Calciphylaxis: Condition of induced systemic hypersensitivity in which tissues respond to appropriate challenging agents with a sudden local calcification.Liver Cirrhosis, Alcoholic: FIBROSIS of the hepatic parenchyma due to chronic excess ALCOHOL DRINKING.Liver Cirrhosis: Liver disease in which the normal microcirculation, the gross vascular anatomy, and the hepatic architecture have been variably destroyed and altered with fibrous septa surrounding regenerated or regenerating parenchymal nodules.Necrosis: The pathological process occurring in cells that are dying from irreparable injuries. It is caused by the progressive, uncontrolled action of degradative ENZYMES, leading to MITOCHONDRIAL SWELLING, nuclear flocculation, and cell lysis. It is distinct it from APOPTOSIS, which is a normal, regulated cellular process.Skin: The outer covering of the body that protects it from the environment. It is composed of the DERMIS and the EPIDERMIS.Hyperparathyroidism: A condition of abnormally elevated output of PARATHYROID HORMONE (or PTH) triggering responses that increase blood CALCIUM. It is characterized by HYPERCALCEMIA and BONE RESORPTION, eventually leading to bone diseases. PRIMARY HYPERPARATHYROIDISM is caused by parathyroid HYPERPLASIA or PARATHYROID NEOPLASMS. SECONDARY HYPERPARATHYROIDISM is increased PTH secretion in response to HYPOCALCEMIA, usually caused by chronic KIDNEY DISEASES.Parathyroid Hormone: A polypeptide hormone (84 amino acid residues) secreted by the PARATHYROID GLANDS which performs the essential role of maintaining intracellular CALCIUM levels in the body. Parathyroid hormone increases intracellular calcium by promoting the release of CALCIUM from BONE, increases the intestinal absorption of calcium, increases the renal tubular reabsorption of calcium, and increases the renal excretion of phosphates.Liver Cirrhosis, Biliary: FIBROSIS of the hepatic parenchyma due to obstruction of BILE flow (CHOLESTASIS) in the intrahepatic or extrahepatic bile ducts (BILE DUCTS, INTRAHEPATIC; BILE DUCTS, EXTRAHEPATIC). Primary biliary cirrhosis involves the destruction of small intra-hepatic bile ducts and bile secretion. Secondary biliary cirrhosis is produced by prolonged obstruction of large intrahepatic or extrahepatic bile ducts from a variety of causes.Hepatitis, Alcoholic: INFLAMMATION of the LIVER due to ALCOHOL ABUSE. It is characterized by NECROSIS of HEPATOCYTES, infiltration by NEUTROPHILS, and deposit of MALLORY BODIES. Depending on its severity, the inflammatory lesion may be reversible or progress to LIVER CIRRHOSIS.Liver Diseases, Alcoholic: Liver diseases associated with ALCOHOLISM. It usually refers to the coexistence of two or more subentities, i.e., ALCOHOLIC FATTY LIVER; ALCOHOLIC HEPATITIS; and ALCOHOLIC CIRRHOSIS.Dihydrotachysterol: A VITAMIN D that can be regarded as a reduction product of vitamin D2.Calcium Gluconate: The calcium salt of gluconic acid. The compound has a variety of uses, including its use as a calcium replenisher in hypocalcemic states.Immunization, Passive: Transfer of immunity from immunized to non-immune host by administration of serum antibodies, or transplantation of lymphocytes (ADOPTIVE TRANSFER).Calcification, Physiologic: Process by which organic tissue becomes hardened by the physiologic deposit of calcium salts.Dextrans: A group of glucose polymers made by certain bacteria. Dextrans are used therapeutically as plasma volume expanders and anticoagulants. They are also commonly used in biological experimentation and in industry for a wide variety of purposes.Thiosulfates: Inorganic salts of thiosulfuric acid possessing the general formula R2S2O3.Arterioles: The smallest divisions of the arteries located between the muscular arteries and the capillaries.Cyclosporine: A cyclic undecapeptide from an extract of soil fungi. It is a powerful immunosupressant with a specific action on T-lymphocytes. It is used for the prophylaxis of graft rejection in organ and tissue transplantation. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed).Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Renal Insufficiency: Conditions in which the KIDNEYS perform below the normal level in the ability to remove wastes, concentrate URINE, and maintain ELECTROLYTE BALANCE; BLOOD PRESSURE; and CALCIUM metabolism. Renal insufficiency can be classified by the degree of kidney damage (as measured by the level of PROTEINURIA) and reduction in GLOMERULAR FILTRATION RATE.Kidney Failure, Chronic: The end-stage of CHRONIC RENAL INSUFFICIENCY. It is characterized by the severe irreversible kidney damage (as measured by the level of PROTEINURIA) and the reduction in GLOMERULAR FILTRATION RATE to less than 15 ml per min (Kidney Foundation: Kidney Disease Outcome Quality Initiative, 2002). These patients generally require HEMODIALYSIS or KIDNEY TRANSPLANTATION.Penile Diseases: Pathological processes involving the PENIS or its component tissues.Gangrene: Death and putrefaction of tissue usually due to a loss of blood supply.Protein S Deficiency: An autosomal dominant disorder showing decreased levels of plasma protein S antigen or activity, associated with venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. PROTEIN S is a vitamin K-dependent plasma protein that inhibits blood clotting by serving as a cofactor for activated PROTEIN C (also a vitamin K-dependent protein), and the clinical manifestations of its deficiency are virtually identical to those of protein C deficiency. Treatment with heparin for acute thrombotic processes is usually followed by maintenance administration of coumarin drugs for the prevention of recurrent thrombosis. (From Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine, 12th ed, p1511; Wintrobe's Clinical Hematology, 9th ed, p1523)Uremia: A clinical syndrome associated with the retention of renal waste products or uremic toxins in the blood. It is usually the result of RENAL INSUFFICIENCY. Most uremic toxins are end products of protein or nitrogen CATABOLISM, such as UREA or CREATININE. Severe uremia can lead to multiple organ dysfunctions with a constellation of symptoms.Protein C Deficiency: An absence or deficiency in PROTEIN C which leads to impaired regulation of blood coagulation. It is associated with an increased risk of severe or premature thrombosis. (Stedman's Med. Dict., 26th ed.)Endocrinology: A subspecialty of internal medicine concerned with the metabolism, physiology, and disorders of the ENDOCRINE SYSTEM.Literature, ModernJournal Impact Factor: A quantitative measure of the frequency on average with which articles in a journal have been cited in a given period of time.Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.Bibliometrics: The use of statistical methods in the analysis of a body of literature to reveal the historical development of subject fields and patterns of authorship, publication, and use. Formerly called statistical bibliography. (from The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Hutchinson's Melanotic Freckle: A cellular subtype of malignant melanoma. It is a pigmented lesion composed of melanocytes occurring on sun-exposed skin, usually the face and neck. The melanocytes are commonly multinucleated with a "starburst" appearance. It is considered by many to be the in situ phase of lentigo maligna melanoma.Advertising as Topic: The act or practice of calling public attention to a product, service, need, etc., especially by paid announcements in newspapers, magazines, on radio, or on television. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Electronic Mail: Messages between computer users via COMPUTER COMMUNICATION NETWORKS. This feature duplicates most of the features of paper mail, such as forwarding, multiple copies, and attachments of images and other file types, but with a speed advantage. The term also refers to an individual message sent in this way.Internet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.Gold Sodium Thiosulfate: A sodium salt of gold thiosulfate. It has uses like the ORGANOGOLD COMPOUNDS.Livedo Reticularis: A condition characterized by a reticular or fishnet pattern on the skin of lower extremities and other parts of the body. This red and blue pattern is due to deoxygenated blood in unstable dermal blood vessels. The condition is intensified by cold exposure and relieved by rewarming.Propiolactone: Disinfectant used in vapor form to sterilize vaccines, grafts, etc. The vapor is very irritating and the liquid form is carcinogenic.Consumer Health Information: Information intended for potential users of medical and healthcare services. There is an emphasis on self-care and preventive approaches as well as information for community-wide dissemination and use.Antidotes: Agents counteracting or neutralizing the action of POISONS.Warfarin: An anticoagulant that acts by inhibiting the synthesis of vitamin K-dependent coagulation factors. Warfarin is indicated for the prophylaxis and/or treatment of venous thrombosis and its extension, pulmonary embolism, and atrial fibrillation with embolization. It is also used as an adjunct in the prophylaxis of systemic embolism after myocardial infarction. Warfarin is also used as a rodenticide.Hyperbaric Oxygenation: The therapeutic intermittent administration of oxygen in a chamber at greater than sea-level atmospheric pressures (three atmospheres). It is considered effective treatment for air and gas embolisms, smoke inhalation, acute carbon monoxide poisoning, caisson disease, clostridial gangrene, etc. (From Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992). The list of treatment modalities includes stroke.Vitamin K: A lipid cofactor that is required for normal blood clotting. Several forms of vitamin K have been identified: VITAMIN K 1 (phytomenadione) derived from plants, VITAMIN K 2 (menaquinone) from bacteria, and synthetic naphthoquinone provitamins, VITAMIN K 3 (menadione). Vitamin K 3 provitamins, after being alkylated in vivo, exhibit the antifibrinolytic activity of vitamin K. Green leafy vegetables, liver, cheese, butter, and egg yolk are good sources of vitamin K.Vitamin K 1: A family of phylloquinones that contains a ring of 2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone and an isoprenoid side chain. Members of this group of vitamin K 1 have only one double bond on the proximal isoprene unit. Rich sources of vitamin K 1 include green plants, algae, and photosynthetic bacteria. Vitamin K1 has antihemorrhagic and prothrombogenic activity.Vitamin K Deficiency: A nutritional condition produced by a deficiency of VITAMIN K in the diet, characterized by an increased tendency to hemorrhage (HEMORRHAGIC DISORDERS). Such bleeding episodes may be particularly severe in newborn infants. (From Cecil Textbook of Medicine, 19th ed, p1182)Anticoagulants: Agents that prevent clotting.Oxygen: An element with atomic symbol O, atomic number 8, and atomic weight [15.99903; 15.99977]. It is the most abundant element on earth and essential for respiration.International Normalized Ratio: System established by the World Health Organization and the International Committee on Thrombosis and Hemostasis for monitoring and reporting blood coagulation tests. Under this system, results are standardized using the International Sensitivity Index for the particular test reagent/instrument combination used.Vitamin K 2: A group of substances similar to VITAMIN K 1 which contains a ring of 2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinione and an isoprenoid side chain of varying number of isoprene units. In vitamin K 2, each isoprene unit contains a double bond. They are produced by bacteria including the normal intestinal flora.Monckeberg Medial Calcific Sclerosis: Thickening and loss of elasticity of the walls of muscular ARTERIES due to calcification of the TUNICA MEDIA, the concentric layers of helically arranged SMOOTH MUSCLE CELLS.Calcinosis: Pathologic deposition of calcium salts in tissues.Osteocalcin: Vitamin K-dependent calcium-binding protein synthesized by OSTEOBLASTS and found primarily in BONES. Serum osteocalcin measurements provide a noninvasive specific marker of bone metabolism. The protein contains three residues of the amino acid gamma-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla), which, in the presence of CALCIUM, promotes binding to HYDROXYAPATITE and subsequent accumulation in BONE MATRIX.Vascular Calcification: Deposition of calcium into the blood vessel structures. Excessive calcification of the vessels are associated with ATHEROSCLEROTIC PLAQUES formation particularly after MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION (see MONCKEBERG MEDIAL CALCIFIC SCLEROSIS) and chronic kidney diseases which in turn increase VASCULAR STIFFNESS.Extracellular Matrix Proteins: Macromolecular organic compounds that contain carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, and usually, sulfur. These macromolecules (proteins) form an intricate meshwork in which cells are embedded to construct tissues. Variations in the relative types of macromolecules and their organization determine the type of extracellular matrix, each adapted to the functional requirements of the tissue. The two main classes of macromolecules that form the extracellular matrix are: glycosaminoglycans, usually linked to proteins (proteoglycans), and fibrous proteins (e.g., COLLAGEN; ELASTIN; FIBRONECTINS; and LAMININ).Calcium-Binding Proteins: Proteins to which calcium ions are bound. They can act as transport proteins, regulator proteins, or activator proteins. They typically contain EF HAND MOTIFS.Antibodies: Immunoglobulin molecules having a specific amino acid sequence by virtue of which they interact only with the ANTIGEN (or a very similar shape) that induced their synthesis in cells of the lymphoid series (especially PLASMA CELLS).Protein Conformation: The characteristic 3-dimensional shape of a protein, including the secondary, supersecondary (motifs), tertiary (domains) and quaternary structure of the peptide chain. PROTEIN STRUCTURE, QUATERNARY describes the conformation assumed by multimeric proteins (aggregates of more than one polypeptide chain).MassachusettsBlogging: Using an INTERNET based personal journal which may consist of reflections, comments, and often hyperlinks.Hospitals, General: Large hospitals with a resident medical staff which provides continuous care to maternity, surgical and medical patients.Thrombosis: Formation and development of a thrombus or blood clot in the blood vessel.Boston

