Callimico: A genus in the subfamily CALLITRICHINAE, comprising a single species with the common name Goeldi's monkey.Ovulation Detection: Method to determine the occurrence of OVULATION by direct or indirect means. Indirect methods examine the effects of PROGESTERONE on cervical mucus (CERVIX MUCUS), or basal body temperature. Direct ovulation detection, generally used in fertility treatment, involves analyses of circulating hormones in blood and ULTRASONOGRAPHY.Callitrichinae: A subfamily in the family CEBIDAE that consists of four genera: CALLITHRIX (marmosets), CALLIMICO (Goeldi's monkey), LEONTOPITHECUS (lion tamarins), and SAGUINUS (long-tusked tamarins). The members of this family inhabit the tropical forests of South and Central America.BooksMicrobiology: The study of microorganisms such as fungi, bacteria, algae, archaea, and viruses.Internet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.Students: Individuals enrolled in a school or formal educational program.Saguinus: A genus in the subfamily CALLITRICHINAE consisting of 12 species and found in Panama as well as South America. Species seen most frequently in the literature are S. oedipus (cotton-top marmoset), S. nigricollis, and S. fusicollis.Mythology: A body of stories, the origins of which may be unknown or forgotten, that serve to explain practices, beliefs, institutions or natural phenomena. Mythology includes legends and folk tales. It may refer to classical mythology or to a body of modern thought and modern life. (From Webster's 1st ed)Monkey Diseases: Diseases of Old World and New World monkeys. This term includes diseases of baboons but not of chimpanzees or gorillas (= APE DISEASES).Encyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Siadenovirus: A genus of ADENOVIRIDAE comprising species including viruses of frogs (FROGS AND TOADS) and TURKEYS. The type species is Frog adenovirus.Animals, ZooLongevity: The normal length of time of an organism's life.Biological Evolution: The process of cumulative change over successive generations through which organisms acquire their distinguishing morphological and physiological characteristics.New YorkEncyclopediasMammals: Warm-blooded vertebrate animals belonging to the class Mammalia, including all that possess hair and suckle their young.New York CityCebidae: A family of New World monkeys in the infraorder PLATYRRHINI, consisting of nine subfamilies: ALOUATTINAE; AOTINAE; Atelinae; Callicebinae; CALLIMICONINAE; CALLITRICHINAE; CEBINAE; Pithecinae; and SAIMIRINAE. They inhabit the forests of South and Central America, comprising the largest family of South American monkeys.ArgentinaMexicoPrimatesPlatyrrhini: An infraorder of New World monkeys, comprised of the families AOTIDAE; ATELIDAE; CEBIDAE; and PITHECIIDAE. They are found exclusively in the Americas.Societies, Scientific: Societies whose membership is limited to scientists.Holistic Health: Health as viewed from the perspective that humans and other organisms function as complete, integrated units rather than as aggregates of separate parts.Societies, Medical: Societies whose membership is limited to physicians.Social Medicine: A branch of medicine concerned with the role of socio-environmental factors in the occurrence, prevention and treatment of disease.Adolescent Health Services: Organized services to provide health care to adolescents, ages ranging from 13 through 18 years.Hong Kong: The former British crown colony located off the southeast coast of China, comprised of Hong Kong Island, Kowloon Peninsula, and New Territories. The three sites were ceded to the British by the Chinese respectively in 1841, 1860, and 1898. Hong Kong reverted to China in July 1997. The name represents the Cantonese pronunciation of the Chinese xianggang, fragrant port, from xiang, perfume and gang, port or harbor, with reference to its currents sweetened by fresh water from a river west of it.Adolescent Development: The continuous sequential physiological and psychological changes during ADOLESCENCE, approximately between the age of 13 and 18.BoliviaZoology: The study of animals - their morphology, growth, distribution, classification, and behavior.Leontopithecus: The genus of lion tamarins in the subfamily CALLITRICHINAE. The common name refers to the mane on the shoulders.Galago: A genus of the family Lorisidae having four species which inhabit the forests and bush regions of Africa south of the Sahara and some nearby islands. The four species are