Tooth Calcification: The process whereby calcium salts are deposited in the dental enamel. The process is normal in the development of bones and teeth. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p43)Tooth: One of a set of bone-like structures in the mouth used for biting and chewing.Calcinosis: Pathologic deposition of calcium salts in tissues.Vascular Calcification: Deposition of calcium into the blood vessel structures. Excessive calcification of the vessels are associated with ATHEROSCLEROTIC PLAQUES formation particularly after MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION (see MONCKEBERG MEDIAL CALCIFIC SCLEROSIS) and chronic kidney diseases which in turn increase VASCULAR STIFFNESS.Bone and Bones: A specialized CONNECTIVE TISSUE that is the main constituent of the SKELETON. The principle cellular component of bone is comprised of OSTEOBLASTS; OSTEOCYTES; and OSTEOCLASTS, while FIBRILLAR COLLAGENS and hydroxyapatite crystals form the BONE MATRIX.Calcification, Physiologic: Process by which organic tissue becomes hardened by the physiologic deposit of calcium salts.Tooth Loss: The failure to retain teeth as a result of disease or injury.Tooth Germ: The collective tissues from which an entire tooth is formed, including the DENTAL SAC; ENAMEL ORGAN; and DENTAL PAPILLA. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Tooth, Deciduous: The teeth of the first dentition, which are shed and replaced by the permanent teeth.Tooth Crown: The upper part of the tooth, which joins the lower part of the tooth (TOOTH ROOT) at the cervix (TOOTH CERVIX) at a line called the cementoenamel junction. The entire surface of the crown is covered with enamel which is thicker at the extremity and becomes progressively thinner toward the cervix. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p216)Tooth Root: The part of a tooth from the neck to the apex, embedded in the alveolar process and covered with cementum. A root may be single or divided into several branches, usually identified by their relative position, e.g., lingual root or buccal root. Single-rooted teeth include mandibular first and second premolars and the maxillary second premolar teeth. The maxillary first premolar has two roots in most cases. Maxillary molars have three roots. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p690)Tooth Eruption: The emergence of a tooth from within its follicle in the ALVEOLAR PROCESS of the MAXILLA or MANDIBLE into the ORAL CAVITY. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)Bone Remodeling: The continuous turnover of BONE MATRIX and mineral that involves first an increase in BONE RESORPTION (osteoclastic activity) and later, reactive BONE FORMATION (osteoblastic activity). The process of bone remodeling takes place in the adult skeleton at discrete foci. The process ensures the mechanical integrity of the skeleton throughout life and plays an important role in calcium HOMEOSTASIS. An imbalance in the regulation of bone remodeling's two contrasting events, bone resorption and bone formation, results in many of the metabolic bone diseases, such as OSTEOPOROSIS.Tooth, Supernumerary: An extra tooth, erupted or unerupted, resembling or unlike the other teeth in the group to which it belongs. Its presence may cause malposition of adjacent teeth or prevent their eruption.Tooth Abnormalities: Congenital absence of or defects in structures of the teeth.Tooth Wear: Loss of the tooth substance by chemical or mechanical processesTooth Extraction: The surgical removal of a tooth. (Dorland, 28th ed)Tooth, Nonvital: A tooth from which the dental pulp has been removed or is necrotic. (Boucher, Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)Molar: The most posterior teeth on either side of the jaw, totaling eight in the deciduous dentition (2 on each side, upper and lower), and usually 12 in the permanent dentition (three on each side, upper and lower). They are grinding teeth, having large crowns and broad chewing surfaces. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p821)Bone Density: The amount of mineral per square centimeter of BONE. This is the definition used in clinical practice. Actual bone density would be expressed in grams per milliliter. It is most frequently measured by X-RAY ABSORPTIOMETRY or TOMOGRAPHY, X RAY COMPUTED. Bone density is an important predictor for OSTEOPOROSIS.Aortic Diseases: Pathological processes involving any part of the AORTA.Tooth, Impacted: A tooth that is prevented from erupting by a physical barrier, usually other teeth. Impaction may also result from orientation of the tooth in an other than vertical position in the periodontal structures.Tooth Discoloration: Any change in the hue, color, or translucency of a tooth due to any cause. Restorative filling materials, drugs (both topical and systemic), pulpal necrosis, or hemorrhage may be responsible. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p253)Tooth, Unerupted: A normal developing tooth which has not yet perforated the oral mucosa or one that fails to erupt in the normal sequence or time interval expected for the type of tooth in a given gender, age, or population group.Incisor: Any of the eight frontal teeth (four maxillary and four mandibular) having a sharp incisal edge for cutting food and a single root, which occurs in man both as a deciduous and a permanent tooth. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p820)Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Tooth Cervix: The constricted part of the tooth at the junction of the crown and root or roots. It is often referred to as the cementoenamel junction (CEJ), the line at which the cementum covering the root of a tooth and the enamel of the tooth meet. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p530, p433)Odontogenesis: The process of TOOTH formation. It is divided into several stages including: the dental lamina stage, the bud stage, the cap stage, and the bell stage. Odontogenesis includes the production of tooth enamel (AMELOGENESIS), dentin (DENTINOGENESIS), and dental cementum (CEMENTOGENESIS).alpha-2-HS-Glycoprotein: A fetuin subtype that is synthesized by HEPATOCYTES and secreted into the circulation. It plays a major role in preventing CALCIUM precipitation in the BLOOD.Bone Resorption: Bone loss due to osteoclastic activity.Dental Enamel: A hard thin translucent layer of calcified substance which envelops and protects the dentin of the crown of the tooth. It is the hardest substance in the body and is almost entirely composed of calcium salts. Under the microscope, it is composed of thin rods (enamel prisms) held together by cementing substance, and surrounded by an enamel sheath. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p286)Vascular Diseases: Pathological processes involving any of the BLOOD VESSELS in the cardiac or peripheral circulation. They include diseases of ARTERIES; VEINS; and rest of the vasculature system in the body.Bone Development: The growth and development of bones from fetus to adult. It includes two principal mechanisms of bone growth: growth in length of long bones at the epiphyseal cartilages and growth in thickness by depositing new bone (OSTEOGENESIS) with the actions of OSTEOBLASTS and OSTEOCLASTS.Tooth Exfoliation: Physiologic loss of the primary dentition. (Zwemer, Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)Cuspid: The third tooth to the left and to the right of the midline of either jaw, situated between the second INCISOR and the premolar teeth (BICUSPID). (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p817)Tooth Avulsion: Partial or complete displacement of a tooth from its alveolar support. It is commonly the result of trauma. (From Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p312)Bone Marrow: The soft tissue filling the cavities of bones. Bone marrow exists in two types, yellow and red. Yellow marrow is found in the large cavities of large bones and consists mostly of fat cells and a few primitive blood cells. Red marrow is a hematopoietic tissue and is the site of production of erythrocytes and granular leukocytes. Bone marrow is made up of a framework of connective tissue containing branching fibers with the frame being filled with marrow cells.Bone Diseases: Diseases of BONES.Fused Teeth: Two teeth united during development by the union of their tooth germs; the teeth may be joined by the enamel of their crowns, by their root dentin, or by both.Dental Pulp: A richly vascularized and innervated connective tissue of mesodermal origin, contained in the central cavity of a tooth and delimited by the dentin, and having formative, nutritive, sensory, and protective functions. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Bone Matrix: Extracellular substance of bone tissue consisting of COLLAGEN fibers, ground substance, and inorganic crystalline minerals and salts.Heart Valve Diseases: Pathological conditions involving any of the various HEART VALVES and the associated structures (PAPILLARY MUSCLES and CHORDAE TENDINEAE).Calcium Carbonate: Carbonic acid calcium salt (CaCO3). An odorless, tasteless powder or crystal that occurs in nature. It is used therapeutically as a phosphate buffer in hemodialysis patients and as a calcium supplement.Bone Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer located in bone tissue or specific BONES.Tooth DiseasesBicuspid: One of the eight permanent teeth, two on either side in each jaw, between the canines (CUSPID) and the molars (MOLAR), serving for grinding and crushing food. The upper have two cusps (bicuspid) but the lower have one to three. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p822)Tooth Socket: A hollow part of the alveolar process of the MAXILLA or MANDIBLE where each tooth fits and is attached via the periodontal ligament.Bone Marrow Cells: Cells contained in the bone marrow including fat cells (see ADIPOCYTES); STROMAL CELLS; MEGAKARYOCYTES; and the immediate precursors of most blood cells.Tooth Ankylosis: Solid fixation of a tooth resulting from fusion of the cementum and alveolar bone, with obliteration of the periodontal ligament. It is uncommon in the deciduous dentition and very rare in permanent teeth. (Jablonski's Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Dental Pulp CalcificationOsteopontin: A negatively-charged extracellular matrix protein that plays a role in the regulation of BONE metabolism and a variety of other biological functions. Cell signaling by osteopontin may occur through a cell adhesion sequence that recognizes INTEGRIN ALPHA-V BETA-3.Alkaline Phosphatase: An enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of an orthophosphoric monoester and water to an alcohol and orthophosphate. EC 3.1.3.1.Maxilla: One of a pair of irregularly shaped bones that form the upper jaw. A maxillary bone provides tooth sockets for the superior teeth, forms part of the ORBIT, and contains the MAXILLARY SINUS.Tooth Erosion: Progressive loss of the hard substance of a tooth by chemical processes that do not involve bacterial action. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p296)Dentin: The hard portion of the tooth surrounding the pulp, covered by enamel on the crown and cementum on the root, which is harder and denser than bone but softer than enamel, and is thus readily abraded when left unprotected. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Coronary Artery Disease: Pathological processes of CORONARY ARTERIES that may derive from a congenital abnormality, atherosclerotic, or non-atherosclerotic cause.Mandible: The largest and strongest bone of the FACE constituting the lower jaw. It supports the lower teeth.Tooth Replantation: Reinsertion of a tooth into the alveolus from which it was removed or otherwise lost.Tooth Resorption: Resorption of calcified dental tissue, involving demineralization due to reversal of the cation exchange and lacunar resorption by osteoclasts. There are two types: external (as a result of tooth pathology) and internal (apparently initiated by a peculiar inflammatory hyperplasia of the pulp). (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p676)Phosphates: Inorganic salts of phosphoric acid.Osteogenesis: The process of bone formation. Histogenesis of bone including ossification.Aortic Valve: The valve between the left ventricle and the ascending aorta which prevents backflow into the left ventricle.Dental Caries: Localized destruction of the tooth surface initiated by decalcification of the enamel followed by enzymatic lysis of organic structures and leading to cavity formation. If left unchecked, the cavity may penetrate the enamel and dentin and reach the pulp.Dentition: The teeth collectively in the dental arch. Dentition ordinarily refers to the natural teeth in position in their alveoli. Dentition referring to the deciduous teeth is DENTITION, PRIMARY; to the permanent teeth, DENTITION, PERMANENT. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Osteoprotegerin: A secreted member of the TNF receptor superfamily that negatively regulates osteoclastogenesis. It is a soluble decoy receptor of RANK LIGAND that inhibits both CELL DIFFERENTIATION and function of OSTEOCLASTS by inhibiting the interaction between RANK LIGAND and RECEPTOR ACTIVATOR OF NUCLEAR FACTOR-KAPPA B.Root Canal Therapy: A treatment modality in endodontics concerned with the therapy of diseases of the dental pulp. For preparatory procedures, ROOT CANAL PREPARATION is available.Odontometry: Measurement of tooth characteristics.Bone Morphogenetic Protein 2: A potent osteoinductive protein that plays a critical role in the differentiation of osteoprogenitor cells into OSTEOBLASTS.Bone Regeneration: Renewal or repair of lost bone tissue. It excludes BONY CALLUS formed after BONE FRACTURES but not yet replaced by hard bone.Tooth Demineralization: A tooth's loss of minerals, such as calcium in hydroxyapatite from the tooth matrix, caused by acidic exposure. An example of the occurrence of demineralization is in the formation of dental caries.Dentition, Permanent: The 32 teeth of adulthood that either replace or are added to the complement of deciduous teeth. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)Dental Restoration, Permanent: A restoration designed to remain in service for not less than 20 to 30 years, usually made of gold casting, cohesive gold, or amalgam. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Osteoblasts: Bone-forming cells which secrete an EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX. HYDROXYAPATITE crystals are then deposited into the matrix to form bone.Bone Morphogenetic Proteins: Bone-growth regulatory factors that are members of the transforming growth factor-beta superfamily of proteins. They are synthesized as large precursor molecules which are cleaved by proteolytic enzymes. The active form can consist of a dimer of two identical proteins or a heterodimer of two related bone morphogenetic proteins.Kidney Failure, Chronic: The end-stage of CHRONIC RENAL INSUFFICIENCY. It is characterized by the severe irreversible kidney damage (as measured by the level of PROTEINURIA) and the reduction in GLOMERULAR FILTRATION RATE to less than 15 ml per min (Kidney Foundation: Kidney Disease Outcome Quality Initiative, 2002). These patients generally require HEMODIALYSIS or KIDNEY TRANSPLANTATION.Age Determination by Teeth: A means of identifying the age of an animal or human through tooth examination.Alveolar Process: The thickest and spongiest part of the maxilla and mandible hollowed out into deep cavities for the teeth.Radiography, Panoramic: Extraoral body-section radiography depicting an entire maxilla, or both maxilla and mandible, on a single film.Calcium: A basic element found in nearly all organized tissues. It is a member of the alkaline earth family of metals with the atomic symbol Ca, atomic number 20, and atomic weight 40. Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body and combines with phosphorus to form calcium phosphate in the bones and teeth. It is essential for the normal functioning of nerves and muscles and plays a role in blood coagulation (as factor IV) and in many enzymatic processes.Phosphorus: A non-metal element that has the atomic symbol P, atomic number 15, and atomic weight 31. It is an essential element that takes part in a broad variety of biochemical reactions.Minerals: Native, inorganic or fossilized organic substances having a definite chemical composition and formed by inorganic reactions. They may occur as individual crystals or may be disseminated in some other mineral or rock. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed; McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Anodontia: Congenital absence of the teeth; it may involve all (total anodontia) or only some of the teeth (partial anodontia, hypodontia), and both the deciduous and the permanent dentition, or only teeth of the permanent dentition. (Dorland, 27th ed)Periodontal Ligament: The fibrous CONNECTIVE TISSUE surrounding the TOOTH ROOT, separating it from and attaching it to the alveolar bone (ALVEOLAR PROCESS).Basal Ganglia Diseases: Diseases of the BASAL GANGLIA including the PUTAMEN; GLOBUS PALLIDUS; claustrum; AMYGDALA; and CAUDATE NUCLEUS. DYSKINESIAS (most notably involuntary movements and alterations of the rate of movement) represent the primary clinical manifestations of these disorders. Common etiologies include CEREBROVASCULAR DISORDERS; NEURODEGENERATIVE DISEASES; and CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA.Monckeberg Medial Calcific Sclerosis: Thickening and loss of elasticity of the walls of muscular ARTERIES due to calcification of the TUNICA MEDIA, the concentric layers of helically arranged SMOOTH MUSCLE CELLS.Hyperphosphatemia: A condition of abnormally high level of PHOSPHATES in the blood, usually significantly above the normal range of 0.84-1.58 mmol per liter of serum.Renal Dialysis: Therapy for the insufficient cleansing of the BLOOD by the kidneys based on dialysis and including hemodialysis, PERITONEAL DIALYSIS, and HEMODIAFILTRATION.Atherosclerosis: A thickening and loss of elasticity of the walls of ARTERIES that occurs with formation of ATHEROSCLEROTIC PLAQUES within the ARTERIAL INTIMA.