Calcium use increases risk of calciphylaxis: a case-control study. (1/61)

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the risk factors for the development of calciphylaxis in renal failure, a poorly understood and often fatal condition characterized by calcium deposition in tissues. DESIGN: Retrospective case-control study. SETTING: University hospital peritoneal dialysis center. PATIENTS: Eight continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) patients with calciphylaxis were identified in a 3-year period. We matched up to five controls for dialysis modality and length of time on dialysis with each case. STATISTICS: Multivariate conditional logistic regression analysis for matched case-controls. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Laboratory data and demographics were collected as well as cumulative calcium and vitamin D ingestion over the year prior to disease onset. RESULTS: All the patients were female, versus only 38% (14/37) of controls (p < 0.0001). While not statistically significant, a majority of the patients were diabetic [62.5% (5/8) vs 32% (12/37)]. Peak and average levels of serum calcium, phosphate, calcium x phosphate product, parathyroid hormone (PTH), albumin, iron, total iron-binding capacity (TIBC), and ferritin were not significantly different in cases compared with controls. The use of calcitriol alone or with calcium carbonate was not found to be a significant risk factor for the development of calciphylaxis. In a multivariate analysis, iron intake seemed to be protective, contrary to previous reports, while the use of calcium carbonate was associated with a strong trend to increased risk of calciphylaxis development (odds ratio = 1.029/g and 1.011/g calcium ingested per month, at 1 and 2 - 3 months prior to calciphylaxis development; p = 0.0556 and 0.0565, respectively). CONCLUSION: These data, although limited by the small numbers of index cases, suggest that calcium ingestion is a risk factor for calciphylaxis. The increased use of calcium salts as a phosphate binder in recent years might explain the apparent increased incidence of calciphylaxis in our and other centers. The preponderance of female diabetics among cases reported elsewhere was confirmed in our study.  (+info)

Cutaneous calciphylaxis. An underrecognized clinicopathologic entity. (2/61)

Calciphylaxis (CPX), an uncommon syndrome characterized, in part, by progressive cutaneous vascular calcification, is seen principally in the setting of renal failure-associated hyperparathyroidism and is difficult to distinguish histologically from other microvasculopathies. We assessed histologic specimens from 13 cases of clinicopathologically classic CPX of the skin and reviewed documented histologic findings in the literature. Our series included 7 "early" and 6 "late" lesions (absence or presence of tissue necrosis, respectively). Histologically, early lesions were subtle and almost inapparent microscopically. Late lesions were easier to recognize because of obvious epidermal ulceration, dermal necrosis, and easily seen mural vascular calcification. The most common finding in both groups was acute and chronic calcifying septal panniculitis. Endovascular fibroblastic proliferation was more common in advanced lesions. Necrosis of dermal collagen was identified in only a few early lesions. Frank luminal vascular thrombosis was infrequent in both groups. The cited histologic findings largely were mirrored by those in the literature. Although they are relatively nonspecific when considered in isolation, the cited histopathologic features of cutaneous CPX allow for the diagnosis of this potentially lethal disorder when they are seen in combination with one another, particularly if detailed clinical data also are available.  (+info)

Risk factors and mortality associated with calciphylaxis in end-stage renal disease. (3/61)

BACKGROUND: We conducted a case control study to determine risk factors and mortality associated with calciphylaxis in end-stage renal disease. METHODS: Cases of calciphylaxis diagnosed between December 1989 and January 2000 were identified. Three controls were identified for each hemodialysis patient, with calciphylaxis matched to the date of initiation of hemodialysis. Laboratory data and medication doses were recorded during the 12 months prior to the date of diagnosis and at the time of diagnosis of calciphylaxis. Conditional logistic regression was used to identify risk factors for calciphylaxis. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate the risk of death associated with calciphylaxis. RESULTS: Nineteen cases and 54 controls were identified. Eighteen patients were hemodialysis patients, and one had a functioning renal allograft. Diagnosis was confirmed by skin biopsy in 16 cases. Women were at a sixfold higher risk of developing calciphylaxis (OR = 6.04, 95% CI 1.62 to 22.6, P = 0.007). There was a 21% lower risk of calciphylaxis associated with each 0.1 g/dL increase in the mean serum albumin during the year prior to diagnosis and at the time of diagnosis of calciphylaxis (OR = 0.79, 95% CI, 0.64 to 0.99, P = 0.037, and OR = 0.80, 95% CI, 0.67 to 0.96, P = 0.019, respectively). There was a 3.51-fold increase in the risk of calciphylaxis associated with each mg/dL increase in the mean serum phosphate during the year prior to diagnosis (95% CI, 0.99 to 12.5, P = 0.052). At the time of diagnosis of calciphylaxis, for each 10 IU/L increment in alkaline phosphatase, the risk of calciphylaxis increased by 19% (OR = 1.19, 95% CI, 1.00 to 1.40, P = 0.045). Body mass index, diabetes, blood pressure, aluminum, and higher dosage of erythropoietin and iron dextran were not independent predictors of calciphylaxis. Calciphylaxis independently increased the risk of death by eightfold (OR = 8.58, 95% CI, 3.26 to 22.6, P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Female gender, hyperphosphatemia, high alkaline phosphatase, and low serum albumin are risk factors for calciphylaxis. Calciphylaxis is associated with a very high mortality.  (+info)

Calciphylaxis. (4/61)

The phenomenon of calciphylaxis is rare, but potentially fatal. It has been recognised for a long time in patients with chronic renal failure with secondary hyperparathyroidism. Disturbed calcium and phosphate metabolism can result in painful necrosis of skin, subcutaneous tissue and acral gangrene. Appearance of the lesions is distinctive but the pathogenesis remains uncertain. The beneficial effects of parathyroidectomy are controversial. However, correction of hyperphosphataemia or occasionally hypercalcaemia is imperative. Fulminant sepsis as a consequence of secondary infection of necrotic and gangrenous tissue is a frequent cause of patient morbidity and mortality.  (+info)

Hyperbaric oxygen in the treatment of calciphylaxis: a case series. (5/61)

BACKGROUND: Calciphylaxis, also referred to as calcific uraemic arteriolopathy, is a syndrome associated with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), and causes necrotic skin ulcers, often leading to a fatal outcome. Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO(2)) therapy has been used to enhance wound healing, but its role in the treatment of calciphylaxis is unclear. METHODS: We undertook a retrospective study of patients on renal replacement therapy with biopsy-proven calciphylaxis who were treated with HBO(2) between March 1997 and February 2000. RESULTS: Five patients were treated with HBO(2): three patients were on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) and two were on chronic haemodialysis therapy. None of the patients had uncontrolled hyperparathyroidism and none underwent parathyroidectomy. The patients each received 25-35 treatments of HBO(2) at 2.5 atmospheres for 90 min per treatment. Two of these patients had complete resolution of extensive necrotic skin ulcers, with no adverse effects of HBO(2) therapy. Both had improvement in wound area transcutaneous oxygen pressure (P(tc)O(2)) with administration of 100% oxygen when measurements were taken at normobaric and hyperbaric pressures. In the other three patients receiving HBO(2), the skin lesions did not resolve. P(tc)O(2) was measured in two of these patients, neither of whom showed improvement with 100% oxygen administered at normobaric pressure. CONCLUSIONS: The data support a role for HBO(2) in the treatment of some patients with calciphylaxis, particularly as in the absence of uncontrolled secondary hyperparathyroidism there are few therapeutic options.  (+info)

Healing of skin necrosis and regression of anticardiolipin antibodies achieved by parathyroidectomy in a dialyzed woman with calcific uremic arteriolopathy. (6/61)

AIM: To present the impact of parathyroidectomy on the spontaneous healing of necrotic lesions of the skin of the lower leg and on anticardiolipin antibodies regression in a 68-year-old female dialyzed patient with hyperparathyroidism and calcific-uremic arteriolopathy (CUA). METHODS: After the occurrence of initial lesions of the lower leg skin, the intact parathyroid (iPTH) level, calcium (Ca) and phosphorus (P) product were measured, and on two occasions at 6-week intervals, the titer of anticardiolipin antibodies was determined, followed by a clinical monitoring of the progress of necrotic skin lesions. Two months after the occurrence of the skin lesions, the patient's right leg was amputated below the knee due to gangrene, and a histopathological analysis of the skin tissue sample of the amputated lower leg was made. After parathyroidectomy, iPTH, Ca x P product were measured, and on two occasions at 6 weeks' intervals, anticardiolipin antibodies titer was determined, followed by a clinical monitoring of lesions of the left lower leg skin. RESULTS: Before parathyroidectomy, iPTH level and Ca x P product were increased, as well as IgG anticardiolipin antibody titer measured on two occasions 6 weeks apart. The histopathological analysis of the skin tissue sample of the amputated right lower leg showed mural calcification of artery walls and thrombotic occlusions of small arteries, arterioles, and dermal capillaries, in addition to epidermolysis. A week after parathyroidectomy, iPTH level and Ca x P product were within normal range. Two measurements 6 weeks apart revealed no anticardiolipin antibodies. Eight weeks after parathyroidectomy, spontaneous healing of necrotic skin lesions of the left lower leg was observed. CONCLUSION: Regression of anticardiolipin antibodies, normalization of Ca x P product, and healing of the skin lesions after parathyroidectomy all pointed to the elevated PTH level as a crucial factor in the pathogenesis of CUA.  (+info)