G. alleni, G. crassicaudatus, G. demidovii, and G. senegalensis. There is another genus, Euoticus, containing two species which some authors have included in the Galago genus.Hepatitis, Infectious Canine: A contagious disease caused by canine adenovirus (ADENOVIRUSES, CANINE) infecting the LIVER, the EYE, the KIDNEY, and other organs in dogs, other canids, and bears. Symptoms include FEVER; EDEMA; VOMITING; and DIARRHEA.Skull: The SKELETON of the HEAD including the FACIAL BONES and the bones enclosing the BRAIN.Dog Diseases: Diseases of the domestic dog (Canis familiaris). This term does not include diseases of wild dogs, WOLVES; FOXES; and other Canidae for which the heading CARNIVORA is used.Research Design: A plan for collecting and utilizing data so that desired information can be obtained with sufficient precision or so that an hypothesis can be tested properly.Musculoskeletal Diseases: Diseases of the muscles and their associated ligaments and other connective tissue and of the bones and cartilage viewed collectively.Congresses as Topic: Conferences, conventions or formal meetings usually attended by delegates representing a special field of interest.Convolvulaceae: The morning glory family of flowering plants, of the order Solanales, which includes about 50 genera and at least 1,400 species. Leaves are alternate and flowers are funnel-shaped. Most are twining and erect herbs, with a few woody vines, trees, and shrubs.United StatesSemicircular Canals: Three long canals (anterior, posterior, and lateral) of the bony labyrinth. They are set at right angles to each other and are situated posterosuperior to the vestibule of the bony labyrinth (VESTIBULAR LABYRINTH). The semicircular canals have five openings into the vestibule with one shared by the anterior and the posterior canals. Within the canals are the SEMICIRCULAR DUCTS.Catarrhini: An infraorder of PRIMATES comprised of the families CERCOPITHECIDAE (old world monkeys); HYLOBATIDAE (siamangs and GIBBONS); and HOMINIDAE (great apes and HUMANS). With the exception of humans, they all live exclusively in Africa and Asia.Craniology: The scientific study of variations in size, shape, and proportion of the cranium.Egypt: A country in northern Africa, bordering the Mediterranean Sea, between Libya and the Gaza Strip, and the Red Sea north of Sudan, and includes the Asian Sinai Peninsula Its capital is Cairo.Fossils: Remains, impressions, or traces of animals or plants of past geological times which have been preserved in the earth's crust.Biological Science Disciplines: All of the divisions of the natural sciences dealing with the various aspects of the phenomena of life and vital processes. The concept includes anatomy and physiology, biochemistry and biophysics, and the biology of animals, plants, and microorganisms. It should be differentiated from BIOLOGY, one of its subdivisions, concerned specifically with the origin and life processes of living organisms.Anthropology: The science devoted to the comparative study of man.OhioAnthropology, Physical: The comparative science dealing with the physical characteristics of humans as related to their origin, evolution, and development in the total environment.Anthropology, Medical: Field of social science that is concerned with differences between human groups as related to health status and beliefs.Anthropology, Cultural: It is the study of social phenomena which characterize the learned, shared, and transmitted social activities of particular ethnic groups with focus on the causes, consequences, and complexities of human social and cultural variability.Dissertations, Academic as Topic: Dissertations embodying results of original research and especially substantiating a specific view, e.g., substantial papers written by candidates for an academic degree under the individual direction of a professor or papers written by undergraduates desirous of achieving honors or distinction.Forensic Anthropology: Scientific study of human skeletal remains with the express purpose of identification. This includes establishing individual identity, trauma analysis, facial reconstruction, photographic superimposition, determination of time interval since death, and crime-scene recovery. Forensic anthropologists do not certify cause of death but provide data to assist in determination of probable cause. This is a branch of the field of physical anthropology and qualified individuals are certified by the American Board of Forensic Anthropology. (From Am J Forensic Med Pathol 1992 Jun;13(2):146)