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Tooth Preparation, Prosthodontic: The selected form given to a natural tooth when it is reduced by instrumentation to receive a prosthesis (e.g., artificial crown or a retainer for a fixed or removable prosthesis). The selection of the form is guided by clinical circumstances and physical properties of the materials that make up the prosthesis. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p239)Tomography, Spiral Computed: Computed tomography where there is continuous X-ray exposure to the patient while being transported in a spiral or helical pattern through the beam of irradiation. This provides improved three-dimensional contrast and spatial resolution compared to conventional computed tomography, where data is obtained and computed from individual sequential exposures.Core Binding Factor Alpha 1 Subunit: A transcription factor that dimerizes with CORE BINDING FACTOR BETA SUBUNIT to form core binding factor. It contains a highly conserved DNA-binding domain known as the runt domain and is involved in genetic regulation of skeletal development and CELL DIFFERENTIATION.Ossification, Heterotopic: The development of bony substance in normally soft structures.OdontoblastsBone Marrow Transplantation: The transference of BONE MARROW from one human or animal to another for a variety of purposes including HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION or MESENCHYMAL STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION.Bone Transplantation: The grafting of bone from a donor site to a recipient site.Extracellular Matrix Proteins: Macromolecular organic compounds that contain carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, and usually, sulfur. These macromolecules (proteins) form an intricate meshwork in which cells are embedded to construct tissues. Variations in the relative types of macromolecules and their organization determine the type of extracellular matrix, each adapted to the functional requirements of the tissue. The two main classes of macromolecules that form the extracellular matrix are: glycosaminoglycans, usually linked to proteins (proteoglycans), and fibrous proteins (e.g., COLLAGEN; ELASTIN; FIBRONECTINS; and LAMININ).Osteocalcin: Vitamin K-dependent calcium-binding protein synthesized by OSTEOBLASTS and found primarily in BONES. Serum osteocalcin measurements provide a noninvasive specific marker of bone metabolism. The protein contains three residues of the amino acid gamma-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla), which, in the presence of CALCIUM, promotes binding to HYDROXYAPATITE and subsequent accumulation in BONE MATRIX.Sialoglycoproteins: Glycoproteins which contain sialic acid as one of their carbohydrates. They are often found on or in the cell or tissue membranes and participate in a variety of biological activities.Dental Pulp Cavity: The space in a tooth bounded by the dentin and containing the dental pulp. The portion of the cavity within the crown of the tooth is the pulp chamber; the portion within the root is the pulp canal or root canal.Uremia: A clinical syndrome associated with the retention of renal waste products or uremic toxins in the blood. It is usually the result of RENAL INSUFFICIENCY. Most uremic toxins are end products of protein or nitrogen CATABOLISM, such as UREA or CREATININE. Severe uremia can lead to multiple organ dysfunctions with a constellation of symptoms.Bone Diseases, MetabolicAortic Valve Stenosis: A pathological constriction that can occur above (supravalvular stenosis), below (subvalvular stenosis), or at the AORTIC VALVE. It is characterized by restricted outflow from the LEFT VENTRICLE into the AORTA.Diphosphates: Inorganic salts of phosphoric acid that contain two phosphate groups.Dental Cementum: The bonelike rigid connective tissue covering the root of a tooth from the cementoenamel junction to the apex and lining the apex of the root canal, also assisting in tooth support by serving as attachment structures for the periodontal ligament. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)X-Ray Microtomography: X-RAY COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY with resolution in the micrometer range.Aorta: The main trunk of the systemic arteries.Calcium Phosphates: Calcium salts of phosphoric acid. These compounds are frequently used as calcium supplements.Anthozoa: A class in the phylum CNIDARIA, comprised mostly of corals and anemones. All members occur only as polyps; the medusa stage is completely absent.Ameloblasts: Cylindrical epithelial cells in the innermost layer of the ENAMEL ORGAN. Their functions include contribution to the development of the dentinoenamel junction by the deposition of a layer of the matrix, thus producing the foundation for the prisms (the structural units of the DENTAL ENAMEL), and production of the matrix for the enamel prisms and interprismatic substance. (From Jablonski's Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Aorta, Abdominal: The aorta from the DIAPHRAGM to the bifurcation into the right and left common iliac arteries.Plaque, Atherosclerotic: Lesions formed within the walls of ARTERIES.Alveolar Bone Loss: Resorption or wasting of the tooth-supporting bone (ALVEOLAR PROCESS) in the MAXILLA or MANDIBLE.Fractures, Bone: Breaks in bones.Bone Substitutes: Synthetic or natural materials for the replacement of bones or bone tissue. They include hard tissue replacement polymers, natural coral, hydroxyapatite, beta-tricalcium phosphate, and various other biomaterials. The bone substitutes as inert materials can be incorporated into surrounding tissue or gradually replaced