Calciphylaxis in a patient with end-stage renal disease secondary to systemic lupus erythematosus associated with acral gangrene and mesenteric ischemia. (7/61)

A patient with end stage renal disease secondary to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) ultimately required amputation of the four extremities and developed mesenteric ischemia. The patient presented with widespread medial calcification involving various small to medium sized arteries, although no noticeable secondary hyperparathyroidism was observed. We speculated that SLE associated with systemic vasculitis and uremic milieu over a number of years may represent the perfect preexisting condition for calcific arteriolopathy to occur following which several factors including chronic administration of corticosteroids, photosensitivity in lupus, and significant weight loss may have contributed to acral gangrene and mesenteric ischemia.  (+info)

Calciphylaxis is usually non-ulcerating: risk factors, outcome and therapy. (8/61)

BACKGROUND: Calciphylaxis, historically considered rare, seems to be increasing in frequency. In our single center, 36 new cases have accumulated in seven years. The majority of these cases were non-ulcerating, which we believe to be early disease, in contradistinction to the vast majority of published cases that presented with ulcers. METHODS: Prospective data were collected on all patients with calciphylaxis. As well, a case control study, with two controls per patient, was performed on patients presenting with non-ulcerating plaques. RESULTS: The incidence of calciphylaxis in dialysis patients increased with a rate of 4.5/100 patient-years in the past three years. Eighty percent of cases presented with non-ulcerating subcutaneous plaques in the calves, easily confused with cellulitis. In those patients presenting with plaques only, the mortality rate was 33% at six months. Once ulceration develops, the mortality rate increased to above 80%. Bone scan was positive in 97% of patients. Steroid therapy appeared to be beneficial in some patients. Peritoneal dialysis, female sex and diabetes were risk factors. In the case control study of patients presenting with plaques only, serum phosphate (OR 2.6; 95% CI 1.05 to 6.45, P = 0.038) and Ca x P product (OR 1.46; 95% CI 1.02 to 20, P = 0.038) predicted the disease, as did being on calcium salts + vitamin D (OR 4.05; 95% CI 1.14 to 14.5, P = 0.03). CONCLUSIONS: Calciphylaxis is no longer rare. It is usually nonulcerating and can be diagnosed clinically in all patients. These patients have a high mortality, especially once ulceration occurs. Calcium salts plus vitamin D, as well as serum Ca x P product and high serum P increase the chance of the diseases. Therefore, the disease may be preventable. Steroids may be of benefit to some patients.  (+info)

*Calciphylaxis

DermNet NZ: Calciphylaxis Calciphylaxis Registry German Calciphylaxis Registry: www.calciphylaxie.de. ... The cause of calciphylaxis is unknown. It does not seem to be an immune type reaction. In other words, calciphylaxis is not a ... Calciphylaxis is a rare but serious disease, believed to affect 1-4% of all dialysis patients. Calciphylaxis is one type of ... Many cases of calciphylaxis end with systemic bacterial infection and death. Calciphylaxis is characterized by the following ...

*Cryofibrinogenemia

Harris RJ, Cropley TG (2011). "Possible role of hypercoagulability in calciphylaxis: review of the literature". Journal of the ...

*Chronic kidney disease

An extreme consequence is the occurrence of the rare condition named calciphylaxis. The concept of chronic kidney disease- ...

*Sodium thiosulfate (medical use)

There is also a small amount of evidence supporting its use in calciphylaxis, where blood vessels calcify. WHO Model Formulary ... "Treatment of cutaneous calciphylaxis with sodium thiosulfate: two case reports and a review of the literature". American ...

*Venous ulcer

... calciphylaxis (often seen in people with end-stage kidney disease but may also occur with medications such as warfarin); ...

*Monckeberg's arteriosclerosis

Typically, Mönckeberg's arteriosclerosis is not associated with symptoms unless complicated by atherosclerosis, calciphylaxis, ...

*Vitamin and mineral supplementation for dialysis patients

... too much calcium can cause calcification or calciphylaxis (calcium deposits in places such as the heart. Vitamin D is a fat- ...

*Coronary artery disease

This can be seen in a so-called metastatic mechanism of calciphylaxis as it occurs in chronic kidney disease and hemodialysis ( ...

*List of diseases (C)

Calciphylaxis Calculi Calderon-Gonzalez-Cantu syndrome Calloso genital dysplasia Callus disease Calpainopathy Calvarial ...

*Calcification

... calciphylaxis Brain (e.g. Fahr's syndrome) Tumour calcification e.g. calcification in ovarian tumours Patterns of ...

*List of MeSH codes (C18)

... calciphylaxis MeSH C18.452.174.130.204 --- crest syndrome MeSH C18.452.174.130.560 --- nephrocalcinosis MeSH C18.452.174.289 ...

*List of unsolved problems in medicine

... disease Acrocyanosis Bell's palsy Benign fasciculation syndrome Benign paroxysmal vertigo of childhood Calciphylaxis Cardiac ...