Centromere repositioning. (1/3)

Primate pericentromeric regions recently have been shown to exhibit extraordinary evolutionary plasticity. In this paper we report an additional peculiar feature of these regions that we discovered while analyzing, by FISH, the evolutionary conservation of primate phylogenetic chromosome IX. If the position of the centromere is not taken into account, a relatively small number of rearrangements must be invoked to account for interspecific differences. Conversely, if the centromere is included, a paradox emerges: The position of the centromere seems to have undergone, in some species, an evolutionary history independent from the surrounding markers. A significant number of additional rearrangements must be proposed to reconcile the order of the markers with centromere position. Alternatively, the evolutionary emergence of neocentromeres can be postulated.  (+info)

First outbreak of callitrichid hepatitis in Germany: genetic characterization of the causative lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus strains. (2/3)

Callitrichid hepatitis (CH) is a highly fatal, rodent-borne zoonosis of New World primates (family Callitrichidae) caused by lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). It is unclear whether virulence in Callitrichidae is associated with specific genetic or phylogenetic markers of the virus as only a partial S RNA sequence of a single CH-associated isolate is known. In a period of 10 months, three pygmy marmosets (Cebuella pygmaea) and one Goeldi's monkey (Callimico goeldii) died from CH in a German zoo. LCMV was most likely transmitted by wild mice. Infection was associated with characteristic histopathological lesions in liver, brain, and lymphoid tissue. Virus sequences from all callitrichids and a captured mouse were > or =99.2% identical. LCMV strains from a pygmy marmoset and the Goeldi's monkey were isolated in cell culture and the 3.4-kb S RNA was completely sequenced. Both strains differed considerably in their genetic and phylogenetic characteristics from known LCMV strains, including the previously described CH-associated strain. These data show that CH is widespread and can be caused by distantly related LCMV strains.  (+info)

Determination of ovarian cycle in Goeldi's monkey (Callimico goeldii) via the measurement of steroids and peptides in plasma and urine. (3/3)

Goeldi's monkey (Callimico goeldii) is an endangered species of New World primate. The present study provides the first description of the non-conception ovarian cycle in this species based on circulating reproductive steroid and peptide hormones. The data obtained were used to validate a non-invasive system for monitoring cyclicity based on urinary reproductive steroid metabolites. Nine sexually mature females were studied. In three females, matched blood and urine samples were collected once every 2-3 days for 90-120 days; in three other females, matched blood and urine samples were collected daily for 14-20 days for one peri-ovulatory period; and in the remaining three females, urine samples only were collected once every 1-3 days for 40-60 days. Plasma progesterone, oestrone-3-conjugates and bioactive LH were measured, in addition to urinary pregnanediol-3 alpha-glucuronide and oestrone-3-conjugates. The mean maximum concentration of plasma LH occurred 1-2 days before a significant rise in plasma progesterone, which was considered to occur 1 day after ovulation. On the basis of plasma progesterone titres, the duration of the ovarian cycle was estimated as 23.9 +/- 0.4 days (n = 9), and constituted a follicular phase of 10.7 +/- 0.3 days and a luteal phase of 13.5 +/- 0.3 days. Urinary pregnanediol-3 alpha-glucuronide demonstrated a high correlation with plasma progesterone (r = 0.8), and demonstrated a significant rise at the same time as plasma progesterone.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)  (+info)

Disclaimer: The Animal Diversity Web is an educational resource written largely by and for college students. ADW doesnt cover all species in the world, nor does it include all the latest scientific information about organisms we describe. Though we edit our accounts for accuracy, we cannot guarantee all information in those accounts. While ADW staff and contributors provide references to books and websites that we believe are reputable, we cannot necessarily endorse the contents of references beyond our control. ...
