Chemical agents that increase the permeability of biological or artificial lipid membranes to specific ions. Most ionophores are relatively small organic molecules that act as mobile carriers within membranes or coalesce to form ion permeable channels across membranes. Many are antibiotics, and many act as uncoupling agents by short-circuiting the proton gradient across mitochondrial membranes.
Cationic ionophore antibiotic obtained from Streptomyces lasaliensis that, among other effects, dissociates the calcium fluxes in muscle fibers. It is used as a coccidiostat, especially in poultry.
An ionophorous, polyether antibiotic from Streptomyces chartreusensis. It binds and transports CALCIUM and other divalent cations across membranes and uncouples oxidative phosphorylation while inhibiting ATPase of rat liver mitochondria. The substance is used mostly as a biochemical tool to study the role of divalent cations in various biological systems.
A divalent calcium ionophore that is widely used as a tool to investigate the role of intracellular calcium in cellular processes.
'Ethers' in a medical context are a class of organic compounds used as medication, particularly as an inhalational agent to induce and maintain general anesthesia, characterized by their ability to produce a state of unconsciousness while providing muscle relaxation and analgesia.
Chemical agents that increase the permeability of CELL MEMBRANES to CALCIUM ions.
A basic element found in nearly all organized tissues. It is a member of the alkaline earth family of metals with the atomic symbol Ca, atomic number 20, and atomic weight 40. Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body and combines with phosphorus to form calcium phosphate in the bones and teeth. It is essential for the normal functioning of nerves and muscles and plays a role in blood coagulation (as factor IV) and in many enzymatic processes.
A chelating agent relatively more specific for calcium and less toxic than EDETIC ACID.
A phorbol ester found in CROTON OIL with very effective tumor promoting activity. It stimulates the synthesis of both DNA and RNA.
Signal transduction mechanisms whereby calcium mobilization (from outside the cell or from intracellular storage pools) to the cytoplasm is triggered by external stimuli. Calcium signals are often seen to propagate as waves, oscillations, spikes, sparks, or puffs. The calcium acts as an intracellular messenger by activating calcium-responsive proteins.
A polyether antibiotic which affects ion transport and ATPase activity in mitochondria. It is produced by Streptomyces hygroscopicus. (From Merck Index, 11th ed)
An antiprotozoal agent produced by Streptomyces cinnamonensis. It exerts its effect during the development of first-generation trophozoites into first-generation schizonts within the intestinal epithelial cells. It does not interfere with hosts' development of acquired immunity to the majority of coccidial species. Monensin is a sodium and proton selective ionophore and is widely used as such in biochemical studies.
Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.
A cyclododecadepsipeptide ionophore antibiotic produced by Streptomyces fulvissimus and related to the enniatins. It is composed of 3 moles each of L-valine, D-alpha-hydroxyisovaleric acid, D-valine, and L-lactic acid linked alternately to form a 36-membered ring. (From Merck Index, 11th ed) Valinomycin is a potassium selective ionophore and is commonly used as a tool in biochemical studies.
Voltage-dependent cell membrane glycoproteins selectively permeable to calcium ions. They are categorized as L-, T-, N-, P-, Q-, and R-types based on the activation and inactivation kinetics, ion specificity, and sensitivity to drugs and toxins. The L- and T-types are present throughout the cardiovascular and central nervous systems and the N-, P-, Q-, & R-types are located in neuronal tissue.
Calcium compounds used as food supplements or in food to supply the body with calcium. Dietary calcium is needed during growth for bone development and for maintenance of skeletal integrity later in life to prevent osteoporosis.
Chemical agents that increase the permeability of CELL MEMBRANES to POTASSIUM ions.
Carbonic acid calcium salt (CaCO3). An odorless, tasteless powder or crystal that occurs in nature. It is used therapeutically as a phosphate buffer in hemodialysis patients and as a calcium supplement.
A proton ionophore. It is commonly used as an uncoupling agent and inhibitor of photosynthesis because of its effects on mitochondrial and chloroplast membranes.
A proton ionophore that is commonly used as an uncoupling agent in biochemical studies.
Chemical agents that increase the permeability of CELL MEMBRANES to SODIUM ions.
Calcium salts of phosphoric acid. These compounds are frequently used as calcium supplements.
Stable calcium atoms that have the same atomic number as the element calcium, but differ in atomic weight. Ca-42-44, 46, and 48 are stable calcium isotopes.
A salt used to replenish calcium levels, as an acid-producing diuretic, and as an antidote for magnesium poisoning.
A group of peptide antibiotics from BACILLUS brevis. Gramicidin C or S is a cyclic, ten-amino acid polypeptide and gramicidins A, B, D are linear. Gramicidin is one of the two principal components of TYROTHRICIN.
The normality of a solution with respect to HYDROGEN ions; H+. It is related to acidity measurements in most cases by pH = log 1/2[1/(H+)], where (H+) is the hydrogen ion concentration in gram equivalents per liter of solution. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.
An element in the alkali group of metals with an atomic symbol K, atomic number 19, and atomic weight 39.10. It is the chief cation in the intracellular fluid of muscle and other cells. Potassium ion is a strong electrolyte that plays a significant role in the regulation of fluid volume and maintenance of the WATER-ELECTROLYTE BALANCE.
The voltage differences across a membrane. For cellular membranes they are computed by subtracting the voltage measured outside the membrane from the voltage measured inside the membrane. They result from differences of inside versus outside concentration of potassium, sodium, chloride, and other ions across cells' or ORGANELLES membranes. For excitable cells, the resting membrane potentials range between -30 and -100 millivolts. Physical, chemical, or electrical stimuli can make a membrane potential more negative (hyperpolarization), or less negative (depolarization).
Long-lasting voltage-gated CALCIUM CHANNELS found in both excitable and nonexcitable tissue. They are responsible for normal myocardial and vascular smooth muscle contractility. Five subunits (alpha-1, alpha-2, beta, gamma, and delta) make up the L-type channel. The alpha-1 subunit is the binding site for calcium-based antagonists. Dihydropyridine-based calcium antagonists are used as markers for these binding sites.
The movement of materials across cell membranes and epithelial layers against an electrochemical gradient, requiring the expenditure of metabolic energy.
Compounds with a 5-membered ring of four carbons and an oxygen. They are aromatic heterocycles. The reduced form is tetrahydrofuran.
The calcium salt of oxalic acid, occurring in the urine as crystals and in certain calculi.
Butylamines are a class of organic compounds where a butyl group is attached to an amine functional group, with the general structure (C4H9)NHR or (C4H9)NR'R", commonly used as stimulants, entactogens, and psychedelics.
The calcium salt of gluconic acid. The compound has a variety of uses, including its use as a calcium replenisher in hypocalcemic states.
A member of the alkali group of metals. It has the atomic symbol Na, atomic number 11, and atomic weight 23.
The movement of materials (including biochemical substances and drugs) through a biological system at the cellular level. The transport can be across cell membranes and epithelial layers. It also can occur within intracellular compartments and extracellular compartments.
Unstable isotopes of calcium that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. Ca atoms with atomic weights 39, 41, 45, 47, 49, and 50 are radioactive calcium isotopes.
An adenine nucleotide containing three phosphate groups esterified to the sugar moiety. In addition to its crucial roles in metabolism adenosine triphosphate is a neurotransmitter.
Lanthanum. The prototypical element in the rare earth family of metals. It has the atomic symbol La, atomic number 57, and atomic weight 138.91. Lanthanide ion is used in experimental biology as a calcium antagonist; lanthanum oxide improves the optical properties of glass.
A metallic element that has the atomic symbol Mg, atomic number 12, and atomic weight 24.31. It is important for the activity of many enzymes, especially those involved in OXIDATIVE PHOSPHORYLATION.
Electrodes which can be used to measure the concentration of particular ions in cells, tissues, or solutions.
Metallochrome indicator that changes color when complexed to the calcium ion under physiological conditions. It is used to measure local calcium ion concentrations in vivo.
Chemical agents that increase the permeability of CELL MEMBRANES to PROTONS.
Solution titration in which the end point is read from the electrode-potential variations with the concentrations of potential determining ions. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
A sesquiterpene lactone found in roots of THAPSIA. It inhibits CA(2+)-TRANSPORTING ATPASE mediated uptake of CALCIUM into SARCOPLASMIC RETICULUM.
Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.
A calcium channel blocker that is a class IV anti-arrhythmia agent.
'Methylamines' are organic compounds consisting of a methyl group (CH3) linked to an amino group (-NH2), with the general formula of CH3-NH-R, where R can be a hydrogen atom or any organic group, and they exist as colorless gases or liquids at room temperature.
Inorganic compounds that contain calcium as an integral part of the molecule.
Chemicals that bind to and remove ions from solutions. Many chelating agents function through the formation of COORDINATION COMPLEXES with METALS.
CALCIUM CHANNELS that are concentrated in neural tissue. Omega toxins inhibit the actions of these channels by altering their voltage dependence.
A suborder of the order ARTIODACTYLA whose members have the distinguishing feature of a four-chambered stomach, including the capacious RUMEN. Horns or antlers are usually present, at least in males.
A toxic dye, chemically related to trinitrophenol (picric acid), used in biochemical studies of oxidative processes where it uncouples oxidative phosphorylation. It is also used as a metabolic stimulant. (Stedman, 26th ed)
Drugs used by veterinarians in the treatment of animal diseases. The veterinarian's pharmacological armamentarium is the counterpart of drugs treating human diseases, with dosage and administration adjusted to the size, weight, disease, and idiosyncrasies of the species. In the United States most drugs are subject to federal regulations with special reference to the safety of drugs and residues in edible animal products.
A carbodiimide that is used as a chemical intermediate and coupling agent in peptide synthesis. (From Hawley's Condensed Chemical Dictionary, 12th ed)
Intracellular fluid from the cytoplasm after removal of ORGANELLES and other insoluble cytoplasmic components.
Stable elementary particles having the smallest known positive charge, found in the nuclei of all elements. The proton mass is less than that of a neutron. A proton is the nucleus of the light hydrogen atom, i.e., the hydrogen ion.
2-Hydroxy-N-phenylbenzamides. N-phenyl substituted salicylamides. Derivatives have been used as fungicides, anti-mildew agents and topical antifungal agents. In concentrated form may cause irritation of skin and mucous membranes.
Agents that increase calcium influx into calcium channels of excitable tissues. This causes vasoconstriction in VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE and/or CARDIAC MUSCLE cells as well as stimulation of insulin release from pancreatic islets. Therefore, tissue-selective calcium agonists have the potential to combat cardiac failure and endocrinological disorders. They have been used primarily in experimental studies in cell and tissue culture.
Agents useful in the treatment or prevention of COCCIDIOSIS in man or animals.
Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
Positively charged atoms, radicals or groups of atoms with a valence of plus 2, which travel to the cathode or negative pole during electrolysis.
Agents that emit light after excitation by light. The wave length of the emitted light is usually longer than that of the incident light. Fluorochromes are substances that cause fluorescence in other substances, i.e., dyes used to mark or label other compounds with fluorescent tags.
A class of compounds composed of repeating 5-carbon units of HEMITERPENES.
An acidifying agent that has expectorant and diuretic effects. Also used in etching and batteries and as a flux in electroplating.
Quinolines substituted in any position by one or more amino groups.
Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.
A quality of cell membranes which permits the passage of solvents and solutes into and out of cells.
The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.
Chemical agents that uncouple oxidation from phosphorylation in the metabolic cycle so that ATP synthesis does not occur. Included here are those IONOPHORES that disrupt electron transfer by short-circuiting the proton gradient across mitochondrial membranes.
The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.
A highly poisonous compound that is an inhibitor of many metabolic processes, but has been shown to be an especially potent inhibitor of heme enzymes and hemeproteins. It is used in many industrial processes.
A chelating agent that sequesters a variety of polyvalent cations such as CALCIUM. It is used in pharmaceutical manufacturing and as a food additive.
Positively charged atoms, radicals or groups of atoms which travel to the cathode or negative pole during electrolysis.
A white powder prepared from lime that has many medical and industrial uses. It is in many dental formulations, especially for root canal filling.
Artificial, single or multilaminar vesicles (made from lecithins or other lipids) that are used for the delivery of a variety of biological molecules or molecular complexes to cells, for example, drug delivery and gene transfer. They are also used to study membranes and membrane proteins.
A non-metal element that has the atomic symbol P, atomic number 15, and atomic weight 31. It is an essential element that takes part in a broad variety of biochemical reactions.
The first stomach of ruminants. It lies on the left side of the body, occupying the whole of the left side of the abdomen and even stretching across the median plane of the body to the right side. It is capacious, divided into an upper and a lower sac, each of which has a blind sac at its posterior extremity. The rumen is lined by mucous membrane containing no digestive glands, but mucus-secreting glands are present in large numbers. Coarse, partially chewed food is stored and churned in the rumen until the animal finds circumstances convenient for rumination. When this occurs, little balls of food are regurgitated through the esophagus into the mouth, and are subjected to a second more thorough mastication, swallowed, and passed on into other parts of the compound stomach. (From Black's Veterinary Dictionary, 17th ed)
'Pyrans' are heterocyclic organic compounds containing a six-membered ring with one oxygen atom and five carbon atoms, which can be found in various natural substances and synthesized compounds, and may have potential applications in medicinal chemistry.
Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.
A potent vasodilator agent with calcium antagonistic action. It is a useful anti-anginal agent that also lowers blood pressure.
A potentially neurotoxic 8-hydroxyquinoline derivative long used as a topical anti-infective, intestinal antiamebic, and vaginal trichomonacide. The oral preparation has been shown to cause subacute myelo-optic neuropathy and has been banned worldwide.
A calcium salt that is used for a variety of purposes including: building materials, as a desiccant, in dentistry as an impression material, cast, or die, and in medicine for immobilizing casts and as a tablet excipient. It exists in various forms and states of hydration. Plaster of Paris is a mixture of powdered and heat-treated gypsum.
The concentration of osmotically active particles in solution expressed in terms of osmoles of solute per liter of solution. Osmolality is expressed in terms of osmoles of solute per kilogram of solvent.
Organic compounds that contain two nitro groups attached to a phenol.
A polypeptide hormone (84 amino acid residues) secreted by the PARATHYROID GLANDS which performs the essential role of maintaining intracellular CALCIUM levels in the body. Parathyroid hormone increases intracellular calcium by promoting the release of CALCIUM from BONE, increases the intestinal absorption of calcium, increases the renal tubular reabsorption of calcium, and increases the renal excretion of phosphates.
An atom or group of atoms that have a positive or negative electric charge due to a gain (negative charge) or loss (positive charge) of one or more electrons. Atoms with a positive charge are known as CATIONS; those with a negative charge are ANIONS.
Artificially produced membranes, such as semipermeable membranes used in artificial kidney dialysis (RENAL DIALYSIS), monomolecular and bimolecular membranes used as models to simulate biological CELL MEMBRANES. These membranes are also used in the process of GUIDED TISSUE REGENERATION.
An adenine nucleotide containing one phosphate group which is esterified to both the 3'- and 5'-positions of the sugar moiety. It is a second messenger and a key intracellular regulator, functioning as a mediator of activity for a number of hormones, including epinephrine, glucagon, and ACTH.
Organic compounds containing the carboxy group (-COOH). This group of compounds includes amino acids and fatty acids. Carboxylic acids can be saturated, unsaturated, or aromatic.
Thin structures that encapsulate subcellular structures or ORGANELLES in EUKARYOTIC CELLS. They include a variety of membranes associated with the CELL NUCLEUS; the MITOCHONDRIA; the GOLGI APPARATUS; the ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM; LYSOSOMES; PLASTIDS; and VACUOLES.
A fluorescent calcium chelating agent which is used to study intracellular calcium in tissues.