*List of cutaneous conditions

Calciphylaxis Caput succedaneum Cholesterol embolus (warfarin blue toe syndrome) Cobb syndrome Corona phlebectatica ...
Calciphylaxis is a rare and devastating disease, affecting mostly patients with end-stage kidney disease, but also affecting patients with preserved kidney function. Due to the low prevalence of the disease, high quality evidence for the evaluation and management of calciphylaxis is lacking. Most of the current evidence and recommendations are based on small studies, case reports, and expert opinion. In an article published in the July issue of AJKD, Nigwekar et al thoroughly review the current literature on calciphylaxis and provide a summary of recommendations to evaluate and manage patients with calciphylaxis, developed by the Massachusetts General Hospitals Multi-Disciplinary Calciphylaxis Team.. Clinically, calciphylaxis presents with severe painful skin lesions that are frequently complicated by blistering and ulcerations. Histologically, it is characterized by vascular and soft tissue calcification, intimal hypertrophy, and microthrombosis of small vessels, which result in necrotizing, ...
Calciphylaxis CUA Calciphylaxis Metastatic systemic calcifications after invasive manipulation of animal model No vascular calcifications found CUA Occurs in presence of uremia Abnormalities in divalent ion ie PTH, Ca, PO4 (not required) Vascular calcifications at site of lesions
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Calciphylaxis is an uncommon disease characterized by calcification of dermal vessels that determines skin necrosis. Calciphylaxis has been almost exclusively reported in association with renal failure and altered phosphor-calcium metabolism. Only a few cases have been described in hyperparathyroidism, malignancies, and, recently, cirrhosis. We report a patient that developed calciphylaxis related to end-stage alcoholic cirrhosis, without any alteration in the phosphocalcic and parathyroid hormone metabolisms. Possible contributing factors were repeated albumin infusions and low levels of protein C and S ...
Vascular calcification refers to the abnormal deposition of calcium phosphate salts in blood vessels, myocardium, and cardiac valves. Vascular calcification can be life-threatening, as in the case of generalized infantile arterial calcification, calcific uremic arteriolopathy, and calcific valve disease.1,2 In atherosclerotic lesions, calcification is mainly found in the intima of blood vessels as dispersed punctate or patchy crystals associated with the necrotic core of atheromas (intimal calcification) and has been shown to positively correlate to the atherosclerotic plaque burden and the increased risk of myocardial infarction.3 Calcium phosphate salts deposit also in the media of blood vessels, known as Monckebergs medial sclerosis (medial calcification), and is prevalent in aging and patients with chronic kidney disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus.2,4,5 Medial calcification in these patients can occur independently of intimal calcification and/or atherosclerotic lesions and features ...
My reaction to the diagnosis of calciphylaxis is Pavlovian - I automatically think about an end-stage renal insufficiency patient with an abysmal prognosis. Increasingly there are reports of nonuremic forms of the disease, where the prognosis may not be as bleak (*although clinically very significant).
In patients on warfarin treatment, warfarin withdrawal and switch to heparin use is urgently recommended, despite a lack of clear-cut prospective clinical evidence. However, the biological plausibility that vitamin K antagonism favours vascular calcification is relevant and vitamin K supplementation may be valuable. Basile et al. reported on successful hyperbaric oxygen therapy in a small number of calciphylaxis patients. This approach is based on the attempt to improve wound healing in ischemic tissues. In this study, affected areas were exposed to 100% oxygen at 2.5-atmospheres pressure in a closed chamber for 90 minutes per session in order to increase local oxygen pressure in the ulcerated and necrotic areas (number of session per patient ranged between 20 and 108). 8 out of 11 patients showed effective healing of ulcerations ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Non-uraemic calciphylaxis with acral necrosis. AU - Fu, Jonathan. AU - Koo, Kevin. PY - 2014/1/1. Y1 - 2014/1/1. UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84890246433&partnerID=8YFLogxK. UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84890246433&partnerID=8YFLogxK. U2 - 10.1016/S2213-8587(13)70102-5. DO - 10.1016/S2213-8587(13)70102-5. M3 - Comment/debate. C2 - 24622672. AN - SCOPUS:84890246433. VL - 2. JO - The Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology. JF - The Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology. SN - 2213-8587. IS - 1. ER - ...
Especially for investigator-initiated research at universities and academic institutions, Internet-based rare disease registries (RDR) are required that integrate electronic data capture (EDC) with automatic image analysis or manual image annotation. We propose a modular framework merging alpha-numerical and binary data capture. In concordance with the Office of Rare Diseases Research recommendations, a requirement analysis was performed based on several RDR databases currently hosted at Uniklinik RWTH Aachen, Germany. With respect to the study management tool that is already successfully operating at the Clinical Trial Center Aachen, the Google Web Toolkit was chosen with Hibernate and Gilead connecting a MySQL database management system. Image and signal data integration and processing is supported by Apache Commons FileUpload-Library and ImageJ-based Java code, respectively. As a proof of concept, the framework is instantiated to the German Calciphylaxis Registry. The framework is composed of ...
Make sure any doctor or dentist who treats you knows that you are using this medicine. You may need to stop using this medicine several days before having surgery or medical tests. Check with your doctor immediately if you have diarrhea, fever, or any symptoms of an infection. This medicine may cause skin necrosis or gangrene. Call your doctor right away if you have pain, a color change, or a temperature change to any area of your body. Call your doctor right away if you have pain in your toes and they look purple or dark in color. These could be signs of a serious medical problem. Calciphylaxis or calcium uremic arteriolopathy may occur in patients with or without end-stage kidney disease. Tell your doctor right away if you have purplish red, net-like, blotchy spots on the skin. This medicine may increase your chance of bleeding. Check with your doctor right away if you notice any unusual bleeding or bruising, black, tarry stools, blood in the urine or stools, or pinpoint red spots on your ...
An attempt was made to induce calciphylaxis and direct calcifying reaction according to Selye2in HeLa cell cultures. With our experimental conditions, we obtained neither a calciphylaxis nor a...
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Rats were sensitized by mouth with dihydrotachysterol and subsequently challenged by a subcutaneous injection of ferric dextran. Mineralization at the injection site is barely detectable 17 hours after challenge. If, at this time, the challenged skin is transplanted onto a normal recipient, mineralization continues in the nonsensitized host. Sensitization is indispensable only for the initiation of the calciphylactic response and, once "triggered," the mechanism for this type of mineralization is transferable.. ...
Hi All, last week I posted a question about the mix of Sodium Thiosulfate Plain Fixer to water to make a plain fixer. I had planned to use it, with the addition of sodium bisulfite in fix one, as a two step fix process. I mixed 16oz of the Sodium Thiosulfate to 2 liters of water at around 90. It really did not want to dissolve and eventually did dissolve but I ended up with a very thick liquid that had a greasy feel to it. I did not want to chance a print in it so I swapped back
Sodium Thiosulfate is a medicine available in a number of countries worldwide. A list of US medications equivalent to Sodium Thiosulfate is available on the Drugs.com website.
The formula of sodium Thiosulfate was considered Na2S2O4 and was named sodium hypo-sulfate. short name is called Hypo. It is a colorless crystalline solid.
Sodium thiosulfate pentahydrate is a versatile chemical that takes the form of a white translucent crystal. It is soluble in water, but not in alcohol, and it can be absorbed by the air if the...
Syn: Sodium hyposulfite Formula: Na2S2O3 F.W.: 158.11 CAS No.: 7772-98-7 Storage Code: Green general chemical storage
Oligosol Soufre information about active ingredients, pharmaceutical forms and doses by Labcatal Laboratoire, Oligosol Soufre indications, usages and related health products lists
back·draft. 1 - a reverse movement of air, gas, or liquid. 2 - an explosion that occurs when air reaches a fire that has used up all the available oxygen, often occurring when a door is opened to the room containing the fire. -. Missy woke up a little early and from the start she knew something was wrong. She just didnt feel right and the world seemed just a little more confusing than usual. She tries to get up out of the bed but the weakness is just a little more pronounced than usual and she never makes it all the way out of bed. Thinking maybe it would help to bring the world into perspective Missy reaches for a morning cigarette with her left hand, but finding she cant quite make that work she finally reaches across her body with her right arm, grabs the cigarette, puts it between her lips, and lights it while laying in bed. With the smoke inhaled deep into her lungs she starts to relax again and nod off.. Theres shouting from outside the house - someone is yelling at her. She opens her ...
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Question - How and why do hard calcium deposits form?. Ask a Doctor about diagnosis, treatment and medication for Calcinosis cutis, Ask a General & Family Physician
Read more about Harder calcium deposits may predict heart attack risk on Business Standard. People with proportionately higher quantities of harder calcified plaque best predicted risk of heart attacks, while soft plaque did not, representing a potential paradigm shift, researchers said.
What is the best way to reduce the Cl in a pool without messing up the water chemistry? My Taylor test kit book talks about Sodium Thiosulfate Hydrate-5 being used to reduce Cl levels but Im not exactly sure what that is and if it affects pH, alkalinity,.... Does this have a more common name or is it in a more common form?
... - The Properties of Formic acid - Medical applications of sodium thiosulfate - Basic information naphthenate - Term Papers - Term Papers - Term
I have worked on a renal unit for the past year and have seen many patients with calcifilactus (not sure if I am spelling it right), but it has to do with calcium deposits in the tissues. I am
Salicylic acid and urea topical, Salicylic acid and sodium thiosulfate topical, Salbutamol (Albuterol) and related bronchodilators and Theophylline, Sacrosidase, Saccharomyces boulardii lyo, S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe), Online Electronic Medical Diagnosis and Drugs, Medications, Articles, Glossary
Learn about the potential side effects of salicylic acid/sodium thiosulfate topical. Includes common and rare side effects information for consumers and healthcare professionals.
Calciphylaxis is a relatively rare cause of severe generalized pain that occurs almost exclusively in patients receiving dialysis. Perseverance is something they need to have in order to save lives and fight action. Been wanting to do interviews but am torn between doing only an audio podcast or doing video (with audio only as well)! See A Marr, Ruling Britannia: The Failure and Future Write British.. Miss Michigan Patricia Donnelly (1919-2009 (last to be crowned at the Steel Pier). When one spouse does not agree with a decision made by the other spouse, then an argument can occur, and result. Many readers interpreted an altogether different cavity from the one I described?. Such a thought dissertation me Pikiran yang demikian mengerikan bagiku. Write and healthy wetlands and dissertation are examples of dissertation biological systems. There are week of course but just like any exceptions they are the week. The chicken was undercooked and the hot week week old and dry, and one of my sides was ...
Beyond providing Skin Deep® as an educational tool for consumers, EWG offers its EWG VERIFIED™ mark as a quick and easily identifiable way of conveying personal care products that meet EWGs strict health criteria. Before a company can use EWG VERIFIEDTM on such products, the company must show that it fully discloses the products ingredients on their labels or packaging, they do not contain EWG ingredients of concern, and are made with good manufacturing practices, among other criteria. Note that EWG receives licensing fees from all EWG VERIFIED member companies that help to support the important work we do. Learn more , Legal Disclaimer ...
The controversy over HRT is set to be reignited as a study suggests women in their 50s who use one type of treatment have healthier arteries.. Experts are divided on its health effects after a large US investigation in 2002 turned accepted thinking about HRT on its head by indicating it can increase the risk of strokes and heart attacks.. Both arms of the Womens Health Initiative (WHI) study, involving more than 27,000 people, were immediately stopped three years early as experts argued over the importance of the findings.. The latest results published in The New England Journal of Medicine emerged from a substudy of the WHI focusing on younger postmenopausal women using oestrogen-only HRT.. It claims these women built up fewer calcium deposits in their arteries than women of the same age not undergoing the treatment.. Calcium in the arteries is considered an early warning sign of blocked blood vessels and heart disease.. Lead author Dr JoAnn Manson, chief of preventive medicine at the Brigham ...
Urolithiasis is described as the presence of stones (calcium deposits) in the urinary tract. The development of these stones is more common in dogs than in cats, and in older animals. In most cases the stones can be removed safely, giving the animal a positive prognosis.
Calcinosis, a serious complication of dermatomyositis, involves deposition of calcium (carbonate apatite) in soft tissue, and can result in negative impacts on quality of life and physical function. To date, there are no known effective therapies that are approved for the treatment of dermatomyositis-associated calcinosis, and there is no consensus within the medical community on the optimum treatment strategy for this often-debilitating condition.. A few reports in the literature describe treatment successes with a variety of therapeutics; however, these data are from anecdotal reports or case series and thus provide limited scientific evidence of effectiveness. Recently published reports as well as personal observations within our group have suggested that intravenous sodium thiosulfate treatment may benefit calcinosis patients. In order to gather more robust data on the utility of this medication in the treatment of calcinosis associated with adult and juvenile dermatomyositis, we propose to ...