The evidence from the semicircular canals suggests that the earliest anthropoids dating to the Late Eocene and Early Oligocene of Egypt were all medium to medium slow in their locomotion. These predictions generally match the hypothesized locomotor behaviours based on postcranial fossil evidence for these Fayum taxa. Catopithecus, Parapithecus and Aegyptopithecus, all predicted to be slow or medium in agility based on postcranial evidence, are also reconstructed as medium to medium slow based on semicircular canal size. Proteopithecus, predicted to be an agile arborealist [27-30], is reconstructed as the fastest of the Fayum anthropoids based on the semicircular canal data. The extant taxon to which Proteopithecus appears most similar in the lateral canal plot is Callimico goeldi, a relatively agile, arboreal New World monkey. In contrast, the results for Apidium are somewhat surprising and contradict expectations. Postcranial remains of Apidium display adaptations to leaping [29,31-36], ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Isolation of an arenavirus from a marmoset with callitrichid hepatitis and its serologic association with disease. AU - Stephensen, C. B.. AU - Jacob, J. R.. AU - Montali, R. J.. AU - Holmes, K. V.. AU - Muchmore, E.. AU - Compans, R. W.. AU - Arms, E. D.. AU - Buchmeier, M. J.. AU - Lanford, R. E.. PY - 1991/1/1. Y1 - 1991/1/1. N2 - Callitrichid hepatitis (CH) is an acute, often fatal viral infection of New World primates from the family Callitrichidae. The etiologic agent of CH is unknown. We report here the isolation of an arenavirus from a common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) with CH by using in vitro cultures of marmoset hepatocytes and Vero-E6 cells. Enveloped virions 67 to 133 nm in diameter with ribosomelike internal structures were seen in infected cultures. Immunofluorescence and Western immunoblot analysis using CH-specific antisera (principally from animals exposed to CH during zoo outbreaks) revealed three antigens in cells infected with this CH-associated virus ...
Aquino, R. and Encarnación, F. 1994. Primates of Peru / Los Primates del Perú. Primate Report 40: 1-127.. Buchanan-Smith, H. M. 1990. Polyspecific association of two tamarin species, Saguinus labiatus and Saguinus fuscicollis, in Bolivia. American Journal of Primatology 22(3): 205-214.. Buchanan-Smith, H. M. 1991b. A field study on the red-bellied tamarin, Saguinus l. labiatus, in Bolivia. International Journal of Primatology 12(3): 259-276.. Buchanan-Smith, H. M. 1991. Field observations of Goeldis monkey, Callimico goeldii, in northern Bolivia. Folia Primatologica 57: 102-105.. Buchanan-Smith, H. M. 1999. Tamarin polyspecific associations: Forest utilization and stability of mixed species groups. Primates 40: 233-247.. Buchanan-Smith, H. M., Hardie, S. M., Caceres, C. and Prescott, M. J. 2000. Distribution and forest utilization of Saguinus and other primates of the Pando Department, northern Bolivia. International Journal of Primatology 21(3): 353-379.. Encarnación, F. and Castro, N. ...
New world Primates are represented by the suborder Platyrrhini. This includes the families Callitrichidae (marmosets and tamarins), Callimiconidae (Goeldis monkey) and Cebidae (cebids) with a total of 55 species according to Honacki et al. (285) and Hershkovitz (277). Some authors (69, 393) recognize a larger number of callitrichids. The primates are the best studied and best known group of neotropical mammals, which is why an exhaustive review of the relevant literature would exceed the purpose of this book. A number of primates are used for food or captured alive or bred for commercial purposes, but there is no outstanding key species in this respect. They will therefore be presented summarily as a group. Local names: Macaco (Brazil), mico, mono (in wide use), pichico (Peru, callitrichids), saqui (Brazil, callitrichids). Geographical distribution: The Cebidae family ranges from southern Mexico to northern Peru, along the Pacific slope and as far southeast as northern Argentina. The more ...