Changes in content and localization of proteins phosphorylated at tyrosine, serine and threonine residues during ram sperm capacitation and acrosome reaction. (1/68)

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The use of anti-VDAC2 antibody for the combined assessment of human sperm acrosome integrity and ionophore A23187-induced acrosome reaction. (2/68)

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Ultrastructure and intracellular calcium response during activation in vitrified and slow-frozen human oocytes. (3/68)

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Effects of FK506 and cyclosporin a on calcium ionophore-induced mitochondrial depolarization and cytosolic calcium in astrocytes and neurons. (4/68)

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Calpain-cleaved type 1 inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (InsP(3)R1) has InsP(3)-independent gating and disrupts intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis. (5/68)

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Activation of human vascular cells decreases their expression of transforming growth factor-beta. (6/68)

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Chromatin disruption in the promoter of bovine leukemia virus during transcriptional activation. (7/68)

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The redox state of transglutaminase 2 controls arterial remodeling. (8/68)

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Ionophores are compounds that have the ability to form complexes with ions and facilitate their transportation across biological membranes. They can be either organic or inorganic molecules, and they play important roles in various physiological processes, including ion homeostasis, signal transduction, and antibiotic activity. In medicine and research, ionophores are used as tools to study ion transport, modulate cellular functions, and as therapeutic agents, especially in the treatment of bacterial and fungal infections.

Lasalocid is defined as an ionophore antibiotic, which is used as a growth promoter in animals and also as an anticoccidial agent. It works by increasing the permeability of the cell membrane to sodium ions, resulting in an imbalance of electrolytes within the cells and ultimately leading to the death of the organism. Lasalocid is available in a variety of forms, including feed additives, boluses, and premixes, and is used primarily in poultry and ruminants. It is important to note that lasalocid is not approved for use in animals intended for human consumption in all countries, and its use should always be in accordance with local regulations and guidelines.

Calcimycin is a ionophore compound that is produced by the bacterium Streptomyces chartreusensis. It is also known as Calcineurin A inhibitor because it can bind to and inhibit the activity of calcineurin, a protein phosphatase. In medical research, calcimycin is often used to study calcium signaling in cells.
It has been also used in laboratory studies for its antiproliferative and pro-apoptotic effects on certain types of cancer cells. However, it is not approved for use as a drug in humans.

Ionomycin is not a medical term per se, but it is a chemical compound used in medical and biological research. Ionomycin is a type of ionophore, which is a molecule that can transport ions across cell membranes. Specifically, ionomycin is known to transport calcium ions (Ca²+).

In medical research, ionomycin is often used to study the role of calcium in various cellular processes, such as signal transduction, gene expression, and muscle contraction. It can be used to selectively increase intracellular calcium concentrations in experiments, allowing researchers to observe the effects on cell function. Ionomycin is also used in the study of calcium-dependent enzymes and channels.

It's important to note that ionomycin is not used as a therapeutic agent in clinical medicine due to its potential toxicity and narrow range of applications.

In medical or clinical terms, "ethers" do not have a specific relevance as a single medical condition or diagnosis. However, in a broader chemical context, ethers are a class of organic compounds characterized by an oxygen atom connected to two alkyl or aryl groups. Ethers are not typically used as therapeutic agents but can be found in certain medications as solvents or as part of the drug's chemical structure.

An example of a medication with an ether group is the antihistamine diphenhydramine (Benadryl), which has a phenyl ether moiety in its chemical structure. Another example is the anesthetic sevoflurane, which is a fluorinated methyl isopropyl ether used for inducing and maintaining general anesthesia during surgeries.

It's important to note that 'ethers' as a term primarily belongs to the field of chemistry rather than medicine.

Calcium ionophores are chemical compounds that increase the permeability of cell membranes to calcium ions. They function by forming a complex with calcium and facilitating its transport across the lipid bilayer of the cell membrane, thereby raising the intracellular concentration of calcium ions (Ca²+).

These ionophores are often used in research and medical settings to study calcium signaling pathways and calcium-mediated cellular processes. They have been utilized in various experimental models to investigate cell proliferation, differentiation, secretion, and muscle contraction. In clinical contexts, calcium ionophores like A23187 are sometimes employed in the diagnosis of certain disorders affecting immune cells, such as detecting T-lymphocyte function in patients with suspected immunodeficiency.

However, it is essential to note that calcium ionophores can induce cytotoxicity at higher concentrations and may trigger uncontrolled calcium signaling, which could lead to cell damage or death. Therefore, their usage should be carefully controlled and monitored in both research and clinical applications.

Calcium is an essential mineral that is vital for various physiological processes in the human body. The medical definition of calcium is as follows:

Calcium (Ca2+) is a crucial cation and the most abundant mineral in the human body, with approximately 99% of it found in bones and teeth. It plays a vital role in maintaining structural integrity, nerve impulse transmission, muscle contraction, hormonal secretion, blood coagulation, and enzyme activation.

Calcium homeostasis is tightly regulated through the interplay of several hormones, including parathyroid hormone (PTH), calcitonin, and vitamin D. Dietary calcium intake, absorption, and excretion are also critical factors in maintaining optimal calcium levels in the body.

Hypocalcemia refers to low serum calcium levels, while hypercalcemia indicates high serum calcium levels. Both conditions can have detrimental effects on various organ systems and require medical intervention to correct.

I apologize, but I am not able to provide a medical definition for "Egtazic Acid" because it is not a term that is recognized in the field of medicine or pharmacology. It is possible that you may have meant "Egтарic Acid," which also does not have a specific medical meaning, or "Ethylene Glycol Tetraacetic Acid (EGTA)," which is a chemical compound used in research and medicine for its ability to bind calcium ions. If you have any other questions, I would be happy to try to help answer them.

Tetradecanoylphorbol acetate (TPA) is defined as a pharmacological agent that is a derivative of the phorbol ester family. It is a potent tumor promoter and activator of protein kinase C (PKC), a group of enzymes that play a role in various cellular processes such as signal transduction, proliferation, and differentiation. TPA has been widely used in research to study PKC-mediated signaling pathways and its role in cancer development and progression. It is also used in topical treatments for skin conditions such as psoriasis.

Calcium signaling is the process by which cells regulate various functions through changes in intracellular calcium ion concentrations. Calcium ions (Ca^2+^) are crucial second messengers that play a critical role in many cellular processes, including muscle contraction, neurotransmitter release, gene expression, and programmed cell death (apoptosis).

Intracellular calcium levels are tightly regulated by a complex network of channels, pumps, and exchangers located on the plasma membrane and intracellular organelles such as the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria. These proteins control the influx, efflux, and storage of calcium ions within the cell.

Calcium signaling is initiated when an external signal, such as a hormone or neurotransmitter, binds to a specific receptor on the plasma membrane. This interaction triggers the opening of ion channels, allowing extracellular Ca^2+^ to flow into the cytoplasm. In some cases, this influx of calcium ions is sufficient to activate downstream targets directly. However, in most instances, the increase in intracellular Ca^2+^ serves as a trigger for the release of additional calcium from internal stores, such as the ER.

The release of calcium from the ER is mediated by ryanodine receptors (RyRs) and inositol trisphosphate receptors (IP3Rs), which are activated by specific second messengers generated in response to the initial external signal. The activation of these channels leads to a rapid increase in cytoplasmic Ca^2+^, creating a transient intracellular calcium signal known as a "calcium spark" or "calcium puff."

These localized increases in calcium concentration can then propagate throughout the cell as waves of elevated calcium, allowing for the spatial and temporal coordination of various cellular responses. The duration and amplitude of these calcium signals are finely tuned by the interplay between calcium-binding proteins, pumps, and exchangers, ensuring that appropriate responses are elicited in a controlled manner.

Dysregulation of intracellular calcium signaling has been implicated in numerous pathological conditions, including neurodegenerative diseases, cardiovascular disorders, and cancer. Therefore, understanding the molecular mechanisms governing calcium homeostasis and signaling is crucial for the development of novel therapeutic strategies targeting these diseases.

Nigericin is not typically considered to have a "medical definition" as it is not a medication or therapeutic agent used in human medicine. However, it is a chemical compound that has been studied in laboratory research for its potential effects on various biological processes.

Nigericin is a polyether antibiotic produced by the bacterium Streptomyces hygroscopicus. It functions as an ionophore, which is a type of molecule that can transport ions across cell membranes. Specifically, nigericin can transport potassium (K+) and hydrogen (H+) ions across membranes, which can affect the balance of these ions inside and outside of cells.

In laboratory research, nigericin has been used to study various cellular processes, including the regulation of intracellular pH, mitochondrial function, and inflammation. However, it is not used as a therapeutic agent in clinical medicine due to its potential toxicity and narrow therapeutic window.

Monensin is a type of antibiotic known as a polyether ionophore, which is used primarily in the veterinary field for the prevention and treatment of coccidiosis, a parasitic disease caused by protozoa in animals. It works by selectively increasing the permeability of cell membranes to sodium ions, leading to disruption of the ion balance within the cells of the parasite and ultimately causing its death.

In addition to its use as an animal antibiotic, monensin has also been studied for its potential effects on human health, including its ability to lower cholesterol levels and improve insulin sensitivity in type 2 diabetes. However, it is not currently approved for use in humans due to concerns about toxicity and potential side effects.

"Cells, cultured" is a medical term that refers to cells that have been removed from an organism and grown in controlled laboratory conditions outside of the body. This process is called cell culture and it allows scientists to study cells in a more controlled and accessible environment than they would have inside the body. Cultured cells can be derived from a variety of sources, including tissues, organs, or fluids from humans, animals, or cell lines that have been previously established in the laboratory.

Cell culture involves several steps, including isolation of the cells from the tissue, purification and characterization of the cells, and maintenance of the cells in appropriate growth conditions. The cells are typically grown in specialized media that contain nutrients, growth factors, and other components necessary for their survival and proliferation. Cultured cells can be used for a variety of purposes, including basic research, drug development and testing, and production of biological products such as vaccines and gene therapies.

It is important to note that cultured cells may behave differently than they do in the body, and results obtained from cell culture studies may not always translate directly to human physiology or disease. Therefore, it is essential to validate findings from cell culture experiments using additional models and ultimately in clinical trials involving human subjects.

Valinomycin is not a medical condition or treatment, but rather it is a naturally occurring antibiotic compound that is produced by certain strains of bacteria. Valinomycin is a cyclic depsipeptide, which means it is made up of a ring of amino acids and alcohols.

Valinomycin is known for its ability to selectively bind to potassium ions (K+) with high affinity and transport them across biological membranes. This property makes valinomycin useful in laboratory research as a tool for studying ion transport and membrane permeability. However, it has no direct medical application in humans or animals.

Calcium channels are specialized proteins that span the membrane of cells and allow calcium ions (Ca²+) to flow in and out of the cell. They are crucial for many physiological processes, including muscle contraction, neurotransmitter release, hormone secretion, and gene expression.

There are several types of calcium channels, classified based on their biophysical and pharmacological properties. The most well-known are:

1. Voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs): These channels are activated by changes in the membrane potential. They are further divided into several subtypes, including L-type, P/Q-type, N-type, R-type, and T-type. VGCCs play a critical role in excitation-contraction coupling in muscle cells and neurotransmitter release in neurons.
2. Receptor-operated calcium channels (ROCCs): These channels are activated by the binding of an extracellular ligand, such as a hormone or neurotransmitter, to a specific receptor on the cell surface. ROCCs are involved in various physiological processes, including smooth muscle contraction and platelet activation.
3. Store-operated calcium channels (SOCCs): These channels are activated by the depletion of intracellular calcium stores, such as those found in the endoplasmic reticulum. SOCCs play a critical role in maintaining calcium homeostasis and signaling within cells.

Dysregulation of calcium channel function has been implicated in various diseases, including hypertension, arrhythmias, migraine, epilepsy, and neurodegenerative disorders. Therefore, calcium channels are an important target for drug development and therapy.

Dietary calcium is a type of calcium that is obtained through food sources. Calcium is an essential mineral that is necessary for many bodily functions, including bone formation and maintenance, muscle contraction, nerve impulse transmission, and blood clotting.

The recommended daily intake of dietary calcium varies depending on age, sex, and other factors. For example, the recommended daily intake for adults aged 19-50 is 1000 mg, while women over 50 and men over 70 require 1200 mg per day.

Good dietary sources of calcium include dairy products such as milk, cheese, and yogurt; leafy green vegetables like broccoli and kale; fortified cereals and juices; and certain types of fish, such as salmon and sardines. It is important to note that some foods can inhibit the absorption of calcium, including oxalates found in spinach and rhubarb, and phytates found in whole grains and legumes.

If a person is unable to get enough calcium through their diet, they may need to take calcium supplements. However, it is important to talk to a healthcare provider before starting any new supplement regimen, as excessive intake of calcium can lead to negative health effects.

Potassium ionophores are chemical compounds that can transport potassium ions (K+) across biological membranes. They act as shuttles for potassium ions, allowing them to move from one side of the membrane to the other. This process is known as facilitated diffusion and helps maintain the balance of electrolytes inside and outside cells. Potassium ionophores are used in research to study the role of potassium ions in various cellular processes and have potential therapeutic applications in treating conditions such as cardiac arrhythmias and cancer. However, their use in clinical settings is still under investigation.

Calcium carbonate is a chemical compound with the formula CaCO3. It is a common substance found in rocks and in the shells of many marine animals. As a mineral, it is known as calcite or aragonite.

In the medical field, calcium carbonate is often used as a dietary supplement to prevent or treat calcium deficiency. It is also commonly used as an antacid to neutralize stomach acid and relieve symptoms of heartburn, acid reflux, and indigestion.

Calcium carbonate works by reacting with hydrochloric acid in the stomach to form water, carbon dioxide, and calcium chloride. This reaction helps to raise the pH level in the stomach and neutralize excess acid.