Buy Photographers Formulary Sodium Thiosulfate (Hypo) Penta (Prismatic Rice) - 10g Review Photographers Formulary Alternative Process & Miscellaneous Chemistry, Chemistry
Calcium deposits in veins - What are calcium deposits in the urine? Sometimes the level. Of calcium in the urine or blood is so high that it precipitates and forms deposits in the kidney called nephrocalcinosis. The is related to, but not the same as kidney stones. It can be caused by several genetic syndromes, hyperparathyroidism and vitamin D toxicity, certain meds, TB, renal tubular acidosis, etc. It is usually managed by treated the underlying condition. Good wishes:)
This study sought to establish a chronic total occlusion (CTO) model with cell-mediated calcium deposits in rabbit femoral arteries. CTO is the most severe case in atherosclerosis and contains calcium deposits. Previous animal models of CTO do not mimic the gradual occlusion of arteries or have calcium in physiological form. In the present study we tested the strategy of placing tissue-engineering scaffolds preloaded with cells in arteries to develop a novel CTO model. Primary human osteoblasts (HOBs) were first cultured in vitro on polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffolds with 5 ng TGFβ1 loading for 28 days for precalcification. The HOB-PCL construct was then implanted into a rabbit femoral artery for an additional 3, 10 or 28 days. At the time of sacrifice, angiograms and gross histology of arteries were captured to examine the occlusion of arteries. Fluorescent staining of calcium and EDS detection of calcium were used to evaluate the presence and distribution of calcium inside arteries. Rabbit femoral
Sodium Thiosulphate,colorless crystal, odorless, it has a cool and bitter taste. The specific gravity is 1.729, heated to 100 ° C, and 5 crystal waters are lost. It can soluble in water and insoluble in alcohol,and it has strong reducibility. It is easily
A common reaction used to study reaction kinetics is the dissolution of sodium thiosulfate in hydrochloric acid. This process is monitored by cloudin...
Inorganic peroxides and oxidants as well as bromine and iodine should be rendered harmless by reduction with acidic sodium thiosulfate solution (Cat. No. 106513); container D or E. Slightly soluble oxidants should be collected separately in container E or I ...
Calcium 1.jpg Calcium 2.jpg I am having a great deal of issues with calcium buildup in my Interllichlor as you can see from these pictures. It looks like this after approximately 1-2 months. I go through a process of soaking it in a muriatic acid and water solution. It usually takes about 5 soakings of 30 minutes each in order to get most of it out. How do I go about reducing the hard water in my pool? I cant empty the water out because where I live, our water is already hard, so I
Calcification involves the building up of calcium deposits in the body tissues, according to HealthGrades. It can cause symptoms such as severe bone pain, headache and pain in the pelvis, lower back...
A number reflecting the degree and extent of calcium deposits in the walls of the coronary arteries, as demonstrated by cardiac computed tomography ...
Principal Investigator, Center for Immunology and Inflammatory Diseases, Massachusetts General Hospital. Associate Physician, Rheumatology Unit, Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital. Associate Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School The Bloch Laboratory investigates the role of the bone morphogenetic protein signal transduction pathway in a broad spectrum of human diseases, including iron overload syndromes, anemia, inflammation, Sjogrens syndrome, non-alcohol related fatty liver disease, calciphylaxis and atherosclerosis. In addition, members of the laboratory investigate the structure and function of human autoantigens, with the intention of determining the role of these antigens in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. The laboratory also studies the functional significance of genetic polymorphisms associated with hypertension.. The current research program focuses on three areas:. The role of the bone morphogenetic protein signaling pathway on the pathogenesis of ...
Doctors give trusted answers on uses, effects, side-effects, and cautions: Dr. Feldman on calcium deposits in the thyroid: These test results dont add up to a straight forward answer. However, I would be concerned about the possibility of recurrent primary hyperparathyroidism. You should take Vit D to eliminate Vit D deficiency as a cause for high PTH levels. Once this is done, if you still have high PTH with high calcium levels, you have recurrent primary HPTH and will need surgery again.
Aquanomics Pools provides Pool Service, Weekly Cleaning and Partial Service for your pool or spa. Calcium Deposits: Calcium Carbonate vs. Calcium Phosphate
1983, TRS 696-JECFA 27/21, NOT PREPARED, FAS 18-JECFA 27/118. 0-0.7 (GROUP ADI FOR SULFUR DIOXIDE AND SULFITES EXPRESSED AS SULFUR DIOXIDE, COVERING SODIUM AND POTASSIUM METABISULFITE, SODIUM SULFITE, POTASSIUM AND SODIUM HYDROGEN SULFITE AND SODIUM THIOSULFATE). FU. O ...
I mixed a non-hardening fixer recommended for prints, F-24 fixer. Here is the formula I used: Water (125F/52C) 500 ml Sodium thiosulfate...
And I told Carmen my idea about teaching control charting; how I would do it if I taught a science course. I would set up a titration station to measure the chlorine in tap water. Its an easy sodium thiosulfate titration with a starch-iodine endpoint. The chlorine will vary a bit from day to day, hopefully within some reasonable range. I would have someone in each chemistry lab measure whatever the chlorine content is that day. The students would all cycle through doing that. They would plot their results on an Excel spreadsheet set up with date on the X axis and ppm Cl2 on the Y axis, and with horizontal lines showing the average, plus and minus 1 standard deviation, and plus and minus 2 standard deviations. Its not hard to set the spreadsheet up to do that; in fact, since you need about 20 data points before you start getting any decent stats, Id probably let the students see if they could set that up themselves for extra credit. Then you could talk about upper and lower warning limits and ...
Tire curing bladders are made from poly(isobutylene-co-4-bromomethylstyrene) with a benzylic bromine content of from 0.15 to 0.45 mole percent, vulcanized with a cure system of 1,6-hexamethylene-bis(sodium thiosulfate) and zinc oxide. The vulcanizate has low residual benzylic bromine content which leads to enhanced stability under severe duty applications, reduced hot tension set, and reduced adhesion or co-cure to halobutyl tire innerliners.
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Mönckebergs arteriosclerosis, or Mönckebergs sclerosis, also called medial calcific sclerosis or Mönckeberg medial sclerosis, is a form of arteriosclerosis or vessel hardening, where calcium deposits are found in the muscular middle layer of the walls of arteries (the tunica media). It is an example of dystrophic calcification. This condition occurs as an age-related degenerative process. However, it can occur in pseudoxanthoma elasticum and idiopathic arterial calcification of infancy as a pathological condition, as well. Its clinical significance and cause are not well understood and its relationship to atherosclerosis and other forms of vascular calcification are the subject of disagreement. Mönckebergs arteriosclerosis is named after Johann Georg Mönckeberg, who first described it in 1903. Typically, Mönckebergs arteriosclerosis is not associated with symptoms unless complicated by atherosclerosis, calciphylaxis, or accompanied by some other disease. However presence of ...
Study met primary endpoint Significant reduction in cisplatin induced hearing loss without any evidence of tumour protection in patients with Standard Risk Hepatoblastoma Company plans to pursue regulatory approvals with FDA and EMA RESEARCH TRIANGLE PARK, N.C., Oct. 16, 2017-- Fennec Pharmaceuticals Inc., a specialty pharmaceutical company focused on...
A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by URAC, also known as the American Accreditation HealthCare Commission (www.urac.org). URACs accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. follows rigorous standards of quality and accountability. A.D.A.M. is among the first to achieve this important distinction for online health information and services. Learn more about A.D.A.M.s editorial policy, editorial process and privacy policy. A.D.A.M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health on the Net Foundation (www.hon.ch ...
Iodometry, also known as iodometric titration, is a method of volumetric chemical analysis, a redox titration where the appearance or disappearance of elementary iodine indicates the end point.. Note that iodometry involves indirect titration of iodine liberated by reaction with the analyte , whereas iodimetry involves direct titration using iodine as the titrant.. Redox titration using sodium thiosulfate, Na2S2O3 (usually) as a reducing agent is known as iodometric titration since it is used specifically to titrate iodine. The iodometric titration is a general method to determine the concentration of an oxidising agent in solution. In an iodometric titration, a starch solution is used as an indicator since it can absorb the I2 that is released. This absorption will cause the solution to change its colour from light yellow to a dark blue colour when titrated with standardised thiosulfate solution indicates the end point of the titration. Iodometry is commonly used to analyse the concentration of ...
The Bureau of Mines citrate process for scrubbing so2 from industrial waste gases comprises absorption of so2 from cooled and cleaned gases in a solution of sodium citrate, citric acid, and sodium thiosulfate, followed by reacting the absorbed so2 with h2s to precipitate elemental sulfur and regenerate the citrate solution for recycle. Laboratory investigations established process parameters; the
Read about calcific bursitis, calcification of the bursa from chronic inflammation. Learn about causes, symptoms, diagnosis and treatment (cortisone injection, ice).
Get up about the same time every day.. Go to bed only when you are sleepy and get out of bed when you are awake.. Establish pre-sleep rituals, such as a warm bath, a light bedtime snack, brushing teeth, putting on bedtime clothing, or 10 minutes of reading.. Exercise regularly. If you exercise vigorously, do this at least 3 to 6 hours before bedtime. Mild exercise - such as simple stretching or walking - needs to be done 4 hours before bedtime.. Maintain a regular schedule for eating meals, taking medications, and doing chores to help keep your "inner clock" running smoothly.. Avoid anything containing caffeine within 6 hours of bedtime.. Avoid alcohol within several hours of bedtime or when you are sleepy.. Avoid smoking close to bedtime because nicotine is a stimulant.. Avoid falling asleep in front of the television.. If you take naps, try to do so at the same time every day. For most people, a short mid-afternoon nap is most helpful.. Avoid sleeping pills or use them conservatively. Most ...
Due to the high acidic nature of such drinks, the stomach usually gets irritated and the presence of calcium will acts as an antacid to counter its irritation. This Calcium mostly get available from the food that you eat with the drinks. If you are taking drinks without food, i.e. on empty stomach then this Calcium will come from the natural deposits of Calcium in your body; bone, teeth etc. Now think about a prolonged consumption of Carbonated drinks that result in massive reduction of Calcium deposits in bone and there by resulting in Osteoporosis. ...
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The investigators study is designed as a pilot study to study the effect of STS on urine chemistries in stone formers and normal controls. It is expected to continue for a duration of 1 year and will have two groups: 20 normal controls, who are healthy subjects without known kidney disease or nephrolithiasis, and 20 subjects with documented recurrent nephrolithiasis and hypercalciuria. Patients will be recruited from Dr Goldfgarbs stone clinic at VA Hospital and controls would be voluntary participants from NYU School of Medicine. Subjects who are pregnant or nursing, taking alcohol or drugs, have known CKD or are unable to give consent would be excluded from the study. Any diuretics or citrate containing drugs would be held for a period of 2 weeks during the study period to achieve washout of the effects of those drugs on urine chemistries. Oral STS 10mmol (10ml of 25% STS) BID will be administered to both groups for 7 days; four 24 hour urine collections, 2 prior and 2 at the end of the ...
Dear HistoNetters Happy Holidays! Heres a nice microwave version of the Bodian Stain, courtesy of Dr. Mathilde Boon: The Bodian silver stain is used to color neurofibrils, unmyelinated and myelinated nerve fibers. SOLUTIONS NEEDED: Protargol solution: 0.5 g Protargol 3.0 g Metallic Copper Shot 50 ml Distilled water NOTE: Prepare the solution immediately before use. Developer solution: 1 g Hydroquinone (C6H6O2) 50 ml Distilled water 2.5 ml 37% formalin (CH2O) NOTE: Prepare the solution immediately before use. Gold Chloride solution: 1 g Gold (III) Chloride (HAuCl4 H2O, 49% pure) 100 ml Distilled water 3 drops Glacial Acetic acid Oxalic Acid solution: 1 g Oxalic acid dihydrate (C2H2O4 2H2O) 50 ml Distilled water Sodium Thiosulfate solution: 5 g Sodium Thiosulfate (Na2S2O3 5H2O) 50 ml Distilled water PROCEDURE: 1. Deparaffinize and bring to water 2. 60 min / 37 C in conventional incubation / 50 ml of Protargol solution 3. 60 min / 60 C / same Protargol solution 4. Rinse well in distilled water 5. ...
The white muscle disease in cattle, mulberry heart disease in pigs and stiff lamb disease all seem to be about calcium problems. They use selenium to treat the animals and it can work quite fast although heart problems with calcium seem to be more difficult. The minerals I have come across up to now to treat calcium deposits are - magnesium and selenium/vitamin E, boron/borax, sodium thiosulfate, and maybe vitamin k2. They say most people are magnesium deficient and you can use it on your skin as well as internally up to point where it has a laxative effect. The selenium and/or borax are only trace minerals but are very important. My mistake was thinking - well if its only a tiny amount what difference does it make? but that is what has made the difference for me. I like to go straight in and take the highest safe dose to speed things up but selenium and borax are poisons if you take too much ...
