Calcium Pyrophosphate: An inorganic pyrophosphate which affects calcium metabolism in mammals. Abnormalities in its metabolism occur in some human diseases, notably HYPOPHOSPHATASIA and pseudogout (CHONDROCALCINOSIS).Chondrocalcinosis: Presence of calcium salts, especially calcium pyrophosphate, in the cartilaginous structures of one or more joints. When accompanied by attacks of goutlike symptoms, it is called pseudogout. (Dorland, 27th ed)Scleral Diseases: General disorders of the sclera or white of the eye. They may include anatomic, embryologic, degenerative, or pigmentation defects.Diphosphates: Inorganic salts of phosphoric acid that contain two phosphate groups.Crystallization: The formation of crystalline substances from solutions or melts. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Phosphate Transport Proteins: Membrane proteins that are involved in the active transport of phosphate.Microscopy, Polarization: Microscopy using polarized light in which phenomena due to the preferential orientation of optical properties with respect to the vibration plane of the polarized light are made visible and correlated parameters are made measurable.Calcium Phosphates: Calcium salts of phosphoric acid. These compounds are frequently used as calcium supplements.Synovial Fluid: The clear, viscous fluid secreted by the SYNOVIAL MEMBRANE. It contains mucin, albumin, fat, and mineral salts and serves to lubricate joints.Gout: Hereditary metabolic disorder characterized by recurrent acute arthritis, hyperuricemia and deposition of sodium urate in and around the joints, sometimes with formation of uric acid calculi.Pyrophosphatases: A group of enzymes within the class EC 3.6.1.- that catalyze the hydrolysis of diphosphate bonds, chiefly in nucleoside di- and triphosphates. They may liberate either a mono- or diphosphate. EC 3.6.1.-.Uric Acid: An oxidation product, via XANTHINE OXIDASE, of oxypurines such as XANTHINE and HYPOXANTHINE. It is the final oxidation product of purine catabolism in humans and primates, whereas in most other mammals URATE OXIDASE further oxidizes it to ALLANTOIN.Calcinosis: Pathologic deposition of calcium salts in tissues.Cartilage, Articular: A protective layer of firm, flexible cartilage over the articulating ends of bones. It provides a smooth surface for joint movement, protecting the ends of long bones from wear at points of contact.Osteoarthritis: A progressive, degenerative joint disease, the most common form of arthritis, especially in older persons. The disease is thought to result not from the aging process but from biochemical changes and biomechanical stresses affecting articular cartilage. In the foreign literature it is often called osteoarthrosis deformans.Knee Joint: A synovial hinge connection formed between the bones of the FEMUR; TIBIA; and PATELLA.Paraproteinemias: A group of related diseases characterized by an unbalanced or disproportionate proliferation of immunoglobulin-producing cells, usually from a single clone. These cells frequently secrete a structurally homogeneous immunoglobulin (M-component) and/or an abnormal immunoglobulin.Arthritis, Gouty: Arthritis, especially of the great toe, as a result of gout. Acute gouty arthritis often is precipitated by trauma, infection, surgery, etc. The initial attacks are usually monoarticular but later attacks are often polyarticular.Saudi ArabiaBursa, Synovial: A fluid-filled sac lined with SYNOVIAL MEMBRANE that provides a cushion between bones, tendons and/or muscles around a joint.Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine: A medical specialty concerned with the use of physical agents, mechanical apparatus, and manipulation in rehabilitating physically diseased or injured patients.Writing: The act or practice of literary composition, the occupation of writer, or producing or engaging in literary work as a profession.Rehabilitation: Restoration of human functions to the maximum degree possible in a person or persons suffering from disease or injury.Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.Publishing: "The business or profession of the commercial production and issuance of literature" (Webster's 3d). It includes the publisher, publication processes, editing and editors. Production may be by conventional printing methods or by electronic publishing.Bibliometrics: The use of statistical methods in the analysis of a body of literature to reveal the historical development of subject fields and patterns of authorship, publication, and use. Formerly called statistical bibliography. (from The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Journal Impact Factor: A quantitative measure of the frequency on average with which articles in a journal have been cited in a given period of time.Shoulder Pain: Unilateral or bilateral pain of the shoulder. It is often caused by physical activities such as work or sports participation, but may also be pathologic in origin.Shoulder: Part of the body in humans and primates where the arms connect to the trunk. The shoulder has five joints; ACROMIOCLAVICULAR joint, CORACOCLAVICULAR joint, GLENOHUMERAL joint, scapulathoracic joint, and STERNOCLAVICULAR joint.Shoulder Joint: The articulation between the head of the HUMERUS and the glenoid cavity of the SCAPULA.Shoulder Dislocation: Displacement of the HUMERUS from the SCAPULA.Arthritis, Rheumatoid: A chronic systemic disease, primarily of the joints, marked by inflammatory changes in the synovial membranes and articular structures, widespread fibrinoid degeneration of the collagen fibers in