It is important to note that excessive use of calcium carbonate can lead to hypercalcemia, a condition characterized by high levels of calcium in the blood, which can cause symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, constipation, confusion, and muscle weakness. Therefore, it is recommended to consult with a healthcare provider before starting any new supplement regimen.

Carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazone (CCCP) is a chemical compound that is often used in research and scientific studies. It is an ionophore, which is a type of molecule that can transport ions across biological membranes. CCCP specifically transports protons (H+ ions) across membranes.

In biochemistry and cell biology, CCCP is commonly used as an uncoupler of oxidative phosphorylation. This is a process by which cells generate energy in the form of ATP (adenosine triphosphate) using the energy from the electron transport chain. By disrupting the proton gradient across the inner mitochondrial membrane, CCCP prevents the synthesis of ATP and causes a rapid depletion of cellular energy stores.

The medical relevance of CCCP is primarily limited to its use as a research tool in laboratory studies. It is not used as a therapeutic agent in clinical medicine.

Carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone (CCP) is a chemical compound that functions as an ionophore, which is a type of molecule that can transport ions across biological membranes. CCP is specifically known to transport protons (H+) and has been used in research as a tool to study the role of proton transport in various cellular processes.

CCP is also a potent mitochondrial uncoupler, which means that it disrupts the normal functioning of the mitochondria, the energy-producing structures in cells. By doing so, CCP can cause a rapid and irreversible decline in ATP (adenosine triphosphate) production, leading to cell death.

Due to its potent toxicity, CCP is not used as a therapeutic agent but rather as a research tool to study mitochondrial function and cellular metabolism. It is important to handle this compound with care and follow appropriate safety protocols when working with it in the laboratory.

Sodium ionophores are substances that facilitate the transport of sodium ions (Na+) across biological membranes. Ionophores are molecules that can complex with ions and act as shuttles, carrying the ions through the lipid bilayer of cell membranes. Sodium ionophores specifically interact with sodium ions and help maintain electrochemical gradients, which are crucial for various physiological processes, including nerve impulse transmission, muscle contraction, and cell volume regulation. Some examples of sodium ionophores include gramicidin, monensin, and nigericin.

Calcium phosphates are a group of minerals that are important components of bones and teeth. They are also found in some foods and are used in dietary supplements and medical applications. Chemically, calcium phosphates are salts of calcium and phosphoric acid, and they exist in various forms, including hydroxyapatite, which is the primary mineral component of bone tissue. Other forms of calcium phosphates include monocalcium phosphate, dicalcium phosphate, and tricalcium phosphate, which are used as food additives and dietary supplements. Calcium phosphates are important for maintaining strong bones and teeth, and they also play a role in various physiological processes, such as nerve impulse transmission and muscle contraction.

Calcium isotopes refer to variants of the chemical element calcium (ca) that have different numbers of neutrons in their atomic nuclei, and therefore differ in their atomic masses while having the same number of protons. The most common and stable calcium isotope is Calcium-40, which contains 20 protons and 20 neutrons. However, calcium has several other isotopes, including Calcium-42, Calcium-43, Calcium-44, and Calcium-46 to -52, each with different numbers of neutrons. Some of these isotopes are radioactive and decay over time. The relative abundances of calcium isotopes can vary in different environments and can provide information about geological and biological processes.

Calcium chloride is an inorganic compound with the chemical formula CaCl2. It is a white, odorless, and tasteless solid that is highly soluble in water. Calcium chloride is commonly used as a de-icing agent, a desiccant (drying agent), and a food additive to enhance texture and flavor.

In medical terms, calcium chloride can be used as a medication to treat hypocalcemia (low levels of calcium in the blood) or hyperkalemia (high levels of potassium in the blood). It is administered intravenously and works by increasing the concentration of calcium ions in the blood, which helps to regulate various physiological processes such as muscle contraction, nerve impulse transmission, and blood clotting.

However, it is important to note that calcium chloride can have adverse effects if not used properly or in excessive amounts. It can cause tissue irritation, cardiac arrhythmias, and other serious complications. Therefore, its use should be monitored carefully by healthcare professionals.

Gramicidin is not a medical condition but rather an antibiotic substance that is used in medical treatments.

Here's the scientific and pharmacological definition:

Gramicidin is a narrow-spectrum, cationic antimicrobial peptide derived from gram-positive bacteria of the genus Bacillus. It is an ionophore that selectively binds to monovalent cations, forming channels in lipid bilayers and causing disruption of bacterial cell membranes, leading to bacterial lysis and death. Gramicidin D, a mixture of at least four different gramicidins (A, B, C, and D), is commonly used in topical formulations for the treatment of skin and eye infections due to its potent antimicrobial activity against many gram-positive and some gram-negative bacteria. However, it has limited systemic use due to its potential toxicity to mammalian cells.

Hydrogen-ion concentration, also known as pH, is a measure of the acidity or basicity of a solution. It is defined as the negative logarithm (to the base 10) of the hydrogen ion activity in a solution. The standard unit of measurement is the pH unit. A pH of 7 is neutral, less than 7 is acidic, and greater than 7 is basic.

In medical terms, hydrogen-ion concentration is important for maintaining homeostasis within the body. For example, in the stomach, a high hydrogen-ion concentration (low pH) is necessary for the digestion of food. However, in other parts of the body such as blood, a high hydrogen-ion concentration can be harmful and lead to acidosis. Conversely, a low hydrogen-ion concentration (high pH) in the blood can lead to alkalosis. Both acidosis and alkalosis can have serious consequences on various organ systems if not corrected.

In the context of medicine and pharmacology, "kinetics" refers to the study of how a drug moves throughout the body, including its absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (often abbreviated as ADME). This field is called "pharmacokinetics."

1. Absorption: This is the process of a drug moving from its site of administration into the bloodstream. Factors such as the route of administration (e.g., oral, intravenous, etc.), formulation, and individual physiological differences can affect absorption.

2. Distribution: Once a drug is in the bloodstream, it gets distributed throughout the body to various tissues and organs. This process is influenced by factors like blood flow, protein binding, and lipid solubility of the drug.

3. Metabolism: Drugs are often chemically modified in the body, typically in the liver, through processes known as metabolism. These changes can lead to the formation of active or inactive metabolites, which may then be further distributed, excreted, or undergo additional metabolic transformations.

4. Excretion: This is the process by which drugs and their metabolites are eliminated from the body, primarily through the kidneys (urine) and the liver (bile).

Understanding the kinetics of a drug is crucial for determining its optimal dosing regimen, potential interactions with other medications or foods, and any necessary adjustments for special populations like pediatric or geriatric patients, or those with impaired renal or hepatic function.

Potassium is a essential mineral and an important electrolyte that is widely distributed in the human body. The majority of potassium in the body (approximately 98%) is found within cells, with the remaining 2% present in blood serum and other bodily fluids. Potassium plays a crucial role in various physiological processes, including:

1. Regulation of fluid balance and maintenance of normal blood pressure through its effects on vascular tone and sodium excretion.
2. Facilitation of nerve impulse transmission and muscle contraction by participating in the generation and propagation of action potentials.
3. Protein synthesis, enzyme activation, and glycogen metabolism.
4. Regulation of acid-base balance through its role in buffering systems.

The normal serum potassium concentration ranges from 3.5 to 5.0 mEq/L (milliequivalents per liter) or mmol/L (millimoles per liter). Potassium levels outside this range can have significant clinical consequences, with both hypokalemia (low potassium levels) and hyperkalemia (high potassium levels) potentially leading to serious complications such as cardiac arrhythmias, muscle weakness, and respiratory failure.

Potassium is primarily obtained through the diet, with rich sources including fruits (e.g., bananas, oranges, and apricots), vegetables (e.g., leafy greens, potatoes, and tomatoes), legumes, nuts, dairy products, and meat. In cases of deficiency or increased needs, potassium supplements may be recommended under the guidance of a healthcare professional.

Membrane potential is the electrical potential difference across a cell membrane, typically for excitable cells such as nerve and muscle cells. It is the difference in electric charge between the inside and outside of a cell, created by the selective permeability of the cell membrane to different ions. The resting membrane potential of a typical animal cell is around -70 mV, with the interior being negative relative to the exterior. This potential is generated and maintained by the active transport of ions across the membrane, primarily through the action of the sodium-potassium pump. Membrane potentials play a crucial role in many physiological processes, including the transmission of nerve impulses and the contraction of muscle cells.

Calcium channels, L-type, are a type of voltage-gated calcium channel that are widely expressed in many excitable cells, including cardiac and skeletal muscle cells, as well as certain neurons. These channels play a crucial role in the regulation of various cellular functions, such as excitation-contraction coupling, hormone secretion, and gene expression.

L-type calcium channels are composed of five subunits: alpha-1, alpha-2, beta, gamma, and delta. The alpha-1 subunit is the pore-forming subunit that contains the voltage sensor and the selectivity filter for calcium ions. It has four repeated domains (I-IV), each containing six transmembrane segments (S1-S6). The S4 segment in each domain functions as a voltage sensor, moving outward upon membrane depolarization to open the channel and allow calcium ions to flow into the cell.

L-type calcium channels are activated by membrane depolarization and have a relatively slow activation and inactivation time course. They are also modulated by various intracellular signaling molecules, such as protein kinases and G proteins. L-type calcium channel blockers, such as nifedipine and verapamil, are commonly used in the treatment of hypertension, angina, and certain cardiac arrhythmias.

Biological transport, active is the process by which cells use energy to move materials across their membranes from an area of lower concentration to an area of higher concentration. This type of transport is facilitated by specialized proteins called transporters or pumps that are located in the cell membrane. These proteins undergo conformational changes to physically carry the molecules through the lipid bilayer of the membrane, often against their concentration gradient.

Active transport requires energy because it works against the natural tendency of molecules to move from an area of higher concentration to an area of lower concentration, a process known as diffusion. Cells obtain this energy in the form of ATP (adenosine triphosphate), which is produced through cellular respiration.

Examples of active transport include the uptake of glucose and amino acids into cells, as well as the secretion of hormones and neurotransmitters. The sodium-potassium pump, which helps maintain resting membrane potential in nerve and muscle cells, is a classic example of an active transporter.

Furans are not a medical term, but a class of organic compounds that contain a four-membered ring with four atoms, usually carbon and oxygen. They can be found in some foods and have been used in the production of certain industrial chemicals. Some furan derivatives have been identified as potentially toxic or carcinogenic, but the effects of exposure to these substances depend on various factors such as the level and duration of exposure.

In a medical context, furans may be mentioned in relation to environmental exposures, food safety, or occupational health. For example, some studies have suggested that high levels of exposure to certain furan compounds may increase the risk of liver damage or cancer. However, more research is needed to fully understand the potential health effects of these substances.

It's worth noting that furans are not a specific medical condition or diagnosis, but rather a class of chemical compounds with potential health implications. If you have concerns about exposure to furans or other environmental chemicals, it's best to consult with a healthcare professional for personalized advice and recommendations.

Calcium oxalate is a chemical compound with the formula CaC2O4. It is the most common type of stone found in kidneys, also known as kidney stones. Calcium oxalate forms when there is too much calcium or oxalate in the urine. This can occur due to various reasons such as dietary habits, dehydration, medical conditions like hyperparathyroidism, or genetic factors.

Calcium oxalate stones are hard and crystalline and can cause severe pain during urination or while passing through the urinary tract. They may also lead to other symptoms like blood in the urine, nausea, vomiting, or fever. Prevention strategies for calcium oxalate stones include staying hydrated, following a balanced diet, and taking prescribed medications to control the levels of calcium and oxalate in the body.

Butylamines are a class of organic compounds that contain a butyl group (a chain of four carbon atoms) attached to an amine functional group, which consists of nitrogen atom bonded to one or more hydrogen atoms. The general structure of a primary butylamine is R-NH2, where R represents the butyl group.

Butylamines can be found in various natural and synthetic substances. Some of them have important uses in industry as solvents, intermediates in chemical synthesis, or building blocks for pharmaceuticals. However, some butylamines are also known to have psychoactive effects and may be used as recreational drugs or abused.

It is worth noting that the term "butylamine" can refer to any of several specific compounds, depending on the context. For example, n-butylamine (also called butan-1-amine) has the formula CH3CH2CH2CH2NH2, while tert-butylamine (also called 2-methylpropan-2-amine) has the formula (CH3)3CNH2. These two compounds have different physical and chemical properties due to their structural differences.

In a medical context, butylamines may be encountered as drugs of abuse or as components of pharmaceuticals. Some examples of butylamine-derived drugs include certain antidepressants, anesthetics, and muscle relaxants. However, it is important to note that these compounds are often highly modified from their parent butylamine structure, and may not resemble them closely in terms of their pharmacological properties or toxicity profiles.

Calcium gluconate is a medical compound that is used primarily as a medication to treat conditions related to low calcium levels in the body (hypocalcemia) or to prevent calcium deficiency. It is also used as an antidote for treating poisoning from certain chemicals, such as beta-blockers and fluoride.

Calcium gluconate is a form of calcium salt, which is combined with gluconic acid, a natural organic acid found in various fruits and honey. This compound has a high concentration of calcium, making it an effective supplement for increasing calcium levels in the body.

In medical settings, calcium gluconate can be administered orally as a tablet or liquid solution, or it can be given intravenously (directly into a vein) by a healthcare professional. The intravenous route is typically used in emergency situations to quickly raise calcium levels and treat symptoms of hypocalcemia, such as muscle cramps, spasms, or seizures.

It's important to note that while calcium gluconate can be beneficial for treating low calcium levels, it should only be used under the guidance of a healthcare provider, as improper use or overdose can lead to serious side effects, including kidney damage and heart problems.

Sodium is an essential mineral and electrolyte that is necessary for human health. In a medical context, sodium is often discussed in terms of its concentration in the blood, as measured by serum sodium levels. The normal range for serum sodium is typically between 135 and 145 milliequivalents per liter (mEq/L).

Sodium plays a number of important roles in the body, including:

* Regulating fluid balance: Sodium helps to regulate the amount of water in and around your cells, which is important for maintaining normal blood pressure and preventing dehydration.
* Facilitating nerve impulse transmission: Sodium is involved in the generation and transmission of electrical signals in the nervous system, which is necessary for proper muscle function and coordination.
* Assisting with muscle contraction: Sodium helps to regulate muscle contractions by interacting with other minerals such as calcium and potassium.

Low sodium levels (hyponatremia) can cause symptoms such as confusion, seizures, and coma, while high sodium levels (hypernatremia) can lead to symptoms such as weakness, muscle cramps, and seizures. Both conditions require medical treatment to correct.

Biological transport refers to the movement of molecules, ions, or solutes across biological membranes or through cells in living organisms. This process is essential for maintaining homeostasis, regulating cellular functions, and enabling communication between cells. There are two main types of biological transport: passive transport and active transport.

