marginalization, poverty, and social inequality, and it can be a complex issue that involves questions of personal autonomy, consent, and human rights. It's important to note that the legal and cultural approaches to prostitution vary widely around the world, ranging from criminalization to decriminalization and legalization.

Dengue is a mosquito-borne viral infection that is primarily transmitted by the Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus species of mosquitoes. It is caused by one of four closely related dengue viruses (DENV 1, DENV 2, DENV 3, or DENV 4). The infection can cause a wide range of symptoms, ranging from mild fever and headache to severe flu-like illness, which is often characterized by the sudden onset of high fever, severe headache, muscle and joint pain, nausea, vomiting, and skin rash. In some cases, dengue can progress to more severe forms, such as dengue hemorrhagic fever or dengue shock syndrome, which can be life-threatening if not treated promptly and appropriately.

Dengue is prevalent in many tropical and subtropical regions around the world, particularly in urban and semi-urban areas with poor sanitation and inadequate mosquito control. There is no specific treatment for dengue, and prevention efforts focus on reducing mosquito populations and avoiding mosquito bites. Vaccines are available in some countries to prevent dengue infection, but they are not widely used due to limitations in their effectiveness and safety.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "satellite imagery" is not a medical term. It refers to photographs or images taken from satellites orbiting the Earth. These images are used in various fields, including meteorology, geology, agriculture, and military surveillance, among others. They can provide information about large-scale phenomena such as weather patterns, natural disasters, and environmental changes. However, they are not typically used in medical contexts.

Rural health is a branch of healthcare that focuses on the unique health challenges and needs of people living in rural areas. The World Health Organization (WHO) defines rural health as "the state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity, in the rural population."

Rural populations often face disparities in healthcare access and quality compared to their urban counterparts. Factors such as geographic isolation, poverty, lack of transportation, and a shortage of healthcare providers can contribute to these disparities. Rural health encompasses a broad range of services, including primary care, prevention, chronic disease management, mental health, oral health, and emergency medical services.

The goal of rural health is to improve the health outcomes of rural populations by addressing these unique challenges and providing high-quality, accessible healthcare services that meet their needs. This may involve innovative approaches such as telemedicine, mobile health clinics, and community-based programs to reach people in remote areas.

Malaria is not a medical definition itself, but it is a disease caused by parasites that are transmitted to people through the bites of infected female Anopheles mosquitoes. Here's a simple definition:

Malaria: A mosquito-borne infectious disease caused by Plasmodium parasites, characterized by cycles of fever, chills, and anemia. It can be fatal if not promptly diagnosed and treated. The five Plasmodium species known to cause malaria in humans are P. falciparum, P. vivax, P. ovale, P. malariae, and P. knowlesi.

Taenia saginata is a type of tapeworm that infects the human intestine. It's also known as the "beef tapeworm" because it typically infects cattle, and humans become infected by eating undercooked or raw beef from an infected animal. The tapeworm can grow up to 15-30 feet long in the human intestine and can survive for several years. Symptoms of infection may include abdominal discomfort, diarrhea, weight loss, and the presence of proglottids (segments of the tapeworm) in stool. In some cases, tapeworm segments may migrate outside the intestine and cause additional health problems.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "geographic mapping" is not a medical term or concept. Geographic mapping typically refers to the process of creating maps that represent geographical features, locations, and spatial data. In a broader context, it can also refer to the visual representation of data related to specific geographical areas, such as disease prevalence or health outcomes across different regions.

If you have any questions related to medical terminology or concepts, please provide more information so I can offer a relevant response.

A rural population refers to people who live in areas that are outside of urban areas, typically defined as having fewer than 2,000 residents and lacking certain infrastructure and services such as running water, sewage systems, and paved roads. Rural populations often have less access to healthcare services, education, and economic opportunities compared to their urban counterparts. This population group can face unique health challenges, including higher rates of poverty, limited access to specialized medical care, and a greater exposure to environmental hazards such as agricultural chemicals and industrial pollutants.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Mekong Valley" is not a term used in medical definitions. The Mekong Valley refers to the geographical region through which the Mekong River flows, including parts of China, Myanmar, Laos, Thailand, Cambodia, and Vietnam. If you have any questions related to health or medicine, I'd be happy to try to help answer those!

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "negotiating" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. Negotiation is a process in which different parties come together to reach a mutually satisfactory agreement on a particular matter. It is often used in various contexts such as business, politics, and law, but it is not typically used in the context of medical terminology.

If you have any questions related to medical terminology or healthcare, I would be happy to try and help answer them for you!

Japanese Encephalitis (JE) vaccines are immunobiological preparations used for active immunization against Japanese Encephalitis, a viral infection transmitted through the bite of infected mosquitoes. The vaccines contain inactivated or live attenuated strains of the JE virus. They work by stimulating the immune system to produce antibodies and T-cells that provide protection against the virus. There are several types of JE vaccines available, including inactivated Vero cell-derived vaccine, live attenuated SA14-14-2 vaccine, and inactivated mouse brain-derived vaccine. These vaccines have been shown to be effective in preventing JE and are recommended for use in individuals traveling to or living in areas where the disease is endemic.

Patient medication knowledge, also known as patient medication literacy or medication adherence, refers to the ability of a patient to understand and effectively communicate about their medications, including what they are for, how and when to take them, potential side effects, and other important information. This is an essential component of medication management, as it allows patients to properly follow their treatment plans and achieve better health outcomes. Factors that can affect patient medication knowledge include age, education level, language barriers, and cognitive impairments. Healthcare providers play a key role in promoting patient medication knowledge by providing clear and concise instructions, using visual aids when necessary, and regularly assessing patients' understanding of their medications.

Sentinel surveillance is a type of public health surveillance that is used to monitor the occurrence and spread of specific diseases or health events in a defined population. It is called "sentinel" because it relies on a network of carefully selected healthcare providers, hospitals, or laboratories to report cases of the disease or event of interest.

The main goal of sentinel surveillance is to provide timely and accurate information about the incidence and trends of a particular health problem in order to inform public health action. This type of surveillance is often used when it is not feasible or practical to monitor an entire population, such as in the case of rare diseases or emerging infectious diseases.

Sentinel surveillance systems typically require well-defined criteria for case identification and reporting, as well as standardized data collection and analysis methods. They may also involve active monitoring and follow-up of cases to better understand the epidemiology of the disease or event. Overall, sentinel surveillance is an important tool for detecting and responding to public health threats in a timely and effective manner.

Inhibitory Concentration 50 (IC50) is a measure used in pharmacology, toxicology, and virology to describe the potency of a drug or chemical compound. It refers to the concentration needed to reduce the biological or biochemical activity of a given substance by half. Specifically, it is most commonly used in reference to the inhibition of an enzyme or receptor.

In the context of infectious diseases, IC50 values are often used to compare the effectiveness of antiviral drugs against a particular virus. A lower IC50 value indicates that less of the drug is needed to achieve the desired effect, suggesting greater potency and potentially fewer side effects. Conversely, a higher IC50 value suggests that more of the drug is required to achieve the same effect, indicating lower potency.

It's important to note that IC50 values can vary depending on the specific assay or experimental conditions used, so they should be interpreted with caution and in conjunction with other measures of drug efficacy.

Malaria, Vivax:

A type of malaria caused by the parasite Plasmodium vivax. It is transmitted to humans through the bites of infected Anopheles mosquitoes. Malaria, Vivax is characterized by recurring fevers, chills, and flu-like symptoms, which can occur every other day or every third day. This type of malaria can have mild to severe symptoms and can sometimes lead to complications such as anemia and splenomegaly (enlarged spleen). One distinguishing feature of Malaria, Vivax is its ability to form dormant stages in the liver (called hypnozoites), which can reactivate and cause relapses even after years of apparent cure. Effective treatment includes medication to kill both the blood and liver stages of the parasite. Preventive measures include using mosquito nets, insect repellents, and antimalarial drugs for prophylaxis in areas with high transmission rates.

Opisthorchis is a genus of trematode flatworms that are commonly known as liver flukes. These parasites primarily infect the bile ducts and liver of various mammals, including humans. The most common species that infect humans are Opisthorchis viverrini and Opisthorchis felineus.

Humans become infected with these parasites by consuming raw or undercooked fish that contain the larval stage of the fluke (metacercariae). Once ingested, the metacercariae excyst in the small intestine and migrate to the bile ducts, where they mature into adults. Adult Opisthorchis worms are thin and elongated, with a length of 7-15 mm and a width of 1-3 mm. They have a characteristic brownish color due to their diet, which consists mainly of blood and bile.

Infection with Opisthorchis can lead to chronic inflammation of the bile ducts and liver, which may result in symptoms such as abdominal pain, diarrhea, weight loss, and fatigue. Long-term infection has been linked to an increased risk of cholangiocarcinoma, a rare but aggressive form of liver cancer.

Prevention of Opisthorchis infection involves avoiding the consumption of raw or undercooked fish, particularly in areas where the parasite is endemic. Infection can also be treated with anti-parasitic drugs such as praziquantel.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Myanmar" is not a medical term or condition. It is the name of a country in Southeast Asia, also known as Burma. If you have any questions about medical conditions or terminology, I would be happy to help clarify those for you.

I apologize for any confusion, but "Asia" is not a medical term. It is the largest continent in the world, comprising about 30% of the Earth's total land area and containing around 60% of the world's current human population. It is divided into several regions, including Northern Asia (Siberia), Eastern Asia (China, Japan, Korea, Mongolia, Taiwan), Southern Asia (India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Maldives), Southeastern Asia (Vietnam, Thailand, Indonesia, Philippines, Malaysia, Singapore, Myanmar, Cambodia, Laos, Brunei), and Western Asia (Middle East).

If you have any questions related to medical terminology or health-related topics, I'd be happy to help.

"Influenza A Virus, H5N1 Subtype" is a specific subtype of the Influenza A virus that is often found in avian species (birds) and can occasionally infect humans. The "H5N1" refers to the specific proteins (hemagglutinin and neuraminidase) found on the surface of the virus. This subtype has caused serious infections in humans, with high mortality rates, especially in cases where people have had close contact with infected birds. It does not commonly spread from person to person, but there is concern that it could mutate and adapt to efficiently transmit between humans, which would potentially cause a pandemic.

Prevalence, in medical terms, refers to the total number of people in a given population who have a particular disease or condition at a specific point in time, or over a specified period. It is typically expressed as a percentage or a ratio of the number of cases to the size of the population. Prevalence differs from incidence, which measures the number of new cases that develop during a certain period.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Organizational Case Studies" is not a medical term. It is a term that is used in various fields including business, management, and social sciences to describe the analysis of a specific organization or a particular aspect of its functioning. An organizational case study typically involves an in-depth examination of an organization, including its structure, culture, processes, and outcomes, with the aim of understanding its performance, challenges, and opportunities for improvement.

In healthcare, case studies are often used to examine specific clinical scenarios or patient cases. However, "Organizational Case Studies" in a medical context might refer to the study of healthcare organizations, such as hospitals or clinics, to analyze their management practices, quality of care, financial performance, and other factors that can impact patient outcomes and overall organizational success.

Primaquine is an antimalarial medication used to prevent and treat malaria caused by Plasmodium falciparum and P. vivax parasites. It is the only antimalarial drug effective against the liver stages (hypnozoites) of P. vivax and P. ovale, which can cause relapses if not treated.

Primaquine works by producing free radicals that damage the malaria parasite's DNA, leading to its death. It is a relatively inexpensive drug and is often used in mass drug administration programs for malaria elimination. However, primaquine can cause hemolysis (destruction of red blood cells) in people with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency, so it is important to screen for this condition before prescribing the drug.

In addition to its antimalarial properties, primaquine has also been used off-label to treat certain types of cutaneous leishmaniasis, a parasitic disease caused by Leishmania species.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but the term "Private Sector" is not a medical definition. It is an economic and sociopolitical term that refers to businesses and organizations which are not owned or controlled by the government. They can be privately owned and operated for profit, such as corporations, partnerships, and sole proprietorships, or they can be non-profit organizations, such as charities and advocacy groups. The private sector is distinct from the "Public Sector," which includes entities that are owned and controlled by the government, like public schools, hospitals, and other services provided by the state.

Helminthiasis is a medical condition characterized by the infection and infestation of body tissues and organs by helminths, which are parasitic worms. These worms can be classified into three main groups: nematodes (roundworms), cestodes (tapeworms), and trematodes (flukes).

Helminthiasis infections can occur through various modes of transmission, such as ingestion of contaminated food or water, skin contact with contaminated soil, or direct contact with an infected person or animal. The severity of the infection depends on several factors, including the type and number of worms involved, the duration of the infestation, and the overall health status of the host.

Common symptoms of helminthiasis include abdominal pain, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, weight loss, anemia, and nutritional deficiencies. In severe cases, the infection can lead to organ damage or failure, impaired growth and development in children, and even death.

Diagnosis of helminthiasis typically involves microscopic examination of stool samples to identify the presence and type of worms. Treatment usually consists of administering anthelmintic drugs that are effective against specific types of worms. Preventive measures include improving sanitation and hygiene, avoiding contact with contaminated soil or water, and practicing safe food handling and preparation.

Parasitemia is a medical term that refers to the presence of parasites, particularly malaria-causing Plasmodium species, in the bloodstream. It is the condition where red blood cells are infected by these parasites, which can lead to various symptoms such as fever, chills, anemia, and organ damage in severe cases. The level of parasitemia is often used to assess the severity of malaria infection and to guide treatment decisions.

Quinolines are a class of organic compounds that consist of a bicyclic structure made up of a benzene ring fused to a piperidine ring. They have a wide range of applications, but they are perhaps best known for their use in the synthesis of various medications, including antibiotics and antimalarial drugs.

Quinolone antibiotics, such as ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin, work by inhibiting the bacterial enzymes involved in DNA replication and repair. They are commonly used to treat a variety of bacterial infections, including urinary tract infections, pneumonia, and skin infections.

Quinoline-based antimalarial drugs, such as chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine, work by inhibiting the parasite's ability to digest hemoglobin in the red blood cells. They are commonly used to prevent and treat malaria.

It is important to note that quinolines have been associated with serious side effects, including tendinitis and tendon rupture, nerve damage, and abnormal heart rhythms. As with any medication, it is important to use quinolines only under the supervision of a healthcare provider, and to follow their instructions carefully.

Chloroquine is an antimalarial and autoimmune disease drug. It works by increasing the pH or making the environment less acidic in the digestive vacuoles of malaria parasites, which inhibits the polymerization of heme and the formation of hemozoin. This results in the accumulation of toxic levels of heme that are harmful to the parasite. Chloroquine is also used as an anti-inflammatory agent in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, discoid or systemic lupus erythematosus, and photodermatitis.

The chemical name for chloroquine is 7-chloro-4-(4-diethylamino-1-methylbutylamino)quinoline, and it has a molecular formula of C18H26ClN3. It is available in the form of phosphate or sulfate salts for oral administration as tablets or solution.

Chloroquine was first synthesized in 1934 by Bayer scientists, and it has been widely used since the 1940s as a safe and effective antimalarial drug. However, the emergence of chloroquine-resistant strains of malaria parasites has limited its use in some areas. Chloroquine is also being investigated for its potential therapeutic effects on various viral infections, including COVID-19.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "war" is not a medical term. It refers to a state of armed conflict between different nations or states or between political or social groups, usually with large-scale violence and loss of life. If you have any questions related to medicine or health, I would be happy to try to help answer them.