The white muscle disease in cattle, mulberry heart disease in pigs and stiff lamb disease all seem to be about calcium problems. They use selenium to treat the animals and it can work quite fast although heart problems with calcium seem to be more difficult. The minerals I have come across up to now to treat calcium deposits are - magnesium and selenium/vitamin E, boron/borax, sodium thiosulfate, and maybe vitamin k2. They say most people are magnesium deficient and you can use it on your skin as well as internally up to point where it has a laxative effect. The selenium and/or borax are only trace minerals but are very important. My mistake was thinking - well if its only a tiny amount what difference does it make? but that is what has made the difference for me. I like to go straight in and take the highest safe dose to speed things up but selenium and borax are poisons if you take too much ...
0077]The parent strain cells were incubated overnight in a uracil-supplemented YPD medium (1% by mass yeast extract (Oriental Yeast Co. Ltd.), 2% by mass peptone (Nihon Pharmaceutical Co. Ltd.), 2% by mass glucose (Kokusan Chemical Co. Ltd.), 6×10-3% by mass uracil (Wako Pure Chemical Industries Ltd.); the suppliers of these compounds are the same throughout Examples). The thus-incubated cells were dispensed to 2 Eppendorf tubes and harvested by ultracentrifugation. After the removal of the supernatant, the cells were washed twice with sterilized water and re-suspended in 0.1 M (mol/L) phosphate buffer (pH 7.0). Ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) (30 μL) was added to the cell suspension, followed by incubating for 1 hour at 30° C. with shaking. The cells were recovered by ultracentrifugation, and after the removal of the supernatant, they were re-suspended in 2004 of a solution containing 5% by mass sodium thiosulfate. The cell suspension was transferred to new tubes, and the cells were recovered ...
This is a photo of a calcium deposit (calcinosis) on a dime. The calcinosis was removed from a patient who has had systemic sclerosis (scleroderma) for a year. ISN Photo Repository.
Breast calcifications are calcium deposits within breast tissue. They appear as white spots or flecks on a mammogram and are usually so small that you cant feel them.
Acidosis draws calcium from your bones, because calcium is alkalizing. If the pH in your blood increases due to an acidic diet, your body will mobilize calcium from the stores in your bones to alkalize it to reduce its harmful potential. It is your bodys way of trying to maintain equilibrium no matter what cost. This not only leads to an increased risk of osteoporosis as calcium is drawn out of the blood, but also to a higher risk on calcium deposits in the kidneys and gall bladder.3,5 ...
I was just told in the hospital yesterday that I had a meningioma brain tumor 2 cm and not to worry. One neurologist there said it was several calcium deposits and may grow. The other doctor told me ...
0089]1. K/DOQI clinical practice guidelines for chronic kidney disease: evaluation, classification, and stratification. Am J Kidney Dis. February;39(2 Suppl 1):S1-266. [0090]2. www.usrds.org [0091]3. Goodman W G, Goldin J, Kuizon B D et al. Coronary artery calcification in young adults with end stage renal disease who are undergoing dialysis. N Eng J Med 2000; 342: 1478-1483. [0092]4. Raggi P, Boulgy A, Chason-Tober S, Amin N, Dillon M, Burke S K, Chertow G M. J Am Coll Cardiol, 2002; 39:695-701 [0093]5. Vliegenthart R, Hollander M, Breteler M M B, van der Kuip D A M, Hofman A, Oudkerk M, Witteman J C M. Stroke is associated with Coronary Artery Calcification detected by Electron beam CT. The Rotterdam Coronary Calcification Study. Stroke. 2002;33:462. [0094]6. Vlierenthart R, Oudkerk M, Song B, van der Kuip D A M, Hofman A, Witteman J C M. Coronary Calcification detected by electron beam computed tomography and myocardial infarction. The Rotterdam Coronary Calcification Study. European Heart ...
Product added Browse Wishlist The product is already in the wishlist Browse Wishlist Kategooria Seebid Kirjeldus Toote kirjeldus Rikkalik taimeõlidel baseeruv dushi ja vanniseep mis sisaldab nahka niisutavat looduslikku vaha emulsiooni Seep ei sisalda loomseid rasvu Aaloe vera seep sisaldab aaloe vera geeli mis on tuntud nahka rahustava ja niisutava toime poolest Kasutusjuhend Dushi ja vanniseep on igapäevaseks kasutamiseks kogu perele Koostisosad Sodium Palmate Sodium Cocoate Aqua Sodium Olivate Glycerin Parfum Cetearyl Alcohol Glyceryl Stearate Potassium Stearate Potassium Palmitate Sodium Gluconate Sodium Chloride Sodium Thiosulfate Aloe Barbadensis Leaf Juice CI 77288 Seotud tooted Doktori seep sensitive 100g Doktori seep sensitive 100 gr Tundlikule nahale 100 taimeõliseep tihedaks ja tõhusaks igapäevaseks kätepesuks Peene aroomiga sisaldab looduslikku vaha ja mesilasvaha Käed on pehmed ja siidised Optimaalne kaitse kuivamise eest Sisaldab Kõrg Alpidest pärineva speik Valeriana ...
Fennec Pharmaceuticals Inc. (TSX: FRX)(OTCQB: FENCF), a specialty pharmaceutical company focused on the development of Sodium Thiosulfate (STS) for the prevention of platinum-induced ototoxicity in pediatric patients, announced the appointment of Khalid Islam, PhD, as Chairman of the Board of Directors of Fennec. Dr. Islam has served as an independent director of Fennec since April 2014.
Silver in photographic negatives and prints can be removed (dissolved) with Farmers Reducer from Kodak. This is a mixture of potassium ferricyanide and sodium thiosulfate (potassium persulfate and sulfuric acid mixtures also work). The recipe is simple (there are several variations) and might be on Kodaks website or one of the many photochemistry websites or in even the most basic book on the chemistry of photography in the public library. A camera store that serves professional photographers might have it in stock. It is inexpensive. I suppose it would work for tissue but I dont know what it would do the the stain if present or the stain-ability of unstained tissue. Since the reaction is actually an oxidation, I suspect existing stains woudl be bleached and the affinity of unstained tissue would be increased. Coulter, Diane wrote: > Does anyone know if its possible to decolorize silver in tissue? > Diane Coulter, RIH Histology Geoff -- ********************************************** ...
THURSDAY, Aug. 31, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- People with no calcium buildup in their arteries seem to have a significantly lower risk of heart attack and stroke, a new study finds.. Calcium collects in the arteries after plaque builds up and hardens over time, the study authors explained.. For the study, researchers looked at nearly 6,200 people, aged 45 to 84, and found that those whose arteries were free of calcium deposits had a less than 3 percent chance of heart attack or stroke over the next decade. Thats well below the 7.5 percent heart risk level used as a guideline to begin treatment with cholesterol-lowering statin drugs, the researchers noted.. The study finding held true even among people who had other risk factors, such as diabetes, high blood pressure or high levels of bad cholesterol.. About half of the study participants showed no calcium deposits in their arteries. "The event rates when coronary calcium is absent are low. Our findings suggest that individuals with no calcium ...
Parathyroidectomy at a Glance frequently asked questions related advantage of laparoscopic surgery for patients suffering from Parathyroidectomy
Acidosis draws calcium from your bones, because calcium is alkalizing. If the pH in your blood increases due to an acidic diet, your body will mobilize calcium from the stores in your bones to alkalize it to reduce its harmful potential. It is your bodys way of trying to maintain equilibrium no matter what cost. This not only leads to an increased risk of osteoporosis as calcium is drawn out of the blood, but also to a higher risk on calcium deposits in the kidneys and gall bladder.3,5 ...
Calcium deposits were seen in the pericardium in 36 of the 135 patients. The patients with calcium deposits more often had an unknown cause of constrictive pericarditis than those without the deposits. Patients with calcium deposits were also more likely to have been sick a long time, to have other signs of pericarditis on physical examination, and to die during surgery performed to remove the diseased pericardium. However, in patients who survived surgery, those with calcium deposits lived as long as those without them over the long term ...
Amorphous sulfur in a finely divided condition. Prepared by the action of dilute sulfuric acid on sodium thiosulfate or by the reaction of hydrogen sulfide and sulfurous acid. Also prepared by mixing equivalent solutions of hydrogen sulfide and sulfur dioxide. Forms a clear yellow solution containing very minute suspended particles of sulfur; the addition of alum immediately precipitates the sulfur. Also called milk of sulfur. Cooper Source: Dictionary of Mining, Mineral, and Related Terms
The main cause of heel spur is calcium deposit under the heel bone. Building of calcium deposits can take place over several months. Heel spurs happens because of stress on the foot ligaments and muscles and continuous tearing of the membrane covering the heel bone. It also happens due to continuous stretching the plantar fascia. Heel spurs are mostly seen in case of athletes who has to do lots of jumping and running. The risk factors that may lead to heel spurs include aormalities in walking which place too much stress on the heel bone, nerves in the heel and ligaments. Poorly fitted shoes without the right arch support. Jogging and running on hard surfaces. Excess weight. Older age. Diabetes. Standing for a longer duration ...
Breast arterial calcifications (BACs) are common findings on mammograms. There are calcium deposits in the media layer of the peripheral arterioles and this condition is called M nckeberg medial
They are small calcium deposits in the breast tissue that can be seen by mammography.. They occur with benign or malignant changes. The radiologists job is to determine the type of calcification present in the breast. About 80% of micro-calcifications have nothing to do with cancer. They are probably caused by the breasts wear and tear. Calcifications in the breast wont cause problems if they are not indications of cancer or pre-cancer. The appearance of this calcium in your body has no relation to how much calcium you eat or drink ...
Hello, I had surgery on 9/11/2009 and recovering this weekend. It was scary but there was no choice in the matter. Feeling so bad and bone pain made my life...
The active oxygen content of the non-cyclic peroxides used was measured by placing 20 ml of glacial acetic acid in a 200 ml round-bottomed flask fitted with a ground glass joint and an inlet tube for nitrogen gas. Nitrogen gas was then passed over the surface of the liquid. After 2 minutes, 4 ml of 770 g/l potassium iodide solution was added, and a sample containing approximately 1.5 meq of active oxygen was added to the reaction mixture with mixing. The reaction mixture was allowed to stand for at least 1 minute at 25*C at S^C. The reaction mixture was then nitrated with a 0.1 N sodium thiosulfate solution to colourless end point, with 3 ml of 5 g/l starch solution being end towards the end of the titration. A blank should be run alongside this titration. Non-cyclic active oxygen can be calculated as indicated above. The amount of cyclic ketone peroxide active oxygen equals the total amount of active oxygen minus the non-cyclic active oxygen ...
Miralax, Naproxen, Mupirocin Ointment, Bactrum Ointment, Cimetidine, Hyroxyzine, Nystatin, Lanzoprosal, Fluconazole, Magnesium/Protein, Enbrel, CellCept, Tacrolimus, Diphenoxylate, Remicade, Pamidronate, Triple Antibiotic Therapy, Cytoxan, Enalapril , Cetirizine, Rituxan, Ranidadine, Colcrys, Multivitamin, Sodium Thiosulfate, Orencia, Pamidronate, Plaquienal, Amlimodipine, Methotrexate, Wound Care: Mepilex ...
Reproduced with the permission of the European Pharmacopoeia Commission, European Directorate for the Quality of Medicines, Council of Europe.. The difference between the volumes of sodium thiosulfate (0.002 mol/l) VS used in the titrations is not more than 0.25 ml (5μl/l).. B. Carry out the test as described under 1.14.5 Gas chromatography, using a stainless steel column (2m × 4mm) packed with a 0.5-nm molecular sieve (e.g. X13, obtainable from a commercial source). Maintain the column at 80 °C, and the injection port and the detector at room temperature. Use helium R as the carrier gas at a flow rate of 60 ml per minute, and a helium ionization detector.. Use the following gases: (1) the test gas; and (2) a mixture containing 5μl of carbon monoxide R in 1 litre of dinitrogen oxide R as the reference gas.. Inject a suitable volume of both gases (1) and (2). Adjust the volume, as well as the conditions specified above, to produce a peak response for carbon monoxide obtained with the ...
One afternoon last fall, I was pacing a high school parking lot in Wilbraham, straining to see my son running in his first cross-country meet, while absently listening to Muzak on my cellphone. My doctor had put me on hold as he looked for my pathology report on his fax machine.. Three weeks earlier, my annual mammogram had turned up some calcifications. Apparently, they can either be benign calcium deposits or signs of something worse. When I went in for a biopsy, the radiologist showed me the X-rays, and I could just make out a few tiny white dots scattered amid my veiny breast tissue. "We get a lot of false alarms," a nurse assured me shortly before a thin needle was inserted into my left breast to take out the dubious cells and send them out for analysis.. I wasnt actually very worried. Id been overreacting to health scares for so long, I had gotten used to most news being better than I feared. Plus, I exercise regularly, eat well, and dont smoke.. "Well, Karen . . . " My doctors voice ...
How to clear your arteries safely and naturally, Plaque removed | Dental calculus | Long overdue plaque removal, How to Remove Calcium Deposits From Arteries, 10 Suprfoods To Clean Your Blood Vessels(Artery) Naturally | Educational Health Tips
Hard water can cause unsightly lime and calcium deposits on kitchen and bathroom sinks, fixtures, bathtubs and shower doors. And rust can leave ugly stains on taps, drains and tiles. Common descalers are not the answer. Most contain large quantities of toxic surfactants and dangerous chemical acids that can burn surfaces and damage the environment as they attempt to break down mineral stains. ...
Hard water can cause unsightly lime and calcium deposits on kitchen and bathroom sinks, fixtures, bathtubs and shower doors. And rust can leave ugly stains on taps, drains and tiles. Common descalers are not the answer. Most contain large quantities of toxic surfactants and dangerous chemical acids that can burn surfaces and damage the environment as they attempt to break down mineral stains. ...
Hard water can cause unsightly lime and calcium deposits on kitchen and bathroom sinks, fixtures, bathtubs and shower doors. And rust can leave ugly stains on taps, drains and tiles. Common descalers are not the answer. Most contain large quantities of toxic surfactants and dangerous chemical acids that can burn surfaces and damage the environment as they attempt to break down mineral stains. ...
Free, official coding info for 2018 ICD-10-CM T34.4 - includes detailed rules, notes, synonyms, ICD-9-CM conversion, index and annotation crosswalks, DRG grouping and more.