Passive transport does not require the input of energy and includes:

1. Diffusion: The random movement of molecules from an area of high concentration to an area of low concentration until equilibrium is reached.
2. Osmosis: The diffusion of solvent molecules (usually water) across a semi-permeable membrane from an area of lower solute concentration to an area of higher solute concentration.
3. Facilitated diffusion: The assisted passage of polar or charged substances through protein channels or carriers in the cell membrane, which increases the rate of diffusion without consuming energy.

Active transport requires the input of energy (in the form of ATP) and includes:

1. Primary active transport: The direct use of ATP to move molecules against their concentration gradient, often driven by specific transport proteins called pumps.
2. Secondary active transport: The coupling of the movement of one substance down its electrochemical gradient with the uphill transport of another substance, mediated by a shared transport protein. This process is also known as co-transport or counter-transport.

Calcium radioisotopes are radioactive isotopes of the element calcium. An isotope is a variant of an element that has the same number of protons in its atoms but a different number of neutrons, resulting in different mass numbers. Calcium has several radioisotopes, including calcium-41, calcium-45, calcium-47, and calcium-49.

These radioisotopes are used in various medical applications, such as in diagnostic imaging and research. For example, calcium-45 is commonly used in bone scans to help diagnose conditions like fractures, tumors, or infections. When administered to the patient, the calcium-45 is taken up by the bones, and a special camera can detect the gamma rays emitted by the radioisotope, providing images of the skeleton.

Similarly, calcium-47 is used in research to study calcium metabolism and bone physiology. The short half-life and low energy of the radiation emitted by these radioisotopes make them relatively safe for medical use, with minimal risk of harm to patients. However, as with any medical procedure involving radiation, appropriate precautions must be taken to ensure safety and minimize exposure.

Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP) is a high-energy molecule that stores and transports energy within cells. It is the main source of energy for most cellular processes, including muscle contraction, nerve impulse transmission, and protein synthesis. ATP is composed of a base (adenine), a sugar (ribose), and three phosphate groups. The bonds between these phosphate groups contain a significant amount of energy, which can be released when the bond between the second and third phosphate group is broken, resulting in the formation of adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and inorganic phosphate. This process is known as hydrolysis and can be catalyzed by various enzymes to drive a wide range of cellular functions. ATP can also be regenerated from ADP through various metabolic pathways, such as oxidative phosphorylation or substrate-level phosphorylation, allowing for the continuous supply of energy to cells.

Lanthanum is not a medical term itself, but it is a chemical element with the symbol "La" and atomic number 57. It is a soft, ductile, silvery-white metal that belongs to the lanthanide series in the periodic table.

However, in medical contexts, lanthanum may be mentioned as a component of certain medications or medical devices. For example, lanthanum carbonate (trade name Fosrenol) is a medication used to treat hyperphosphatemia (elevated levels of phosphate in the blood) in patients with chronic kidney disease. Lanthanum carbonate works by binding to phosphate in the gastrointestinal tract, preventing its absorption into the bloodstream.

It is important to note that lanthanum compounds are not biologically active and do not have any specific medical effects on their own. Any medical uses of lanthanum are related to its physical or chemical properties, rather than its biological activity.

Magnesium is an essential mineral that plays a crucial role in various biological processes in the human body. It is the fourth most abundant cation in the body and is involved in over 300 enzymatic reactions, including protein synthesis, muscle and nerve function, blood glucose control, and blood pressure regulation. Magnesium also contributes to the structural development of bones and teeth.

In medical terms, magnesium deficiency can lead to several health issues, such as muscle cramps, weakness, heart arrhythmias, and seizures. On the other hand, excessive magnesium levels can cause symptoms like diarrhea, nausea, and muscle weakness. Magnesium supplements or magnesium-rich foods are often recommended to maintain optimal magnesium levels in the body.

Some common dietary sources of magnesium include leafy green vegetables, nuts, seeds, legumes, whole grains, and dairy products. Magnesium is also available in various forms as a dietary supplement, including magnesium oxide, magnesium citrate, magnesium chloride, and magnesium glycinate.

Ion-Selective Electrodes (ISEs) are a type of chemical sensor that measure the activity of specific ions in a solution. They work by converting the chemical response into an electrical signal, which can then be measured and analyzed. The electrode is coated with a membrane that is selectively permeable to a particular ion, allowing for the detection and measurement of that specific ion in the presence of other ions.

ISEs are widely used in various fields such as clinical chemistry, biomedical research, environmental monitoring, and industrial process control. In medical diagnostics, ISEs are commonly used to measure the levels of ions such as sodium, potassium, chloride, and calcium in biological samples like blood, urine, and cerebrospinal fluid.

The response of an ISE is based on Nernst's equation, which relates the electrical potential across the membrane to the activity of the ion being measured. The selectivity of the electrode for a particular ion is determined by the type of membrane used, and the choice of membrane depends on the application and the specific ions to be measured.

Overall, Ion-Selective Electrodes are important tools in medical diagnostics and research, providing accurate and reliable measurements of ion activity in biological systems.

Arsenazo III is a chemical compound that is used as a complexometric reagent in analytical chemistry, particularly for the determination of metal ions such as calcium and magnesium. It forms stable, brightly colored chelates with these metals, allowing for their quantitative analysis through spectrophotometry or other techniques. Arsenazo III is also used in some medical tests, such as the arsenazo III calcium test, to measure serum calcium levels.

Proton ionophores are substances that increase the permeability of cell membranes to hydrogen ions (protons). They facilitate the transport of protons across biological membranes, which can affect various physiological processes such as pH regulation, ATP synthesis, and signal transduction. Some examples of proton ionophores include gramicidin D, nigericin, and carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP). These substances are often used in research to manipulate membrane potentials and study cellular processes. However, they can also have harmful effects on cells and tissues, especially at high concentrations or under prolonged exposure.

Potentiometry is a method used in analytical chemistry to measure the potential (or voltage) difference between two electrodes, which reflects the concentration of an ion or a particular molecule in a solution. It involves setting up an electrochemical cell with two electrodes: a working electrode and a reference electrode. The working electrode is immersed in the test solution and its potential is measured against the stable potential of the reference electrode.

The Nernst equation can be used to relate the potential difference to the concentration of the analyte, allowing for quantitative analysis. Potentiometry is often used to measure the activity or concentration of ions such as H+, Na+, K+, and Cl-, as well as other redox-active species.

In medical testing, potentiometry can be used to measure the concentration of certain ions in biological fluids such as blood, urine, or sweat. For example, it can be used to measure the pH of a solution (the concentration of H+ ions) or the concentration of glucose in blood using a glucometer.

Thapsigargin is not a medical term per se, but it is a chemical compound that has been studied in the field of medicine and biology. Thapsigargin is a substance that is derived from the plant Thapsia garganica, also known as the "deadly carrot." It is a powerful inhibitor of the sarcoendoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA) pump, which is responsible for maintaining calcium homeostasis within cells.

Thapsigargin has been studied for its potential use in cancer therapy due to its ability to induce cell death in certain types of cancer cells. However, its use as a therapeutic agent is still being investigated and is not yet approved for medical use. It should be noted that thapsigargin can also have toxic effects on normal cells, so its therapeutic use must be carefully studied and optimized to minimize harm to healthy tissues.

"Cattle" is a term used in the agricultural and veterinary fields to refer to domesticated animals of the genus *Bos*, primarily *Bos taurus* (European cattle) and *Bos indicus* (Zebu). These animals are often raised for meat, milk, leather, and labor. They are also known as bovines or cows (for females), bulls (intact males), and steers/bullocks (castrated males). However, in a strict medical definition, "cattle" does not apply to humans or other animals.

Verapamil is a calcium channel blocker medication that is primarily used to treat hypertension (high blood pressure), angina (chest pain), and certain types of cardiac arrhythmias (irregular heart rhyats). It works by relaxing the smooth muscle cells in the walls of blood vessels, which causes them to dilate or widen, reducing the resistance to blood flow and thereby lowering blood pressure. Verapamil also slows down the conduction of electrical signals within the heart, which can help to regulate the heart rate and rhythm.

In addition to its cardiovascular effects, verapamil is sometimes used off-label for the treatment of other conditions such as migraine headaches, Raynaud's phenomenon, and certain types of tremors. It is available in various forms, including immediate-release tablets, extended-release capsules, and intravenous (IV) injection.

It is important to note that verapamil can interact with other medications, so it is essential to inform your healthcare provider about all the drugs you are taking before starting this medication. Additionally, verapamil should be used with caution in people with certain medical conditions, such as heart failure, liver disease, and low blood pressure.

Methylamines are organic compounds that contain a methyl group (CH3) and an amino group (-NH2). They have the general formula of CH3-NH-R, where R can be a hydrogen atom or any organic group. Methylamines are derivatives of ammonia (NH3), in which one or more hydrogen atoms have been replaced by methyl groups.

There are several types of methylamines, including:

1. Methylamine (CH3-NH2): This is the simplest methylamine and is a colorless gas at room temperature with a strong odor. It is highly flammable and reactive.
2. Dimethylamine (CH3)2-NH: This is a colorless liquid at room temperature with an unpleasant fishy odor. It is less reactive than methylamine but still highly flammable.
3. Trimethylamine (CH3)3-N: This is a colorless liquid at room temperature that has a strong, unpleasant odor often described as "fishy." It is less reactive than dimethylamine and is used in various industrial applications.

Methylamines are used in the production of various chemicals, including pesticides, dyes, and pharmaceuticals. They can also be found naturally in some foods and are produced by certain types of bacteria in the body. Exposure to high levels of methylamines can cause irritation to the eyes, skin, and respiratory tract, and prolonged exposure can lead to more serious health effects.

Calcium compounds are chemical substances that contain calcium ions (Ca2+) bonded to various anions. Calcium is an essential mineral for human health, and calcium compounds have numerous biological and industrial applications. Here are some examples of calcium compounds with their medical definitions:

1. Calcium carbonate (CaCO3): A common mineral found in rocks and sediments, calcium carbonate is also a major component of shells, pearls, and bones. It is used as a dietary supplement to prevent or treat calcium deficiency and as an antacid to neutralize stomach acid.
2. Calcium citrate (C6H8CaO7): A calcium salt of citric acid, calcium citrate is often used as a dietary supplement to prevent or treat calcium deficiency. It is more soluble in water and gastric juice than calcium carbonate, making it easier to absorb, especially for people with low stomach acid.
3. Calcium gluconate (C12H22CaO14): A calcium salt of gluconic acid, calcium gluconate is used as a medication to treat or prevent hypocalcemia (low blood calcium levels) and hyperkalemia (high blood potassium levels). It can be given intravenously, orally, or topically.
4. Calcium chloride (CaCl2): A white, deliquescent salt, calcium chloride is used as a de-icing agent, a food additive, and a desiccant. In medical settings, it can be used to treat hypocalcemia or hyperkalemia, or as an antidote for magnesium overdose.
5. Calcium lactate (C6H10CaO6): A calcium salt of lactic acid, calcium lactate is used as a dietary supplement to prevent or treat calcium deficiency. It is less commonly used than calcium carbonate or calcium citrate but may be better tolerated by some people.
6. Calcium phosphate (Ca3(PO4)2): A mineral found in rocks and bones, calcium phosphate is used as a dietary supplement to prevent or treat calcium deficiency. It can also be used as a food additive or a pharmaceutical excipient.
7. Calcium sulfate (CaSO4): A white, insoluble powder, calcium sulfate is used as a desiccant, a plaster, and a fertilizer. In medical settings, it can be used to treat hypocalcemia or as an antidote for magnesium overdose.
8. Calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2): A white, alkaline powder, calcium hydroxide is used as a disinfectant, a flocculant, and a building material. In medical settings, it can be used to treat hyperkalemia or as an antidote for aluminum overdose.
9. Calcium acetate (Ca(C2H3O2)2): A white, crystalline powder, calcium acetate is used as a food additive and a medication. It can be used to treat hyperphosphatemia (high blood phosphate levels) in patients with kidney disease.
10. Calcium carbonate (CaCO3): A white, chalky powder, calcium carbonate is used as a dietary supplement, a food additive, and a pharmaceutical excipient. It can also be used as a building material and a mineral supplement.

Chelating agents are substances that can bind and form stable complexes with certain metal ions, preventing them from participating in chemical reactions. In medicine, chelating agents are used to remove toxic or excessive amounts of metal ions from the body. For example, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) is a commonly used chelating agent that can bind with heavy metals such as lead and mercury, helping to eliminate them from the body and reduce their toxic effects. Other chelating agents include dimercaprol (BAL), penicillamine, and deferoxamine. These agents are used to treat metal poisoning, including lead poisoning, iron overload, and copper toxicity.

Calcium channels, N-type ( Cav2.2) are voltage-gated calcium channels found in excitable cells such as neurons and cardiac myocytes. They play a crucial role in regulating various cellular functions, including neurotransmitter release, gene expression, and cell excitability.

N-type calcium channels are composed of five subunits: an alpha1 (Cav2.2) subunit that forms the ion-conducting pore, and four auxiliary subunits (alpha2delta, beta, and gamma) that modulate channel function and stability. The alpha1 subunit contains the voltage sensor and the selectivity filter for calcium ions.

N-type calcium channels are activated by depolarization of the cell membrane and mediate a rapid influx of calcium ions into the cytoplasm. This calcium influx triggers neurotransmitter release from presynaptic terminals, regulates gene expression in the nucleus, and contributes to the electrical excitability of neurons.

N-type calcium channels are also targets for various drugs and toxins that modulate their activity. For example, the peptide toxin from cone snail venom, known as ω-conotoxin MVIIA (Ziconotide), specifically binds to N-type calcium channels and inhibits their activity, making it a potent analgesic for treating chronic pain.

Ruminants are a category of hooved mammals that are known for their unique digestive system, which involves a process called rumination. This group includes animals such as cattle, deer, sheep, goats, and giraffes, among others. The digestive system of ruminants consists of a specialized stomach with multiple compartments (the rumen, reticulum, omasum, and abomasum).

Ruminants primarily consume plant-based diets, which are high in cellulose, a complex carbohydrate that is difficult for many animals to digest. In the rumen, microbes break down the cellulose into simpler compounds, producing volatile fatty acids (VFAs) that serve as a major energy source for ruminants. The animal then regurgitates the partially digested plant material (known as cud), chews it further to mix it with saliva and additional microbes, and swallows it again for further digestion in the rumen. This process of rumination allows ruminants to efficiently extract nutrients from their fibrous diets.

2,4-Dinitrophenol (DNP) is a chemical compound with the formula C6H4N2O5. It is an organic compound that contains two nitro groups (-NO2) attached to a phenol molecule. DNP is a yellow, crystalline solid that is slightly soluble in water and more soluble in organic solvents.