mesenchymal tissues, and by atrophy and rarefaction of bony structures. Etiology is unknown, but autoimmune mechanisms have been implicated.ArthritisPain: An unpleasant sensation induced by noxious stimuli which are detected by NERVE ENDINGS of NOCICEPTIVE NEURONS.Radiology: A specialty concerned with the use of x-ray and other forms of radiant energy in the diagnosis and treatment of disease.Temporomandibular Joint Disorders: A variety of conditions affecting the anatomic and functional characteristics of the temporomandibular joint. Factors contributing to the complexity of temporomandibular diseases are its relation to dentition and mastication and the symptomatic effects in other areas which account for referred pain to the joint and the difficulties in applying traditional diagnostic procedures to temporomandibular joint pathology where tissue is rarely obtained and x-rays are often inadequate or nonspecific. Common diseases are developmental abnormalities, trauma, subluxation, luxation, arthritis, and neoplasia. (From Thoma's Oral Pathology, 6th ed, pp577-600)Radiography: Examination of any part of the body for diagnostic purposes by means of X-RAYS or GAMMA RAYS, recording the image on a sensitized surface (such as photographic film).BooksHand Deformities, Acquired: Deformities of the hand, or a part of the hand, acquired after birth as the result of injury or disease.Radiology Information Systems: Information systems, usually computer-assisted, designed to store, manipulate, and retrieve information for planning, organizing, directing, and controlling administrative activities associated with the provision and utilization of radiology services and facilities.Osteophyte: Bony outgrowth usually found around joints and often seen in conditions such as ARTHRITIS.Connective Tissue Diseases: A heterogeneous group of disorders, some hereditary, others acquired, characterized by abnormal structure or function of one or more of the elements of connective tissue, i.e., collagen, elastin, or the mucopolysaccharides.Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome: A heterogeneous group of autosomally inherited COLLAGEN DISEASES caused by defects in the synthesis or structure of FIBRILLAR COLLAGEN. There are numerous subtypes: classical, hypermobility, vascular, and others. Common clinical features include hyperextensible skin and joints, skin fragility and reduced wound healing capability.Marfan Syndrome: An autosomal dominant disorder of CONNECTIVE TISSUE with abnormal features in the heart, the eye, and the skeleton. Cardiovascular manifestations include MITRAL VALVE PROLAPSE, dilation of the AORTA, and aortic dissection. Other features include lens displacement (ectopia lentis), disproportioned long limbs and enlarged DURA MATER (dural ectasia). Marfan syndrome is associated with mutations in the gene encoding fibrillin, a major element of extracellular microfibrils of connective tissue.Connective Tissue: Tissue that supports and binds other tissues. It consists of CONNECTIVE TISSUE CELLS embedded in a large amount of EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX.Musculoskeletal Diseases: Diseases of the muscles and their associated ligaments and other connective tissue and of the bones and cartilage viewed collectively.Collagen Type V: A fibrillar collagen found widely distributed as a minor component in tissues that contain COLLAGEN TYPE I and COLLAGEN TYPE III. It is a heterotrimeric molecule composed of alpha1(V), alpha2(V) and alpha3(V) subunits. Several forms of collagen type V exist depending upon the composition of the subunits that form the trimer.Collagen Diseases: Historically, a heterogeneous group of acute and chronic diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, progressive systemic sclerosis, dermatomyositis, etc. This classification was based on the notion that "collagen" was equivalent to "connective tissue", but with the present recognition of the different types of collagen and the aggregates derived from them as distinct entities, the term "collagen diseases" now pertains exclusively to those inherited conditions in which the primary defect is at the gene level and affects collagen biosynthesis, post-translational modification, or extracellular processing directly. (From Cecil Textbook of Medicine, 19th ed, p1494)Academic Medical Centers: Medical complexes consisting of medical school, hospitals, clinics, libraries, administrative facilities, etc.Hospitals, Veterans: Hospitals providing medical care to veterans of wars.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Tertiary Care Centers: A medical facility which provides a high degree of subspecialty expertise for patients from centers where they received SECONDARY CARE.Germinal Center: The activated center of a lymphoid follicle in secondary lymphoid tissue where B-LYMPHOCYTES are stimulated by antigens and helper T cells (T-LYMPHOCYTES, HELPER-INDUCER) are stimulated to generate memory cells.United StatesIsrael
2005). "The ANKH gene and familial calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition disease". Joint Bone Spine. 71 (5): 365-8. doi: ... 1999). "Refinement of the chromosome 5p locus for familial calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition disease". Am. J. Hum. ... Williams CJ (2003). "Familial calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition disease and the ANKH gene". Current Opinion in ... "Autosomal dominant familial calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition disease is caused by mutation in the transmembrane ...