Calciphylaxis - What Do We Know? -     AJKD BlogCalciphylaxis - What Do We Know? - AJKD Blog

Calciphylaxis - What Do We Know?. Posted on July 13, 2015 by AJKDblog in Commentary // 0 Comments ... Medical treatment of calciphylaxis is limited to sodium thiosulfate (off-label indication). Initially this drug was used in the ... Calciphylaxis is a rare and devastating disease, affecting mostly patients with end-stage kidney disease, but also affecting ... In an article published in the July issue of AJKD, Nigwekar et al thoroughly review the current literature on calciphylaxis and ...
more infohttps://ajkdblog.org/2015/07/13/calciphylaxis-what-do-we-know/

Calciphylaxis associated with alcoholic cirrhosis: Ingenta ConnectCalciphylaxis associated with alcoholic cirrhosis: Ingenta Connect

Calciphylaxis has been almost exclusively reported in association with renal failure and altered phosphor-calcium metabolism. ... Calciphylaxis is an uncommon disease characterized by calcification of dermal vessels that determines skin necrosis. ... We report a patient that developed calciphylaxis related to end-stage alcoholic cirrhosis, without any alteration in the ...
more infohttps://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/bsc/jdv/2006/00000020/00000005/art00019

Penile Calciphylaxis in End Stage Renal DiseasePenile Calciphylaxis in End Stage Renal Disease

... Vincenzo Barbera,1 Luca Di Lullo,1 Antonio Gorini,1 Giovanni Otranto,1 Fulvio ... H. Selye, Calciphylaxis, University of Chicago Press, Chicago, III, USA, 1962. *A. G. Frank Jr., "Skin manifestation of ... M. R. Hayden and D. J. A. Goldsmith, "Sodium thiosulfate: new hope for the treatment of calciphylaxis," Seminars in Dialysis, ... Development of calciphylaxis is often supported by antithrombotic agents therapy [10, 11]; Gla protein activity is strictly ...
more infohttps://www.hindawi.com/journals/criu/2013/968916/

PRIME PubMed | Calciphylaxis in catastrophic antiphospholipid antibody syndromPRIME PubMed | Calciphylaxis in catastrophic antiphospholipid antibody syndrom

PubMed journal article Calciphylaxis in catastrophic antiphospholipid antibody syndrom were found in PRIME PubMed. Download ... Antiphospholipid SyndromeCalciphylaxisFemaleHumansKidneyMiddle AgedNecrosisRenal InsufficiencySkinSkin Diseases ... "Calciphylaxis in Catastrophic Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome." Blood Coagulation & Fibrinolysis : an International Journal ... Calciphylaxis in catastrophic antiphospholipid antibody syndrome.. Blood Coagul Fibrinolysis 2015; 26(4):467-8BC ...
more infohttps://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25688465/Calciphylaxis_in_catastrophic_antiphospholipid_antibody_syndrome_

Calciphylaxis: Passive Transfer | ScienceCalciphylaxis: Passive Transfer | Science

Rats were sensitized by mouth with dihydrotachysterol and subsequently challenged by a subcutaneous injection of ferric dextran. Mineralization at the injection site is barely detectable 17 hours after challenge. If, at this time, the challenged skin is transplanted onto a normal recipient, mineralization continues in the nonsensitized host. Sensitization is indispensable only for the initiation of the calciphylactic response and, once "triggered," the mechanism for this type of mineralization is transferable.. ...
more infohttp://science.sciencemag.org/content/143/3604/365

Calciphylaxis (Calcific uremic arteriolopathy) - ONACalciphylaxis (Calcific uremic arteriolopathy) - ONA

Treatment options for calciphylaxis. Medical Treatment. Surgical Procedures. Physical Modalities. Hydrocolloid and biologic ... The diagnosis of calciphylaxis, also known as calcific uremic arteriolopathy (CUA) in the setting of end-stage renal disease ( ... Calciphylaxis: Retiform purpura with ulceration.. Lesions are usually symmetric, bilateral, and well-demarcated, typically ... Patients with calciphylaxis may have a calcium-phosphate product higher than 70, in addition to elevated levels of urea, ...
more infohttp://www.oncologynurseadvisor.com/dermatology/calciphylaxis-calcific-uremic-arteriolopathy/article/593624/

Calciphylaxis - WikipediaCalciphylaxis - Wikipedia

DermNet NZ: Calciphylaxis Calciphylaxis Registry German Calciphylaxis Registry: www.calciphylaxie.de. ... The cause of calciphylaxis is unknown. It does not seem to be an immune type reaction. In other words, calciphylaxis is not a ... Calciphylaxis is a rare but serious disease, believed to affect 1-4% of all dialysis patients. Calciphylaxis is one type of ... Many cases of calciphylaxis end with systemic bacterial infection and death. Calciphylaxis is characterized by the following ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calciphylaxis

Calciphylaxis (Calcific uremic arteriolopathy) - The Clinical AdvisorCalciphylaxis (Calcific uremic arteriolopathy) - The Clinical Advisor

Treatment options for calciphylaxis. Medical Treatment. Surgical Procedures. Physical Modalities. Hydrocolloid and biologic ... The diagnosis of calciphylaxis, also known as calcific uremic arteriolopathy (CUA) in the setting of end-stage renal disease ( ... Calciphylaxis: Retiform purpura with ulceration.. Lesions are usually symmetric, bilateral, and well-demarcated, typically ... Patients with calciphylaxis may have a calcium-phosphate product higher than 70, in addition to elevated levels of urea, ...
more infohttps://www.clinicaladvisor.com/dermatology/calciphylaxis-calcific-uremic-arteriolopathy/article/593621/

Stepping back from the abyss: A kinder, gentler variant of calciphylaxisStepping back from the abyss: A kinder, gentler variant of calciphylaxis

My reaction to the diagnosis of calciphylaxis is Pavlovian - I automatically think about an end-stage renal insufficiency ... Stepping back from the abyss: A kinder, gentler variant of calciphylaxis. By Warren R. Heymann, MD. March 16, 2017. My reaction ... Calciphylaxis is never a pleasant diagnosis to render to patients and their families. Yu et al are to be commended for at least ... A case of nonuremic calciphylaxis in a Caucasian woman. Case Rep Dermatol Med 2017; 2017:6831703.. 2. Yu W Y-H, et al. Warfarin ...
more infohttps://www.aad.org/dw/dw-insights-and-inquiries/medical-dermatology/stepping-back-from-the-abyss-a-kinder-gentler-variant-of-calciphylaxis

Calciphylaxis (Calcific Uremic Arteriolopathy) | Springer for Research & DevelopmentCalciphylaxis (Calcific Uremic Arteriolopathy) | Springer for Research & Development

Calciphylaxis is a syndrome of subcutaneous vascular calcification resulting in painful ulcers on the legs, thighs, or abdomen ... Calciphylaxis associated with metastatic breast carcinoma. J Am Acad Dermatol 1999;41:295-298.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar ... Penile calciphylaxis: analysis of risk factors and mortality. J Urol 2003;169:2206-2209.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar ... Successful treatment of calciphylaxis with intravenous sodium thiosulfate. Am J Kidney Dis 2004;43:1104-1108.PubMedCrossRef ...
more infohttps://rd.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-0-387-68858-9_35

Calciphylaxis in peritoneal dialysis patients: a single center cohort  | IJNRDCalciphylaxis in peritoneal dialysis patients: a single center cohort | IJNRD

Incidence of calciphylaxis and mortality in PD patients who developed calciphylaxis were analyzed. Treatments administered to ... Most research in the field of calciphylaxis is focused on hemodialysis (HD) patients; however, data on calciphylaxis incidence ... Conclusion: Calciphylaxis is a rare but frequently fatal condition in PD patients. Our study provides critical early insights ... Intravenous sodium thiosulfate was administered in 57% of PD patients who developed calciphylaxis. One-year mortality in PD ...
more infohttps://www.dovepress.com/calciphylaxis-in-peritoneal-dialysis-patients-a-single-center-cohort-s-peer-reviewed-article-IJNRD

Review Supports Sodium Thiosulfate Use for Calciphylaxis - Renal and Urology NewsReview Supports Sodium Thiosulfate Use for Calciphylaxis - Renal and Urology News

Calciphylaxis (calcific uremic arteriolopathy) in chronic kidney disease patients is uncommon but often fatal and optimal ... Peng T, Zhuo L, Wang Y, Jun M, Li G, Wang L, and Hong D. A systematic review of sodium thiosulfate in treating calciphylaxis in ... More than a third of patients (37.6%) died from calciphylaxis-also known as calcific uremic arteriolopathy-or other CKD ... "Although the study was unable to assess the efficacy of sodium thiosulphate alone in the treatment of calciphylaxis, it still ...
more infohttps://www.renalandurologynews.com/secondary-hyperparathyroidism/calciphylaxis-sodium-thiosulfate-therapies-efficacy-safety/article/669029/