In the medical field, DNP has been used in the past as a weight loss agent due to its ability to disrupt mitochondrial function and increase metabolic rate. However, its use as a weight loss drug was banned in the United States in the 1930s due to serious side effects, including cataracts, skin lesions, and hyperthermia, which can lead to death.

Exposure to DNP can occur through ingestion, inhalation, or skin contact. Acute exposure to high levels of DNP can cause symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, sweating, dizziness, headache, and rapid heartbeat. Chronic exposure to lower levels of DNP can lead to cataracts, skin lesions, and damage to the nervous system, liver, and kidneys.

It is important to note that DNP is not approved for use as a weight loss agent or any other medical purpose in the United States. Its use as a dietary supplement or weight loss aid is illegal and can be dangerous.

Veterinary drugs, also known as veterinary medicines, are substances or combinations of substances used to treat, prevent, or diagnose diseases in animals, including food-producing species and pets. These drugs can be administered to animals through various routes such as oral, topical, injectable, or inhalation. They contain active ingredients that interact with the animal's biological system to produce a therapeutic effect. Veterinary drugs are subject to regulatory control and must be prescribed or recommended by a licensed veterinarian in many countries to ensure their safe and effective use.

Dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCC) is a chemical compound with the formula (C6H11)2NCO. It is a white to off-white solid that is used as a dehydrating agent in organic synthesis, particularly in the formation of peptide bonds. DCC works by activating carboxylic acids to form an active ester intermediate, which can then react with amines to form amides.

It's important to note that Dicyclohexylcarbodiimide is a hazardous chemical and should be handled with appropriate safety precautions, including the use of personal protective equipment (PPE) such as gloves, lab coats, and eye protection. It can cause skin and eye irritation, and prolonged exposure can lead to respiratory problems. Additionally, it can react violently with water and strong oxidizing agents.

It's also important to note that Dicyclohexylcarbodiimide is not a medical term or a substance used in medical treatment, but rather a chemical reagent used in laboratory settings for research purposes.

Cytosol refers to the liquid portion of the cytoplasm found within a eukaryotic cell, excluding the organelles and structures suspended in it. It is the site of various metabolic activities and contains a variety of ions, small molecules, and enzymes. The cytosol is where many biochemical reactions take place, including glycolysis, protein synthesis, and the regulation of cellular pH. It is also where some organelles, such as ribosomes and vesicles, are located. In contrast to the cytosol, the term "cytoplasm" refers to the entire contents of a cell, including both the cytosol and the organelles suspended within it.

In the context of medicine, particularly in relation to cancer treatment, protons refer to positively charged subatomic particles found in the nucleus of an atom. Proton therapy, a type of radiation therapy, uses a beam of protons to target and destroy cancer cells with high precision, minimizing damage to surrounding healthy tissue. The concentrated dose of radiation is delivered directly to the tumor site, reducing side effects and improving quality of life during treatment.

Salicylanilides are a group of synthetic compounds that contain a salicylic acid moiety (a phenolic ring with a hydroxyl and a carboxyl group) linked to an aniline part through a carbon chain. They are known for their antimicrobial, antifungal, and anti-inflammatory properties. Some common representatives of this class include salicylanilide, 2-naphthoxyacetic acid methyl ester, and 3-amino-5-chlorosalicylanilide. These compounds have been used in various medical and veterinary applications, such as topical antimicrobial agents, ovicides (agents that kill the eggs of parasites), and anthelmintics (agents that expel or destroy parasitic worms). However, due to concerns about potential toxicity and environmental persistence, their use has been limited in recent years.

Calcium channel agonists are substances that increase the activity or function of calcium channels. Calcium channels are specialized proteins in cell membranes that regulate the flow of calcium ions into and out of cells. They play a crucial role in various physiological processes, including muscle contraction, hormone secretion, and nerve impulse transmission.

Calcium channel agonists can enhance the opening of these channels, leading to an increased influx of calcium ions into the cells. This can result in various pharmacological effects, depending on the type of cell and tissue involved. For example, calcium channel agonists may be used to treat conditions such as hypotension (low blood pressure) or heart block by increasing cardiac contractility and heart rate. However, these agents should be used with caution due to their potential to cause adverse effects, including increased heart rate, hypertension, and arrhythmias.

Examples of calcium channel agonists include drugs such as Bay K 8644, FPL 64176, and A23187. It's important to note that some substances can act as both calcium channel agonists and antagonists, depending on the dose, concentration, or duration of exposure.

Coccidiostats are a type of medication used to prevent and treat coccidiosis, which is an infection caused by protozoan parasites of the genus Coccidia. These medications work by inhibiting the growth and reproduction of the parasites in the gastrointestinal tract of animals, particularly poultry and livestock.

Coccidiostats are commonly added to animal feed to prevent infection and reduce the spread of coccidiosis within a flock or herd. They can also be used to treat active infections, often in combination with other medications. Common examples of coccidiostats include sulfaquinoxaline, monensin, and lasalocid.

It's important to note that the use of coccidiostats in food-producing animals is regulated by government agencies such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the European Medicines Agency (EMA) to ensure their safe use and to minimize the risk of residues in animal products.

Anti-bacterial agents, also known as antibiotics, are a type of medication used to treat infections caused by bacteria. These agents work by either killing the bacteria or inhibiting their growth and reproduction. There are several different classes of anti-bacterial agents, including penicillins, cephalosporins, fluoroquinolones, macrolides, and tetracyclines, among others. Each class of antibiotic has a specific mechanism of action and is used to treat certain types of bacterial infections. It's important to note that anti-bacterial agents are not effective against viral infections, such as the common cold or flu. Misuse and overuse of antibiotics can lead to antibiotic resistance, which is a significant global health concern.

In the field of medicine, "time factors" refer to the duration of symptoms or time elapsed since the onset of a medical condition, which can have significant implications for diagnosis and treatment. Understanding time factors is crucial in determining the progression of a disease, evaluating the effectiveness of treatments, and making critical decisions regarding patient care.

For example, in stroke management, "time is brain," meaning that rapid intervention within a specific time frame (usually within 4.5 hours) is essential to administering tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a clot-busting drug that can minimize brain damage and improve patient outcomes. Similarly, in trauma care, the "golden hour" concept emphasizes the importance of providing definitive care within the first 60 minutes after injury to increase survival rates and reduce morbidity.

Time factors also play a role in monitoring the progression of chronic conditions like diabetes or heart disease, where regular follow-ups and assessments help determine appropriate treatment adjustments and prevent complications. In infectious diseases, time factors are crucial for initiating antibiotic therapy and identifying potential outbreaks to control their spread.

Overall, "time factors" encompass the significance of recognizing and acting promptly in various medical scenarios to optimize patient outcomes and provide effective care.

Divalent cations are ions that carry a positive charge of +2. They are called divalent because they have two positive charges. Common examples of divalent cations include calcium (Ca²+), magnesium (Mg²+), and iron (Fe²+). These ions play important roles in various biological processes, such as muscle contraction, nerve impulse transmission, and bone metabolism. They can also interact with certain drugs and affect their absorption, distribution, and elimination in the body.

Fluorescent dyes are substances that emit light upon excitation by absorbing light of a shorter wavelength. In a medical context, these dyes are often used in various diagnostic tests and procedures to highlight or mark certain structures or substances within the body. For example, fluorescent dyes may be used in imaging techniques such as fluorescence microscopy or fluorescence angiography to help visualize cells, tissues, or blood vessels. These dyes can also be used in flow cytometry to identify and sort specific types of cells. The choice of fluorescent dye depends on the specific application and the desired properties, such as excitation and emission spectra, quantum yield, and photostability.

Terpenes are a large and diverse class of organic compounds produced by a variety of plants, including cannabis. They are responsible for the distinctive aromas and flavors found in different strains of cannabis. Terpenes have been found to have various therapeutic benefits, such as anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and antimicrobial properties. Some terpenes may also enhance the psychoactive effects of THC, the main psychoactive compound in cannabis. It's important to note that more research is needed to fully understand the potential medical benefits and risks associated with terpenes.

Ammonium chloride is an inorganic compound with the formula NH4Cl. It is a white crystalline salt that is highly soluble in water and can be produced by combining ammonia (NH3) with hydrochloric acid (HCl). Ammonium chloride is commonly used as a source of hydrogen ions in chemical reactions, and it has a variety of industrial and medical applications.

In the medical field, ammonium chloride is sometimes used as a expectorant to help thin and loosen mucus in the respiratory tract, making it easier to cough up and clear from the lungs. It may also be used to treat conditions such as metabolic alkalosis, a condition characterized by an excess of base in the body that can lead to symptoms such as confusion, muscle twitching, and irregular heartbeat.

However, it is important to note that ammonium chloride can have side effects, including stomach upset, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. It should be used under the guidance of a healthcare professional and should not be taken in large amounts or for extended periods of time without medical supervision.

Aminoquinolines are a class of drugs that contain a quinoline chemical structure and an amino group. They are primarily used as antimalarial agents, with the most well-known members of this class being chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine. These drugs work by inhibiting the parasite's ability to digest hemoglobin in the red blood cells, which is necessary for its survival and reproduction.

In addition to their antimalarial properties, aminoquinolines have also been studied for their potential anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects. They have been investigated as a treatment for various autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and lupus, although their use in these conditions is not yet widely accepted.

It's important to note that aminoquinolines can have significant side effects, including gastrointestinal symptoms, retinopathy, and cardiac toxicity. They should only be used under the close supervision of a healthcare provider, and their use may be contraindicated in certain populations, such as pregnant women or individuals with preexisting heart conditions.

A cell line is a culture of cells that are grown in a laboratory for use in research. These cells are usually taken from a single cell or group of cells, and they are able to divide and grow continuously in the lab. Cell lines can come from many different sources, including animals, plants, and humans. They are often used in scientific research to study cellular processes, disease mechanisms, and to test new drugs or treatments. Some common types of human cell lines include HeLa cells (which come from a cancer patient named Henrietta Lacks), HEK293 cells (which come from embryonic kidney cells), and HUVEC cells (which come from umbilical vein endothelial cells). It is important to note that cell lines are not the same as primary cells, which are cells that are taken directly from a living organism and have not been grown in the lab.

Cell membrane permeability refers to the ability of various substances, such as molecules and ions, to pass through the cell membrane. The cell membrane, also known as the plasma membrane, is a thin, flexible barrier that surrounds all cells, controlling what enters and leaves the cell. Its primary function is to protect the cell's internal environment and maintain homeostasis.

The permeability of the cell membrane depends on its structure, which consists of a phospholipid bilayer interspersed with proteins. The hydrophilic (water-loving) heads of the phospholipids face outward, while the hydrophobic (water-fearing) tails face inward, creating a barrier that is generally impermeable to large, polar, or charged molecules.

However, specific proteins within the membrane, called channels and transporters, allow certain substances to cross the membrane. Channels are protein structures that span the membrane and provide a pore for ions or small uncharged molecules to pass through. Transporters, on the other hand, are proteins that bind to specific molecules and facilitate their movement across the membrane, often using energy in the form of ATP.

The permeability of the cell membrane can be influenced by various factors, such as temperature, pH, and the presence of certain chemicals or drugs. Changes in permeability can have significant consequences for the cell's function and survival, as they can disrupt ion balances, nutrient uptake, waste removal, and signal transduction.

A dose-response relationship in the context of drugs refers to the changes in the effects or symptoms that occur as the dose of a drug is increased or decreased. Generally, as the dose of a drug is increased, the severity or intensity of its effects also increases. Conversely, as the dose is decreased, the effects of the drug become less severe or may disappear altogether.

The dose-response relationship is an important concept in pharmacology and toxicology because it helps to establish the safe and effective dosage range for a drug. By understanding how changes in the dose of a drug affect its therapeutic and adverse effects, healthcare providers can optimize treatment plans for their patients while minimizing the risk of harm.

The dose-response relationship is typically depicted as a curve that shows the relationship between the dose of a drug and its effect. The shape of the curve may vary depending on the drug and the specific effect being measured. Some drugs may have a steep dose-response curve, meaning that small changes in the dose can result in large differences in the effect. Other drugs may have a more gradual dose-response curve, where larger changes in the dose are needed to produce significant effects.

In addition to helping establish safe and effective dosages, the dose-response relationship is also used to evaluate the potential therapeutic benefits and risks of new drugs during clinical trials. By systematically testing different doses of a drug in controlled studies, researchers can identify the optimal dosage range for the drug and assess its safety and efficacy.

Uncoupling agents are chemicals that interfere with the normal process of oxidative phosphorylation in cells. In this process, the energy from food is converted into ATP (adenosine triphosphate), which is the main source of energy for cellular functions. Uncouplers disrupt this process by preventing the transfer of high-energy electrons to oxygen, which normally drives the production of ATP.

Instead, the energy from these electrons is released as heat, leading to an increase in body temperature. This effect is similar to what happens during shivering or exercise, when the body generates heat to maintain its core temperature. Uncoupling agents are therefore also known as "mitochondrial protonophores" because they allow protons to leak across the inner mitochondrial membrane, bypassing the ATP synthase enzyme that would normally use the energy from this proton gradient to produce ATP.

Uncoupling agents have been studied for their potential therapeutic uses, such as in weight loss and the treatment of metabolic disorders. However, they can also be toxic at high doses, and their long-term effects on health are not well understood.

I believe there may be some confusion in your question. "Rabbits" is a common name used to refer to the Lagomorpha species, particularly members of the family Leporidae. They are small mammals known for their long ears, strong legs, and quick reproduction.

However, if you're referring to "rabbits" in a medical context, there is a term called "rabbit syndrome," which is a rare movement disorder characterized by repetitive, involuntary movements of the fingers, resembling those of a rabbit chewing. It is also known as "finger-chewing chorea." This condition is usually associated with certain medications, particularly antipsychotics, and typically resolves when the medication is stopped or adjusted.

Potassium Cyanide (C6H5KN) is defined as a white, water-soluble, crystalline salt that is highly toxic. It is used in fumigation, electroplating, and metal cleaning. When combined with acids, it releases the deadly gas hydrogen cyanide. It can cause immediate death by inhibiting cellular respiration. It is also known as Cyanide of Potassium or Potassium Salt of Hydrocyanic Acid.

Edetic acid, also known as ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), is not a medical term per se, but a chemical compound with various applications in medicine. EDTA is a synthetic amino acid that acts as a chelating agent, which means it can bind to metallic ions and form stable complexes.

In medicine, EDTA is primarily used in the treatment of heavy metal poisoning, such as lead or mercury toxicity. It works by binding to the toxic metal ions in the body, forming a stable compound that can be excreted through urine. This helps reduce the levels of harmful metals in the body and alleviate their toxic effects.