A common cause of chondrocalcinosis is calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystal deposition disease (CPPD). Hypomagnesemia may ... Rothschild, Bruce M Calcium Pyrophosphate Deposition Disease (radiology) Matt A. Morgan and Frank Gaillard; et al. " ... Wright GD, Doherty M (1997). "Calcium pyrophosphate crystal deposition is not always 'wear and tear' or aging". Ann. Rheum. Dis ... As with most conditions, chondrocalcinosis can present with similarity to other diseases such as ankylosing spondylitis and ...
Sodium pyrophosphate Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition disease Dimethylallyl pyrophosphate ADP ATP Ortho acids ... It is best prepared by ion exchange from sodium pyrophosphate or by reacting hydrogen sulfide with lead pyrophosphate. When ... Anions, salts, and esters of pyrophosphoric acid are called pyrophosphates. While pyrophosporic acid is corrosive, it is not ...
... is a rheumatological condition similar to calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition disease (CPPD). It is associated with ... Crystal deposition in the joint causes the release of collagenases, serine proteases, elastases, and interleukin-1. This ... Along with symptomatology, the disease typically presents with positive radiologic findings, often showing marked erosion of ... periarticular or intraarticular deposition of hydroxyapatite crystals. ...
... protein and ANK in articular hyaline cartilage from patients with calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystal deposition disease". ... Major alterations in the composition of the cartilage extracellular matrix occur in joint disease, such as osteoarthrosis. The ... 2007). "Phenotypic and population differences in the association between CILP and lumbar disc disease". J. Med. Genet. 44 (4): ... is associated with susceptibility to lumbar disc disease". Nat. Genet. 37 (6): 607-12. doi:10.1038/ng1557. PMID 15864306. Mori ...
ATPase ATP hydrolysis ATP synthase Biochemistry Bone Calcium pyrophosphate Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition disease ... I. Normal values in osteoarthritis and calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystal deposition disease". Arthritis Rheum. 22 (8): ... A number of hydrogen pyrophosphates also exist, such as Na2H2P2O7, as well as the normal pyrophosphates. Pyrophosphates were ... Pyrophosphate is the first member of an entire series of polyphosphates. The term pyrophosphate is also the name of esters ...
Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystal deposition disease, also known as pseudogout and pyrophosphate arthropathy is a ... "Calcium Pyrophosphate Dihydrate Deposition Disease: Synovial Biopsy, Wrist". Rheumatology Image Bank. American College of ... Rothschild, Bruce M Calcium Pyrophosphate Deposition Disease (rheumatology) at eMedicine Wright GD, Doherty M (1997). "Calcium ... Pyrophosphate arthropathy refers to several of these situations. Rothschild, Bruce M Calcium Pyrophosphate Deposition Disease ( ...
Bruce M Calcium Pyrophosphate Deposition Disease (radiology) *^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n Rothschild, Bruce M Calcium ... Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystal deposition disease, also known as pseudogout and pyrophosphate arthropathy, is a ... Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystal deposition disease. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. (Redirected from Calcium ... "Calcium Pyrophosphate Dihydrate Deposition Disease: Synovial Biopsy, Wrist". Rheumatology Image Bank. American College of ...
Some patients suffer from calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystal depositions with occasional attacks of arthritis (pseudogout ... a pyrophosphate synthetic analog) in one infant had no discernible effect on the skeleton, and the infant's disease progressed ... In some cases, a build-up of calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystals in the joint can cause pseudogout. Perinatal and ... features of pyrophosphate arthropathy, and calcific periarthritis. Odontohypophosphatasia is present when dental disease is the ...
... dihydrate crystals in cartilage are responsible for the severe joint pain in cases of calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease ... In both the pyrophosphates are essentially eclipsed. "Calcium Pyrophosphate Deposition Disease". Medscape. Ropp, R.C. (2013). " ... Calcium pyrophosphate (Ca2P2O7) is a chemical compound, an insoluble calcium salt containing the pyrophosphate anion. There are ... "Calcium pyrophosphate crystal deposition disease: Preparation and characterization of crystals". Journal of Crystal Growth. 87 ...
Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystals are associated with a range of clinical syndromes, which have been given various names, based upon which clinical symptoms or radiographic findings are most prominent.[11] A task force of the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) made recommendations on preferred terminology.[5] Accordingly, calcium pyrophosphate deposition (CPPD) is an umbrella term for the various clinical subsets, whose naming reflects an emphasis on particular features. For example, pseudogout refers to the acute symptoms of joint inflammation or synovitis: red, tender, and swollen joints that may resemble gouty arthritis (a similar condition in which monosodium urate crystals are deposited within the joints). Chondrocalcinosis,[2][3] on the other hand, refers to the radiographic evidence of calcification in hyaline and/or ...
... (apatite-associated destructive arthritis) is a rheumatological condition similar to calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition disease (CPPD). It is associated with periarticular or intraarticular deposition of hydroxyapatite crystals. Crystal deposition in the joint causes the release of collagenases, serine proteases, elastases, and interleukin-1. This precipitates acute and rapid decline in joint function and degradation of joint anatomy. Subsequently disruption of the rotator cuff ensues. Along with symptomatology, the disease typically presents with positive radiologic findings, often showing marked erosion of the humeral head, cartilage, capsule, and bursae. Though rare, it is most often seen in females beginning in their 50s or 60s. Diagnosis is made with arthrocentesis and Alizarin Red staining along with clinical symptoms. ...
... , also known as haemochromatosis, indicates accumulation of iron in the body from any cause. The most important causes are hereditary haemochromatosis (HHC), a genetic disorder, and transfusional iron overload, which can result from repeated blood transfusions. Play media Organs commonly affected by haemochromatosis are the liver, heart, and endocrine glands. Haemochromatosis may present with the following clinical syndromes: Cirrhosis of the liver: Varies from zonal iron deposition to fibrosis (cirrhosis). Diabetes due to selective iron deposition in pancreatic islet beta cells leading to functional failure and cell death. Cardiomyopathy Arthritis, from calcium pyrophosphate deposition in joints. The most commonly affected joints are those of the hands, particularly the knuckles of the second and third fingers. Testicular failure Bronzing of the skin. This deep tan color, in concert ...
As well as the anhydrous compound Co(NO3)2, several hydrates of cobalt(II) nitrate exist. These hydrates have the chemical formula Co(NO3)2·nH2O, where n = 0, 2, 4, 6. Anhydrous cobalt(II) nitrate adopts a three-dimensional polymeric network structure, with each cobalt(II) atom approximately octahedrally coordinated by six oxygen atoms, each from a different nitrate ion. Each nitrate ion coordinates to three cobalts.[3] The dihydrate is a two-dimensional polymer, with nitrate bridges between Co(II) centres and hydrogen bonding holding the layers together. The tetrahydrate consists of discrete, octahedral [(H2O)4Co(NO3)2] molecules. The hexahydrate is better described as hexaaquacobalt(II) nitrate, [Co(OH2)6][NO3]2, as it consists of discrete [Co(OH2)6]2+ and [NO3]− ions.[4] Above 55 °C, the hexahydrate converts to the trihydrate and at higher temperatures to the monohydrate.[2]. ...
Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystals are associated with a range of clinical syndromes, which have been given various names, based upon which clinical symptoms or radiographic findings are most prominent.[11] A task force of the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) made recommendations on preferred terminology.[5] Accordingly, calcium pyrophosphate deposition (CPPD) is an umbrella term for the various clinical subsets, whose naming reflects an emphasis on particular features. For example, pseudogout refers to the acute symptoms of joint inflammation or synovitis: red, tender, and swollen joints that may resemble gouty arthritis (a similar condition in which monosodium urate crystals are deposited within the joints). Chondrocalcinosis,[2][3] on the other hand, refers to the radiographic evidence of calcification in hyaline and/or ...
... (apatite-associated destructive arthritis) is a rheumatological condition similar to calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition disease (CPPD). It is associated with periarticular or intraarticular deposition of hydroxyapatite crystals. Crystal deposition in the joint causes the release of collagenases, serine proteases, elastases, and interleukin-1. This precipitates acute and rapid decline in joint function and degradation of joint anatomy. Subsequently disruption of the rotator cuff ensues. Along with symptomatology, the disease typically presents with positive radiologic findings, often showing marked erosion of the humeral head, cartilage, capsule, and bursae. Though rare, it is most often seen in females beginning in their 50s or 60s. Diagnosis is made with arthrocentesis and Alizarin Red staining along with clinical symptoms. ...