by original tissue.Dental Pulp Necrosis: Death of pulp tissue with or without bacterial invasion. When the necrosis is due to ischemia with superimposed bacterial infection, it is referred to as pulp gangrene. When the necrosis is non-bacterial in origin, it is called pulp mummification.Bioprosthesis: Prosthesis, usually heart valve, composed of biological material and whose durability depends upon the stability of the material after pretreatment, rather than regeneration by host cell ingrowth. Durability is achieved 1, mechanically by the interposition of a cloth, usually polytetrafluoroethylene, between the host and the graft, and 2, chemically by stabilization of the tissue by intermolecular linking, usually with glutaraldehyde, after removal of antigenic components, or the use of reconstituted and restructured biopolymers.Pseudoxanthoma Elasticum: An inherited disorder of connective tissue with extensive degeneration and calcification of ELASTIC TISSUE primarily in the skin, eye, and vasculature. At least two forms exist, autosomal recessive and autosomal dominant. This disorder is caused by mutations of one of the ATP-BINDING CASSETTE TRANSPORTERS. Patients are predisposed to MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION and GASTROINTESTINAL HEMORRHAGE.Glutaral: One of the protein CROSS-LINKING REAGENTS that is used as a disinfectant for sterilization of heat-sensitive equipment and as a laboratory reagent, especially as a fixative.Mitral Valve: The valve between the left atrium and left ventricle of the heart.Dental Models: Presentation devices used for patient education and technique training in dentistry.Tooth Remineralization: Therapeutic technique for replacement of minerals in partially decalcified teeth.Cardiomyopathies: A group of diseases in which the dominant feature is the involvement of the CARDIAC MUSCLE itself. Cardiomyopathies are classified according to their predominant pathophysiological features (DILATED CARDIOMYOPATHY; HYPERTROPHIC CARDIOMYOPATHY; RESTRICTIVE CARDIOMYOPATHY) or their etiological/pathological factors (CARDIOMYOPATHY, ALCOHOLIC; ENDOCARDIAL FIBROELASTOSIS).Calcium-Binding Proteins: Proteins to which calcium ions are bound. They can act as transport proteins, regulator proteins, or activator proteins. They typically contain EF HAND MOTIFS.Kidney Diseases: Pathological processes of the KIDNEY or its component tissues.
Chronic over-absorption can cause hardening of bones, calcification of ligaments, and buildup on teeth. Fluoride can cause ... The fluoride enhances the strength of teeth by the formation of fluorapatite, a naturally occurring component of tooth enamel. ... In particular it has a high and rapid bone uptake accompanied by very rapid blood clearance, which results in a high bone-to- ... which can alter the appearance of children's teeth during tooth development; this is mostly mild and is unlikely to represent ...
Fisher LW, Fedarko NS (2003). "Six genes expressed in bones and teeth encode the current members of the SIBLING family of ... bone (and tooth) mineralization diseases, osteoporosis, and some forms of stress. OPN has been implicated in pathogenesis of ... ectopic calcification - such as for example, in urolithiasis and vascular calcification ‒ presumably at least in part to ... OPN expression in bone predominantly occurs by osteoblasts and osteocyctes (bone-forming cells) as well as osteoclasts (bone- ...
Typically, radiographs show defects in calcification and characteristic bony defects near the ends of major long bones. Growth ... As a result of defects in the development of the dental cementum, the deciduous teeth (baby teeth) are often lost fore the age ... Dental problems: Children particularly benefit from skilled dental care, as early tooth loss can cause malnutrition and inhibit ... one of the main components of bone, causing rickets in infants and children and osteomalacia (soft bones) in adults. PLP is the ...
... ectopic bone or cartilage, lymph nodes, granulomatous lesions or calcification of the stylohyoid ligament in the context of ... This may include gargling with salt water or attempts to remove with a tooth pick or cotton swab.[5] ... Imaging diagnostic techniques can identify a radiopaque mass that may be mistaken for foreign bodies, displaced teeth or ... Tonsilloliths or tonsil stones are calcifications that form in the crypts of the palatal tonsils. They are also known to form ...
... ectopic bone or cartilage, lymph nodes, granulomatous lesions or calcification of the stylohyoid ligament in the context of ... This may include gargling with salt water or attempts to remove with a tooth pick or cotton swab. Tonsilloliths or tonsillar ... Imaging diagnostic techniques can identify a radiopaque mass that may be mistaken for foreign bodies, displaced teeth or ... isolated bone which is usually derived from embryonic rests originating from the branchial arches. Tonsilloliths are difficult ...
An average adult human contains about 0.7 kg of phosphorus, about 85-90% in bones and teeth in the form of apatite, and the ... Hydroxyapatite is the main component of tooth enamel. Water fluoridation enhances the resistance of teeth to decay by the ... Too much phosphate can lead to diarrhoea and calcification (hardening) of organs and soft tissue, and can interfere with the ... Bone ash was the major source of phosphorus until the 1840s. The method started by roasting bones, then employed the use of ...
However whilst the unequivocal presence of ACP in bones and teeth is the subject of debate, there is evidence that transient ... "Role of calcium phosphate nanoclusters in the control of calcification". FEBS Journal. 276 (8): 2308-2323. doi:10.1111/j.1742- ... composites are believed to be effective anti-demineralizing/remineralizing agents for the preservation and repair of tooth ... amorphous precursors are involved in the development of bone and teeth. The ACP in bovine milk is believed to involve calcium ...