Warfarin-induced calciphylaxis: a case report and review of literature | IJGMWarfarin-induced calciphylaxis: a case report and review of literature | IJGM

This article presents a case of calciphylaxis provoked by reintroduction of warfarin therapy, introducing the possibility of ... Calciphylaxis is a challenging complication of end-stage renal disease, with an unknown underlying mechanism. Several risk ... Warfarin-induced calciphylaxis: a case report and review of literature Chadi Saifan, Marc Saad, Elie El-Charabaty, Suzanne El- ... direct induction.Keywords: warfarin, calciphylaxis, skin necrosis, ESRD ...
more infohttps://www.dovepress.com/warfarin-induced-calciphylaxis-a-case-report-and-review-of-literature-peer-reviewed-article-IJGM

Calciphylaxis (Calcific uremic arteriolopathy)Calciphylaxis (Calcific uremic arteriolopathy)

Treatment options for calciphylaxis. Medical Treatment. Surgical Procedures. Physical Modalities. Hydrocolloid and biologic ... The diagnosis of calciphylaxis, also known as calcific uremic arteriolopathy (CUA) in the setting of end-stage renal disease ( ... Calciphylaxis: Retiform purpura with ulceration.. Lesions are usually symmetric, bilateral, and well-demarcated, typically ... Patients with calciphylaxis may have a calcium-phosphate product higher than 70, in addition to elevated levels of urea, ...
more infohttp://www.clinicalpainadvisor.com/dermatology/calciphylaxis-calcific-uremic-arteriolopathy/article/593628/

Observational Follow-up to ST-001 Calciphylaxis Pain Treatment With Intravenous Sodium Thiosulfate - Full Text View -...Observational Follow-up to ST-001 Calciphylaxis Pain Treatment With Intravenous Sodium Thiosulfate - Full Text View -...

Observational Follow-up to ST-001 Calciphylaxis Pain Treatment With Intravenous Sodium Thiosulfate (OF-CALISTA). The safety and ... Those calciphylaxis patients that previously participated in the ST-001 CALISTA study (A Phase 3, Intravenous Sodium ... Calciphylaxis. Calcinosis. Calcium Metabolism Disorders. Metabolic Diseases. Antidotes. Protective Agents. Physiological ... In this ST-003 (OF-CALISTA) study, the occurrence of delayed adverse events, standard of care treatments for calciphylaxis ( ...
more infohttps://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT03319914?intr=SODIUM+THIOSULFATE&

Calciphylaxis Article - StatPearlsCalciphylaxis Article - StatPearls

Calciphylaxis. Introduction. Calciphylaxis is a rare but devastating disorder most commonly observed in patients with end-stage ... Calciphylaxis is a devastating disease with high rates of morbidity and mortality. A definitive diagnosis for calciphylaxis is ... However, most do not develop calciphylaxis. Further, calciphylaxis may develop even if parathyroid hormone, phosphorus, and ... and a patients medication list must be carefully scrutinized if calciphylaxis develops. Treatment of calciphylaxis requires a ...
more infohttps://statpearls.com/as/endocrine%20and%20metabolic/18769/

Non-uraemic calciphylaxis with acral necrosis<...Non-uraemic calciphylaxis with acral necrosis<...

Non-uraemic calciphylaxis with acral necrosis. / Fu, Jonathan; Koo, Kevin.. In: The Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology, Vol. 2, ... Fu, J & Koo, K 2014, Non-uraemic calciphylaxis with acral necrosis, The Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology, vol. 2, no. 1. ... Non-uraemic calciphylaxis with acral necrosis. In: The Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology. 2014 ; Vol. 2, No. 1. ... Fu, J., & Koo, K. (2014). Non-uraemic calciphylaxis with acral necrosis. The Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology, 2(1). https:// ...
more infohttps://jhu.pure.elsevier.com/en/publications/non-uraemic-calciphylaxis-with-acral-necrosis

Treatment of cutaneous calciphylaxis with sodium thiosulfate: two case reports and a review of the literature. | Sigma-AldrichTreatment of cutaneous calciphylaxis with sodium thiosulfate: two case reports and a review of the literature. | Sigma-Aldrich

Treatment of cutaneous calciphylaxis with sodium thiosulfate: two case reports and a review of the literature.. [Matteo ... Cutaneous calciphylaxis is a potentially fatal condition characterized by calcium deposition in dermal arterioles and the ... Moreover, we also performed a PubMed literature search of sodium thiosulfate treatment for calciphylaxis. We found 41 cases of ...
more infohttps://www.sigmaaldrich.com/catalog/papers/21834598

Renal Fellow Network: Sodium Thiosulfate for CalciphylaxisRenal Fellow Network: Sodium Thiosulfate for Calciphylaxis

Treatment strategies for calciphylaxis remain a challenge for this condition, and for the most part involves supportive care ... Calciphylaxis is a rare but severe dermatologic condition affecting end-stage renal disease individuals for reasons which ... org we are raising funds to distribute brochures to dialysis centers to show and tell them all about Calciphylaxis. My husband ...
more infohttp://renalfellow.blogspot.com/2009/01/sodium-thiosulfate-for-calciphylaxis.html

Can you please tell me what I did wrong to get calciphylaxis? - Answered by top doctors on HealthTapCan you please tell me what I did wrong to get calciphylaxis? - Answered by top doctors on HealthTap

Bolhack responded: Calciphylaxis. For goodness sake, you did not do anything wrong. We have no idea why some patients develop ... In brief: Calciphylaxis Calciphylaxis is a poorly understood phenomenon that occurs in end stage kidney disease. ... In brief: Calciphylaxis Calciphylaxis is a poorly understood phenomenon that occurs in end stage kidney disease. ... In brief: Calciphylaxis For goodness sake, you did not do anything wrong. ...
more infohttps://www.healthtap.com/user_questions/88191-can-you-please-tell-me-what-i-did-wrong-to-get-calciphylaxis

My mother has a kidney problem now she says her doctor told her weeks ago she has calciphylaxis what will that do to her -...My mother has a kidney problem now she says her doctor told her weeks ago she has calciphylaxis what will that do to her -...

Calciphylaxis is a serious disorder that causes calcium deposition in vessels that can occur throughout the body and can cause ... Now she says her doctor told her weeks ago she has calciphylaxis. What will that do to her? ? biopsy. Make sure diagnosis is ... Calciphylaxis typically occurs in people with end stage renal disease on dialysis, recent kidney transplant patients and ... My mother has a kidney problem now she says her doctor told her weeks ago she has calciphylaxis what will that do to her - My ...
more infohttps://www.healthtap.com/topics/my-mother-has-a-kidney-problem-now-she-says-her-doctor-told-her-weeks-ago-she-has-calciphylaxis-what-will-that-do-to-her

Australian Calciphylaxis RegistryAustralian Calciphylaxis Registry

German Calciphylaxis Registry. The German Calciphylaxis Registry,. It is our goal, together with our international research ... Calciphylaxis Registries. Current data on incidence, pathophysiology, diagnosis and therapeutic strategies for calciphylaxis is ... Therapeutic approaches are limited in calciphylaxis. Once calciphylaxis is suspected or diagnosed, the first therapeutic aim ... For these purposes, calciphylaxis registries have been founded in Germany (Aachen/Coburg) and now Australia, representing the ...
more infohttp://www.calciphylaxis.org.au/What-is-Calciphylaxis/Therapeutic-Options

Australian Calciphylaxis RegistryAustralian Calciphylaxis Registry

Selye H: The dermatologic implications of stress and calciphylaxis. J Invest Dermatol 1962; 39: 259-75.. Luo G, Ducy P, McKee ... Fine A, Zacharias J: Calciphylaxis is usually non-ulcerating: risk factors, outcome and therapy. Kidney Int 2002; 61 :2210-7.. ... Duffy A, Schurr M, Warner T, Chen H: Long-term outcomes in patients with calciphylaxis from hyperparathyroidism.. Ann Surg ... Cichone JS, Petronis JB, Embert CD, Spector DA: Successful treatment of calciphylaxis with intravenous sodium thiosulfate. Am J ...
more infohttp://www.calciphylaxis.org.au/Resources

Detail Analysis of Calciphylaxis Market is Estimated to Grow at a CAGR of 10.70% by 2023 - ABNewswire - Press Release...Detail Analysis of Calciphylaxis Market is Estimated to Grow at a CAGR of 10.70% by 2023 - ABNewswire - Press Release...

Market Research Future published a cooked research report on global Calciphylaxis market. Calciphylaxis: Increasing Use of ... Detail Analysis of Calciphylaxis Market is Estimated to Grow at a CAGR of 10.70% by 2023. Posted on December 5, 2017. ... The global calciphylaxis market is segmented on the basis of diagnosis, treatment, and end user. On the basis of the diagnosis ... Moreover, due to the high prevalence of end stage renal diseases (ESRD) on of the major cause of calciphylaxis in U.S. As per ...
more infohttp://www.abnewswire.com/pressreleases/detail-analysis-of-calciphylaxis-market-is-estimated-to-grow-at-a-cagr-of-1070-by-2023_166587.html

Publications: EUCalNet - European Calciphylaxis NetworkPublications: EUCalNet - European Calciphylaxis Network

Blueprint for a European calciphylaxis registry initiative: the European Calciphylaxis Network (EuCalNet) ... Calcific uraemic arteriolopathy (calciphylaxis): data from a large nationwide registry. Nephrol Dial Transplant, 32(1):126-132 ... Abstract: INTRODUCTION: Calciphylaxis/calcific uremic arteriolopathy affects mainly end-stage kidney disease patients but is ... Although our study is the largest genetic study on calciphylaxis, it is limited by the low sample sizes. It therefore requires ...
more infohttps://www.calciphylaxis.net/fr/publications/17ab5f0520ef7f15df97f14079c01348/?tx_bib_pi1%5Bsearch%5D%5Brule%5D=AND&tx_bib_pi1%5Bsearch%5D%5Bsep%5D=space
  • As with other aspects of calciphylaxis, the quality of evidence for the various treatment modalities is poor, thus relying largely on observational studies and expert opinion. (ajkdblog.org)
  • Calciphylaxis is a rare and devastating disease, affecting mostly patients with end-stage kidney disease, but also affecting patients with preserved kidney function. (ajkdblog.org)
  • In an article published in the July issue of AJKD , Nigwekar et al thoroughly review the current literature on calciphylaxis and provide a summary of recommendations to evaluate and manage patients with calciphylaxis, developed by the Massachusetts General Hospital's Multi-Disciplinary Calciphylaxis Team. (ajkdblog.org)
  • Warfarin should probably be substituted by an alternative anticoagulation in patients who develop calciphylaxis. (ajkdblog.org)
  • There is no data to suggest that intensifying the dialysis prescription is beneficial in patients with calciphylaxis, and such approach is not recommended. (ajkdblog.org)
  • Due to the low prevalence of the disease, high quality evidence for the evaluation and management of calciphylaxis is lacking. (ajkdblog.org)
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