Sex workers are individuals who receive payment for performing sexual services or engaging in sexual activities with others. This can include various forms of sex work such as prostitution, pornography, stripping, and escort services. It is important to note that the ethical and legal considerations surrounding sex work are complex and vary greatly across different cultures, societies, and jurisdictions.

The World Health Organization (WHO) recognizes that sex workers are a marginalized population who often face stigma, discrimination, and violence. In order to protect the health and human rights of sex workers, WHO recommends that sex work be recognized as a legitimate form of work and that sex workers have access to the same protections and rights as other workers. This includes access to healthcare services, education, and legal protection against abuse and discrimination.

Anthelmintics are a type of medication used to treat infections caused by parasitic worms, also known as helminths. These medications work by either stunting the growth of the worms, paralyzing them, or killing them outright, allowing the body to expel the worms through normal bodily functions. Anthelmintics are commonly used to treat infections caused by roundworms, tapeworms, flukeworms, and hookworms. Examples of anthelmintic drugs include albendazole, mebendazole, praziquantel, and ivermectin.

Amphetamine-related disorders are a category of mental disorders related to the use of amphetamines or similar stimulant drugs. According to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5), there are several specific amphetamine-related disorders:

1. Amphetamine Use Disorder: This disorder is characterized by a problematic pattern of amphetamine use leading to clinically significant impairment or distress. The symptoms include increased tolerance, withdrawal, unsuccessful attempts to cut down or quit using, and continued use despite negative consequences.
2. Amphetamine Intoxication: This disorder occurs when an individual uses amphetamines and experiences symptoms such as agitation, aggression, hallucinations, delusions, tachycardia, hypertension, and elevated body temperature.
3. Amphetamine Withdrawal: This disorder is characterized by a cluster of symptoms that occur after cessation or reduction in amphetamine use, including dysphoric mood, fatigue, increased appetite, sleep disturbances, vivid dreams, and slowing of psychomotor activity.
4. Other Specified Amphetamine-Related Disorder: This category is used when an individual experiences significant problems related to amphetamine use that do not meet the full criteria for any of the other disorders in this category.
5. Unspecified Amphetamine-Related Disorder: This category is used when an individual experiences significant problems related to amphetamine use, but the specific diagnosis cannot be determined due to insufficient information or because the clinician chooses not to specify the reason.

It's important to note that amphetamines are a class of drugs that include prescription stimulants such as Adderall and Ritalin, as well as illicit substances like methamphetamine. Amphetamine-related disorders can have serious consequences for an individual's physical and mental health, relationships, and overall quality of life.

Health services accessibility refers to the degree to which individuals and populations are able to obtain needed health services in a timely manner. It includes factors such as physical access (e.g., distance, transportation), affordability (e.g., cost of services, insurance coverage), availability (e.g., supply of providers, hours of operation), and acceptability (e.g., cultural competence, language concordance).

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), accessibility is one of the key components of health system performance, along with responsiveness and fair financing. Improving accessibility to health services is essential for achieving universal health coverage and ensuring that everyone has access to quality healthcare without facing financial hardship. Factors that affect health services accessibility can vary widely between and within countries, and addressing these disparities requires a multifaceted approach that includes policy interventions, infrastructure development, and community engagement.

'Avian influenza' refers to the infection caused by avian (bird) influenza A viruses. These viruses occur naturally among wild aquatic birds worldwide and can infect domestic poultry and other bird and animal species. Avian influenza viruses do not normally infect humans, but rare cases of human infection have occurred mainly after close contact with infected birds or heavily contaminated environments.

There are many different subtypes of avian influenza viruses based on two proteins on the surface of the virus: hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA). There are 16 known HA subtypes and 9 known NA subtypes, creating a vast number of possible combinations. Some of these combinations cause severe disease and death in birds (e.g., H5N1, H7N9), while others only cause mild illness (e.g., H9N2).

Most avian influenza viruses do not infect humans. However, some forms are zoonotic, meaning they can infect animals and humans. The risk to human health is generally low. When human infections with avian influenza viruses have occurred, most have resulted from direct contact with infected poultry or surfaces contaminated by their feces.

Avian influenza viruses have caused several pandemics in the past, including the 1918 Spanish flu (H1N1), which was an H1N1 virus containing genes of avian origin. The concern is that a highly pathogenic avian influenza virus could mutate to become easily transmissible from human to human, leading to another pandemic. This is one of the reasons why avian influenza viruses are closely monitored by public health authorities worldwide.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "poverty" is not a medical condition or term. It is a social condition defined by the World Bank as "pronounced deprivation in well-being," and measured through indicators such as income, consumption, and access to basic services. Poverty can have significant impacts on health outcomes and healthcare access, but it is not considered a medical diagnosis. If you have any questions related to health or medicine, I'd be happy to try my best to help answer them!

Personal Financing is not a term that has a specific medical definition. However, in general terms, it refers to the management of an individual's financial resources, such as income, assets, liabilities, and debts, to meet their personal needs and goals. This can include budgeting, saving, investing, planning for retirement, and managing debt.

In the context of healthcare, personal financing may refer to the ability of individuals to pay for their own medical care expenses, including health insurance premiums, deductibles, co-pays, and out-of-pocket costs. This can be a significant concern for many people, particularly those with chronic medical conditions or disabilities who may face ongoing healthcare expenses.

Personal financing for healthcare may involve various strategies, such as setting aside savings, using health savings accounts (HSAs) or flexible spending accounts (FSAs), purchasing health insurance policies with lower premiums but higher out-of-pocket costs, or negotiating payment plans with healthcare providers. Ultimately, personal financing for healthcare involves making informed decisions about how to allocate financial resources to meet both immediate and long-term medical needs while also balancing other financial goals and responsibilities.

Meningoencephalitis is a medical term that refers to an inflammation of both the brain (encephalitis) and the membranes covering the brain and spinal cord (meninges), known as the meninges. It is often caused by an infection, such as bacterial or viral infections, that spreads to the meninges and brain. In some cases, it can also be caused by other factors like autoimmune disorders or certain medications.

The symptoms of meningoencephalitis may include fever, headache, stiff neck, confusion, seizures, and changes in mental status. If left untreated, this condition can lead to serious complications, such as brain damage, hearing loss, learning disabilities, or even death. Treatment typically involves antibiotics for bacterial infections or antiviral medications for viral infections, along with supportive care to manage symptoms and prevent complications.

Community health workers (CHWs) are individuals who are trained to work within and promote the health of their own communities. They serve as a bridge between healthcare professionals and the communities they serve, often working in underserved or hard-to-reach areas. CHWs may provide a range of services, including health education, outreach, advocacy, and case management.

CHWs come from diverse backgrounds and may have different levels of training and education. They are typically trusted members of their communities and share similar language, culture, and life experiences with the people they serve. This helps to build rapport and trust with community members, making it easier for CHWs to provide culturally sensitive care and support.

The role of CHWs can vary depending on the needs of the community and the healthcare system in which they work. In some settings, CHWs may focus on specific health issues, such as maternal and child health, infectious diseases, or chronic conditions like diabetes. In other cases, they may provide more general support to help individuals navigate the healthcare system and access needed services.

Overall, community health workers play an important role in promoting health equity and improving health outcomes for vulnerable populations. By working closely with communities and connecting them to appropriate care and resources, CHWs can help to reduce disparities and improve the overall health of their communities.

Multidrug Resistance-Associated Proteins (MRPs) are a subfamily of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter proteins that play a crucial role in the efflux of various substrates, including drugs and organic anions, out of cells. They are located in the plasma membrane of many cell types, including epithelial cells in the liver, intestine, kidney, and blood-brain barrier.

MRPs are known to transport a wide range of molecules, such as glutathione conjugates, bilirubin, bile acids, and various clinical drugs. One of the most well-known MRPs is MRP1 (ABCC1), which was initially identified in drug-resistant tumor cells. MRP1 can confer resistance to chemotherapeutic agents by actively pumping them out of cancer cells, thereby reducing their intracellular concentration and effectiveness.

The activity of MRPs can have significant implications for the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of drugs, as they can affect drug absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME). Understanding the function and regulation of MRPs is essential for developing strategies to overcome multidrug resistance in cancer therapy and optimizing drug dosing regimens in various clinical settings.

'Burkholderia pseudomallei' is a Gram-negative, aerobic, motile, rod-shaped bacterium that is the causative agent of melioidosis. It is found in soil and water in tropical and subtropical regions, particularly in Southeast Asia and northern Australia. The bacterium can infect humans and animals through inhalation, ingestion, or direct contact with contaminated soil or water. Melioidosis can cause a wide range of symptoms, including pneumonia, sepsis, and abscesses in various organs. It is a serious and potentially fatal disease, especially in people with underlying medical conditions such as diabetes, kidney disease, or compromised immune systems. Proper diagnosis and treatment with appropriate antibiotics are essential for managing melioidosis.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Protozoan Proteins" is not a specific medical or scientific term. Protozoa are single-celled eukaryotic organisms, and proteins are large biological molecules consisting of one or more chains of amino acid residues. Therefore, "Protozoan Proteins" generally refers to the various types of proteins found in protozoa.

However, if you're looking for information about proteins specific to certain protozoan parasites with medical relevance (such as Plasmodium falciparum, which causes malaria), I would be happy to help! Please provide more context or specify the particular protozoan of interest.

Smokeless tobacco is a type of tobacco that is not burned or smoked. It's often called "spit" or "chewing" tobacco. The most common forms of smokeless tobacco in the United States are snuff and chewing tobacco. Snuff is a finely ground tobacco that can be dry or moist. Dry snuff is sniffed or taken through the nose, while moist snuff is placed between the lower lip or cheek and gum. Chewing tobacco is plugs, leaves, or twists of tobacco that are chewed or sucked on.

Smokeless tobacco contains nicotine, which is addictive. When you use smokeless tobacco, the nicotine is absorbed through the lining of your mouth and goes directly into your bloodstream. This can lead to a rapid increase in nicotine levels in your body, which can make it harder to quit using tobacco.

Smokeless tobacco also contains harmful chemicals that can cause cancer of the mouth, esophagus, and pancreas. It can also cause other health problems, such as gum disease, tooth decay, and precancerous lesions in the mouth. Using smokeless tobacco can also increase your risk of developing heart disease and having a stroke.

"Plasmodium vivax" is a species of protozoan parasite that causes malaria in humans. It's one of the five malaria parasites that can infect humans, with P. falciparum being the most deadly.

P. vivax typically enters the human body through the bite of an infected Anopheles mosquito. Once inside the human host, the parasite travels to the liver where it multiplies and matures. After a period of development that can range from weeks to several months, the mature parasites are released into the bloodstream, where they infect red blood cells and continue to multiply.

The symptoms of P. vivax malaria include fever, chills, headache, muscle and joint pain, and fatigue. One distinctive feature of P. vivax is its ability to form dormant stages (hypnozoites) in the liver, which can reactivate and cause relapses of the disease months or even years after the initial infection.

P. vivax malaria is treatable with medications such as chloroquine, but resistance to this drug has been reported in some parts of the world. Prevention measures include using insecticide-treated bed nets and indoor residual spraying to reduce mosquito populations, as well as taking prophylactic medications for travelers visiting areas where malaria is common.

HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) infection is a viral illness that progressively attacks and weakens the immune system, making individuals more susceptible to other infections and diseases. The virus primarily infects CD4+ T cells, a type of white blood cell essential for fighting off infections. Over time, as the number of these immune cells declines, the body becomes increasingly vulnerable to opportunistic infections and cancers.

HIV infection has three stages:

1. Acute HIV infection: This is the initial stage that occurs within 2-4 weeks after exposure to the virus. During this period, individuals may experience flu-like symptoms such as fever, fatigue, rash, swollen glands, and muscle aches. The virus replicates rapidly, and the viral load in the body is very high.
2. Chronic HIV infection (Clinical latency): This stage follows the acute infection and can last several years if left untreated. Although individuals may not show any symptoms during this phase, the virus continues to replicate at low levels, and the immune system gradually weakens. The viral load remains relatively stable, but the number of CD4+ T cells declines over time.
3. AIDS (Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome): This is the most advanced stage of HIV infection, characterized by a severely damaged immune system and numerous opportunistic infections or cancers. At this stage, the CD4+ T cell count drops below 200 cells/mm3 of blood.

It's important to note that with proper antiretroviral therapy (ART), individuals with HIV infection can effectively manage the virus, maintain a healthy immune system, and significantly reduce the risk of transmission to others. Early diagnosis and treatment are crucial for improving long-term health outcomes and reducing the spread of HIV.

"Plasmodium" is a genus of protozoan parasites that are the causative agents of malaria in humans and other animals. There are several species within this genus, including Plasmodium falciparum, P. vivax, P. ovale, P. malariae, and P. knowlesi, among others.

These parasites have a complex life cycle that involves two hosts: an Anopheles mosquito and a vertebrate host (such as humans). When a person is bitten by an infected mosquito, the parasites enter the bloodstream and infect red blood cells, where they multiply and cause the symptoms of malaria.

Plasmodium species are transmitted through the bites of infected female Anopheles mosquitoes, which become infected after taking a blood meal from an infected person. The parasites then develop in the mosquito's midgut, eventually making their way to the salivary glands, where they can be transmitted to another human through the mosquito's bite.

Malaria is a serious and sometimes fatal disease that affects millions of people worldwide, particularly in tropical and subtropical regions. It is characterized by fever, chills, headache, muscle and joint pain, and anemia, among other symptoms. Prompt diagnosis and treatment are essential to prevent severe illness and death from malaria.

'Government Financing' in the context of healthcare refers to the role of government in funding healthcare services, programs, and infrastructure. This can be achieved through various mechanisms such as:

1. Direct provision of healthcare services: The government operates and funds its own hospitals, clinics, and other healthcare facilities, where it employs healthcare professionals to deliver care.
2. Public insurance programs: The government establishes and manages health insurance programs, like Medicare and Medicaid in the United States, which provide coverage for specific populations and reimburse healthcare providers for services delivered to enrollees.
3. Tax subsidies and incentives: Governments may offer tax breaks or other financial incentives to encourage private investments in healthcare infrastructure, research, and development.
4. Grants and loans: Government agencies can provide funding to healthcare organizations, researchers, and educational institutions in the form of grants and loans for specific projects, programs, or initiatives.
5. Public-private partnerships (PPPs): Governments collaborate with private entities to jointly fund and manage healthcare services, facilities, or infrastructure projects.

Government financing plays a significant role in shaping healthcare systems and ensuring access to care for vulnerable populations. The extent of government involvement in financing varies across countries, depending on their political, economic, and social contexts.

Quinine is defined as a bitter crystalline alkaloid derived from the bark of the Cinchona tree, primarily used in the treatment of malaria and other parasitic diseases. It works by interfering with the reproduction of the malaria parasite within red blood cells. Quinine has also been used historically as a muscle relaxant and analgesic, but its use for these purposes is now limited due to potential serious side effects. In addition, quinine can be found in some beverages like tonic water, where it is present in very small amounts for flavoring purposes.

Fever, also known as pyrexia or febrile response, is a common medical sign characterized by an elevation in core body temperature above the normal range of 36.5-37.5°C (97.7-99.5°F) due to a dysregulation of the body's thermoregulatory system. It is often a response to an infection, inflammation, or other underlying medical conditions, and it serves as a part of the immune system's effort to combat the invading pathogens or to repair damaged tissues.