Calcium and vitamin D3 are critical for proper bone formation during development and for proper calcification of eggs for a ... Next to the full grown tooth there is a small replacement tooth developing from the odontogenic stem cell in the dental lamina ... Common leopard geckos are polyphyodonts and able to replace each of their 100 teeth every 3 to 4 months. ... Their "egg tooth" will fall off within one to two days. In addition to this, their skin will usually shed within 24 hours of ...
It is not to be confused (but often is) with whale bone or whale's bone meaning the actual bones of whales, used in carving, ... The transition from teeth to baleen is proposed to have occurred stepwise, from teeth to a hybrid to baleen. It is known that ... However, developing mysticetes do not produce tooth enamel because at some point this trait evolved to become a pseudogene. ... permanent dead link] Szewciw, L. J.; De Kerckhove, D. G.; Grime, G. W.; Fudge, D. S. (2010). "Calcification provides mechanical ...
This mutation causes bone deformities, fractures, and delayed tooth eruption.[40] Type XIII[edit]. OI caused by a mutation in ... Children with OI should go for a dental check-up as soon as their teeth erupt, this may minimize tooth structure loss as a ... OI Type V leads to calcification of the membrane between the two forearm bones, making it difficult to turn the wrist. Another ... "Brittle Bone Disorder". 1996. Retrieved 6 November 2018.. *^ a b c d e f g h i j "Osteogenesis Imperfecta Overview". NIAMS. ...
The carinae, or tooth edges, are strongly developed both anteriorly and posteriorly. The premaxillary teeth are generally ... Also, the sutures that separate the bones of the skull in both specimens are fully fused, suggesting that the individuals have ... the osteoderms begin calcification after 1 year and grow to articulate with other osteoderms to form a dermal shield at ... "Festooned" refers to the lateral undulations in the maxillae and premaxillae that form around the tooth sockets, or alveoli. ...
... sclerosis/transparent dentin-sclerosis of primary dentin is regressive alteration in tooth characterized by calcification of ... Dentin is a bone-like matrix that is porous and yellow-hued material. It is made up of 70% inorganic materials (mainly ... Some mammalian teeth exploit this phenomenon, especially herbivores such as horses, deer or elephants. In many herbivores, the ... Secondary dentin is a layer of dentin produced after the root of the tooth is completely formed. Tertiary dentin is created in ...
Calcification normally proceeds downward to the base of the tooth, but calcification from the tip stops abruptly in pedicellate ... teeth. Calcification resumes at the base, leaving an area in the center of the tooth uncalcified. This pattern is seen in ... Their bones are not highly developed for movement on land. The cross-sectional thickness of limb bones in adult metoposaurids ... Temnospondyls often have teeth on their palates, as well as in their jaws. Some of these teeth are so large, they are referred ...
... sclerosis/transparent dentin-sclerosis of primary dentin is regressive alteration in tooth characterized by calcification of ... Some mammalian teeth exploit this phenomenon, especially herbivores such as horses, deer or elephants. In many herbivores, the ... Dentin is a bone-like matrix that is porous and yellow-hued material. It is made up of 70% inorganic materials (mainly ... Dentin is derived from the dental papilla of the tooth germ.[5] After apposition of predentin and maturation into dentin, the ...
Examples of biogenic minerals include: Apatite in bones and teeth. Aragonite, calcite, fluorite in vestibular systems (part of ... Anghileri, L. J.; Maincent, P.; Cordova-Martinez, A. (1993). "On the mechanism of soft tissue calcification induced by ... is underlined by a remarkable experiment whereby the nacreous layer of a molluscan shell was implanted into a human tooth, and ... Iron is stored in close proximity to magnetite-coated chiton teeth, so that the teeth can be renewed as they wear. Not only is ...
Anterior teeth typically do not require full coverage restorations after a root canal, unless there is extensive tooth loss ... The dark circles at the bottom of the tooth roots (7 & 8) indicated infection in the surrounding bone. Recommended treatment is ... calcification and number of roots on the tooth being treated. Complications resulting from incompletely cleaned canals, due to ... The tooth can also be unroofed to allow drainage and help relieve pressure.[citation needed] A root treated tooth may be eased ...
... tooth loss MeSH C07.465.714.836 --- tooth migration MeSH C07.465.714.836.535 --- mesial movement of teeth MeSH C07.465.714.898 ... alveolar bone loss MeSH C07.465.714.204 --- furcation defects MeSH C07.465.714.258 --- gingival diseases MeSH C07.465.714.258. ... dental pulp calcification MeSH C07.793.237.283 --- dental pulp exposure MeSH C07.793.237.315 --- dental pulp necrosis MeSH ... tooth avulsion MeSH C07.793.850.750 --- tooth fractures MeSH C07.793.850.750.300 --- cracked tooth syndrome MeSH C07.793. ...