S. oedipus has the common names "cotton-top tamarin" and "cotton-headed tamarin" in English. Its name comes from the white hair that spans its head and flows down past the neck.[3] In Spanish, it is commonly called bichichi, tití pielroja, "tití blanco, tití cabeza blanca, or tití leoncito.[2][4] In German-speaking areas, the cotton-top tamarin is commonly known as Lisztaffe (literally "Liszt monkey") most likely due to the resemblance of its crest to the hairstyle of Hungarian composer and piano virtuoso Franz Liszt.[5] The species was first described by Linnaeus in 1758[2] as Simia oedipus.[6] Linnaeus chose the species name oedipus, which means swollen foot, but as the species does not have particularly large feet, it is unknown why he chose this name. (Linnaeus often selected names from mythology without any particular rationale, and he may have used the name of Oedipus, the mythical Greek king of Thebes, more or less arbitrarily.)[7] In 1977, Philip Hershkovitz performed a taxonomic ...
Mittermeier, R. A. & Rylands, A. B. (2008). "Callimico goeldii". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2008. ... Callimico goeldii; family Callimiconidae) in 1904. Representatives from all the remaining rodent families with living ...
Media related to Callimico goeldii at Wikimedia Commons Data related to Callimico at Wikispecies Data related to Callimico ... The Goeldi's marmoset or Goeldi's monkey (Callimico goeldii) is a small, South American New World monkey that lives in the ... It is the only species classified in the genus Callimico, and the monkeys are sometimes referred to as "callimicos". Goeldi's ... Play media Goeldi's marmoset was first described in 1904, making Callimico one of the more recent monkey genera to be described ...
Groves, C.P. (2005). "Callimico goeldii". In Wilson, D.E.; Reeder, D.M. Mammal Species of the World: A Taxonomic and Geographic ... Mittermeier, R. A. & Rylands, A. B. (2008). "Callimico goeldii". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2008. ... lion tamarins Genus Saguinus Genus Callimico Family Cebidae: capuchins and squirrel monkeys Genus Cebus: capuchins Genus ...
According to the Online Etymology Dictionary, the word "monkey" may originate in a German version of the Reynard the Fox fable, published circa 1580. In this version of the fable, a character named Moneke is the son of Martin the Ape.[21] In English, no very clear distinction was originally made between "ape" and "monkey"; thus the 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica entry for "ape" notes that it is either a synonym for "monkey" or is used to mean a tailless humanlike primate.[22] Colloquially, the terms "monkey" and "ape" are widely used interchangeably.[23] Also, a few monkey species have the word "ape" in their common name, such as the Barbary ape. Later in the first half of the 20th century, the idea developed that there were trends in primate evolution and that the living members of the order could be arranged in a series, leading through "monkeys" and "apes" to humans.[24] Monkeys thus constituted a "grade" on the path to humans and were distinguished from "apes". Scientific classifications are ...
The Smallest Anthropoids: The Marmoset/Callimico Radiation. p. 37. ISBN 1-4419-0292-9. CS1 maint: Uses authors parameter (link ...
2009). The Smallest Anthropoids: The Marmoset/Callimico Radiation. Springer 40. Ferrari, Stephen Francis, and Maria Aparecida ...
Osman Hill, W. C. (1959). "The Anatomy of Callimico goeldii (Thomas): A Primitive American Primate". Transactions of the ...
Rodzaje: marmozeta (Leontopithecus), miko (Callimico), pigmejka (Cebuella), tamaryna (Saguinus), uistiti (Callithrix). * ...
The term marmoset is also used in reference to the Goeldi's marmoset, Callimico goeldii, which is closely related. Most ...
Callimico goeldii), pacaranas (Dinomys branickii), and eastern lowland olingos (Bassaricyon alleni) are found here, but not in ...