... , also known as haemochromatosis, indicates accumulation of iron in the body from any cause. The most important causes are hereditary haemochromatosis (HHC), a genetic disorder, and transfusional iron overload, which can result from repeated blood transfusions. Play media Organs commonly affected by haemochromatosis are the liver, heart, and endocrine glands. Haemochromatosis may present with the following clinical syndromes: Cirrhosis of the liver: Varies from zonal iron deposition to fibrosis (cirrhosis). Diabetes due to selective iron deposition in pancreatic islet beta cells leading to functional failure and cell death. Cardiomyopathy Arthritis, from calcium pyrophosphate deposition in joints. The most commonly affected joints are those of the hands, particularly the knuckles of the second and third fingers. Testicular failure Bronzing of the skin. This deep tan color, in concert ...
If the knee is swollen and red and warm to the touch when compared to the other knee, a doctor may be concerned about inflammation due to rheumatoid arthritis or a crystalline arthritis, such as gout or pseudogout, or joint infection. Besides sending the joint fluid to a laboratory for analysis, blood tests may requested to determine a white blood cell count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and perhaps the level of C-reactive protein or uric acid. If blood tests reveal Lyme disease antibodies forming, the condition may be attributed to it. ...
Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystals are associated with a range of clinical syndromes, which have been given various names, based upon which clinical symptoms or radiographic findings are most prominent.[11] A task force of the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) made recommendations on preferred terminology.[5] Accordingly, calcium pyrophosphate deposition (CPPD) is an umbrella term for the various clinical subsets, whose naming reflects an emphasis on particular features. For example, pseudogout refers to the acute symptoms of joint inflammation or synovitis: red, tender, and swollen joints that may resemble gouty arthritis (a similar condition in which monosodium urate crystals are deposited within the joints). Chondrocalcinosis,[2][3] on the other hand, refers to the radiographic evidence of calcification in hyaline and/or ...
... (apatite-associated destructive arthritis) is a rheumatological condition similar to calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition disease (CPPD). It is associated with periarticular or intraarticular deposition of hydroxyapatite crystals. Crystal deposition in the joint causes the release of collagenases, serine proteases, elastases, and interleukin-1. This precipitates acute and rapid decline in joint function and degradation of joint anatomy. Subsequently disruption of the rotator cuff ensues. Along with symptomatology, the disease typically presents with positive radiologic findings, often showing marked erosion of the humeral head, cartilage, capsule, and bursae. Though rare, it is most often seen in females beginning in their 50s or 60s. Diagnosis is made with arthrocentesis and Alizarin Red staining along with clinical symptoms. ...
... (村田 茂助, Murata Mosuke) is a Japanese dermatologist and was the designator of erythema nodosum leprosum (ENL)(1912), the type 2 lepra reaction. Mosuke Murata joined the Zensho Byoin, now Tama Zenshoen Sanatorium in 1909. The chief dermatologist was Kensuke Mitsuda and there was another doctor Chin. Murata belonged to the surgery section, and studied leprosy. He was known for naming a hot nodule of leprosy, erythema nodosum leprosum (ENL). There was need to differentiate it from other types of erythema nodosum, which is usually seen in the lower parts of the body. In his paper, he thanked Kensuke Mitsuda for allowing him to study a total of 67 cases. After writing papers, he went into private practice in 1914. Erythema nodosum leprosum is one of the most frequently used terms in the science of leprosy. It is an immune-mediated complication of leprosy presenting with inflammatory skin nodules. Immune complex production and deposition as well as complement activation have long ...
Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystals are associated with a range of clinical syndromes, which have been given various names, based upon which clinical symptoms or radiographic findings are most prominent.[11] A task force of the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) made recommendations on preferred terminology.[5] Accordingly, calcium pyrophosphate deposition (CPPD) is an umbrella term for the various clinical subsets, whose naming reflects an emphasis on particular features. For example, pseudogout refers to the acute symptoms of joint inflammation or synovitis: red, tender, and swollen joints that may resemble gouty arthritis (a similar condition in which monosodium urate crystals are deposited within the joints). Chondrocalcinosis,[2][3] on the other hand, refers to the radiographic evidence of calcification in hyaline and/or ...