The mineral fractions of bone and teeth act as a reservoir of trace elements, including carbon, oxygen and strontium. Stable ... Daniel Bryant, J.; Luz, B.; Froelich, P. N. (1994). "Oxygen isotopic composition of fossil horse tooth phosphate as a record of ... Hydroxylapatite crystals are also found in the small calcifications, within the pineal gland and other structures, known as ... Up to 50% by volume and 70% by weight of human bone is a modified form of hydroxylapatite, known as bone mineral. Carbonated ...
The best method of maintaining the health of teeth is to practice exemplary oral hygiene. More tooth loss is likely to occur if ... As well as this, numerous pulp stones can be often found in the pulp chambers due to abnormal calcifications. In primary teeth ... Both onlay bone grafting and sinus lift techniques can be carried out together to accomplish implant placement. Kim, J.-W.; ... The teeth are mostly maligned and have higher risk of fracture. In other words, affect primary teeth usually have abnormal ...
The dark circles at the bottom of the tooth roots (7 and 8) indicated infection in the surrounding bone. Recommended treatment ... calcification and number of roots on the tooth being treated. Complications resulting from incompletely cleaned canals, due to ... Root-canal-treated teeth may fail to heal-for example, if the dentist does not find, clean and fill all of the root canals ... Tooth discoloration[edit]. Tooth discoloration is common following root canal treatment; however, the exact causes for this are ...
Bone tissue is a type of dense connective tissue. Because bones come in a variety of shapes and have a complex internal and ... The upper jaw is formed from the pterygoids and vomers alone, all of which bear teeth. Much of the skull is formed from ... Cartilaginous fish have numerous tooth-like denticles embedded in their skin, in place of true scales. Sweat glands and ... The lower tube surrounds the notochord, and has a complex structure, often including multiple layers of calcification. Lampreys ...
Apatite in bones and teeth.. *Aragonite, calcite, fluorite in vestibular systems (part of the inner ear) of vertebrates. ... Because extracellular[20] iron is strongly involved in inducing calcification,[21][22] its control is essential in developing ... is underlined by a remarkable experiment whereby the nacreous layer of a molluscan shell was implanted into a human tooth, and ... Iron is stored in close proximity to magnetite-coated chiton teeth, so that the teeth can be renewed as they wear. Not only is ...
... steel crowns which are advocated for primary teeth where occlusal face height may be hugely compromised due to loss of tooth ... 2007). "Bisphosphonate associated osteonecrosis of the jaw: report of a task force of the American Society for Bone and Mineral ... any environmental or systemic upset that impedes calcification or metabolisation of calcium can also result in anomalous ... These teeth are usually known as "shell teeth". Periapical radiolucency may be seen on radiographs but may occur without any ...
The drug is able to chelate calcium ions and is incorporated into teeth, cartilage, and bone.[26] Ingestion during the years of ... matrix of dental plaque and calcified tissues undergo a series of chemical and morphological changes that lead to calcification ... Tooth wear and ageing: Tooth wear is a progressive loss of enamel and dentine due to tooth erosion, abrasion and attrition. As ... The process of tooth whitening lightens the colour of a tooth.[1] Tooth whitening can be achieved by either changing the ...
The drug is able to chelate calcium ions and is incorporated into teeth, cartilage, and bone.[26] Ingestion during the years of ... matrix of dental plaque and calcified tissues undergo a series of chemical and morphological changes that lead to calcification ... "Teeth Whitening". WebMD. Retrieved 2020-03-03.. *^ a b Greenwall, Linda (2017-04-11), "Tooth Sensitivity Associated with Tooth ... Tooth whitening or tooth bleaching is the process of lightning the color of human teeth.[1] Whitening is often desirable when ...
... (also called deficiency of alkaline phosphatase or phosphoethanolaminuria) is a rare, and sometimes fatal, metabolic bone disease. Clinical symptoms are heterogeneous, ranging from the rapidly fatal, perinatal variant, with profound skeletal hypomineralization and respiratory compromise, to a milder, progressive osteomalacia later in life. Tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNSALP) deficiency in osteoblasts and chondrocytes impairs bone mineralization, leading to rickets or osteomalacia. The pathognomonic finding is subnormal serum activity of the TNSALP enzyme, which is caused by one of 200 genetic mutations identified to date, in the gene encoding TNSALP. Genetic inheritance is autosomal recessive for the perinatal and infantile forms but either autosomal recessive or autosomal dominant in the milder forms. The prevalence of hypophosphatasia is not known; one study estimated the live birth incidence of severe forms to be 1:100,000. There is a remarkable variety of ...
... is the softening of the bones caused by impaired bone metabolism primarily due to inadequate levels of available phosphate, calcium, and vitamin D, or because of resorption of calcium. The impairment of bone metabolism causes inadequate bone mineralization. Osteomalacia in children is known as rickets, and because of this, use of the term "osteomalacia" is often restricted to the milder, adult form of the disease. Signs and symptoms can include diffuse body pains, muscle weakness, and fragility of the bones. In addition to low systemic levels of circulating mineral ions necessary for bone and tooth mineralization, accumulation of mineralization-inhibiting proteins and peptides (such as osteopontin and ASARM peptides) occurs in the extracellular matrix of bones and teeth, likely contributing locally to cause matrix hypomineralization (osteomalacia).[1][2][3][4][5] The most common cause of osteomalacia is a deficiency of ...