Fevers can be classified based on their magnitude:

* Low-grade fever: 37.5-38°C (99.5-100.4°F)
* Moderate fever: 38-39°C (100.4-102.2°F)
* High-grade or severe fever: above 39°C (102.2°F)

It is important to note that a single elevated temperature reading does not necessarily indicate the presence of a fever, as body temperature can fluctuate throughout the day and can be influenced by various factors such as physical activity, environmental conditions, and the menstrual cycle in females. The diagnosis of fever typically requires the confirmation of an elevated core body temperature on at least two occasions or a consistently high temperature over a period of time.

While fevers are generally considered beneficial in fighting off infections and promoting recovery, extremely high temperatures or prolonged febrile states may necessitate medical intervention to prevent potential complications such as dehydration, seizures, or damage to vital organs.

Epidemiological monitoring is the systematic and ongoing collection, analysis, interpretation, and dissemination of health data pertaining to a specific population or community, with the aim of identifying and tracking patterns of disease or injury, understanding their causes, and informing public health interventions and policies. This process typically involves the use of surveillance systems, such as disease registries, to collect data on the incidence, prevalence, and distribution of health outcomes of interest, as well as potential risk factors and exposures. The information generated through epidemiological monitoring can help to identify trends and emerging health threats, inform resource allocation and program planning, and evaluate the impact of public health interventions.

A cross-sectional study is a type of observational research design that examines the relationship between variables at one point in time. It provides a snapshot or a "cross-section" of the population at a particular moment, allowing researchers to estimate the prevalence of a disease or condition and identify potential risk factors or associations.

In a cross-sectional study, data is collected from a sample of participants at a single time point, and the variables of interest are measured simultaneously. This design can be used to investigate the association between exposure and outcome, but it cannot establish causality because it does not follow changes over time.

Cross-sectional studies can be conducted using various data collection methods, such as surveys, interviews, or medical examinations. They are often used in epidemiology to estimate the prevalence of a disease or condition in a population and to identify potential risk factors that may contribute to its development. However, because cross-sectional studies only provide a snapshot of the population at one point in time, they cannot account for changes over time or determine whether exposure preceded the outcome.

Therefore, while cross-sectional studies can be useful for generating hypotheses and identifying potential associations between variables, further research using other study designs, such as cohort or case-control studies, is necessary to establish causality and confirm any findings.

I believe there may be some confusion in your question. "Fluorenes" is not a medical term, but rather a chemical term referring to organic compounds that contain a fluorene moiety, which is a bicyclic compound made up of two benzene rings fused to a five-membered ring containing two carbon atoms and one double bond.

Fluorenes have various applications in the field of materials science, including organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs), organic photovoltaics (OPVs), and organic field-effect transistors (OFETs). They are not typically used in a medical context, although some fluorene derivatives have been explored for potential therapeutic applications.

Therefore, I cannot provide a medical definition of "Fluorenes." However, if you have any questions about the chemical properties or applications of fluorenes, I would be happy to try and answer them.

Population surveillance in a public health and medical context refers to the ongoing, systematic collection, analysis, interpretation, and dissemination of health-related data for a defined population over time. It aims to monitor the health status, identify emerging health threats or trends, and evaluate the impact of interventions within that population. This information is used to inform public health policy, prioritize healthcare resources, and guide disease prevention and control efforts. Population surveillance can involve various data sources, such as vital records, disease registries, surveys, and electronic health records.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "seasons" is not a term that has a medical definition. Seasons refer to the four divisions of the year (spring, summer, autumn or fall, and winter) based on the position of the earth in its orbit around the sun. If you have any questions related to health or medicine, I'd be happy to try to help answer those!

Sesquiterpenes are a class of terpenes that consist of three isoprene units, hence the name "sesqui-" meaning "one and a half" in Latin. They are composed of 15 carbon atoms and have a wide range of chemical structures and biological activities. Sesquiterpenes can be found in various plants, fungi, and insects, and they play important roles in the defense mechanisms of these organisms. Some sesquiterpenes are also used in traditional medicine and have been studied for their potential therapeutic benefits.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "geography" is not a term that has a medical definition. Geography is a field of study that deals with the location and distribution of physical and cultural features on Earth's surface, as well as how humans interact with and affect those features. It is not a concept that is typically used in a medical context. If you have any questions related to medicine or healthcare, I would be happy to try to help answer them for you!

"Health Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices" (HKAP) is a term used in public health to refer to the knowledge, beliefs, assumptions, and behaviors that individuals possess or engage in that are related to health. Here's a brief definition of each component:

1. Health Knowledge: Refers to the factual information and understanding that individuals have about various health-related topics, such as anatomy, physiology, disease processes, and healthy behaviors.
2. Attitudes: Represent the positive or negative evaluations, feelings, or dispositions that people hold towards certain health issues, practices, or services. These attitudes can influence their willingness to adopt and maintain healthy behaviors.
3. Practices: Encompass the specific actions or habits that individuals engage in related to their health, such as dietary choices, exercise routines, hygiene practices, and use of healthcare services.

HKAP is a multidimensional concept that helps public health professionals understand and address various factors influencing individual and community health outcomes. By assessing and addressing knowledge gaps, negative attitudes, or unhealthy practices, interventions can be designed to promote positive behavior change and improve overall health status.

Communicable disease control is a branch of public health that focuses on preventing and controlling the spread of infectious diseases within a population. The goal is to reduce the incidence and prevalence of communicable diseases through various strategies, such as:

1. Surveillance: Monitoring and tracking the occurrence of communicable diseases in a population to identify trends, outbreaks, and high-risk areas.
2. Prevention: Implementing measures to prevent the transmission of infectious agents, such as vaccination programs, education campaigns, and environmental interventions (e.g., water treatment, food safety).
3. Case management: Identifying, diagnosing, and treating cases of communicable diseases to reduce their duration and severity, as well as to prevent further spread.
4. Contact tracing: Identifying and monitoring individuals who have been in close contact with infected persons to detect and prevent secondary cases.
5. Outbreak response: Coordinating a rapid and effective response to disease outbreaks, including the implementation of control measures, communication with affected communities, and evaluation of interventions.
6. Collaboration: Working closely with healthcare providers, laboratories, policymakers, and other stakeholders to ensure a coordinated and comprehensive approach to communicable disease control.
7. Research: Conducting research to better understand the epidemiology, transmission dynamics, and prevention strategies for communicable diseases.

Effective communicable disease control requires a multidisciplinary approach that combines expertise in medicine, epidemiology, microbiology, public health, social sciences, and healthcare management.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "poultry" is not a medical term. It is a agricultural and culinary term that refers to domestic birds (such as chickens, ducks, geese, and turkeys) that are kept for their eggs, meat, or feathers. The study and care of these birds would fall under the field of veterinary medicine, but "poultry" itself is not a medical term.

Insect vectors are insects that transmit disease-causing pathogens (such as viruses, bacteria, parasites) from one host to another. They do this while feeding on the host's blood or tissues. The insects themselves are not infected by the pathogen but act as mechanical carriers that pass it on during their bite. Examples of diseases spread by insect vectors include malaria (transmitted by mosquitoes), Lyme disease (transmitted by ticks), and plague (transmitted by fleas). Proper prevention measures, such as using insect repellent and reducing standing water where mosquitoes breed, can help reduce the risk of contracting these diseases.

The "delivery of health care" refers to the process of providing medical services, treatments, and interventions to individuals in order to maintain, restore, or improve their health. This encompasses a wide range of activities, including:

1. Preventive care: Routine check-ups, screenings, immunizations, and counseling aimed at preventing illnesses or identifying them at an early stage.
2. Diagnostic services: Tests and procedures used to identify and understand medical conditions, such as laboratory tests, imaging studies, and biopsies.
3. Treatment interventions: Medical, surgical, or therapeutic treatments provided to manage acute or chronic health issues, including medications, surgeries, physical therapy, and psychotherapy.
4. Acute care services: Short-term medical interventions focused on addressing immediate health concerns, such as hospitalizations for infections, injuries, or complications from medical conditions.
5. Chronic care management: Long-term care and support provided to individuals with ongoing medical needs, such as those living with chronic diseases like diabetes, heart disease, or cancer.
6. Rehabilitation services: Programs designed to help patients recover from illnesses, injuries, or surgeries, focusing on restoring physical, cognitive, and emotional function.
7. End-of-life care: Palliative and hospice care provided to individuals facing terminal illnesses, with an emphasis on comfort, dignity, and quality of life.
8. Public health initiatives: Population-level interventions aimed at improving community health, such as disease prevention programs, health education campaigns, and environmental modifications.

The delivery of health care involves a complex network of healthcare professionals, institutions, and systems working together to ensure that patients receive the best possible care. This includes primary care physicians, specialists, nurses, allied health professionals, hospitals, clinics, long-term care facilities, and public health organizations. Effective communication, coordination, and collaboration among these stakeholders are essential for high-quality, patient-centered care.

Rural health services refer to the healthcare delivery systems and facilities that are located in rural areas and are designed to meet the unique health needs of rural populations. These services can include hospitals, clinics, community health centers, mental health centers, and home health agencies, as well as various programs and initiatives aimed at improving access to care, addressing health disparities, and promoting health and wellness in rural communities.

Rural health services are often characterized by longer travel distances to healthcare facilities, a greater reliance on primary care and preventive services, and a higher prevalence of certain health conditions such as chronic diseases, injuries, and mental health disorders. As a result, rural health services must be tailored to address these challenges and provide high-quality, affordable, and accessible care to rural residents.

In many countries, rural health services are supported by government policies and programs aimed at improving healthcare infrastructure, workforce development, and telehealth technologies in rural areas. These efforts are critical for ensuring that all individuals, regardless of where they live, have access to the healthcare services they need to maintain their health and well-being.

A drug combination refers to the use of two or more drugs in combination for the treatment of a single medical condition or disease. The rationale behind using drug combinations is to achieve a therapeutic effect that is superior to that obtained with any single agent alone, through various mechanisms such as:

* Complementary modes of action: When different drugs target different aspects of the disease process, their combined effects may be greater than either drug used alone.
* Synergistic interactions: In some cases, the combination of two or more drugs can result in a greater-than-additive effect, where the total response is greater than the sum of the individual responses to each drug.
* Antagonism of adverse effects: Sometimes, the use of one drug can mitigate the side effects of another, allowing for higher doses or longer durations of therapy.

Examples of drug combinations include:

* Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for HIV infection, which typically involves a combination of three or more antiretroviral drugs to suppress viral replication and prevent the development of drug resistance.
* Chemotherapy regimens for cancer treatment, where combinations of cytotoxic agents are used to target different stages of the cell cycle and increase the likelihood of tumor cell death.
* Fixed-dose combination products, such as those used in the treatment of hypertension or type 2 diabetes, which combine two or more active ingredients into a single formulation for ease of administration and improved adherence to therapy.

However, it's important to note that drug combinations can also increase the risk of adverse effects, drug-drug interactions, and medication errors. Therefore, careful consideration should be given to the selection of appropriate drugs, dosing regimens, and monitoring parameters when using drug combinations in clinical practice.

Influenza, also known as the flu, is a highly contagious viral infection that attacks the respiratory system of humans. It is caused by influenza viruses A, B, or C and is characterized by the sudden onset of fever, chills, headache, muscle pain, sore throat, cough, runny nose, and fatigue. Influenza can lead to complications such as pneumonia, bronchitis, and ear infections, and can be particularly dangerous for young children, older adults, pregnant women, and people with weakened immune systems or chronic medical conditions. The virus is spread through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs, sneezes, or talks, and can also survive on surfaces for a period of time. Influenza viruses are constantly changing, which makes it necessary to get vaccinated annually to protect against the most recent and prevalent strains.

"Aedes" is a genus of mosquitoes that are known to transmit various diseases, including Zika virus, dengue fever, chikungunya, and yellow fever. These mosquitoes are typically found in tropical and subtropical regions around the world. They are distinguished by their black and white striped legs and thorax. Aedes aegypti is the most common species associated with disease transmission, although other species such as Aedes albopictus can also transmit diseases. It's important to note that only female mosquitoes bite and feed on blood, while males feed solely on nectar and plant juices.

Genotype, in genetics, refers to the complete heritable genetic makeup of an individual organism, including all of its genes. It is the set of instructions contained in an organism's DNA for the development and function of that organism. The genotype is the basis for an individual's inherited traits, and it can be contrasted with an individual's phenotype, which refers to the observable physical or biochemical characteristics of an organism that result from the expression of its genes in combination with environmental influences.

It is important to note that an individual's genotype is not necessarily identical to their genetic sequence. Some genes have multiple forms called alleles, and an individual may inherit different alleles for a given gene from each parent. The combination of alleles that an individual inherits for a particular gene is known as their genotype for that gene.

Understanding an individual's genotype can provide important information about their susceptibility to certain diseases, their response to drugs and other treatments, and their risk of passing on inherited genetic disorders to their offspring.

Seroepidemiologic studies are a type of epidemiological study that measures the presence and levels of antibodies in a population's blood serum to investigate the prevalence, distribution, and transmission of infectious diseases. These studies help to identify patterns of infection and immunity within a population, which can inform public health policies and interventions.

Seroepidemiologic studies typically involve collecting blood samples from a representative sample of individuals in a population and testing them for the presence of antibodies against specific pathogens. The results are then analyzed to estimate the prevalence of infection and immunity within the population, as well as any factors associated with increased or decreased risk of infection.

These studies can provide valuable insights into the spread of infectious diseases, including emerging and re-emerging infections, and help to monitor the effectiveness of vaccination programs. Additionally, seroepidemiologic studies can also be used to investigate the transmission dynamics of infectious agents, such as identifying sources of infection or tracking the spread of antibiotic resistance.

Genes in protozoa refer to the hereditary units of these single-celled organisms that carry genetic information necessary for their growth, development, and reproduction. These genes are made up of DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) molecules, which contain sequences of nucleotide bases that code for specific proteins or RNA molecules. Protozoan genes are responsible for various functions, such as metabolism, response to environmental stimuli, and reproduction.

It is important to note that the study of protozoan genes has contributed significantly to our understanding of genetics and evolution, particularly in areas such as molecular biology, cell biology, and genomics. However, there is still much to be learned about the genetic diversity and complexity of these organisms, which continue to be an active area of research.

A disease outbreak is defined as the occurrence of cases of a disease in excess of what would normally be expected in a given time and place. It may affect a small and localized group or a large number of people spread over a wide area, even internationally. An outbreak may be caused by a new agent, a change in the agent's virulence or host susceptibility, or an increase in the size or density of the host population.

Outbreaks can have significant public health and economic impacts, and require prompt investigation and control measures to prevent further spread of the disease. The investigation typically involves identifying the source of the outbreak, determining the mode of transmission, and implementing measures to interrupt the chain of infection. This may include vaccination, isolation or quarantine, and education of the public about the risks and prevention strategies.

Examples of disease outbreaks include foodborne illnesses linked to contaminated food or water, respiratory infections spread through coughing and sneezing, and mosquito-borne diseases such as Zika virus and West Nile virus. Outbreaks can also occur in healthcare settings, such as hospitals and nursing homes, where vulnerable populations may be at increased risk of infection.

Patient acceptance of health care refers to the willingness and ability of a patient to follow and engage in a recommended treatment plan or healthcare regimen. This involves understanding the proposed medical interventions, considering their potential benefits and risks, and making an informed decision to proceed with the recommended course of action.