... (FPP), also known as farnesyl diphosphate (FDP), is an intermediate in both the mevalonate and non-mevalonate pathways used by organisms in the biosynthesis of terpenes, terpenoids, and sterols. It is used in the synthesis of CoQ (part of the electron transport chain), as well as being the immediate precursor of squalene (via the enzyme squalene synthase), dehydrodolichol diphosphate (a precursor of dolichol, which transports proteins to the ER lumen for N-glycosylation), and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP). Farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase (a prenyl transferase) catalyzes sequential condensation reactions of dimethylallyl pyrophosphate with 2 units of 3-isopentenyl pyrophosphate to form farnesyl pyrophosphate, as is shown in the following two steps: Dimethylallyl pyrophosphate reacts with ...
Bruce M Calcium Pyrophosphate Deposition Disease (radiology) *^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n Rothschild, Bruce M Calcium ... Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystal deposition disease, also known as pseudogout and pyrophosphate arthropathy, is a ... Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystal deposition disease. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. (Redirected from Calcium ... "Calcium Pyrophosphate Dihydrate Deposition Disease: Synovial Biopsy, Wrist". Rheumatology Image Bank. American College of ...
Learn more about Calcium Pyrophosphate Dihydrate Deposition Disease at Medical City Dallas DefinitionCausesRisk ... Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition disease (CPPD) is a build up of calcium crystals in the joints. These crystals cause ... Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystal deposition disease (CPPD) (Pseudogout). The Arthritis Foundation website. Available at ... T114067/Calcium-pyrophosphate-dihydrate-deposition-disease: Wise JN, Weissman BN, et al. American College of Radiology (ACR) ...
Roentgenographic aspects of calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystal deposition disease (pseudogout). Arthitis Rheum1976;19:307- ... Until now, the diagnosis of calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystal deposition disease has been based mainly on ... Calcium pyrophosphate crystal deposition disease, pseudogout and articular chondrocalcinosis. In: McCarty DJ, Koopman WJ, eds. ... Further observations on the arthropathy of calcium pyrophosphate crystal deposition disease. Radiology1981;141:1-15. ...
Precipitation of crystals of calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPP) in connective tissues may be asymptomatic or may be ... Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystal deposition disease--1975. Arthritis Rheum 1976; 19 Suppl 3:275. ... Pathogenesis and etiology of calcium pyrophosphate crystal deposition (CPPD) disease. *Patient education: Calcium pyrophosphate ... with calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease (also abbreviated as CPPD disease) as the umbrella term for all instances of CPP ...
Doherty M. Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystal-associated arthropathy. In: Hochberg MC, Silman AJ, Smolen JS, et al., eds. ... Calcium Pyrophoshate Dihydrate Crystal Deposition Disease (CPPD)Dz Last updated: November 24, 2014 ... Definite CPPD crystal deposition disease: criteria I or II.A and II.B. Probable CPPD crystal deposition disease: criterion II.A ... Chronic CPPD crystal deposition disease: No specific therapy exists for chronic CPPD crystal deposition disease, and treatment ...
Jones AC, Chuck AJ, Arie EA, Green DJ, Doherty M: Diseases associated with calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease. Semin ... Chondrocalcinosis, is defined as the deposition of calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate in hyaline or fibrous cartilage [14]. In ... EULAR recommendations for calcium pyrophosphate deposition. Part II: management. Ann Rheum Dis. 2011, 70: 571-575.PubMedGoogle ... European League Against Rheumatism recommendations for calcium pyrophosphate deposition. Part I: terminology and diagnosis. Ann ...
Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystal deposition disease, also known as pseudogout and pyrophosphate arthropathy is a ... "Calcium Pyrophosphate Dihydrate Deposition Disease: Synovial Biopsy, Wrist". Rheumatology Image Bank. American College of ... Rothschild, Bruce M Calcium Pyrophosphate Deposition Disease (rheumatology) at eMedicine Wright GD, Doherty M (1997). "Calcium ... Pyrophosphate arthropathy refers to several of these situations. Rothschild, Bruce M Calcium Pyrophosphate Deposition Disease ( ...
An update on the epidemiology of calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystal deposition disease.. Richette P1, Bardin T, Doherty M. ... familial forms of CC and diseases associated with CC. We searched MEDLINE for articles published in English from 1998 to 2008 ...
calcium-pyrophosphate-dihydrate-deposition-disease definition: Proper noun 1. (medicine) A medical condition, also called ... calcium-pyrophosphate-dihydrate-deposition-disease. Proper noun *(medicine) A medical condition, also called pseudogout or CPPD ... www.yourdictionary.com/calcium-pyrophosphate-dihydrate-deposition-disease ... "calcium-pyrophosphate-dihydrate-deposition-disease." YourDictionary, n.d. Web. 17 January 2019. ,https://www.yourdictionary.com ...