EDTA is also used in some diagnostic tests, such as the determination of calcium levels in blood. Additionally, it has been explored as a potential therapy for conditions like atherosclerosis and Alzheimer's disease, although its efficacy in these areas remains controversial and unproven.

It is important to note that EDTA should only be administered under medical supervision due to its potential side effects and the need for careful monitoring of its use.

A cation is a type of ion, which is a charged particle, that has a positive charge. In chemistry and biology, cations are formed when a neutral atom loses one or more electrons during chemical reactions. The removal of electrons results in the atom having more protons than electrons, giving it a net positive charge.

Cations are important in many biological processes, including nerve impulse transmission, muscle contraction, and enzyme function. For example, sodium (Na+), potassium (K+), calcium (Ca2+), and magnesium (Mg2+) are all essential cations that play critical roles in various physiological functions.

In medical contexts, cations can also be relevant in the diagnosis and treatment of various conditions. For instance, abnormal levels of certain cations, such as potassium or calcium, can indicate specific diseases or disorders. Additionally, medications used to treat various conditions may work by altering cation concentrations or activity within the body.

Calcium hydroxide is an inorganic compound with the chemical formula Ca(OH)2. It is also known as slaked lime or hydrated lime. Calcium hydroxide is a white, odorless, tasteless, and alkaline powder that dissolves in water to form a caustic solution.

Medically, calcium hydroxide is used as an antacid to neutralize stomach acid and relieve symptoms of heartburn, indigestion, and upset stomach. It is also used as a topical agent to treat skin conditions such as poison ivy rash, sunburn, and minor burns. When applied to the skin, calcium hydroxide helps to reduce inflammation, neutralize irritants, and promote healing.

In dental applications, calcium hydroxide is used as a filling material for root canals and as a paste to treat tooth sensitivity. It has the ability to stimulate the formation of new dentin, which is the hard tissue that makes up the bulk of the tooth.

It's important to note that calcium hydroxide should be used with caution, as it can cause irritation and burns if it comes into contact with the eyes or mucous membranes. It should also be stored in a cool, dry place away from heat and open flames.

Liposomes are artificially prepared, small, spherical vesicles composed of one or more lipid bilayers that enclose an aqueous compartment. They can encapsulate both hydrophilic and hydrophobic drugs, making them useful for drug delivery applications in the medical field. The lipid bilayer structure of liposomes is similar to that of biological membranes, which allows them to merge with and deliver their contents into cells. This property makes liposomes a valuable tool in delivering drugs directly to targeted sites within the body, improving drug efficacy while minimizing side effects.

Phosphorus is an essential mineral that is required by every cell in the body for normal functioning. It is a key component of several important biomolecules, including adenosine triphosphate (ATP), which is the primary source of energy for cells, and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and ribonucleic acid (RNA), which are the genetic materials in cells.

Phosphorus is also a major constituent of bones and teeth, where it combines with calcium to provide strength and structure. In addition, phosphorus plays a critical role in various metabolic processes, including energy production, nerve impulse transmission, and pH regulation.

The medical definition of phosphorus refers to the chemical element with the atomic number 15 and the symbol P. It is a highly reactive non-metal that exists in several forms, including white phosphorus, red phosphorus, and black phosphorus. In the body, phosphorus is primarily found in the form of organic compounds, such as phospholipids, phosphoproteins, and nucleic acids.

Abnormal levels of phosphorus in the body can lead to various health problems. For example, high levels of phosphorus (hyperphosphatemia) can occur in patients with kidney disease or those who consume large amounts of phosphorus-rich foods, and can contribute to the development of calcification of soft tissues and cardiovascular disease. On the other hand, low levels of phosphorus (hypophosphatemia) can occur in patients with malnutrition, vitamin D deficiency, or alcoholism, and can lead to muscle weakness, bone pain, and an increased risk of infection.

The rumen is the largest compartment of the stomach in ruminant animals, such as cows, goats, and sheep. It is a specialized fermentation chamber where microbes break down tough plant material into nutrients that the animal can absorb and use for energy and growth. The rumen contains billions of microorganisms, including bacteria, protozoa, and fungi, which help to break down cellulose and other complex carbohydrates in the plant material through fermentation.

The rumen is characterized by its large size, muscular walls, and the presence of a thick mat of partially digested food and microbes called the rumen mat or cud. The animal regurgitates the rumen contents periodically to chew it again, which helps to break down the plant material further and mix it with saliva, creating a more favorable environment for fermentation.

The rumen plays an essential role in the digestion and nutrition of ruminant animals, allowing them to thrive on a diet of low-quality plant material that would be difficult for other animals to digest.

"Pyrans" is not a term commonly used in medical definitions. It is a chemical term that refers to a class of heterocyclic compounds containing a six-membered ring with one oxygen atom and five carbon atoms. The name "pyran" comes from the fact that it contains a pyroline unit (two double-bonded carbons) and a ketone group (a carbon double-bonded to an oxygen).

While pyrans are not directly related to medical definitions, some of their derivatives have been studied for potential medicinal applications. For example, certain pyran derivatives have shown anti-inflammatory, antiviral, and anticancer activities in laboratory experiments. However, more research is needed before these compounds can be considered as potential therapeutic agents.

Biological models, also known as physiological models or organismal models, are simplified representations of biological systems, processes, or mechanisms that are used to understand and explain the underlying principles and relationships. These models can be theoretical (conceptual or mathematical) or physical (such as anatomical models, cell cultures, or animal models). They are widely used in biomedical research to study various phenomena, including disease pathophysiology, drug action, and therapeutic interventions.

Examples of biological models include:

1. Mathematical models: These use mathematical equations and formulas to describe complex biological systems or processes, such as population dynamics, metabolic pathways, or gene regulation networks. They can help predict the behavior of these systems under different conditions and test hypotheses about their underlying mechanisms.
2. Cell cultures: These are collections of cells grown in a controlled environment, typically in a laboratory dish or flask. They can be used to study cellular processes, such as signal transduction, gene expression, or metabolism, and to test the effects of drugs or other treatments on these processes.
3. Animal models: These are living organisms, usually vertebrates like mice, rats, or non-human primates, that are used to study various aspects of human biology and disease. They can provide valuable insights into the pathophysiology of diseases, the mechanisms of drug action, and the safety and efficacy of new therapies.
4. Anatomical models: These are physical representations of biological structures or systems, such as plastic models of organs or tissues, that can be used for educational purposes or to plan surgical procedures. They can also serve as a basis for developing more sophisticated models, such as computer simulations or 3D-printed replicas.

Overall, biological models play a crucial role in advancing our understanding of biology and medicine, helping to identify new targets for therapeutic intervention, develop novel drugs and treatments, and improve human health.

Nifedipine is an antihypertensive and calcium channel blocker medication. It works by relaxing the muscles of the blood vessels, which helps to lower blood pressure and improve the supply of oxygen and nutrients to the heart. Nifedipine is used to treat high blood pressure (hypertension), angina (chest pain), and certain types of heart rhythm disorders.

In medical terms, nifedipine can be defined as: "A dihydropyridine calcium channel blocker that is used in the treatment of hypertension, angina pectoris, and Raynaud's phenomenon. It works by inhibiting the influx of calcium ions into vascular smooth muscle and cardiac muscle, which results in relaxation of the vascular smooth muscle and decreased workload on the heart."

Clioquinol is an antimicrobial drug that contains a combination of clioquinal and hydrocortisone acetate. It is used topically to treat various skin infections and inflammatory conditions. Clioquinol has antibacterial and antifungal properties, while hydrocortisone acetate is a corticosteroid that reduces inflammation and suppresses the immune response.

Clioquinol was first synthesized in the 1930s and was widely used as an antidiarrheal medication until it was banned in many countries due to its association with a neurological disorder called subacute myelooptic neuropathy (SMON). However, topical clioquinol is still available in some countries for the treatment of skin conditions.

It's important to note that topical clioquinol should be used with caution and under the supervision of a healthcare professional, as it can cause skin irritation and sensitization in some individuals. Additionally, prolonged or excessive use of corticosteroids like hydrocortisone acetate can lead to thinning of the skin, increased susceptibility to infection, and other adverse effects.

Calcium sulfate is an inorganic compound with the chemical formula CaSO4. It is a white, odorless, and tasteless solid that is insoluble in alcohol but soluble in water. Calcium sulfate is commonly found in nature as the mineral gypsum, which is used in various industrial applications such as plaster, wallboard, and cement.

In the medical field, calcium sulfate may be used as a component of some pharmaceutical products or as a surgical material. For example, it can be used as a bone void filler to promote healing after bone fractures or surgeries. Calcium sulfate is also used in some dental materials and medical devices.

It's important to note that while calcium sulfate has various industrial and medical uses, it should not be taken as a dietary supplement or medication without the guidance of a healthcare professional.

Osmolar concentration is a measure of the total number of solute particles (such as ions or molecules) dissolved in a solution per liter of solvent (usually water), which affects the osmotic pressure. It is expressed in units of osmoles per liter (osmol/L). Osmolarity and osmolality are related concepts, with osmolarity referring to the number of osmoles per unit volume of solution, typically measured in liters, while osmolality refers to the number of osmoles per kilogram of solvent. In clinical contexts, osmolar concentration is often used to describe the solute concentration of bodily fluids such as blood or urine.

Dinitrophenols (DNP) are a class of chemical compounds that contain two nitro groups (-NO2) attached to a phenol group. Dinitrophenols have been used in the past as industrial dyes, wood preservatives, and pesticides. However, they have also been misused as weight loss supplements due to their ability to increase metabolic rate and cause weight loss.

The use of DNP for weight loss is dangerous and has been linked to several fatalities. DNP works by disrupting the normal functioning of the mitochondria in cells, which are responsible for producing energy. This disruption causes an increase in metabolic rate, leading to a rapid breakdown of fat and carbohydrates, and ultimately weight loss. However, this increased metabolism can also produce excessive heat, leading to hyperthermia, dehydration, and damage to organs such as the heart, liver, and kidneys.

Due to their potential for serious harm, DNP-containing products are banned in many countries, including the United States. Medical professionals should be aware of the dangers associated with DNP use and advise patients accordingly.

Parathyroid hormone (PTH) is a polypeptide hormone that plays a crucial role in the regulation of calcium and phosphate levels in the body. It is produced and secreted by the parathyroid glands, which are four small endocrine glands located on the back surface of the thyroid gland.

The primary function of PTH is to maintain normal calcium levels in the blood by increasing calcium absorption from the gut, mobilizing calcium from bones, and decreasing calcium excretion by the kidneys. PTH also increases phosphate excretion by the kidneys, which helps to lower serum phosphate levels.

In addition to its role in calcium and phosphate homeostasis, PTH has been shown to have anabolic effects on bone tissue, stimulating bone formation and preventing bone loss. However, chronic elevations in PTH levels can lead to excessive bone resorption and osteoporosis.

Overall, Parathyroid Hormone is a critical hormone that helps maintain mineral homeostasis and supports healthy bone metabolism.

An ion is an atom or molecule that has gained or lost one or more electrons, resulting in a net electric charge. Cations are positively charged ions, which have lost electrons, while anions are negatively charged ions, which have gained electrons. Ions can play a significant role in various physiological processes within the human body, including enzyme function, nerve impulse transmission, and maintenance of acid-base balance. They also contribute to the formation of salts and buffer systems that help regulate fluid composition and pH levels in different bodily fluids.

Artificial membranes are synthetic or man-made materials that possess properties similar to natural biological membranes, such as selective permeability and barrier functions. These membranes can be designed to control the movement of molecules, ions, or cells across them, making them useful in various medical and biotechnological applications.

Examples of artificial membranes include:

1. Dialysis membranes: Used in hemodialysis for patients with renal failure, these semi-permeable membranes filter waste products and excess fluids from the blood while retaining essential proteins and cells.
2. Hemofiltration membranes: Utilized in extracorporeal circuits to remove larger molecules, such as cytokines or inflammatory mediators, from the blood during critical illnesses or sepsis.
3. Drug delivery systems: Artificial membranes can be used to encapsulate drugs, allowing for controlled release and targeted drug delivery in specific tissues or cells.
4. Tissue engineering: Synthetic membranes serve as scaffolds for cell growth and tissue regeneration, guiding the formation of new functional tissues.
5. Biosensors: Artificial membranes can be integrated into biosensing devices to selectively detect and quantify biomolecules, such as proteins or nucleic acids, in diagnostic applications.
6. Microfluidics: Artificial membranes are used in microfluidic systems for lab-on-a-chip applications, enabling the manipulation and analysis of small volumes of fluids for various medical and biological purposes.

Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is a key secondary messenger in many biological processes, including the regulation of metabolism, gene expression, and cellular excitability. It is synthesized from adenosine triphosphate (ATP) by the enzyme adenylyl cyclase and is degraded by the enzyme phosphodiesterase.

In the body, cAMP plays a crucial role in mediating the effects of hormones and neurotransmitters on target cells. For example, when a hormone binds to its receptor on the surface of a cell, it can activate a G protein, which in turn activates adenylyl cyclase to produce cAMP. The increased levels of cAMP then activate various effector proteins, such as protein kinases, which go on to regulate various cellular processes.

Overall, the regulation of cAMP levels is critical for maintaining proper cellular function and homeostasis, and abnormalities in cAMP signaling have been implicated in a variety of diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and neurological disorders.

Carboxylic acids are organic compounds that contain a carboxyl group, which is a functional group made up of a carbon atom doubly bonded to an oxygen atom and single bonded to a hydroxyl group. The general formula for a carboxylic acid is R-COOH, where R represents the rest of the molecule.

Carboxylic acids can be found in various natural sources such as in fruits, vegetables, and animal products. Some common examples of carboxylic acids include formic acid (HCOOH), acetic acid (CH3COOH), propionic acid (C2H5COOH), and butyric acid (C3H7COOH).

Carboxylic acids have a variety of uses in industry, including as food additives, pharmaceuticals, and industrial chemicals. They are also important intermediates in the synthesis of other organic compounds. In the body, carboxylic acids play important roles in metabolism and energy production.

Intracellular membranes refer to the membrane structures that exist within a eukaryotic cell (excluding bacteria and archaea, which are prokaryotic and do not have intracellular membranes). These membranes compartmentalize the cell, creating distinct organelles or functional regions with specific roles in various cellular processes.