The factors that influence patient acceptance can include:

1. Patient's understanding of their condition and treatment options
2. Trust in their healthcare provider
3. Personal beliefs and values related to health and illness
4. Cultural, linguistic, or socioeconomic barriers
5. Emotional responses to the diagnosis or proposed treatment
6. Practical considerations, such as cost, time commitment, or potential side effects

Healthcare providers play a crucial role in facilitating patient acceptance by clearly communicating information, addressing concerns and questions, and providing support throughout the decision-making process. Encouraging shared decision-making and tailoring care plans to individual patient needs and preferences can also enhance patient acceptance of health care.

'Mosquito Control' is not a medical term per se, but it is a public health concept that refers to the systematic reduction or elimination of mosquito populations through various methods to prevent or minimize the transmission of mosquito-borne diseases. This multidisciplinary field involves entomologists, ecologists, engineers, and public health professionals working together to manage mosquito habitats, apply insecticides, and educate communities about personal protection measures. By controlling mosquito populations, we can significantly reduce the risk of contracting vector-borne illnesses such as malaria, dengue fever, yellow fever, Zika virus, and West Nile virus, among others.

I believe there may be some confusion in your question. "Organic chemicals" is a broad term that refers to chemical compounds containing carbon, often bonded to hydrogen. These can include natural substances like sugars and proteins, as well as synthetic materials like plastics and pharmaceuticals.

However, if you're asking about "organic" in the context of farming or food production, it refers to things that are produced without the use of synthetic pesticides, fertilizers, genetically modified organisms, irradiation, and sewage sludge.

In the field of medicine, there isn't a specific definition for 'organic chemicals'. If certain organic chemicals are used in medical contexts, they would be defined by their specific use or function (like a specific drug name).

"Family characteristics" is a broad term that can refer to various attributes, dynamics, and structures of a family unit. These characteristics can include:

1. Family structure: This refers to the composition of the family, such as whether it is a nuclear family (two parents and their children), single-parent family, extended family, blended family, or same-sex parent family.
2. Family roles: The responsibilities and expectations assigned to each family member, such as caregiver, provider, or decision-maker.
3. Communication patterns: How family members communicate with one another, including frequency, tone, and level of openness.
4. Problem-solving styles: How the family approaches and resolves conflicts and challenges.
5. Cultural and religious practices: The values, traditions, and beliefs that shape the family's identity and worldview.
6. Family functioning: The overall health and effectiveness of the family system, including its ability to adapt to change and support individual members' needs.
7. Attachment styles: The quality and nature of the emotional bonds between family members, which can impact attachment security and relationships throughout life.
8. Parenting style: The approach that parents take in raising their children, such as authoritative, authoritarian, permissive, or uninvolved.
9. Family history: Past experiences and events that have shaped the family's development and dynamics.
10. Genetic factors: Inherited traits and predispositions that can influence family members' health, behavior, and personality.

Understanding family characteristics is essential in fields such as medicine, psychology, social work, and counseling, as these factors can significantly impact individual and family well-being.

Health surveys are research studies that collect data from a sample population to describe the current health status, health behaviors, and healthcare utilization of a particular group or community. These surveys may include questions about various aspects of health such as physical health, mental health, chronic conditions, lifestyle habits, access to healthcare services, and demographic information. The data collected from health surveys can be used to monitor trends in health over time, identify disparities in health outcomes, develop and evaluate public health programs and policies, and inform resource allocation decisions. Examples of national health surveys include the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) and the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS).

In epidemiology, the incidence of a disease is defined as the number of new cases of that disease within a specific population over a certain period of time. It is typically expressed as a rate, with the number of new cases in the numerator and the size of the population at risk in the denominator. Incidence provides information about the risk of developing a disease during a given time period and can be used to compare disease rates between different populations or to monitor trends in disease occurrence over time.

Phylogeny is the evolutionary history and relationship among biological entities, such as species or genes, based on their shared characteristics. In other words, it refers to the branching pattern of evolution that shows how various organisms have descended from a common ancestor over time. Phylogenetic analysis involves constructing a tree-like diagram called a phylogenetic tree, which depicts the inferred evolutionary relationships among organisms or genes based on molecular sequence data or other types of characters. This information is crucial for understanding the diversity and distribution of life on Earth, as well as for studying the emergence and spread of diseases.

I apologize for any confusion, but "Cambodia" is not a medical term or concept. It is the name of a country located in Southeast Asia, bordered by Thailand, Laos, Vietnam, and the Gulf of Thailand. The capital city of Cambodia is Phnom Penh.

If you have any questions related to healthcare, medical conditions, treatments, or other health-related topics, I would be happy to help you with those!

Socioeconomic factors are a range of interconnected conditions and influences that affect the opportunities and resources a person or group has to maintain and improve their health and well-being. These factors include:

1. Economic stability: This includes employment status, job security, income level, and poverty status. Lower income and lack of employment are associated with poorer health outcomes.
2. Education: Higher levels of education are generally associated with better health outcomes. Education can affect a person's ability to access and understand health information, as well as their ability to navigate the healthcare system.
3. Social and community context: This includes factors such as social support networks, discrimination, and community safety. Strong social supports and positive community connections are associated with better health outcomes, while discrimination and lack of safety can negatively impact health.
4. Healthcare access and quality: Access to affordable, high-quality healthcare is an important socioeconomic factor that can significantly impact a person's health. Factors such as insurance status, availability of providers, and cultural competency of healthcare systems can all affect healthcare access and quality.
5. Neighborhood and built environment: The physical conditions in which people live, work, and play can also impact their health. Factors such as housing quality, transportation options, availability of healthy foods, and exposure to environmental hazards can all influence health outcomes.

Socioeconomic factors are often interrelated and can have a cumulative effect on health outcomes. For example, someone who lives in a low-income neighborhood with limited access to healthy foods and safe parks may also face challenges related to employment, education, and healthcare access that further impact their health. Addressing socioeconomic factors is an important part of promoting health equity and reducing health disparities.

Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) is a laboratory technique used to amplify specific regions of DNA. It enables the production of thousands to millions of copies of a particular DNA sequence in a rapid and efficient manner, making it an essential tool in various fields such as molecular biology, medical diagnostics, forensic science, and research.

The PCR process involves repeated cycles of heating and cooling to separate the DNA strands, allow primers (short sequences of single-stranded DNA) to attach to the target regions, and extend these primers using an enzyme called Taq polymerase, resulting in the exponential amplification of the desired DNA segment.

In a medical context, PCR is often used for detecting and quantifying specific pathogens (viruses, bacteria, fungi, or parasites) in clinical samples, identifying genetic mutations or polymorphisms associated with diseases, monitoring disease progression, and evaluating treatment effectiveness.

Feces are the solid or semisolid remains of food that could not be digested or absorbed in the small intestine, along with bacteria and other waste products. After being stored in the colon, feces are eliminated from the body through the rectum and anus during defecation. Feces can vary in color, consistency, and odor depending on a person's diet, health status, and other factors.

A questionnaire in the medical context is a standardized, systematic, and structured tool used to gather information from individuals regarding their symptoms, medical history, lifestyle, or other health-related factors. It typically consists of a series of written questions that can be either self-administered or administered by an interviewer. Questionnaires are widely used in various areas of healthcare, including clinical research, epidemiological studies, patient care, and health services evaluation to collect data that can inform diagnosis, treatment planning, and population health management. They provide a consistent and organized method for obtaining information from large groups or individual patients, helping to ensure accurate and comprehensive data collection while minimizing bias and variability in the information gathered.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but the term "Africa" actually refers to a continent, not a medical condition or concept. Africa is the second-largest continent in the world, consisting of 54 countries and a wide range of diverse ethnic groups, cultures, languages, and landscapes. It is home to a vast array of wildlife, including many species that are not found anywhere else in the world. If you have any questions about Africa's geography, history, or culture, I would be happy to try to help answer them!

An endemic disease is a type of disease that is regularly found among particular people or in a certain population, and is spread easily from person to person. The rate of infection is consistently high in these populations, but it is relatively stable and does not change dramatically over time. Endemic diseases are contrasted with epidemic diseases, which suddenly increase in incidence and spread rapidly through a large population.

Endemic diseases are often associated with poverty, poor sanitation, and limited access to healthcare. They can also be influenced by environmental factors such as climate, water quality, and exposure to vectors like mosquitoes or ticks. Examples of endemic diseases include malaria in some tropical countries, tuberculosis (TB) in many parts of the world, and HIV/AIDS in certain populations.

Effective prevention and control measures for endemic diseases typically involve improving access to healthcare, promoting good hygiene and sanitation practices, providing vaccinations when available, and implementing vector control strategies. By addressing the underlying social and environmental factors that contribute to the spread of these diseases, it is possible to reduce their impact on affected populations and improve overall health outcomes.

DNA Sequence Analysis is the systematic determination of the order of nucleotides in a DNA molecule. It is a critical component of modern molecular biology, genetics, and genetic engineering. The process involves determining the exact order of the four nucleotide bases - adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T) - in a DNA molecule or fragment. This information is used in various applications such as identifying gene mutations, studying evolutionary relationships, developing molecular markers for breeding, and diagnosing genetic diseases.

The process of DNA Sequence Analysis typically involves several steps, including DNA extraction, PCR amplification (if necessary), purification, sequencing reaction, and electrophoresis. The resulting data is then analyzed using specialized software to determine the exact sequence of nucleotides.

In recent years, high-throughput DNA sequencing technologies have revolutionized the field of genomics, enabling the rapid and cost-effective sequencing of entire genomes. This has led to an explosion of genomic data and new insights into the genetic basis of many diseases and traits.

Genetic variation refers to the differences in DNA sequences among individuals and populations. These variations can result from mutations, genetic recombination, or gene flow between populations. Genetic variation is essential for evolution by providing the raw material upon which natural selection acts. It can occur within a single gene, between different genes, or at larger scales, such as differences in the number of chromosomes or entire sets of chromosomes. The study of genetic variation is crucial in understanding the genetic basis of diseases and traits, as well as the evolutionary history and relationships among species.

Treatment failure is a term used in medicine to describe the situation when a prescribed treatment or intervention is not achieving the desired therapeutic goals or objectives. This may occur due to various reasons, such as:

1. Development of drug resistance by the pathogen or disease being treated.
2. Inadequate dosage or frequency of the medication.
3. Poor adherence or compliance to the treatment regimen by the patient.
4. The presence of underlying conditions or comorbidities that may affect the efficacy of the treatment.
5. The severity or progression of the disease despite appropriate treatment.

When treatment failure occurs, healthcare providers may need to reassess the patient's condition and modify the treatment plan accordingly, which may include adjusting the dosage, changing the medication, adding new medications, or considering alternative treatments.

I'm happy to help, but it seems there might be some confusion in your question. "Interviews" is a broad topic that isn't typically a medical term or subject. However, interviews can certainly be a part of medical settings and procedures, such as job interviews for healthcare positions, patient interviews during medical consultations, or research interviews in clinical studies.

In the context of medical education, an interview might refer to the process by which medical schools evaluate applicants for admission, known as the medical school interview. This is a critical component of the application process and typically involves one-on-one conversations between the applicant and an admissions committee member or a series of multiple mini-interviews (MMIs) with various evaluators.

If you could provide more context or clarify what you mean by "Interviews as Topic" in a medical setting, I'd be happy to help further!

Cluster analysis is a statistical method used to group similar objects or data points together based on their characteristics or features. In medical and healthcare research, cluster analysis can be used to identify patterns or relationships within complex datasets, such as patient records or genetic information. This technique can help researchers to classify patients into distinct subgroups based on their symptoms, diagnoses, or other variables, which can inform more personalized treatment plans or public health interventions.

Cluster analysis involves several steps, including:

1. Data preparation: The researcher must first collect and clean the data, ensuring that it is complete and free from errors. This may involve removing outlier values or missing data points.
2. Distance measurement: Next, the researcher must determine how to measure the distance between each pair of data points. Common methods include Euclidean distance (the straight-line distance between two points) or Manhattan distance (the distance between two points along a grid).
3. Clustering algorithm: The researcher then applies a clustering algorithm, which groups similar data points together based on their distances from one another. Common algorithms include hierarchical clustering (which creates a tree-like structure of clusters) or k-means clustering (which assigns each data point to the nearest centroid).
4. Validation: Finally, the researcher must validate the results of the cluster analysis by evaluating the stability and robustness of the clusters. This may involve re-running the analysis with different distance measures or clustering algorithms, or comparing the results to external criteria.

Cluster analysis is a powerful tool for identifying patterns and relationships within complex datasets, but it requires careful consideration of the data preparation, distance measurement, and validation steps to ensure accurate and meaningful results.

Health services research (HSR) is a multidisciplinary field of scientific investigation that studies how social factors, financing systems, organizational structures and processes, health technologies, and personal behaviors affect access to healthcare, the quality and cost of care, and ultimately, our health and well-being. The goal of HSR is to inform policy and practice, improve system performance, and enhance the health and well-being of individuals and communities. It involves the use of various research methods, including epidemiology, biostatistics, economics, sociology, management science, political science, and psychology, to answer questions about the healthcare system and how it can be improved.

Examples of HSR topics include:

* Evaluating the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of different healthcare interventions and technologies
* Studying patient-centered care and patient experiences with the healthcare system
* Examining healthcare workforce issues, such as shortages of primary care providers or the impact of nurse-to-patient ratios on patient outcomes
* Investigating the impact of health insurance design and financing systems on access to care and health disparities
* Analyzing the organization and delivery of healthcare services in different settings, such as hospitals, clinics, and long-term care facilities
* Identifying best practices for improving healthcare quality and safety, reducing medical errors, and eliminating wasteful or unnecessary care.

Pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) is an infectious disease caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium tuberculosis. It primarily affects the lungs and can spread to other parts of the body through the bloodstream or lymphatic system. The infection typically enters the body when a person inhales droplets containing the bacteria, which are released into the air when an infected person coughs, sneezes, or talks.

The symptoms of pulmonary TB can vary but often include:

* Persistent cough that lasts for more than three weeks and may produce phlegm or blood-tinged sputum
* Chest pain or discomfort, particularly when breathing deeply or coughing
* Fatigue and weakness
* Unexplained weight loss
* Fever and night sweats
* Loss of appetite

Pulmonary TB can cause serious complications if left untreated, including damage to the lungs, respiratory failure, and spread of the infection to other parts of the body. Treatment typically involves a course of antibiotics that can last several months, and it is essential for patients to complete the full treatment regimen to ensure that the infection is fully eradicated.

Preventive measures include vaccination with the Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine, which can provide some protection against severe forms of TB in children, and measures to prevent the spread of the disease, such as covering the mouth and nose when coughing or sneezing, wearing a mask in public places, and avoiding close contact with people who have active TB.

"Focus groups" is a term from the field of social science research, rather than medicine. It does not have a specific medical definition. However, focus groups are sometimes used in medical research to gather data and insights from a small group of people on a specific topic or product. This can include gathering feedback on patient experiences, testing prototypes of medical devices or treatments, or exploring attitudes and perceptions related to health issues. The goal is to gain a deeper understanding of the perspectives and needs of the target population through facilitated group discussion.

Treatment outcome is a term used to describe the result or effect of medical treatment on a patient's health status. It can be measured in various ways, such as through symptoms improvement, disease remission, reduced disability, improved quality of life, or survival rates. The treatment outcome helps healthcare providers evaluate the effectiveness of a particular treatment plan and make informed decisions about future care. It is also used in clinical research to compare the efficacy of different treatments and improve patient care.

Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs), also known as Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs), are a group of diseases or infections that spread primarily through sexual contact, including vaginal, oral, and anal sex. They can also be transmitted through non-sexual means such as mother-to-child transmission during childbirth or breastfeeding, or via shared needles.

STDs can cause a range of symptoms, from mild to severe, and some may not show any symptoms at all. Common STDs include chlamydia, gonorrhea, syphilis, HIV/AIDS, human papillomavirus (HPV), herpes simplex virus (HSV), hepatitis B, and pubic lice.

If left untreated, some STDs can lead to serious health complications, such as infertility, organ damage, blindness, or even death. It is important to practice safe sex and get regular screenings for STDs if you are sexually active, especially if you have multiple partners or engage in high-risk behaviors.

Preventive measures include using barrier methods of protection, such as condoms, dental dams, and female condoms, getting vaccinated against HPV and hepatitis B, and limiting the number of sexual partners. If you suspect that you may have an STD, it is important to seek medical attention promptly for diagnosis and treatment.

Combination drug therapy is a treatment approach that involves the use of multiple medications with different mechanisms of action to achieve better therapeutic outcomes. This approach is often used in the management of complex medical conditions such as cancer, HIV/AIDS, and cardiovascular diseases. The goal of combination drug therapy is to improve efficacy, reduce the risk of drug resistance, decrease the likelihood of adverse effects, and enhance the overall quality of life for patients.

In combining drugs, healthcare providers aim to target various pathways involved in the disease process, which may help to:

1. Increase the effectiveness of treatment by attacking the disease from multiple angles.
2. Decrease the dosage of individual medications, reducing the risk and severity of side effects.
3. Slow down or prevent the development of drug resistance, a common problem in chronic diseases like HIV/AIDS and cancer.
4. Improve patient compliance by simplifying dosing schedules and reducing pill burden.

Examples of combination drug therapy include:

1. Antiretroviral therapy (ART) for HIV treatment, which typically involves three or more drugs from different classes to suppress viral replication and prevent the development of drug resistance.
2. Chemotherapy regimens for cancer treatment, where multiple cytotoxic agents are used to target various stages of the cell cycle and reduce the likelihood of tumor cells developing resistance.
3. Cardiovascular disease management, which may involve combining medications such as angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, beta-blockers, diuretics, and statins to control blood pressure, heart rate, fluid balance, and cholesterol levels.
4. Treatment of tuberculosis, which often involves a combination of several antibiotics to target different aspects of the bacterial life cycle and prevent the development of drug-resistant strains.

When prescribing combination drug therapy, healthcare providers must carefully consider factors such as potential drug interactions, dosing schedules, adverse effects, and contraindications to ensure safe and effective treatment. Regular monitoring of patients is essential to assess treatment response, manage side effects, and adjust the treatment plan as needed.

"Multiple drug resistance" (MDR) is a term used in medicine to describe the condition where a patient's infection becomes resistant to multiple antimicrobial drugs. This means that the bacteria, virus, fungus or parasite that is causing the infection has developed the ability to survive and multiply despite being exposed to medications that were originally designed to kill or inhibit its growth.

In particular, MDR occurs when an organism becomes resistant to at least one drug in three or more antimicrobial categories. This can happen due to genetic changes in the microorganism that allow it to survive in the presence of these drugs. The development of MDR is a significant concern for public health because it limits treatment options and can make infections harder, if not impossible, to treat.

MDR can develop through several mechanisms, including mutations in the genes that encode drug targets or enzymes involved in drug metabolism, as well as the acquisition of genetic elements such as plasmids and transposons that carry resistance genes. The overuse and misuse of antimicrobial drugs are major drivers of MDR, as they create selective pressure for the emergence and spread of resistant strains.

MDR infections can occur in various settings, including hospitals, long-term care facilities, and communities. They can affect people of all ages and backgrounds, although certain populations may be at higher risk, such as those with weakened immune systems or chronic medical conditions. Preventing the spread of MDR requires a multifaceted approach that includes surveillance, infection control, antimicrobial stewardship, and research into new therapies and diagnostics.

Sexual behavior refers to any physical or emotional interaction that has the potential to lead to sexual arousal and/or satisfaction. This can include a wide range of activities, such as kissing, touching, fondling, oral sex, vaginal sex, anal sex, and masturbation. It can also involve the use of sexual aids, such as vibrators or pornography.

Sexual behavior is influenced by a variety of factors, including biological, psychological, social, and cultural influences. It is an important aspect of human development and relationships, and it is essential to healthy sexual functioning and satisfaction. However, sexual behavior can also be associated with risks, such as sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and unintended pregnancies, and it is important for individuals to engage in safe and responsible sexual practices.

It's important to note that sexual behavior can vary widely among individuals and cultures, and what may be considered normal or acceptable in one culture or context may not be in another. It's also important to recognize that all individuals have the right to make informed decisions about their own sexual behavior and to have their sexual rights and autonomy respected.

Medical Definition:

"Risk factors" are any attribute, characteristic or exposure of an individual that increases the likelihood of developing a disease or injury. They can be divided into modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors. Modifiable risk factors are those that can be changed through lifestyle choices or medical treatment, while non-modifiable risk factors are inherent traits such as age, gender, or genetic predisposition. Examples of modifiable risk factors include smoking, alcohol consumption, physical inactivity, and unhealthy diet, while non-modifiable risk factors include age, sex, and family history. It is important to note that having a risk factor does not guarantee that a person will develop the disease, but rather indicates an increased susceptibility.

Program Evaluation is a systematic and objective assessment of a healthcare program's design, implementation, and outcomes. It is a medical term used to describe the process of determining the relevance, effectiveness, and efficiency of a program in achieving its goals and objectives. Program evaluation involves collecting and analyzing data related to various aspects of the program, such as its reach, impact, cost-effectiveness, and quality. The results of program evaluation can be used to improve the design and implementation of existing programs or to inform the development of new ones. It is a critical tool for ensuring that healthcare programs are meeting the needs of their intended audiences and delivering high-quality care in an efficient and effective manner.

A newborn infant is a baby who is within the first 28 days of life. This period is also referred to as the neonatal period. Newborns require specialized care and attention due to their immature bodily systems and increased vulnerability to various health issues. They are closely monitored for signs of well-being, growth, and development during this critical time.

Microsatellite repeats, also known as short tandem repeats (STRs), are repetitive DNA sequences made up of units of 1-6 base pairs that are repeated in a head-to-tail manner. These repeats are spread throughout the human genome and are highly polymorphic, meaning they can have different numbers of repeat units in different individuals.

Microsatellites are useful as genetic markers because of their high degree of variability. They are commonly used in forensic science to identify individuals, in genealogy to trace ancestry, and in medical research to study genetic diseases and disorders. Mutations in microsatellite repeats have been associated with various neurological conditions, including Huntington's disease and fragile X syndrome.

Antigens are substances (usually proteins) found on the surface of cells, or viruses, that can be recognized by the immune system and stimulate an immune response. In the context of protozoa, antigens refer to the specific proteins or other molecules found on the surface of these single-celled organisms that can trigger an immune response in a host organism.

Protozoa are a group of microscopic eukaryotic organisms that include a diverse range of species, some of which can cause diseases in humans and animals. When a protozoan infects a host, the host's immune system recognizes the protozoan antigens as foreign and mounts an immune response to eliminate the infection. This response involves the activation of various types of immune cells, such as T-cells and B-cells, which recognize and target the protozoan antigens.

Understanding the nature of protozoan antigens is important for developing vaccines and other immunotherapies to prevent or treat protozoan infections. For example, researchers have identified specific antigens on the surface of the malaria parasite that are recognized by the human immune system and have used this information to develop vaccine candidates. However, many protozoan infections remain difficult to prevent or treat, and further research is needed to identify new targets for vaccines and therapies.

"Health personnel" is a broad term that refers to individuals who are involved in maintaining, promoting, and restoring the health of populations or individuals. This can include a wide range of professionals such as:

1. Healthcare providers: These are medical doctors, nurses, midwives, dentists, pharmacists, allied health professionals (like physical therapists, occupational therapists, speech therapists, dietitians, etc.), and other healthcare workers who provide direct patient care.

2. Public health professionals: These are individuals who work in public health agencies, non-governmental organizations, or academia to promote health, prevent diseases, and protect populations from health hazards. They include epidemiologists, biostatisticians, health educators, environmental health specialists, and health services researchers.

3. Health managers and administrators: These are professionals who oversee the operations, finances, and strategic planning of healthcare organizations, such as hospitals, clinics, or public health departments. They may include hospital CEOs, medical directors, practice managers, and healthcare consultants.

4. Health support staff: This group includes various personnel who provide essential services to healthcare organizations, such as medical records technicians, billing specialists, receptionists, and maintenance workers.

5. Health researchers and academics: These are professionals involved in conducting research, teaching, and disseminating knowledge related to health sciences, medicine, public health, or healthcare management in universities, research institutions, or think tanks.

The World Health Organization (WHO) defines "health worker" as "a person who contributes to the promotion, protection, or improvement of health through prevention, treatment, rehabilitation, palliation, health promotion, and health education." This definition encompasses a wide range of professionals working in various capacities to improve health outcomes.

Tuberculosis (TB) is a chronic infectious disease caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium tuberculosis. It primarily affects the lungs but can also involve other organs and tissues in the body. The infection is usually spread through the air when an infected person coughs, sneezes, or talks.

The symptoms of pulmonary TB include persistent cough, chest pain, coughing up blood, fatigue, fever, night sweats, and weight loss. Diagnosis typically involves a combination of medical history, physical examination, chest X-ray, and microbiological tests such as sputum smear microscopy and culture. In some cases, molecular tests like polymerase chain reaction (PCR) may be used for rapid diagnosis.

Treatment usually consists of a standard six-month course of multiple antibiotics, including isoniazid, rifampin, ethambutol, and pyrazinamide. In some cases, longer treatment durations or different drug regimens might be necessary due to drug resistance or other factors. Preventive measures include vaccination with the Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine and early detection and treatment of infected individuals to prevent transmission.

Sensitivity and specificity are statistical measures used to describe the performance of a diagnostic test or screening tool in identifying true positive and true negative results.

* Sensitivity refers to the proportion of people who have a particular condition (true positives) who are correctly identified by the test. It is also known as the "true positive rate" or "recall." A highly sensitive test will identify most or all of the people with the condition, but may also produce more false positives.
* Specificity refers to the proportion of people who do not have a particular condition (true negatives) who are correctly identified by the test. It is also known as the "true negative rate." A highly specific test will identify most or all of the people without the condition, but may also produce more false negatives.

In medical testing, both sensitivity and specificity are important considerations when evaluating a diagnostic test. High sensitivity is desirable for screening tests that aim to identify as many cases of a condition as possible, while high specificity is desirable for confirmatory tests that aim to rule out the condition in people who do not have it.

It's worth noting that sensitivity and specificity are often influenced by factors such as the prevalence of the condition in the population being tested, the threshold used to define a positive result, and the reliability and validity of the test itself. Therefore, it's important to consider these factors when interpreting the results of a diagnostic test.

"Age distribution" is a term used to describe the number of individuals within a population or sample that fall into different age categories. It is often presented in the form of a graph, table, or chart, and can provide important information about the demographic structure of a population.

The age distribution of a population can be influenced by a variety of factors, including birth rates, mortality rates, migration patterns, and aging. Public health officials and researchers use age distribution data to inform policies and programs related to healthcare, social services, and other areas that affect the well-being of populations.

For example, an age distribution graph might show a larger number of individuals in the younger age categories, indicating a population with a high birth rate. Alternatively, it might show a larger number of individuals in the older age categories, indicating a population with a high life expectancy or an aging population. Understanding the age distribution of a population can help policymakers plan for future needs and allocate resources more effectively.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "pilot projects" is not a medical term per se. Instead, it is a general term used in various fields, including healthcare and medicine, to describe a small-scale initiative that is implemented on a temporary basis to evaluate its feasibility, effectiveness, or impact before deciding whether to expand or continue it.

In the context of healthcare, pilot projects might involve testing new treatment protocols, implementing innovative care models, or introducing technology solutions in a limited setting to assess their potential benefits and drawbacks. The results of these projects can help inform decisions about broader implementation and provide valuable insights for improving the quality and efficiency of healthcare services.

A viral RNA (ribonucleic acid) is the genetic material found in certain types of viruses, as opposed to viruses that contain DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid). These viruses are known as RNA viruses. The RNA can be single-stranded or double-stranded and can exist as several different forms, such as positive-sense, negative-sense, or ambisense RNA. Upon infecting a host cell, the viral RNA uses the host's cellular machinery to translate the genetic information into proteins, leading to the production of new virus particles and the continuation of the viral life cycle. Examples of human diseases caused by RNA viruses include influenza, COVID-19 (SARS-CoV-2), hepatitis C, and polio.

Molecular sequence data refers to the specific arrangement of molecules, most commonly nucleotides in DNA or RNA, or amino acids in proteins, that make up a biological macromolecule. This data is generated through laboratory techniques such as sequencing, and provides information about the exact order of the constituent molecules. This data is crucial in various fields of biology, including genetics, evolution, and molecular biology, allowing for comparisons between different organisms, identification of genetic variations, and studies of gene function and regulation.

Recurrence, in a medical context, refers to the return of symptoms or signs of a disease after a period of improvement or remission. It indicates that the condition has not been fully eradicated and may require further treatment. Recurrence is often used to describe situations where a disease such as cancer comes back after initial treatment, but it can also apply to other medical conditions. The likelihood of recurrence varies depending on the type of disease and individual patient factors.

Anti-bacterial agents, also known as antibiotics, are a type of medication used to treat infections caused by bacteria. These agents work by either killing the bacteria or inhibiting their growth and reproduction. There are several different classes of anti-bacterial agents, including penicillins, cephalosporins, fluoroquinolones, macrolides, and tetracyclines, among others. Each class of antibiotic has a specific mechanism of action and is used to treat certain types of bacterial infections. It's important to note that anti-bacterial agents are not effective against viral infections, such as the common cold or flu. Misuse and overuse of antibiotics can lead to antibiotic resistance, which is a significant global health concern.

Prospective studies, also known as longitudinal studies, are a type of cohort study in which data is collected forward in time, following a group of individuals who share a common characteristic or exposure over a period of time. The researchers clearly define the study population and exposure of interest at the beginning of the study and follow up with the participants to determine the outcomes that develop over time. This type of study design allows for the investigation of causal relationships between exposures and outcomes, as well as the identification of risk factors and the estimation of disease incidence rates. Prospective studies are particularly useful in epidemiology and medical research when studying diseases with long latency periods or rare outcomes.

Antibodies, viral are proteins produced by the immune system in response to an infection with a virus. These antibodies are capable of recognizing and binding to specific antigens on the surface of the virus, which helps to neutralize or destroy the virus and prevent its replication. Once produced, these antibodies can provide immunity against future infections with the same virus.

Viral antibodies are typically composed of four polypeptide chains - two heavy chains and two light chains - that are held together by disulfide bonds. The binding site for the antigen is located at the tip of the Y-shaped structure, formed by the variable regions of the heavy and light chains.