Callimico goeldii) Black agouti (Dasyprocta fuliginosa) White-faced saki (Pithecia pithecia) Common squirrel monkey (Saimiri ...
Callimico goeldii), jaguar (Panthera onca), margay (Leopardus wiedii), Sechuran fox (Lycalopex sechurae), southern little ...
Callimico goeldii Callithrix aurita Callithrix flaviceps Caloenas nicobarica Canis lupus (Only the populations of Bhutan, India ...
... callimico MeSH B01.150.900.649.801.400.600.130.114 --- callithrix MeSH B01.150.900.649.801.400.600.130.450 --- leontopithecus ...
Callimico Goeldi's marmoset, Callimico goeldii VU Genus: Callithrix Buffy-tufted marmoset, Callithrix aurita VU Buffy-headed ...
Callimico goeldii), South American tapir (Tapirus terrestris), neotropical otter (Lontra longicaudis) , margay (Leopardus ...
Callithrix flaviceps Genus Callimico Goeldi's marmoset, Callimico goeldii Genus Saguinus Subgenus Leontocebus Black-mantled ...
Callimico, douroucouli, Geoffrey's marmoset, Geoffroy's tamarin, Wied's marmoset, lesser spot-nosed guenon, pygmy slow loris, ...
Callimico goeldii). Endangered mammals include Peruvian spider monkey (Ateles chamek) and giant otter (Pteronura brasiliensis ...
Callimico Goeldi's marmoset Callimico goeldii VU Genus: Leontopithecus Superagui lion tamarin Leontopithecus caissara CR Golden ...
Callimico Goeldi's marmoset Callimico goeldii VU Subfamily: Cebinae Genus: Cebus White-fronted capuchin Cebus albifrons LC ...
Some of the species which bear his name are: Goeldi's antbird - Myrmeciza goeldii Goeldi's marmoset - Callimico goeldii ...
... callimico monkeys, agouti, boa and more Tortoise exhibit - Galapagos tortoise, African spurred tortoise Singing dogs - New ...
Callimico Goeldi's marmoset Callimico goeldii NT Subfamily: Cebinae Genus: Cebus White-fronted capuchin Cebus albifrons LC ...
Allocebus Allochrocebus Alouatta Aotus Arctocebus Ateles Avahi Brachyteles Cacajao Callibella Callicebus Callimico Callithrix ...
Polyspecific association between Saguinus fuscicollis, Saguinus labiatus, Callimico goeldii and other primates in north-western ... Field observations of Goeldis monkey, Callimico goeldii, in northern Bolivia. Folia Primatologica 57: 102-105. ...
Species Callimico goeldii Goeldis marmoset Callimico goeldii: information (1) Callimico goeldii: pictures (5) Callimico ... Callimico goeldii generally stay within 5 meters of the forest floor and travel to higher elevations in order to obtain fruit. ... Callimico goeldii travel roughly 2 km per day in a circular pattern and within a territory of 30-80 hectacres.,BR,,BR, ... Callimico goeldii are vertical climbers and leapers. They leap from one tree, turn in flight, and grab their target. Pook (1990 ...
Species Callimico goeldii Goeldis marmoset Callimico goeldii: information (1) Callimico goeldii: pictures (5) Callimico ... Callimico goeldii (Goeldis marmoset). Callimico goeldii: information (1) Callimico goeldii: pictures (5) Callimico goeldii: ...
Callimico goeldii):SPECIES ACCOUNTSPYGMY MARMOSET (Cebuella pygmaea):SPECIES ACCOUNTS Source for information on Marmosets, ... GOELDIS MONKEY (Callimico goeldii):SPECIES ACCOUNTS. PYGMY MARMOSET (Cebuella pygmaea):SPECIES ACCOUNTS. PHYSICAL ... "Callimico goeldii." Animal Diversity Web. http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Callimico_goeldii. ...