Major types of intracellular membranes include:

1. Nuclear membrane (nuclear envelope): A double-membraned structure that surrounds and protects the genetic material within the nucleus. It consists of an outer and inner membrane, perforated by nuclear pores that regulate the transport of molecules between the nucleus and cytoplasm.
2. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER): An extensive network of interconnected tubules and sacs that serve as a major site for protein folding, modification, and lipid synthesis. The ER has two types: rough ER (with ribosomes on its surface) and smooth ER (without ribosomes).
3. Golgi apparatus/Golgi complex: A series of stacked membrane-bound compartments that process, sort, and modify proteins and lipids before they are transported to their final destinations within the cell or secreted out of the cell.
4. Lysosomes: Membrane-bound organelles containing hydrolytic enzymes for breaking down various biomolecules (proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids) in the process called autophagy or from outside the cell via endocytosis.
5. Peroxisomes: Single-membrane organelles involved in various metabolic processes, such as fatty acid oxidation and detoxification of harmful substances like hydrogen peroxide.
6. Vacuoles: Membrane-bound compartments that store and transport various molecules, including nutrients, waste products, and enzymes. Plant cells have a large central vacuole for maintaining turgor pressure and storing metabolites.
7. Mitochondria: Double-membraned organelles responsible for generating energy (ATP) through oxidative phosphorylation and other metabolic processes, such as the citric acid cycle and fatty acid synthesis.
8. Chloroplasts: Double-membraned organelles found in plant cells that convert light energy into chemical energy during photosynthesis, producing oxygen and organic compounds (glucose) from carbon dioxide and water.
9. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER): A network of interconnected membrane-bound tubules involved in protein folding, modification, and transport; it is divided into two types: rough ER (with ribosomes on the surface) and smooth ER (without ribosomes).
10. Nucleus: Double-membraned organelle containing genetic material (DNA) and associated proteins involved in replication, transcription, RNA processing, and DNA repair. The nuclear membrane separates the nucleoplasm from the cytoplasm and contains nuclear pores for transporting molecules between the two compartments.

Fura-2 is not a medical term per se, but a chemical compound used in scientific research, particularly in the field of physiology and cell biology. Fura-2 is a calcium indicator dye that is commonly used to measure intracellular calcium concentrations in living cells. It works by binding to calcium ions (Ca²+) in the cytoplasm of cells, which causes a change in its fluorescence emission spectrum.

When excited with ultraviolet light at specific wavelengths, Fura-2 exhibits different fluorescence intensities depending on the concentration of calcium ions it has bound to. By measuring these changes in fluorescence intensity, researchers can quantify intracellular calcium levels and study how they change in response to various stimuli or experimental conditions.

While Fura-2 is not a medical term itself, understanding its function and use is essential for researchers working in the fields of physiology, pharmacology, neuroscience, and other biomedical disciplines.