There are five classes of antibodies in humans: IgA, IgD, IgE, IgG, and IgM. Each class has a different function and is distributed differently throughout the body. For example, IgG is the most common type of antibody found in the bloodstream and provides long-term immunity against viruses, while IgA is found primarily in mucous membranes and helps to protect against respiratory and gastrointestinal infections.

In addition to their role in the immune response, viral antibodies can also be used as diagnostic tools to detect the presence of a specific virus in a patient's blood or other bodily fluids.

An Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) is a type of analytical biochemistry assay used to detect and quantify the presence of a substance, typically a protein or peptide, in a liquid sample. It takes its name from the enzyme-linked antibodies used in the assay.

In an ELISA, the sample is added to a well containing a surface that has been treated to capture the target substance. If the target substance is present in the sample, it will bind to the surface. Next, an enzyme-linked antibody specific to the target substance is added. This antibody will bind to the captured target substance if it is present. After washing away any unbound material, a substrate for the enzyme is added. If the enzyme is present due to its linkage to the antibody, it will catalyze a reaction that produces a detectable signal, such as a color change or fluorescence. The intensity of this signal is proportional to the amount of target substance present in the sample, allowing for quantification.

ELISAs are widely used in research and clinical settings to detect and measure various substances, including hormones, viruses, and bacteria. They offer high sensitivity, specificity, and reproducibility, making them a reliable choice for many applications.

Pregnancy is a physiological state or condition where a fertilized egg (zygote) successfully implants and grows in the uterus of a woman, leading to the development of an embryo and finally a fetus. This process typically spans approximately 40 weeks, divided into three trimesters, and culminates in childbirth. Throughout this period, numerous hormonal and physical changes occur to support the growing offspring, including uterine enlargement, breast development, and various maternal adaptations to ensure the fetus's optimal growth and well-being.

The odds ratio (OR) is a statistical measure used in epidemiology and research to estimate the association between an exposure and an outcome. It represents the odds that an event will occur in one group versus the odds that it will occur in another group, assuming that all other factors are held constant.

In medical research, the odds ratio is often used to quantify the strength of the relationship between a risk factor (exposure) and a disease outcome. An OR of 1 indicates no association between the exposure and the outcome, while an OR greater than 1 suggests that there is a positive association between the two. Conversely, an OR less than 1 implies a negative association.

It's important to note that the odds ratio is not the same as the relative risk (RR), which compares the incidence rates of an outcome in two groups. While the OR can approximate the RR when the outcome is rare, they are not interchangeable and can lead to different conclusions about the association between an exposure and an outcome.

Retrospective studies, also known as retrospective research or looking back studies, are a type of observational study that examines data from the past to draw conclusions about possible causal relationships between risk factors and outcomes. In these studies, researchers analyze existing records, medical charts, or previously collected data to test a hypothesis or answer a specific research question.

Retrospective studies can be useful for generating hypotheses and identifying trends, but they have limitations compared to prospective studies, which follow participants forward in time from exposure to outcome. Retrospective studies are subject to biases such as recall bias, selection bias, and information bias, which can affect the validity of the results. Therefore, retrospective studies should be interpreted with caution and used primarily to generate hypotheses for further testing in prospective studies.

Follow-up studies are a type of longitudinal research that involve repeated observations or measurements of the same variables over a period of time, in order to understand their long-term effects or outcomes. In medical context, follow-up studies are often used to evaluate the safety and efficacy of medical treatments, interventions, or procedures.

In a typical follow-up study, a group of individuals (called a cohort) who have received a particular treatment or intervention are identified and then followed over time through periodic assessments or data collection. The data collected may include information on clinical outcomes, adverse events, changes in symptoms or functional status, and other relevant measures.

The results of follow-up studies can provide important insights into the long-term benefits and risks of medical interventions, as well as help to identify factors that may influence treatment effectiveness or patient outcomes. However, it is important to note that follow-up studies can be subject to various biases and limitations, such as loss to follow-up, recall bias, and changes in clinical practice over time, which must be carefully considered when interpreting the results.

A base sequence in the context of molecular biology refers to the specific order of nucleotides in a DNA or RNA molecule. In DNA, these nucleotides are adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T). In RNA, uracil (U) takes the place of thymine. The base sequence contains genetic information that is transcribed into RNA and ultimately translated into proteins. It is the exact order of these bases that determines the genetic code and thus the function of the DNA or RNA molecule.