S. oedipus has the common names "cotton-top tamarin" and "cotton-headed tamarin" in English. Its name comes from the white hair that spans its head and flows down past the neck.[3] In Spanish, it is commonly called bichichi, tití pielroja, "tití blanco, tití cabeza blanca, or tití leoncito.[2][4] In German-speaking areas, the cotton-top tamarin is commonly known as Lisztaffe (literally "Liszt monkey") most likely due to the resemblance of its crest to the hairstyle of Hungarian composer and piano virtuoso Franz Liszt.[5] The species was first described by Linnaeus in 1758[2] as Simia oedipus.[6] Linnaeus chose the species name oedipus, which means swollen foot, but as the species does not have particularly large feet, it is unknown why he chose this name. (Linnaeus often selected names from mythology without any particular rationale, and he may have used the name of Oedipus, the mythical Greek king of Thebes, more or less arbitrarily.)[7] In 1977, Philip Hershkovitz performed a taxonomic ...
Callimico goeldii (Goeldi s monkey (+)). [100]. Grzimek, B., ed. 1990. Grzimeks Animal Life Encyclopedia. Mammals I - IV. ed. ...
Callimico (Goeldis monkey). 1 species.. *. Family Pitheciidae 29 or so species in 4 genera.. *. Subfamily Callicebinae *. ...
Mittermeier, R. A. & Rylands, A. B. (2008). "Callimico goeldii". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2008. ... Callimico goeldii; family Callimiconidae) in 1904. Representatives from all the remaining rodent families with living ...
Media related to Callimico goeldii at Wikimedia Commons Data related to Callimico at Wikispecies Data related to Callimico ... The Goeldis marmoset or Goeldis monkey (Callimico goeldii) is a small, South American New World monkey that lives in the ... It is the only species classified in the genus Callimico, and the monkeys are sometimes referred to as "callimicos". Goeldis ... Play media Goeldis marmoset was first described in 1904, making Callimico one of the more recent monkey genera to be described ...
Chromosome numbers were determined for the platyrrhine genera Callithrix (2n=46), Leontocebus (2n=46), and Callimico (2n=48). ...
The callitrichids, Callimico and other cebids such as Aotus. Callicebus and Pithecia live in small family groups made up of a ... Callitrichids almost always give birth to two young and Callimico and the cebids just one. The interval between successive ... The smaller insectivore-frugivore species such as the callitrichids Callimico, Aotus, Saimiri and Callicebus are more apt to ...
Rodzaje: marmozeta (Leontopithecus), miko (Callimico), pigmejka (Cebuella), tamaryna (Saguinus), uistiti (Callithrix). * ...
Callimico) (Callitrichidae, Primates). In S. M. Ford, C. A. Porter, & L. C. Davis (Eds.), The smallest anthropoids: The ... marmoset/callimico radiation (pp. 25-62). Developments in primatology: Progress and prospects. New York: Springer Science + ...
In: The Smallest Anthropoids: The Marmoset/Callimico Radiation. S. M. Ford, L. M. Porter and, L. C. Davis (eds.). Springer, New ... Size and shape in callimico and marmoset skulls: allometry and heterochrony in the morphological evolution of small anthropoids ...
Callimico goeldii (Goeldis monkey) *Callithrix (marmoset). *. Callithrix jacchus (common marmoset) *. Callithrix pygmaea ( ...
According to the Online Etymology Dictionary, the word "monkey" may originate in a German version of the Reynard the Fox fable, published circa 1580. In this version of the fable, a character named Moneke is the son of Martin the Ape.[21] In English, no very clear distinction was originally made between "ape" and "monkey"; thus the 1910 Encyclopædia Britannica entry for "ape" notes that it is either a synonym for "monkey" or is used to mean a tailless humanlike primate.[22] Colloquially, the terms "monkey" and "ape" are widely used interchangeably.[23] Also, a few monkey species have the word "ape" in their common name, such as the Barbary ape. Later in the first half of the 20th century, the idea developed that there were trends in primate evolution and that the living members of the order could be arranged in a series, leading through "monkeys" and "apes" to humans.[24] Monkeys thus constituted a "grade" on the path to humans and were distinguished from "apes". Scientific classifications are ...