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Fenstein, MB; Fraser, C (1975). "Human platelet secretion and aggregation induced by calcium ionophores. Inhibition by PGE1 and ... IP receptors bind with ionophores that induce ADP and serotonin secretion. PGE1 inhibits the secretion of factors that ... 5-triphosphate signaling and the mobilization of calcium inside the cell for thromboxane A2. PGI2, prostacyclin, binds to IP ...
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... a novel diacidic polyether antibiotic having high affinity for calcium ions". Journal of the American Chemical Society. 101 (12 ... unlike carrier ionophores. Examples of channel-forming ionophores are gramicidin A and nystatin. Ionophores that transport ... Ionophores can be selective to a particular ion but may not be exclusive to it. Ionophores facilitate the transport of ions ... However, these ionophores become unable to transport ions under very low temperatures. An example of a carrier ionophore is ...
Jamil, K.; White, I. G. (December 1981). "Induction of acrosomal reaction in sperm with ionophore A23187 and calcium". Archives ... as well as the more commonly used calcium ionophore A23187. This can be done to serve as a positive control when assessing the ...
... and calcium ionophore-induced arachidonic acid release". J. Biol. Chem. 278 (40): 38206-13. doi:10.1074/jbc.M304816200. PMID ... CERK was later confirmed to bind calmodulin in the presence of calcium, indicating the calmodulin first binds calcium and then ... A calcium-stimulated lipid kinase that co-purifies with brain synaptic vesicles". J. Biol. Chem. 264 (24): 14354-60. doi: ... CERK has also been found to participate in the calcium-dependent degranulation of mast cells. Sugiura M, Kono K, Liu H, ...
Lee AS (January 1987). "Coordinated regulation of a set of genes by glucose and calcium ionophores in mammalian cells". Trends ... This calcium then interacts with calcineurin and calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinases that in turn activate transcription ... Muscular contraction during exercise causes calcium to be released from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), a specialized ER ... calcium that is stored bound to resident molecular chaperones; and redox buffers that maintain the oxidizing environment ...
Asaga H, Yamada M, Senshu T (February 1998). "Selective deimination of vimentin in calcium ionophore-induced apoptosis of mouse ...
Calcium Ionophore, Antibiotic A23187 and Calcium Ionophore A23187. It is produced at fermentation of Streptomyces ... The ionophore is used in laboratories to increase intracellular Ca2+ levels in intact cells. It also uncouples oxidative ... It also acts as a divalent cation ionophore, allowing these ions to cross cell membranes, which are usually impermeable to them ... of Topotecan Enhances Anticancer Efficacy in Murine and Human Xenograft Models Cancer Research Effect of calcium ionophore on ...
Reiss, Hans-Dieter; Herth, Werner (1979). "Calcium ionophore A 23187 affects localized wall secretion in the tip region of ...
ARE-directed mRNA degradation is influenced by many exogenous factors, including phorbol esters, calcium ionophores, cytokines ...
... is an ionophore and an antibiotic that binds calcium ions (Ca2+) in a ratio 1:1. It is produced by the bacterium ... Its β-diketone and carboxylic acid group form a chelate with calcium. It was extracted in 1978 and the complete structure was ... It is used in research to raise the intracellular calcium level (Ca2+) and as a research tool to understand Ca2+ transport ... 1979). "Structure of ionomycin - a novel diacidic polyether antibiotic having high affinity for calcium ions". Journal of the ...
Saunders, M. J.; P. K. Hepler (1982). "Calcium ionophore A23187 stimulates cytokinin-like mitosis in Funaria". Science. 217 ( ... This calcium binding may account for the bulk of the observed extracellular current. The intracellular calcium gradient may ... He has shown that calcium ions and protons are essential for growth. The intracellular free calcium ions exist in a gradient ... The delay between the extracellular and intracellular calcium peaks indicates that calcium ions do not immediately enter the ...
... may be artificially facilitated by calcium ionophores, something that is speculated to be useful in case of ... The slow block is through a biochemical mechanism triggered by a wave of calcium increase. The rise of calcium is both ... "Roscovitine in combination with calcium ionophore induces oocyte activation through reduction of M-phase promoting factor ... Sperm entry causes calcium release into the oocyte. In mammals, this is caused by the introduction of phospholipase C isoform ...
The anergy in T cells can be induced by Ionomycin, the ionophore capable of raising intracellular concentration of calcium ions ... Under this condition, calcium dependent phosphatase calcineurin removes phosphates from a transcriptional factor NFAT, which in ... On the contrary, TCR signalling without costimulatory receptors sufficiently activates only the calcium arm of the signalling ... calcium dependent arm of a lymphocyte signalling is activated by TCR. This leads to an elevation of intracellular Ca+II ...
Interference from calcium, magnesium, or lithium, on the other hand, is weak enough that their presence in normal ... Ionophores for potassium-selective electrodes v t e (Electrodes, All stub articles, Electrochemistry stubs). ... These electrodes are typical ion exchange resin membrane electrodes, using valinomycin, a potassium ionophore, as the ion ... calcium, magnesium, and lithium. The most significant interference with measurement of potassium concentration is from the ...
"Epidermal growth factor induces p11 gene and protein expression and down-regulates calcium ionophore-induced arachidonic acid ... "Epidermal growth factor induces p11 gene and protein expression and down-regulates calcium ionophore-induced arachidonic acid ... S100 calcium-binding protein A10 (S100A10), also known as p11, is a protein that is encoded by the S100A10 gene in humans and ... Wu T, Angus CW, Yao XL, Logun C, Shelhamer JH (Jul 1997). "P11, a unique member of the S100 family of calcium-binding proteins ...
PCP-2 mRNA is regulated by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) or calcium ionophore, okadaic acid, the Ras inhibitor manumycin, and ... down-regulation of gene expression by PMA and calcium ionophore in Jurkat T lymphoma cells". Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 231 (1 ...
UTR of G-CSF mRNA contains a destabilizing element that is insensitive to calcium ionophore, hence SLDE regulates G-CSF mRNA. ...
Sperm activation has been shown to be caused by calcium ionophores in vitro, progesterone released by nearby cumulus cells and ... The opening of CatSper channels is responsible for the influx of calcium. The sudden rise in calcium levels causes the ... A recent discovery links hyperactivation to a sudden influx of calcium ion into the tails. The whip-like tail (flagellum) of ... These channels are selective, allowing only calcium ions to pass. ...
Sperm activation has been shown to be caused by calcium ionophores in vitro, progesterone released by nearby cumulus cells and ... The opening of CatSper channels is responsible for the influx of calcium. The sudden rise in calcium levels causes the ... A recent discovery links hyperactivation to a sudden influx of calcium ion into the tails. The whip-like tail (flagellum) of ... These channels are selective, allowing only calcium ion to pass. ...
... slow and inert in the reproductive tracts or storage areas of the female and are only activated by calcium ionophores in vitro ...
... calcium channel agonists MeSH D27.505.519.562.249 - calcium channel blockers MeSH D27.505.519.562.374 - ionophores MeSH D27.505 ... calcium channel agonists MeSH D27.505.954.411.793.610 - nasal decongestants MeSH D27.505.954.411.918 - vasodilator agents MeSH ... calcium channel blockers MeSH D27.505.954.411.207 - cardioplegic solutions MeSH D27.505.954.411.222 - cardiotonic agents MeSH ...
... of agents such as the chelator EGTA and the ionophore A23187 could have been incorrectly said to be specific for calcium in ... The traditional supply of calcium salts to fungal cultures may have met the need for trace elements as even A.R. calcium salts ... In the experiments with oxygen and hyphal development there was no requirement for calcium and no inhibition by EGTA. At the ... time of these studies many mycologists thought that calcium played a role in fungal morphology and were disinclined to believe ...
... scrambling and do not express negatively charged phospholipids on their surface even after treatment with calcium ionophores. ...
... as well as the more commonly used calcium ionophore A23187. Birefringence microscopy, flow cytometry or fluorescence microscopy ... Once the two meet, a calcium influx occurs, causing a signaling cascade. The cortical granules inside the oocyte then fuse to ...
... down-regulation of gene expression by PMA and calcium ionophore in Jurkat T lymphoma cells". Biochemical and Biophysical ... Flentke GR, Garic A, Amberger E, Hernandez M, Smith SM (July 2011). "Calcium-mediated repression of β-catenin and its ... Soluble inositol-(1,4,5)-trisphosphate triggers calcium to be released from the endoplasmic reticulum. This sudden increase in ... "Modification of the composition of polycystin-1 multiprotein complexes by calcium and tyrosine phosphorylation". Biochimica et ...
The vibrating ion-selective microelectrode was first used in 1990 to measure calcium fluxes in various cells and tissues. The ... Only the specific ion permeates the ionophore, therefore the voltage readout is proportional to the ion concentration in the ... Some ions (such as calcium) and molecules (such as hydrogen peroxide) modulate targeted translocators to produce a current or ... ionophore) is tip-filled into a previously silanized (to prevent leakage) microelectrode. Also, the microelectrode vibrates at ...
... such as calcium ionophore treatment, microinjection of calcium ions, or electrical stimulation. Treatment with cycloheximide, a ... The fertilization event causes intracellular calcium oscillations, and targeted degradation of cyclin B, a regulatory subunit ...
... and a lipid-soluble molecule that transports calcium ions (Ca2+) across the bilayer, also known as calcium ionophore. C1P was ... Inside the cell, S1P can induce calcium release independent of the S1PRs-the mechanism of which remains unknown. To date, the ... Tornquist, K. (February 2003). "Ceramide-1-phosphate increases intracellular free calcium concentrations in thyroid FRTL-5 ... and increase intracellular free calcium concentrations in thyroid cells. C1P also has known roles in vesicular trafficking, ...
"Calcium Ionophores" by people in this website by year, and whether "Calcium Ionophores" was a major or minor topic of these ... Transient exposure to calcium ionophore enables in vitro fertilization in sterile mouse models. Sci Rep. 2016 09 15; 6:33589. ... "Calcium Ionophores" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicines controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH (Medical ... Below are the most recent publications written about "Calcium Ionophores" by people in Profiles. ...
... are induced to release lysosomal enzymes by the calcium ionophore A23187 in the presence but not the absence of extracel ... Contrasting effects of local anesthetics and a calcium ionophore. Changes in ionic movements across rabbit polymorphonuclear ... Human peripheral blood leukocytes (PMN) are induced to release lysosomal enzymes by the calcium ionophore A23187 in the ... S Hoffstein, G Weissmann; Microfilaments and microtubules in calcium ionophore-induced secretion of lysosomal enzymes from ...
Fluo-8 AM, green fluorescent calcium binding dye (ab142773) Reviews (1) Specific References (43) ...
Calcium indicators and ionophores 637520272540000000. Article. ER stress interactive pathway 637469238280000000. Pathway ...
Flow-through type calcium ion selective optodes based on novel neutral ionophores and a lipophilic anionic dye. In: Analytica ... Flow-through type calcium ion selective optodes based on novel neutral ionophores and a lipophilic anionic dye. / Hisamoto, ... Flow-through type calcium ion selective optodes based on novel neutral ionophores and a lipophilic anionic dye were developed. ... Flow-through type calcium ion selective optodes based on novel neutral ionophores and a lipophilic anionic dye. ...
Keywords: Calcium ionophore, Globozoospermia, Intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), Morphologically abnormal sperm. To cite ... Next, calcium ionophore was applied following the ICSI procedure to improve the chances for fertilization. The case report ... Conclusion: ICSI with assisted oocyte activation by calcium ionophore may overcome male infertility where there is total ... A Successful Healthy Childbirth in a Case of Total Globozoospermia with Oocyte Activation by Calcium Ionophore. ...
Calcium ionophores are also ideal to induce capacitation. Adding heparin to capacitation inducing medium mimics the secretion ... Calcium chloride is added to facilitated the influx via of calcium cations. In animal models, Tyrodes albumin lactate pyruvate ...
Calcium Ionophore I). Biochemicals , Ionophores , Calcium Ionophores Substance Name:CA 1001; Eth 1001; Calcium ionophore; (−)-( ... Biochemicals , Ionophores , Calcium Ionophores Substance Name:4-Bromocalcimycin; 4-bromo-Calcium Ionophore A23187; 6-bromo-5-( ... Biochemicals , Ionophores , Calcium Ionophores Substance Name:(1S,1S,2S,2S)-1,1-diacetyl-2,2,3,3-tetrahydro-2,2,5,5,10, ... Biochemicals , Ionophores , Calcium Ionophores Substance Name:(2-butyl-3-benzofuranyl)[4-[2-(diethylamino)ethoxy]-3,5- ...
The calcium ionophore A23187 causes endothelium-dependent contractions in the aorta of wild type but not COX1 knock-out male ... The calcium ionophore A23187 causes endothelium-dependent contractions in the aorta of wild type but not COX1 knock-out male ... Conference Paper: The calcium ionophore A23187 causes endothelium-dependent contractions in the aorta of wild type but not COX1 ...
P8139, Millipore Sigma), calcium ionophore A23187 (500 ng/mL; cat. C9275, Millipore Sigma), brefeldin A (10 μg/mL; cat. 420601 ...
When the sample buffer mixture contacts the electrode, calcium ions complex with the ionophore at the electrode surface. ... LBXSCA - Total calcium (mg/dL). Variable Name: LBXSCA. SAS Label: Total calcium (mg/dL). English Text: Total calcium (mg/dL). ... LBDSCASI - Total calcium (mmol/L). Variable Name: LBDSCASI. SAS Label: Total calcium (mmol/L). English Text: Total calcium ( ... A calcium ion selective electrode measures un-bound free calcium ions in solution. The system determines calcium concentration ...
They hope to mediate the concentrations of both calcium and chloride ions using synthetic ionophores. ... Benzimidazolium-based synthetic chloride and calcium transporters in bacterial membranes. Claude-Rosny Elie, Audrey Hébert, ... and increases bacterial cell wall permeability to calcium ions. ... transport of chloride ions in epithelial cells through calcium ...
Calcium ionophore-stimulated chemiluminescence (CL) from human granulocytes: evidence that A23187-induced chemiluminescence ...
Pharmacological modulation of responses of guinea-pig airways contracted with antigen and calcium ionophore A23187. Burka, J.F ... Release of leukotrienes into the perfusate of calcium-ionophore stimulated rabbit lungs. Influence of 5-lipoxygenase inhibitors ...
Interrelationship of glutathione, vitamin E and calcium ion during injury to rat hepatocytes by the calcium ionophore A23187 ... Extracellular calcium protects isolated rat hepatocytes from injuryBiochemical and Biophysical Research Communications ... Mitochondrial glutathione status during Ca2+ ionophore-induced injury to isolated hepatocytesArchives of Biochemistry and ...
A-23187, also known as Calcimycin or Calcium Ionophore III, is a calcium ionophore that rapidly equilibrates intracellular and ... A-23187, also known as Calcimycin or Calcium Ionophore III, is a calcium ionophore that rapidly equilibrates intracellular and ... The ionophore allows Mn2 to enter the cells and quench intracellular fluorescence of calcium indicators. Also see 4-bromo A- ... Calcium Calibration Buffer Kit This kit provides buffers for generating a range of accurate calcium concentrations for the ...
... the NMDA receptor is a Calcium ionophore which when activated leads to prominent increases in intracellular calcium. This ... Now, increasing Cl permeability as by opening the GABA-A or glycine ionophore may have no inhibitory effect or may lead to an ... The alpha2delta subunit of the Voltage gated calcium channel also plays an important role. After nerve injury increased ... calcium channels and the NMDA receptors) while others such as the mitogen activated kinases (MAP kinases) serve to mediate ...
... substituting the calcium ionophore A23187 (A23, 10 µM) for thapsigargin. (D) As in B substituting the calcium ionophore ... Similar observations were made in CHO-K1 cells exposed to the calcium ionophore A23187, pointing to the role of lumenal calcium ... ER calcium depletion was documented by monitoring the change in fluorescent lifetime of an ER-localized calcium probe (Figure ... calcium on oligomer formation as proposed in Figure 10B. To support the model depicted in Figure 10B, the authors need to show ...
Home Biochemicals Ionophores Calcium Ionophores Ionomycin, Free Acid, 1 MG Price$ 103.25 ... It is used to study calcium transport across the plasma membrane.. It is known to induce apoptosis in some cell lines. For ... Ionomycin is a highly specific ionophore isolated from Streptomyces conglobatus. It acts as a transport carrier of divalent ... It is also believed that the ionophore induces apoptotic degeneration of embryonic cortical neurons.. ...
Calcium Signaling in Human Platelet Aggregation Mediated by Platelet Activating Factor and Calcium Ionophore, A23187. Huma ...
8a) or the ability to undergo a calcium ionophore induced acrosome reaction (Fig. 8a) differed significantly between the ... a calcium ionophore (A23187) induced acrosome reaction and bind zona pellucidae as previously described53,54. Alternatively, 2 ... their ability to undergo a calcium ionophore induced acrosome reaction [assessed via peanut agglutinin (PNA) labeling of the ...
It was shown that treatment of platelet rich plasma with calcium ionophore resulted in an increase in the fraction of annexin V ...
Double Ionophore Application to Improve Blastocyst Development & Pregnancy Rate. Double exposure to calcium ionophore may ...
Double Ionophore Application to Improve Blastocyst Development & Pregnancy Rate. Double exposure to calcium ionophore may ...
... calcium ionophore calcimycin (A23187), staurosporine (STS), N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), and Maitotoxin (MTX)) that mimic ... hydrophobic peptides and pore-forming ionophores. Model membranes from MPL were investigated; black lipid membrane, Langmuir- ... hydrophobic peptides and pore-forming ionophores. Model membranes from [...] Read more. ...
... tachyzoites under conditions that mimic resting parasites and those primed to invade through stimulation with calcium ionophore ... tachyzoites under conditions that mimic resting parasites and those primed to invade through stimulation with calcium ionophore ... tachyzoites under conditions that mimic resting parasites and those primed to invade through stimulation with calcium ionophore ...
Prostaglandin E2, theophylline, calcium-ionophore A23187, 8-Br-cAMP (8-bromo-cyclic-3′,5′-adenosine monophosphate), and 8-Br- ... and calcium-dependent signaling pathways [131]. As one of these mechanisms is triggered by most toxins that induce diarrhea, ...
Ludowyke RI; Warton K; Scurr LL, 1998, Inhibition of antigen and calcium ionophore induced secretion from RBL-2H3 cells by ...
  • Human peripheral blood leukocytes (PMN) are induced to release lysosomal enzymes by the calcium ionophore A23187 in the presence but not the absence of extracellular Ca++. (rupress.org)
  • Calcium ionophore-stimulated chemiluminescence (CL) from human granulocytes: evidence that A23187-induced chemiluminescence originates from arachidonic acid metabolism. (cdc.gov)
  • In addition, ATP release from T cells treated with 4Br-A23187, a calcium ionophore, was completely blocked with inhibitors of both connexin hemichannels and Panx1 channels. (2011globalhealth.org)
  • DHFO stabilised p815 murine MCs stimulated by C48/80 and calcium ionophore - A23187, indicating an action downstream of calcium mobilisation. (monash.edu)
  • Here we studied the effects of the tumor promoter phorbol ester (TPA), or the calcium ionophore A23187, on the pattern of expression of 2-5 A synthetase isoforms, and found a role of protein kinase C (PKC) in the adjustments of this pattern. (elsevierpure.com)
  • We show that in HeLa cells the 100 kDa 2-5 A synthetase can be specifically induced by short term treatments with TPA, or with the calcium ionophore A23187. (elsevierpure.com)
  • treatment of resting human B cells with phorbol ester, calcium ionophore and forskolin results in modest increases in cell surface levels of CD25. (gla.ac.uk)
  • Additionally, chelation of intracellular calcium and down-regulation of PKC, by chronic phorbol ester treatment, attenuates the ability of IL-4 to up-regulate CD25. (gla.ac.uk)
  • A-23187, also known as Calcimycin or Calcium Ionophore III, is a calcium ionophore that rapidly equilibrates intracellular and extracellular calcium concentrations. (biotium.com)
  • Mac-1 induced production of aEV apparently necessitates a strong calcium signal as it fully depends on the presence of extracellular calcium. (stanford.edu)
  • AACOCF3 blocks production of arachidonate and 12-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid by calcium ionophore-challenged platelets. (medchemexpress.com)
  • Ionomycin is a highly specific ionophore isolated from Streptomyces conglobatus . (agscientific.com)
  • Chemical agents that increase the permeability of CELL MEMBRANES to CALCIUM ions. (umassmed.edu)
  • The best optode tested exhibited a good response to calcium ions in the concentration range from 10 -7 M to 10 -1 M with 0.05 M Tris-HCl of pH 7.0 as the flowing buffer solution. (elsevierpure.com)
  • In this HOT paper , the Schmitzer group at the Université de Montréal are particularly interested in the transport of chloride ions in epithelial cells through calcium activated ion channels. (rsc.org)
  • They hope to mediate the concentrations of both calcium and chloride ions using synthetic ionophores. (rsc.org)
  • Building on their research into imidazolium amphiphiles , they have developed a benzimidazolium-based compound that increases chloride flux in a variety of lipid bilayer systems, and increases bacterial cell wall permeability to calcium ions. (rsc.org)
  • Transient exposure to calcium ionophore enables in vitro fertilization in sterile mouse models. (umassmed.edu)
  • It is commonly used for in situ calibrations of fluorescent calcium indicators. (biotium.com)
  • Whereas contractions parallel to the plasma membrane could occur in the absence of enzyme release (ionophore alone) and enzyme release could occur in the absence of such contractions (ionophore plus calcium plus cytochalasin B), contraction toward the cytocenter occurred in all experimental conditions in which significant enzyme release was obtained. (rupress.org)
  • Microfilaments and microtubules in calcium ionophore-induced secretion of lysosomal enzymes from human polymorphonuclear leukocytes. (rupress.org)
  • In contrast, an intracellular calcium signal is necessary but by itself not sufficient for the production of antibacterial and pro-inflammatory EVs. (stanford.edu)
  • We sought to extend the receptor-desensitization paradigm for use with a cultured cell system, in which an intracellular calcium signal rather than a contractile response might be used as an index of receptor activation. (aspetjournals.org)
  • Calcium chloride is added to facilitated the influx via of calcium cations. (wikipedia.org)
  • RAMOS Cell Line human has been used to carry out a MTT (colorimetric assay) cell viability assay to measure calcium ionophore-induced cell death in Ramos cells under different conditions and to determine the expression of ZFP36 ring finger protein like 1 (ZFP36L1) in Ramos B cells during different stages of B cell differentiation. (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • We developed a calcium signaling-based assay, using cultured human embryonic kidney cells (HEK), that evaluates simultaneously, the activation/desensitization or blockade of the proteinase-activated receptors, PAR 1 and PAR 2 . (aspetjournals.org)
  • To this end, we developed a calcium-signaling assay, employing cultured human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293) in which the action of PAR 1 and PAR 2 agonists and antagonists could be evaluated simultaneously. (aspetjournals.org)
  • The novel calcium ion selective neutral ionophores designed and synthesized were double-armed diazacrown ether compounds possessing glycolic amides as the binding arms. (elsevierpure.com)
  • It is also believed that the ionophore induces apoptotic degeneration of embryonic cortical neurons. (agscientific.com)
  • It binds and transports CALCIUM and other divalent cations across membranes and uncouples oxidative phosphorylation while inhibiting ATPase of rat liver mitochondria. (bvsalud.org)
  • This case report detailed the course of treatment and protocol of a patient with type 1 globozoospermia using Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection (ICSI) and oocyte activation by calcium ionophore, which yielded conception and birth of a healthy baby after six previous unsuccessful attempts, using ICSI alone. (jri.ir)
  • We found that most of the previously described PAR 1 -targeted agents can also activate/desensitize PAR 2 , and most of these peptides can also activate a calcium signaling pathway in a target cell that possesses PAR 2 along with PAR 1 . (aspetjournals.org)
  • Ca++ did not appear to regulate microtubule assembly in these cells since resting PMN had a mean of 22.3 +/- 2.0 microtubules in the centriolar region as compared to 22.3 +/- 1.1 in ionophore-treated cells and 24.9 +/- 1.5 in cells exposed to ionophore and 1 mM Ca++. (rupress.org)
  • Medium affinity green fluorescent calcium binding dye. (abcam.com)
  • Next, calcium ionophore was applied following the ICSI procedure to improve the chances for fertilization. (jri.ir)
  • It is suggested that assisted oocyte activation with Ca++ ionophore and electrical or mechanical stimulation might increase fertilization rates (9-11). (jri.ir)
  • Sensor response theory, response time, selectivity, and application to the determination of calcium ion concentration in human serum were also discussed together with experimental results. (elsevierpure.com)
  • There is a reciprocal relationship between serum calcium and inorganic phosphorus. (cdc.gov)
  • Granulocyte activation induced with soluble stimulators (calcium ionophore, phorbol myristate acetate, N-formylmethionyl- leucyl-phenylalanine) results in release and increased expression of NCA. (bdbiosciences.com)
  • However, initiation of a strong calcium signal by an ionophore only results the generation of EV devoid of any antibacterial or pro-inflammatory effect. (stanford.edu)
  • It seemed possible therefore, that the ability of IL-4 to promote increases in intracellular calcium, protein kinase C activation and cAMP generation might have a role in IL-4-induced CD25 expression. (gla.ac.uk)
  • The article discusses research 1 demonstrating that parthenogenesis can be induced in human eggs by a simple chemical stimulus using the compound called calcium ionophore. (chemistryworld.com)
  • Conclusion: ICSI with assisted oocyte activation by calcium ionophore may overcome male infertility where there is total globozoospermia. (jri.ir)
  • Karaca N, Akpak YK, Oral S, Durmus T, Yilmaz R. A Successful Healthy Childbirth in a Case of Total Globozoospermia with Oocyte Activation by Calcium Ionophore. (jri.ir)
  • These calcium-mediated contractile events are mediated by cytochalasin B-insensitive microfilaments but not by microtubule assembly. (rupress.org)
  • Calcium measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of parathyroid disease, bone diseases, chronic renal disease and tetany. (cdc.gov)
  • If the mineral mix contains steamed bone meal as a calcium and phosphorous source, these calves no longer will be considered naturally raised since they had access to an animal byproduct while grazing with the cows. (thebeefsite.com)
  • It was shown that treatment of platelet rich plasma with calcium ionophore resulted in an increase in the fraction of annexin V and CD61-positive EVs. (nih.gov)
  • and can therefore be used to produce two-photon activated calcium release with high spatial precision ( Figure 19.8.3 ). (thermofisher.com)
  • It is used to study calcium transport across the plasma membrane. (agscientific.com)
  • This graph shows the total number of publications written about "Calcium Ionophores" by people in this website by year, and whether "Calcium Ionophores" was a major or minor topic of these publications. (umassmed.edu)
  • Providing an ionophore to improve feed efficiency also is not allowed. (thebeefsite.com)
  • Most creep feeds would have an ionophore included to help control bloat and improve feed efficiency, so calves eating a creep feed with an ionophore are disqualified from being classified as naturally raised. (thebeefsite.com)