... from UCB Libraries GovPubs (archived 3 July 2008) Cambodia at Curlie Cambodia profile from the BBC News Cambodia at ... Cambodia portal Asia portal Index of Cambodia-related articles Outline of Cambodia Landmines in Cambodia "Constitution of the ... making Cambodia a de facto one-party state. The United Nations designates Cambodia as a least developed country. Cambodia is a ... In 2017, Cambodia had a homicide rate of 2.4 per 100,000 population. Prostitution is illegal in Cambodia but yet appears to be ...
... or Communist Kampuchea may refer to: Democratic Kampuchea, Cambodia under the rule of Khmer Rouge from 1975 ... the Khmer Rouge from 1979 to 1989 This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Communist Cambodia. If an ...
... based in Berlin and the Memot Centre for Archaeology in Cambodia. Cambodia has a tropical climate with warm temperatures and ... He wrote that the people in Cambodia had no source of gold or silver to mine themselves, so they traded for it with the Chinese ... Prohear is an archaeological site from the Early Iron Age located in the Prey Veng province of Cambodia between the capital ... "Cambodia - Climate , Britannica". www.britannica.com. Retrieved 2022-03-17. Crossing Borders: Selected Papers from the 13th ...
Cambodia portal Miss Grand Cambodia Cambodia at major beauty pageants "Miss Cambodia 2016". news.sabay.com.kh. 14 October 2016 ... The Miss Cambodia is a national beauty pageant in Cambodia which also selects other winners to participate in big beauty ... The Miss Universe Cambodia holds a National Costume Competition. The grand final will be Live on CTN (Cambodia National TV ... Miss Grand Cambodia 2020 "មកមើលសម្រស់ Top 5 Miss Grand Cambodia 2020 ដែលទើបតែគ្រងដំណែងថ្មី". Archived from the original on 13 ...
HIV/AIDS in Cambodia, Medical and health organisations based in Cambodia). ... National AIDS Authority Archived 5 November 2010 at the Wayback Machine in Cambodia. "Research - A Network of Civil Society ... Information sharing: HACC promotes communication and the sharing of information among members and stakeholders in Cambodia and ... National AIDS Authority of Cambodia (NAA Archived 21 March 2012 at the Wayback Machine). "Candlelight Memorial Day Campaign ...
Sung is a khum (commune) of Samlout District in Battambang Province in north-western Cambodia. Chamkar Chek Kandal Kanh Chaang ...
"AirAsia launches new low cost airline in Cambodia". The Star. 9 December 2022. Retrieved 9 December 2022. Portals: Cambodia ... AirAsia Cambodia (Khmer: អ៊ែរ អេស៊ា ខេមបូឌា) is a Cambodian low-cost airline based at Phnom Penh International Airport. It is a ... Cambodia is the fifth country in Southeast Asia that Capital A established AirAsia brand. In May 2017, AirAsia planned to open ... AirAsia Cambodia plans to start operations with two Airbus A321neos, and will expand to 15 in the near future. "AirAsia BIG ...
The Cambodia House was inaugurated in 1957, four years after Cambodia's independence. In the 1970s, the center was the scene of ... The Cambodia House was inaugurated on October 24, 1957, four years after Cambodia's independence, in the presence of then- ... The project of the Cambodia House was first mentioned in 1948, by King of Cambodia Norodom Sihanouk during an official trip to ... The Cambodia House was shut down for 30 years following the death of one of its residents in 1973. After major work carried out ...
On Monday 6 April 2009, the Royal Government of Cambodia sold 75% of its shares in the formerly state owned CAMINCO insurance ... BVB (Bopha Vibol) is a private company conglomerate based in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. On 2 May, the Ratanakiri provincial governor ... Accessed 2010-01-05 2008 Human Rights Report: Cambodia Caminco v t e (Webarchive template wayback links, Use dmy dates from ... Accessed 2011-01-01 "2008 Human Rights Report: Cambodia". U.S. Department of State. Accessed 2009-01-01 "2008 Country Reports ...
... operates CamNet, Cambodia's first internet service provider. Communications in Cambodia Government of Cambodia ... Telecom Cambodia (TC) is a state corporation of Cambodia, and is the principal telecom company of that country. The company was ... Government-owned companies of Cambodia, Telecommunications companies of Cambodia, Telecommunications companies established in ... Telecommunications Telecom Cambodia, History TC Archived 2008-06-17 at the Wayback Machine Telecom Cambodia CamNet Ministry of ...
... is a butterfly of the family Nymphalidae. It is found in Cambodia, Thailand and Indochina. Wikimedia ... Wikispecies has information related to Stichophthalma cambodia. Stichophthalma at Markku Savela's Lepidoptera and Some Other ... Commons has media related to Stichophthalma cambodia. ...
Kumru (Khmer: ឃុំគំរូ) is a khum (commune) of Thma Puok District in Banteay Meanchey Province in north-western Cambodia. ... cambodia.gov.kh. Archived from the original on 2008-12-24. 13°57′N 103°03′E / 13.950°N 103.050°E / 13.950; 103.050 v t e ( ...
From 2017, LOLC Cambodia obtained permission from the National Bank of Cambodia to offer a finance lease/leasing service, and ... It is also a Microfinance Deposit-Taking Institution registered with the National Bank of Cambodia (NBC). LOLC Cambodia was ... both within LOLC Cambodia and interbank transfer via NBC projects such as FAST, RFT and Bakong. LOLC Cambodia also issued a CSS ... of LOLC Cambodia's total shares, with the remaining 3.03% owned by TPC-ESOP. LOLC Cambodia originally offered loan services, ...
... is a Christian development agency which was founded in the United Kingdom in 1973 by a Cambodian Christian, Major ... Having worked with Cambodian refugees during and after the Khmer Rouge years, it started operating in Cambodia after the ... Official website v t e (International development agencies, Non-profit organisations based in Cambodia, All stub articles, ...
... Co., Ltd., operating as Cambodia Airways (Khmer: ខេមបូឌា អ៊ែរវ៉េ) is a full-service airline based in Phnom ... "Cambodia Airways adds Siem Reap - Fuzhou from late-Jan 2020". "Cambodia Airways to link Phnom Penh-Wenzhou in Nov-2019". ... The company slogan is The Wings of Cambodia. By the end of August 2019, Cambodia Airways serves eight routes from its hub in ... "Cambodia Airways fixes launch date, outlines initial network". ch-aviation. Retrieved 19 June 2018. "Cambodia Airways to ...
History of Cambodia by period, 20th century in Cambodia, 21st century in Cambodia, Contemporary history by country, Political ... Politics of Cambodia "Hun Sen sworn in as Cambodia's PM for new 5-year term". Xinhua. 2013-09-24. Archived from the original on ... "Cambodia crowns new king". NBC News. Thul, Prak Chan (6 September 2013). "As protest looms, Cambodia's strongman Hun Sen faces ... Original text from U.S. State Department Background Note: Cambodia Michael Vickery, The real story of Cambodia cries out to be ...
"Cambodia" A 21-second sample of "Cambodia". Problems playing this file? See media help. "Cambodia" was written by Marty Wilde ... "Kim Wilde - Cambodia" (in Dutch). Single Top 100. "Kim Wilde - Cambodia". Top 40 Singles. "Kim Wilde - Cambodia". VG-lista. "SA ... "Kim Wilde - Cambodia". Singles Top 100. "Kim Wilde - Cambodia". Swiss Singles Chart. "Kim Wilde: Artist Chart History". ... ISBN 0-646-11917-6. "Kim Wilde - Cambodia" (in German). Ö3 Austria Top 40. "Kim Wilde - Cambodia" (in Dutch). Ultratop 50. ...
16 - Cambodia". Inside Survivor. Retrieved July 28, 2021. "Survivor All-Time Top 40 Rankings , #9: Cambodia with Christian ... 2015 in Cambodia, Television shows filmed in Cambodia, 2015 American television seasons, Survivor (American TV series) seasons ... Survivor: Cambodia - Second Chance is the 31st season of the American CBS competitive reality television series Survivor. ... Survivor: Cambodia reunion show, CBS, December 16, 2015 Official CBS Survivor website Media related to Survivor at Wikimedia ...
Osmose is a conservation organization in Cambodia. They are active against the invasive water hyacinth and support conservation ... Environmental organisations based in Cambodia, All stub articles, Ecology stubs). ...
Pate (Khmer: ប៉ាតេ) is a commune in Ou Ya Dav District in northeast Cambodia. It contains four villages and has a population of ... NGO Forum on Cambodia (August 2006). Accessed June 6, 2008. "Ratanak Kiri Province" Archived 2008-06-02 at the Wayback Machine ... Cambodia National Institute of Statistics. Accessed June 6, 2008. "Official Results of the 2007 Commune Councils Election in ... Cambodia National Institute of Statistics. Accessed June 6, 2008. (Webarchive template wayback links, Articles with short ...
... was an airline in Cambodia owned by The Royal Group and PAL Holdings, Inc. of the Philippines. As of ... The Royal Group of Cambodia owned 100% of Cambodia Airlines before the joint venture. Operations between Manila and Phnom Penh ... "Cambodia Airlines to get $20m", Phnom Penh Post[dead link] "Cambodia Airlines". ch-aviation. 16 April 2016. World Airline ... Kith Meng of Cambodia sign deal to set up Cambodia Airlines", The Inquirer - Lawrence Agcaoili (4 April 2013), "PAL, Royal ...
Subsequently, two main Scout groupings emerged in Cambodia and were registered in July 2000: the Scout Organization of Cambodia ... In the effort to unite these into a new single national association, the Coordinating Scout Committee of Cambodia (CSCC) was ... To further the development of Scouting in Cambodia the association focuses on: Orientation of adult leaders on Scouting at all ... It was founded in September 2005 through the merger of the Scout Organization of Cambodia and the Cambodian Scouts (Khmer: ...
The Fishhook was the name given to a salient of Kampong Cham Province, southeast Cambodia that protrudes into Bình Long and Tây ... Shawcross, William (1979). Sideshow: Kissinger, Nixon, and the Destruction of Cambodia. Washington Square Press. pp. 23-24. ... in the first phase of the secret bombing of Cambodia. On 24 April 1969, a further B-52 raid took place on the suspected ... Focus on Cambodia" (PDF). National Security Agency. January 1974. pp. 11-12. This article incorporates text from this source, ...
Cambodia) Parliament of Cambodia Politics of Cambodia List of legislatures by country "ក្នុងការបម្រើជាតិ តើព្រឹទ្ធសភាកម្ពុជា ... List of Senators Ruling party wins Cambodia poll Senate of the Kingdom of Cambodia Senate Homepage Official Results of the 2007 ... 1993 establishments in Cambodia, National upper houses, Parliament of Cambodia, Phnom Penh). ... The Senate of Cambodia is elected every 6 years by an indirect party-list proportional representation through 8 multi members ...
... is the Cambodian association for practical shooting under the International Practical Shooting Confederation. " ... v t e (Regions of the International Practical Shooting Confederation, Sports organisations of Cambodia, All stub articles, ...
"Land Alienation in Indigenous Minority Communities - Ratanakiri Province, Cambodia" (PDF). NGO Forum on Cambodia. August 2006. ... Kalai (Khmer: កាឡៃ) is a commune in Ou Chum District in north-east Cambodia. It contains three villages and had a population of ... "Ratanak Kiri Province". Cambodia National Institute of Statistics. Archived from the original on June 2, 2008. Retrieved June 6 ... The NGO Forum on Cambodia reported in 2006 that the land alienation rate in Kalai was moderate. (See Ratanakiri Province for ...
Roka (Khmer: ឃុំរកា) is a Khum (commune) of Sangkae District in Battambang Province in north-western Cambodia. Chhung Tradak ...
"Cambodia's Kitchen brings a taste of Cambodia to the CBD". The Age. Monssen, Kara (16 November 2022). "Cambodia's Kitchen ... Cambodia's Kitchen is a Cambodian Australian restaurant in Melbourne, Victoria. The restaurant is known for its Cambodian soups ... I hope that Cambodia's Kitchen opens people's minds and hearts to the pleasures of Cambodian food. The best possible outcome is ... you might not even notice Cambodia's Kitchen among the many other superficially similar spots along Russell Street'. In her ...
"Land Alienation in Indigenous Minority Communities - Ratanakiri Province, Cambodia" (PDF). NGO Forum on Cambodia. August 2006. ... "Ratanak Kiri Province". Cambodia National Institute of Statistics. Archived from the original on June 2, 2008. Retrieved June 6 ... Malik (Khmer: ម៉ាលិក) is a commune in Andoung Meas District in north-east Cambodia. It contains four villages and has a ... "Final Population Totals, Rotanak Kiri Province, 1998" (PDF). Cambodia National Institute of Statistics. Archived from the ...
... is a terrestrial television channel in Cambodia that was launched in 1992. Both the Cambodian Ministry of Defence ... TV5 Cambodia is the first Cambodian television station to broadcast in digital. "Media Ownership Monitor Cambodia". Media ... "TV5's Supachai Verapuchong: 'All television in Cambodia is losing money'". Sea-globe.com. 30 December 2016. Retrieved 16 June ... Television stations in Cambodia, Mass media in Phnom Penh, Television channels and stations established in 1995, All stub ...
About the ILO in Cambodia. Cambodia became a member of the ILO in 1969. Since the early 1990s, the ILO has been an active ... Better Factories Cambodia. No 9, Street 322, Boeung Keng Kang I,. Phnom Penh, Cambodia PO Box 2642. Tel: +855 23 212 847 / 023 ... Better Factories Cambodia (BFC) , which works with the garment industry, is a unique programme managed by the ILO and supported ... To strengthen the links between its standard-setting role and services and programmes for Cambodias people, the ILO runs a ...
Cambodia from UCB Libraries GovPubs (archived 3 July 2008) Cambodia at Curlie Cambodia profile from the BBC News Cambodia at ... Cambodia portal Asia portal Index of Cambodia-related articles Outline of Cambodia Landmines in Cambodia "Constitution of the ... making Cambodia a de facto one-party state. The United Nations designates Cambodia as a least developed country. Cambodia is a ... In 2017, Cambodia had a homicide rate of 2.4 per 100,000 population. Prostitution is illegal in Cambodia but yet appears to be ...
... range of high hills in southwestern Cambodia that is situated on a southeast-northwest axis and continues westward into the ... Krâvanh Mountains, range of high hills in southwestern Cambodia that is situated on a southeast-northwest axis and continues ... World Wildlife Fund - Southeastern Asia: Southern Cambodia stretching into Thailand and Vietnam ... World Wildlife Fund - Southeastern Asia: Southern Cambodia stretching into Thailand and Vietnam ...
Unicef endorsed the move after criticizing Cambodias actions last week, stating that milk needed to remain in Cambodia where ... take actions to immediately prevent the purchasing and exporting of breast milk from mothers from Cambodia. Although Cambodia ... Cambodia imposed an immediate ban on exporting breast milk on Tuesday, after dozens of women sold their milk to a U.S.-based ... Cambodia Bans Breast Milk Exports. By Eleanor Ross On 3/29/17 at 10:30 AM EDT. ...
Explore Cambodia holidays and discover the best time and places to visit. ... Do you need a visa to visit to Cambodia? Can you extend your visa? Where do you enter the country? We have answers to all your ... Cambodia is incredibly cheap when compared with destinations in Europe or North America. These top tips can make your budget ... The best way to take in the magic of Cambodia might be on two wheels. Here is our guide to the top motorcycle itineraries in ...
Boreth: In Cambodia, NFS, really doesnt have a lot of direct activities, what NFS does is through me in Cambodia linking NFS ... They know about the Vietnam War, they know about the genocide in Cambodia, the killing fields in Cambodia and Angkor Wat, one ... Right now because of climate change, you look at Southeast Asia, you know Thailand and Cambodia; Cambodia is underwater now. ... Boreth: What I just want to say is that I think what Reality Tours and Global Exchange are doing in Cambodia and Thailand is ...
Promote the conservation of Eastern Sarus Crane and the habitats in Cambodia on which they depend International Crane ...
Cambodia has crowned an unknown as ruler, taking the place of the beloved Sihanouk. ... PHNOM PENH, CAMBODIA Halfway around the world from his native Cambodia, Prince Norodom Sihamoni lived for years out of a modest ... Sihanouk comes home to Cambodia for final time * Cambodias King Norodom Sihamoni reappoints premier despite opposition ... Under Cambodias constitution, the king officially reigns as head of state but does not govern. But the former king never ...
Additional delivery information for Cambodia. Bank Holidays & Non-Working Days. *Bank Holidays for this year in Cambodia can be ... Additional delivery information for Cambodia. Bank Holidays & Non-Working Days. *Bank Holidays for this year in Cambodia can be ... Sending parcels to Cambodia requires customs paperwork for most items. *In order to confirm that your items are not prohibited ... Sending parcels to Cambodia requires customs paperwork for most items. *In order to confirm that your items are not prohibited ...
Cambodia Health Profiles (Subcategories). Births and maternity 25 Infant mortality rate 3 ...
The Khmer are by far the largest ethnic group in Cambodia, alongside smaller numbers of other Southeast Asian peoples. ... Ethnic Groups In Cambodia. Traditional Aspara dancers in Cambodia. Cambodia formally known as the Kingdom of Cambodia is an ... Ethnic Groups In Cambodia. Rank. Ethnic Group. Share of Population of Cambodia. ... Ethnic Groups In Cambodia Khmer The Khmer are the oldest ethnic groups in Cambodia having spread out into Southeast Asia around ...
10 am to 5 pm daily (except Christmas Day). In preparation for the daily Last Post Ceremony,. galleries are progressively closed from 4 pm.. Public entrance via Fairbairn Avenue, Campbell ACT 2612. Book your ticket to visit: awm.gov.au/visit. ...
Cambodia on a map. Flag of Cambodia. Cambodia (/kæmˈboʊdiə/; Khmer: កម្ពុជា, or Kampuchea: IPA: [kam.pu.ciə], French: Cambodge ... A holiday in Cambodia. Where youll kiss ass or crack. Its a holiday in Cambodia. Where youll do what youre told. Its a ... Enver Hoxha, In regard to Cambodia, our Party and state have condemned the bloodthirsty activities of the Pol Pot clique, a ... When the coating finally wore off, as it threatened to do, there we would all be, in Cambodia. *Lucius Shepard, Dog-Eared ...
Cambodia is powering up its new National Internet Gateway, a move activists say will allow the government to further silence ... PHNOM PENH - Cambodia is powering up its new National Internet Gateway, a move activists say will allow the government to ... Once fully operational, Cambodias new National Internet Gateway will channel all traffic through a single entry point ... But the new gateway appears to be taking Cambodia down a path beaten by China, which maintains even more sophisticated digital ...
Some of the largest linga (phallic symbols) in Cambodia can still be seen in a cluster of four temples about 1km northeast of ... One of the last places on earth where you can see Cambodias national bird, the critically endangered giant ibis. Trips here ... One of the last places on earth where you can see Cambodias national bird, the critically endangered giant ibis. Trips here ...
Cambodia: AIDS Colony Violates Rights. HIV/AIDS and Social Justice Groups call on Government to Halt Evictions of HIV- ... Increasing property values in Cambodias capital city have left thousands of urban poor people vulnerable to forced evictions ... 2009 to Cambodias prime minister and health minister. ...
Cambodia Energy Profiles (Subcategories). Charcoal 12 Hydroelectricity 3 Combustible renewables and waste 3 Investment in ... Cambodia ranked 45 places from the bottom for crude oil , proved reserves amongst Hot countries in 2013. ... Cambodia ranked 8th last for crude oil , production amongst East Asia and Pacific in 2012. ...
A chronology of key events in the history of Cambodia ... Cambodia Year Zero. 1975 - Lon Nol is overthrown as the Khmer ... 1953 - Cambodia wins its independence from France. Under King Sihanouk, it becomes the Kingdom of Cambodia. ... Cambodia and Thailand move troops to disputed land near Preah Vihear temple after decision to list it as UN World Heritage Site ... 2012 July - Cambodia and Thailand withdraw their troops from a disputed border area near the Preah Vihear temple in line with a ...
In addition to the divisions that ship or provide logistic services in Cambodia, DHL has other divisions that operate in ... In addition to the divisions that ship or provide logistic services in Cambodia, DHL has other divisions that operate in ...
Cambodia. Angkor Wat is the obvious highlight in Cambodia, but I also enjoyed the frantic pace and busy streets of Phnom Penh. ... Mark L , profile , all galleries >> Galleries >> Cambodia tree view , thumbnails , slideshow Burma , Thailand , Laos , Vietnam ... Cambodia Log 19-Jun-2006 14:07. Thanks for the beatiful pictures, and for taking me back to Cambodia! Stefan http://cambodia. ... Cambodia , Malaysia , Bangladesh , Chile , Brazil , Argentina , Paraguay , Colombia , Ecuador , Peru , Bolivia , Uruguay , Cook ...
In 1999, Cambodia contracted out management of government health services to NGOs in five districts that had been randomly made ...
The development objective of this higher education project is to improve the quality of teaching, management, and research capacity.
Cambodia became a member of the ILO in 1969. Since the early 1990s, the ILO has been an active partner in Cambodias economic, ... Experiences of Cambodia, Thailand and Viet Nam Participatory training programmes are increasingly applied in Asia for ... Report of the Independent Final Evaluation of EEOW Cambodia Chapter Following the completion of the original project term in ... Experts from the ILO visit north-western Cambodia to assist at the ILOs first occupational safety and health training session ...
Southeast Asian foreign ministers are holding emergency talks about a deadly border dispute that broke out between Cambodia and ... Southeast Asian foreign ministers are holding emergency talks about a deadly border dispute that broke out between Cambodia and ...