Latin Name: Callimico goeldii. *Class: Mammals. *Order: Primates. *Family: Callithrichidae. *Conservation Status: Vulnerable ...
Callimico goedlii: Understory Monkeys of Northern Bolivia. L.M. Porter [96]. 8:15. Nutrient Composition and Distribution of ...
Rosenberger AL, and Stafford BJ (1994) Locomotion in captive Leontopithecus and Callimico: a multimedia study. Am. J. Phys. ...
... they also travel with Callimico goeldii (Pook and Pook 1982a; Buchanan-Smith 1990, 1991a; Porter 2007).. Size:. Tamarins are ...
I included emperor tamarins, callimico (Goeldis monkeys) and titi monkeys. Titi monkeys are known for the endearing habit of ...
Saguinusy Callimico) que poseen una dentici6n en muchos. aspects distintiva. Estos pequeflos primates han perdido. el tercer ... morphology in Goeldis monkey (Callimico goeldii) L.. C. Davis, pp.133-156; Ecology of the "southern" marmo-. sets (Callithrix ... Saguinus, Callimico y. Leontopithecus presentan incisivos inferiores de corona. espatulada e implantaci6n relativamente ... Ateles, Brachyteles, Cacajao, Callicebus, Callimico,. Callithrix, Cebuella, Cebus, Chiropotes, Lagothrix,. Leontopithecus, ...
P. (2009). "The vocal identity of the Callithrix species," in The Smallest Anthropoids: The Marmoset/Callimico Radiation ... The Marmoset/Callimico Radiation (Developments in Primatology: Progress and Prospects), eds S. M. Ford, L. M. Porter, and L. C ... Available at: http://www.amazon.com/Smallest-Anthropoids-Callimico-Developments-Primatology/dp/1441902929. ... Available at: http://www.amazon.com/Smallest-Anthropoids-Callimico-Developments-Primatology/dp/1441902929. ...
Isolation and characterization of chitin-degrading micro-organisms from the faeces of Goeldis monkey,Callimico goeldii. ... Callimico goeldii. Journal of Applied Microbiology. 116, 52-59. doi:10.1111/jam.12338. ISSN 1364-5072 ... Callimico goeldii. Journal of Applied Microbiology. 116, 52-59. doi:10.1111/jam.12338. ISSN 1364-5072 ...
Isospora arctopitheci Isospora callimico Plasmodium brasilianum Plasmodium simium Toxoplasma gondii Encephalitozoon cuniculi ...
  • Informe preliminar sobre censo de primates no humanos en el sur oriente peruano: Iberia e Iñapari (Departamento de Madre de Dios), Mayo 15 - Junio 14, 1978. (iucnredlist.org)
  • Months earlier, before the first Goeldi's monkey baby was born, we had poured over callimico birthing and rearing protocols from other zoos (primarily Brookfield), allowing us to create our own protocol for situations we might face. (gctelegram.com)
  • However, they disagree in relation to the branching order among these three major clades, within the ateline and callitrichine clades, and also on the placement of Saimiri, Cebus, Aotus, Callicebus , and Callimico . (scielo.br)
  • Hershkovitz (1977), placed the small Callimico in its own family Callimiconidae, based on its controversial features: this genus shares small body size and the presence of claws instead of nails with the callitrichines, and single pregnancy and the presence of a third molar with the remaining platyrrhine lineages. (scielo.br)
  • On the other hand, based on those ambiguous affinities, other morphologists place Callimico as the first callitrichine offshoot to diverge from the common ancestor (Rosenberger 1981, Ford 1986, Kay 1990). (scielo.br)
  • Analisis poblacional del pichico pecho anaranjado, Saguinus labiatus , en el sur oriente peruano. (iucnredlist.org)