Anteroposterior radiograph of the right knee linear calcifications in the meniscis consistent with chondrocalcinosis and osteophytes particularly in the medial joint compartment
... crystal deposition, infection, and trauma. The initial aim of the evaluation of a patient with joint pain is to localize the ... a reflection of the diverse joint diseases, which arise from inflammation, cartilage degeneration, ... Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystal deposition disease. Radiographic evidence of calcium crystal deposition in articular ... calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate, basic calcium phosphate (including hydroxyapatite), and calcium oxalate. ...
Calcium Pyrophosphate Dihydrate Crystal Deposition Disease): Read more about Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment, Complications, ... 61 Volpe A...Furlani L 19467900 2009 48 An idiopathic case of calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystal deposition disease with ... Calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease. [emedicine.medscape.com] Gout or hyperuricemia in an adolescent or child is rare but ... Calcium pyrophosphate crystal deposition disease: diagnosis and treatment. Open Access Rheumatology : Research and Reviews. ...
Imaging Characteristics of Calcium Pyrophosphate Dihydrate Crystal Deposition Disease. Lin, Yun-Yi; Wang, Tyng-Guey; Li, Ko-Jen ... Particle Disease Osteolysis of the Pelvis and the Hip After Hip Arthroplasty. Maltese, John T. Jr; LaBan, Myron M.; Gorab, ... Aggravated Dysphagia Caused by Cervical Osteophyte in a Patient with Parkinson Disease. Lee, Seung Hak; Bae, Soon Ook; Paik, ... Images are essential in the diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation of injury and disease. Many technologies have been ...
PROLIFERATIVE WRIST TENOSYNOVITIS IN CALCIUM PYROPHOSPHATE DIHYDRATE DEPOSITION DISEASE: CASE REPORT. Molloy, Philip J. ...
... arthritis is a joint disease that can cause attacks of arthritis. Like gout, crystals form in the joints. But in this arthritis ... Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition disease; CPPD disease; Acute/chronic CPPD arthritis; Pseudogout; Pyrophosphate ... Terkeltaub R. Calcium crystal disease: calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate and basic calcium phosphate. In: Firestein GS, Budd RC, ... Deposition of calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) causes this form of arthritis. The buildup of this chemical forms crystals ...
Read about the common diseases that affect the shoulder. ... Many forms of arthritis and other diseases can cause shoulder ... Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystal deposition disease (pseudogout). Like gout, pseudogout occurs when crystals form within ... With pseudogout, however, the crystals are formed from a salt called calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate. Although pseudogout ... Lyme disease. Lyme disease is an infectious disease spread by the bite of deer ticks infected with the bacteria Borrelia ...
Calcium Pyrophosphate Dihydrate Crystal Deposition Disease --. 35. Calcium Hydroxyapatite Crystal Deposition Disease --. 36. ... Calcium Pyrophosphate Dihydrate Crystal Deposition Disease -- 35. Calcium Hydroxyapatite Crystal Deposition Disease -- 36. ... Metabolic Diseases --. 41. Osteoporosis --. 42. Rickets and Osteomalacia --. 43. Paget₂s Disease --. XII. Endocrine Diseases -- ... Degenerative Diseases --. 29. Degenerative Diseases of Extraspinal Locations --. 30. Degenerative Diseases of the Spine --. 31 ...
Learn about diseases that can impact the ankle. ... Calcium Pyrophosphate Dihydrate Crystal Deposition Disease ( ... With pseudogout, however, the crystals are formed of a salt called calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate. Although pseudogout occurs ... The skin disease often precedes the arthritis; in a small percentage of cases the joint disease develops before the skin ... Here are some diseases that can affect the ankles.. *Osteoarthritis (OA). The most common form of arthritis, osteoarthritis is ...
Tophaceous pseudogout (tumoral calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystal deposition disease). Hum Pathol. 1995;26(6):587-93. ... Abhishek A, Doherty M. Epidemiology of calcium pyrophosphate crystal arthritis and basic calcium phosphate crystal arthropathy ... Temporomandibular joint space in children without joint disease. Acta Radiol Diagn (Stockh). 1981;22(1):85-8.CrossRefGoogle ... We discuss the most common rheumatic diseases in adults and children and some uncommon other types of arthritis and their TMJ ...
Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystal deposition disease c. Calcium hydroxyapatite deposition disease 6. Neuropathic ... C. Specific diseases. 1. Osteoarthritis a. Primary b. Secondary c. Erosive (inflammatory) 2. Inflammatory joint diseases a. ... 4. Connective tissue disease a. Systemic lupus erythematosus b. Scleroderma c. Dermatomyositis and polymyositis 5. Crystal- ... osteoarthropathy (neuropathic joint disease) a. Diabetes mellitus b. Syringomyelia Miscellaneous Disorders. *Osteochodroses (e. ...
Learn more about Conditions and Diseases -- Skeletal and Muscular Systems at St. Davids HealthCare ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTVWZ ... ... Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition disease. *Pseudogout. * Pulled muscle * Pulled calf muscle * Pulled gluteal muscle ...
2005). "The ANKH gene and familial calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition disease". Joint Bone Spine. 71 (5): 365-8. doi: ... 1999). "Refinement of the chromosome 5p locus for familial calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition disease". Am. J. Hum. ... Williams CJ (2003). "Familial calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition disease and the ANKH gene". Current Opinion in ... "Autosomal dominant familial calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition disease is caused by mutation in the transmembrane ...
... is a metabolic arthropathy caused by the deposition of calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate in and around joints, especially in ... encoded search term (Calcium Pyrophosphate Deposition Disease) and Calcium Pyrophosphate Deposition Disease What to Read Next ... Calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease. Appearance of calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystals obtained from the knee of a ... Calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease. High-powered view of calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystals with compensated ...
Ultrasound in the diagnosis of calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition disease. A systematic literature review and a meta- ... Identification of calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease (CPPD) by ultrasound: reliability of the OMERACT definitions in an ... Definition and Reliability Assessment of Elementary Ultrasonographic Findings in Calcium Pyrophosphate Deposition Disease: A ... Study by the OMERACT Calcium Pyrophosphate Deposition Disease Ultrasound Subtask Force.. Filippou G, Scirè CA, Damjanov N, ...
Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition disease (CPPD)/Pseudogout of the temporomandibular joint - FNA findings and ...
  • The human homolog is virtually identical to the mouse protein and ANKH-mediated control of pyrophosphate levels has been suggested as a possible mechanism regulating tissue calcification and susceptibility to arthritis in higher animals. (wikipedia.org)
  • The ANKH protein is involved in transport of inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi), which regulates calcification, bone mineralization, and bone resorption. (medscape.com)
  • calcification, the deposit of calcium salts in tissues and organs that do not normally contain them in undissolved form. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The causes of calcium accumulation in the blood include diseases of the large intestine and kidneys and hypovitaminosis D. In contrast to dystrophic calcification, the sedimentation of lime in healthy, unchanged tissues and organs occurs only in those tissues that normally have an alkaline medium (lungs, stomach, kidneys, and arteries). (thefreedictionary.com)
  • In addition to the symptoms of polymyositis, including pain and weakness of the muscles around the shoulders and pelvis, symptoms of dermatomyositis also include a patchy skin rash, purplish discoloration of the eyelids, swelling around the eyes, changes around the nail beds and calcium deposits in the shoulders, pelvis, hips, calves and thighs, which may limit motion. (arthritis.org)
  • This table lists symptoms that people with this disease may have. (cdc.gov)
  • For most diseases, symptoms will vary from person to person. (cdc.gov)
  • People with the same disease may not have all the symptoms listed. (cdc.gov)
  • Do you have more information about symptoms of this disease? (cdc.gov)
  • In addition, the ANKH protein transports a molecule called pyrophosphate out of cells to the intricate network of proteins that forms in the spaces between cells (extracellular matrix). (medlineplus.gov)
  • The altered ANKH proteins may also be less able to transport pyrophosphate out of cells. (medlineplus.gov)
  • These polymorphisms probably result in slight changes in the activity of the ANKH protein, affecting the levels of pyrophosphate in the extracellular matrix. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Progressive ankylosis protein homolog (ANKH) is a putative transmembrane pyrophosphate (PPi) transport channel protein found in osteoblasts of various bones. (reactome.org)
  • Radiographs have been the mainstay of initial imaging of the elbow, while ultrasound examination is often used for soft tissue disease. (medworm.com)
  • Recognize that all of the monoarticular arthritides can present in a polyarticular distribution, and classically polyarticular diseases may occasionally only affect a single joint. (mhmedical.com)
  • A radiograph of the left hip taken on presentation to our service (6 weeks after symptom onset) showed severe degenerative disease, with slight flattening and irregularity of the femoral head (Figure 1). (advection.net)