The filters were introduced to Cambodia in 2001 by International Development Enterprises (IDE, www.ide-cambodia.org) and are ... IDE Cambodia March 24, 2009 at 6:21 am Thanks for this article. There is, however, a slight misreprestenation of the facts. ... UNICEF and WSP do not provide or promote ceramic water filters in Cambodia at all. The IWA award was given for research funded ... The filters are distributed and marketed with the aid of a variety of NGOs and independent businesses in Cambodia. This trial ...
Information on ADBs development assistance to Cambodia, economic data and analysis, resident mission contacts and holidays, ... Cambodia Facts. ADBs Work in Cambodia. Cambodias economic growth averaged over 7% per annum in the decade before the pandemic ... Cambodia and ADB. ADB helps Cambodia address challenges for post-COVID-19 pandemic recovery with a focus on economic ... Poverty in Cambodia. Development indicators for Cambodia, including a selection of economic, environmental, and social ...
Cambodias largest commercial bank listed on the countrys stock market Monday, the first lender to trade on the fledgling ... Cambodia has so far reported 124 cases of the coronavirus, though there are concerns that not enough tests and contact tracing ... Cambodias largest commercial bank listed on the countrys stock market Monday, the first lender to trade on the fledgling ... "We saw that our investors did not hesitate because of the trust in Cambodia, in Acleda Bank and in relevant authorities," In ...
Cambodia Cambodia is a land of lush beauty, contrast and ancient mystery. Together with Laos, they form the little known region ... Cambodia makes cheap travelling for the basics such as food and shelter. Lodging can range from just $2-3USD for a basic room ... Cambodia is still recovering from its recent period of brutality since the 1970s war with the USA, but everywhere you go you ... Staple foods of Cambodia include rice and fish, which are the basic ingredients for many Khmer dishes. Fish is the main source ...
Photos and description of the architecture of Preah Ko, Cambodia
A project in Cambodia and Laos, led by Dr Jaquie Mitchell of the University of Queensland, aims to develop weed management ... In Laos and Cambodia, access to formal financial services is low. It is substantially lower among rural and remote communities ... In Cambodia, about 80% of the animal protein consumed comes from freshwater fisheries, which provide work for about 2 million ... However, Cambodia still suffered critical shocks triggered by the global pandemic, and the economic impacts were more severe ...
  • March 3, 2023 -This update provides results of a preliminary assessment of the H5N1 viruses identified in two human infections detected in Cambodia in 2023 based on their genetic sequences and gives an update on the epidemiological investigation. (cdc.gov)
  • Krâvanh Mountains , range of high hills in southwestern Cambodia that is situated on a southeast-northwest axis and continues westward into the highland area around Chanthaburi, Thailand . (britannica.com)
  • This is the second in a two-part interview by Global Exchange Reality Tours Intern Sue Sullivan with our Cambodia and Thailand program officer, Boreth Sun. Follow along to discover what it means to be an in-country representative of Reality Tours and our partnering organization Not For Sale . (globalexchange.org)
  • This past October, Reality Tours' in-country program officer for Cambodia and Thailand, Boreth Sun traveled to the Bay Area to speak at the 2011 Global Forum on Human Trafficking . (globalexchange.org)
  • Some of the people who participated on the tour also went back to Asia, went back to Thailand, went back to Cambodia and they are providing some support to local NGOs. (globalexchange.org)
  • Cambodia is bordered by Laos, Vietnam, Thailand, and the Gulf of Thailand with a total population of more 15 million people. (worldatlas.com)
  • JAKARTA, Indonesia - Southeast Asian foreign ministers are holding emergency talks about a deadly border dispute that broke out between Cambodia and Thailand near an 11th century temple. (foxnews.com)
  • She holds a BS in Agriculture from the Royal University of Chamkar Dong, Cambodia, and a M.A. in Management of Rural Development from Khorn Kean University, Thailand, and Fellowship Certificate on Pedagogy Skill from Ukraina University, Russia, and Chevening certificate on Government Relation with NGOs and Civil Society in the UK. (give2asia.org)
  • He rejected further assistance from the United States, because Washington supported the Republic of Vietnam (South Vietnam), and from Thailand, with which Cambodia had continuous frontier disputes. (countrystudies.us)
  • Increasingly, tourists are also visiting other areas of Cambodia, including the capital Phnom Penh, the southern beaches, and the islands in the Gulf of Thailand. (cdc.gov)
  • Anemia, iron deficiency, and thalassemia among the Thai population inhabiting at the Thailand-Lao PDR-Cambodia triangle. (bvsalud.org)
  • Limited studies on these have been carried out on people living at the borders of Thailand , Lao PDR, and Cambodia . (bvsalud.org)
  • This cross-sectional study was done in four areas along the borders of Thailand , Lao PDR, and Cambodia . (bvsalud.org)
  • The results indicate that thalassemia and hemoglobinopathies rather than ID are major causes of anemia in Thailand -Lao PDR- Cambodia triangle. (bvsalud.org)
  • Famed for its temples, jungles and beaches, Cambodia is small in size but big on adventures. (lonelyplanet.com)
  • They know about the Vietnam War, they know about the genocide in Cambodia, the killing fields in Cambodia and Angkor Wat, one of the oldest temples in Cambodia. (globalexchange.org)
  • I will return to Cambodia to live at Siem Reap/Angkor when the Royal Throne Council has chosen a new king," he said, referring to the city in northwest Cambodia adjacent to the famed Angkor Wat temples. (irishtimes.com)
  • Many tourists to Cambodia visit the Angkor temple complex (which includes Angkor Wat), a collection of approximately 1,000 ancient temples and other structures covering 400 km2 (250 mi2) in the northwestern Cambodia jungle. (cdc.gov)
  • After the decline of the Khmer Empire, the site was largely abandoned to the surrounding jungle and remained virtually untouched until descriptions of the ruined temples of Cambodia were published in a journal in the late 19th century. (cdc.gov)
  • ADB helps Cambodia address challenges for post-COVID-19 pandemic recovery with a focus on economic diversification, skill development, and climate change mitigation and adaptation. (adb.org)
  • Cambodia's economic growth averaged over 7% per annum in the decade before the pandemic, making Cambodia one of the fastest-growing economies in the region. (adb.org)
  • Hiroshi Suzuki, CEO of Business Research Institute for Cambodia (BRIC), questioned the timing of the IPO in the middle of the coronavirus pandemic. (bangkokpost.com)
  • However, Cambodia still suffered critical shocks triggered by the global pandemic, and the economic impacts were more severe than the health impacts. (aciar.gov.au)
  • Border closures, travel restrictions and business shutdowns during the pandemic hit the complex web of agricultural supply chains, affecting input suppliers, producers, collectors, processors and consumers in Cambodia. (aciar.gov.au)
  • Cambodia has crowned an unknown as ruler, taking the place of the beloved Sihanouk. (csmonitor.com)
  • Under King Sihanouk, it becomes the Kingdom of Cambodia. (bbc.com)
  • 1965 - Sihanouk breaks off relations with the US and allows North Vietnamese guerrillas to set up bases in Cambodia in pursuance of their campaign against the US-backed government in South Vietnam. (bbc.com)
  • But Sihanouk said in a statement he would not return to Cambodia until the nine-member Royal Throne Council responsible for choosing his successor had named a new king. (irishtimes.com)
  • The filters were introduced to Cambodia in 2001 by International Development Enterprises (IDE, www.ide-cambodia.org) and are currently produced and distributed by three organizations: IDE, Resource Development International (RDI, www.rdic.org) and the Cambodian Red Cross. (inhabitat.com)
  • The Vietnamese were the most populous among the ethnic minority groups in Cambodia before the Cambodian Civil War with an estimated population of 450,000 mostly found in Southeast of Cambodia alongside the Mekong Delta. (worldatlas.com)
  • The modern Cambodian government also maintained close ties with the Vietnamese and backed the Vietnamese ventures when they came to Cambodia to invest in the new market. (worldatlas.com)
  • The Tai, Lao, Cham, and other group's population in Cambodia significantly decreased during the Cambodian civil war. (worldatlas.com)
  • Most Lao born in Cambodia are acknowledged as Khmer according to a policy set by the Cambodian government. (worldatlas.com)
  • In Cambodia, the Cambodian people, communists and patriots, have risen against the barbarous government of Pol Pot , which was nothing but a group of provocateurs in the service of the imperialist bourgeoisie and of the Chinese revisionists, in particular, which had as its aim to discredit the idea of socialism in the international arena. (wikiquote.org)
  • The anti-popular line of that regime is confirmed, also, by the fact that the Albanian embassy in the Cambodian capital, the embassy of a country which has given the people of Cambodia every possible aid, was kept isolated, indeed, encircled with barbed wire, as if it were in a concentration camp. (wikiquote.org)
  • CDC Cambodia supports the Cambodian Applied Veterinary Epidemiology Training (CAVET) program . (cdc.gov)
  • Angkor Wat is the obvious highlight in Cambodia, but I also enjoyed the frantic pace and busy streets of Phnom Penh. (pbase.com)
  • ACIAR and the Royal Government of Cambodia (represented by the Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries) have an ongoing 10-year agreement on the strategic priorities for research collaboration. (aciar.gov.au)
  • The Khmer are the oldest ethnic groups in Cambodia having spread out into Southeast Asia around the same period the Mon did. (worldatlas.com)
  • Cambodia is one of the poorest countries in Southeast Asia but is currently experiencing a period of rapid economic development. (cdc.gov)
  • Because fluoroquinolone resistance is widespread in Cambodia and other areas of Southeast Asia, azithromycin is preferred. (cdc.gov)
  • In 1999, Cambodia contracted out management of government health services to NGOs in five districts that had been randomly made eligible for contracting. (brookings.edu)
  • The filters are distributed and marketed with the aid of a variety of NGOs and independent businesses in Cambodia. (inhabitat.com)
  • Following the 1991 Paris Peace Accords which formally ended the war with Vietnam, Cambodia was governed by a United Nations mission (1992-93). (wikipedia.org)
  • Most urban immigrants consist of villagers who illegally cross the border into Cambodia to flee from poor rural conditions in Vietnam with hope for a better life. (worldatlas.com)
  • The genetic sequences suggest that an existing clade 2.3.2.1c candidate vaccine virus (CVV), called NIBRG-301 (A/duck/Vietnam/NCVD-1584/2012-like) would offer protection against the viruses identified in Cambodia. (cdc.gov)
  • Ben's first monograph, titled In the Shadow of the Constitution: the Micropolitics of Constitutional Contestation in Cambodia is due for publication with Cambridge University Press in 2024. (lu.se)
  • The name Cambodia is used most often in the Western world while Kampuchea is more widely used in the East. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the fifteenth century, Cambodia experienced a decline of power, and in 1863, it became a protectorate of France. (wikipedia.org)
  • Most of the Chinese were settlers who came because of trade and commerce when Cambodia was under the French protectorate. (worldatlas.com)
  • 1863 - Cambodia becomes a protectorate of France. (bbc.com)
  • Although the rate of poverty continues to decline in Cambodia, rural poverty remains obstinately high at 40 per cent. (ilo.org)
  • In 2020, the Kingdom of Cambodia largely avoided a health crisis due to swift actions to detect and contain local COVID-19 outbreaks. (aciar.gov.au)
  • In Cambodia, or Indo-China, Buddhism conspired with Hinduism to provide the religious framework for one of the richest ages in the history of Oriental art. (wikiquote.org)
  • Cambodia is ranked 144th out of 180 countries in RSF's 2021 World Press Freedom Index . (rsf.org)
  • PMI supports the National Malaria Elimination Action Framework to scale up control and elimination activities for a malaria-free Cambodia by 2025. (cdc.gov)
  • There exists sparse evidence for a Pleistocene human occupation of present-day Cambodia, which includes quartz and quartzite pebble tools found in terraces along the Mekong River, in Stung Treng and Kratié provinces, and in Kampot Province, although their dating is unreliable. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Lao people live in the distant northeast part of Cambodia along the Mekong and its tributaries. (worldatlas.com)
  • The Mekong lowlands, the eastern region of Cambodia was identified as the most vulnerable area to climate change. (wvi.org)
  • However, there are opportunities for Cambodia to develop and strengthen its agriculture sector through diversification, higher value-added crops, fisheries and livestock. (aciar.gov.au)
  • CDC's team in Cambodia works to enhance the country's ability to respond to public health emergencies and strengthen workforce capacity. (cdc.gov)
  • CDC helps strengthen the quality of laboratory systems in Cambodia to accurately diagnose, monitor, and treat infections, including HIV/AIDS, COVID-19, TB, and influenza viruses. (cdc.gov)
  • While constitutionally a multi-party state, CPP dominates the political system and dissolved its main opposition party in 2017, making Cambodia a de facto one-party state. (wikipedia.org)
  • With subsequent practice in Cambodia characterised by widespread corruption, impunity and increasing autocratisation, Cambodia's Constitution is often assumed to be a mere "sham," with constitutional contestation "muted" at best. (lu.se)
  • The Chinese descended between the 19th and 20th century in Cambodia. (worldatlas.com)
  • After a period of Japanese occupation during the Second World War, Cambodia gained independence in 1953. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1953 - Cambodia wins its independence from France. (bbc.com)
  • Indeed, during the first decade that he was in power in newly independent Cambodia (1953-63), the prince carefully practiced his 'purer form of neutrality between East and West' in seeking foreign economic assistance for development. (countrystudies.us)
  • Cambodia is a member of the United Nations, ASEAN, the RCEP, the East Asia Summit, the WTO, the Non-Aligned Movement and La Francophonie. (wikipedia.org)
  • On Friday, as a bevy of Buddhist monks blessed him, Sihamoni was crowned king of Cambodia and donned the royal golden sarong as his father placed responsibility for a struggling country's heart and soul into his hands. (csmonitor.com)
  • PHNOM PENH - Cambodia is powering up its new National Internet Gateway, a move activists say will allow the government to further silence the country's embattled opposition voices. (voanews.com)
  • Cambodia formally known as the Kingdom of Cambodia is an Asian country situated in the Southeast Asian Peninsula. (worldatlas.com)
  • An adventure to Cambodia will inspire travelers to contemplate what happens when ancient and modern worlds collide. (lonelyplanet.com)
  • All travelers to Cambodia should be up to date with their routine immunizations, including seasonal influenza, and should be protected against hepatitis A, hepatitis B, and typhoid fever. (cdc.gov)
  • Although yellow fever is not a disease risk in Cambodia, the government requires travelers arriving from countries with a risk of yellow fever virus transmission to present proof of yellow fever vaccination. (cdc.gov)
  • Diarrhea and foodborne infections in travelers are common in Cambodia. (cdc.gov)
  • Typhoid and paratyphoid fever are endemic to Cambodia, and travelers are at risk. (cdc.gov)
  • All travelers going to Cambodia should be up to date with their COVID-19 vaccines . (cdc.gov)
  • But the new gateway appears to be taking Cambodia down a path beaten by China, which maintains even more sophisticated digital tools to monitor and censor the internet for its citizens, keeping the online world behind a 'Great Firewall' and blocking major Western platforms such as Twitter, Facebook and YouTube. (voanews.com)
  • The Kingdom of Cambodia is the official English name of the country. (wikipedia.org)
  • The country is re-named the Kingdom of Cambodia. (bbc.com)
  • Cambodia has so far reported 124 cases of the coronavirus, though there are concerns that not enough tests and contact tracing is being done within the kingdom. (bangkokpost.com)
  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) established an office in the Kingdom of Cambodia in 2002. (cdc.gov)
  • Get the most up-to-date information for Cambodia related to Cambodia travel visas, Cambodia visa requirements and applications, embassy and consulate addresses, foreign relations information, travel advisories, entry and exit restrictions, and travel tips from the US State Department's website . (traveldocs.com)
  • For current information on coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in Cambodia, consult the US Embassy in Cambodia website. (cdc.gov)
  • In September , Cambodia became one of few countries offering Covid-19 vaccines to children ages 6 to 12. (hrw.org)
  • When the Vietnamese left Cambodia, he was renamed king in 1993. (csmonitor.com)
  • The minority groups in Cambodia include the Chams, Chinese, Vietnamese, and 30 other tribes from the hills. (worldatlas.com)
  • The Vietnamese of Cambodia also lived upstream along the shores of Tonlé Sap. (worldatlas.com)
  • However, during the civil war, the Vietnamese community was almost annihilated' from Cambodia. (worldatlas.com)
  • He proclaims the Khmer Republic and sends the army to fight the North Vietnamese in Cambodia. (bbc.com)
  • All of the Cambodia visa requirements and application forms, plus convenient online ordering. (traveldocs.com)
  • Unicef endorsed the move after criticizing Cambodia's actions last week, stating that milk needed to remain in Cambodia where children lack nutrition. (newsweek.com)
  • Recently, the International Water Association (IWA) awarded UNICEF and the Water and Sanitation Program with the 2008 Project Innovation Award Grand Prize for providing Cambodia with ceramic water filters. (inhabitat.com)
  • UNICEF and WSP do not provide or promote ceramic water filters in Cambodia at all. (inhabitat.com)
  • UNICEF Cambodia said that "schools do not drive the spread of COVID-19 in the community" and that "safeschool reopening is possible through risk mitigation measures," such as wearing masks and maintaining social distance. (hrw.org)
  • Some slight archaeological evidence shows communities of hunter-gatherers inhabited the region during Holocene: the most ancient archaeological discovery site in Cambodia is considered to be the cave of Laang Spean, which belongs to the Hoabinhian period. (wikipedia.org)
  • Strengthening disaster risk finance would help Cambodia manage financial disaster impacts. (gfdrr.org)
  • Cigarette tax and price: Affordability and impacts on consumption and revenue (Cambodia). (who.int)
  • While Henry continues to nibble nori rolls & remaki at A-list parties, Cambodia, the neutral nation he secretly and illegally bombed, invaded, undermined, and then threw to the dogs, is still trying to raise itself up on its one remaining leg. (wikiquote.org)
  • Cambodia is considered among the most vulnerable countries to climate change. (wikipedia.org)
  • The United Nations designates Cambodia as a least developed country. (wikipedia.org)
  • What has your experience been as an In-Country Program Officer in Cambodia? (globalexchange.org)
  • The country is re-named the State of Cambodia. (bbc.com)
  • The best time to visit Cambodia is November through January when the weather is not too hot and the cool, dry northeastern winds bring little rain to the country. (pilotguides.com)
  • During the last 2 decades, Cambodia was the fastest growing country in East Asia, averaging a 7.7% real growth rate. (aciar.gov.au)
  • Unveiled on 2 August, the committee will "examine complaints by the public against journalists and media outlets," "evaluate the practice of journalism in Cambodia" and "provide orientation to journalists on how to conduct themselves," according to pro-government media outlets . (rsf.org)
  • Do you need a visa to visit to Cambodia? (lonelyplanet.com)
  • Experts from the ILO visit north-western Cambodia to assist at the ILO's first occupational safety and health training session in that region. (ilo.org)
  • Get to the heart of Cambodia with one of our in-depth, award-winning guidebooks, covering maps, itineraries, and expert guidance. (lonelyplanet.com)
  • In a letter viewed by AFP, written by the health ministry, he said: "[it will] take actions to immediately prevent the purchasing and exporting of breast milk from mothers from Cambodia. (newsweek.com)
  • When you need to get your Cambodia travel visa processed quickly, Travel Document Systems is here to help. (traveldocs.com)
  • Trips to Cambodia can still be enjoyed during the wet season, with September and October being the wettest months, since the rains tend to come only sporadically in the afternoon. (pilotguides.com)
  • A woman talks on a phone next to the Cambodia Securities Exchange (CSX) logo during the official listing ceremony of ACLEDA Bank Plc on the exchange in Phnom Penh on Monday. (bangkokpost.com)
  • When you are travelling to Cambodia with a U.S. Passport, a Official or Diplomatic Visa is required . (traveldocs.com)
  • Better Factories Cambodia (BFC) , which works with the garment industry, is a unique programme managed by the ILO and supported by the government, trade unions and the industry employers' association. (ilo.org)
  • United States economic assistance to Cambodia amounted to more than US$350 million for the 1955 to 1962 period, and it was invested mostly in the areas of public health, education, and agricultural development. (countrystudies.us)