2 levels may also play a role.[32]. Biomineralization evolved multiple times, independently,[35] and most animal lineages first expressed biomineralized components in the Cambrian period.[36] Many of the same processes are used in unrelated lineages, which suggests that biomineralization machinery was assembled from pre-existing "off-the-shelf" components already used for other purposes in the organism.[37] Although the biomachinery facilitating biomineralization is complex - involving signalling transmitters, inhibitors, and transcription factors - many elements of this 'toolkit' are shared between phyla as diverse as corals, molluscs, and vertebrates.[38] The shared components tend to perform quite fundamental tasks, such as designating that cells will be used to create the minerals, whereas genes controlling more finely tuned aspects that occur later in the biomineralization process - such as the precise alignment and structure of the crystals produced - tend to be uniquely evolved in ...
2 levels may also play a role.[32] Biomineralization evolved multiple times, independently,[35] and most animal lineages first expressed biomineralized components in the Cambrian period.[36] Many of the same processes are used in unrelated lineages, which suggests that biomineralization machinery was assembled from pre-existing "off-the-shelf" components already used for other purposes in the organism.[37] Although the biomachinery facilitating biomineralization is complex - involving signalling transmitters, inhibitors, and transcription factors - many elements of this 'toolkit' are shared between phyla as diverse as corals, molluscs, and vertebrates.[38] The shared components tend to perform quite fundamental tasks, such as designating that cells will be used to create the minerals, whereas genes controlling more finely tuned aspects that occur later in the biomineralization process - such as the precise alignment and structure of the crystals produced - tend to be uniquely evolved in ...
... (also termed tooth staining) is abnormal tooth color, hue or translucency. External discoloration is accumulation of stains on the tooth surface. Internal discoloration is due to absorption of pigment particles into tooth structure. Sometimes there are several different co-existent factors responsible for discoloration. The appearance and perception of a tooth is the result of a complex interaction of factors such as lighting conditions, translucency, opacity, light scattering, gloss and the human eye and brain. Of these, the intrinsic pigmentation of a tooth is the most influential, which in turn is determined by genetic and natural factors. Light hitting a tooth undergoes reflection, absorption and transmission by varying degrees in each tissue layer of the tooth substance. Reflected light detected by the human eye determines the perceived appearance of a ...
A tooth (plural teeth) is a hard, calcified structure found in the jaws (or mouths) of many vertebrates and used to break down food. Some animals, particularly carnivores, also use teeth for hunting or for defensive purposes. The roots of teeth are covered by gums. Teeth are not made of bone, but rather of multiple tissues of varying density and hardness. The cellular tissues that ultimately become teeth originate from the embryonic germ layer, the ectoderm. The general structure of teeth is similar across the vertebrates, although there is considerable variation in their form and position. The teeth of mammals have deep roots, and this pattern is also found in some fish, and in crocodilians. In most teleost fish, however, the teeth are attached to the outer surface of the bone, while in lizards they are attached to the inner surface of the jaw by one side. ...
Before the treatment, the clinician should examine the patient: taking a health and dental history (including allergies and sensitivities), observe hard and soft tissues, placement and conditions of restorations, and sometimes x-rays to determine the nature and depth of possible irregularities. If this is not completed prior to the whitening agents being applied to the tooth surface, excessive sensitivity and other complications may occur. The whitening shade guides are used to measure tooth colour. These shades determine the effectiveness of the whitening procedure, which may vary from two to seven shades.[33] These shades may be reached after a single in office appointment, or may take longer, depending on the individual. The effects of bleaching can last for several months, but may vary depending on the lifestyle of the patient. Consuming tooth staining foods or drinks that have a strong colour may compromise effectiveness of the treatment. These include ...
... is one of the four major tissues that make up the tooth in humans and many other animals, including some species of fish. It makes up the normally visible part of the tooth, covering the crown. The other major tissues are dentin, cementum, and dental pulp. It is a very hard, white to off-white, highly mineralised substance that acts as a barrier to protect the tooth but can become susceptible to degradation, especially by acids from food and drink. Enamel is the hardest substance in the human body and contains the highest percentage of minerals, 96%, with water and organic material composing the rest. The primary mineral is hydroxyapatite, which is a crystalline calcium phosphate. Enamel is formed on the tooth while the tooth is developing within the gum, before it erupts into the mouth. Once fully formed, it does not contain blood vessels or nerves. Remineralisation of teeth can repair damage to the ...
The cause of isolated missing teeth remains unclear, but the condition is believed to be associated with genetic or environmental factors during dental development. Missing teeth have been reported in association with increased maternal age, low birth weight, multiple births and rubella virus infection during embryonic life.[citation needed] In a recent study assessing environmental risk factors for hypodontia, it was established that maternal smoking does play a causative role in Hypodontia. Passive smoking and caffeine were also assessed but showed no statistical significance.[7] There is a possible correlation between tooth agenesis and innervation.[8][9][10][11][12] A relationship was also postulated between abnormalities of the brainstem and the presence of agenesis.[13] Hypodontia is often familial, and can also be associated with genetic disorders such as ectodermal dysplasia or Down syndrome. Hypodontia can also be seen in people with cleft lip and ...
... often wear in specific patterns, based on the way the horse eats its food, and these patterns are often used to conjecture on the age of the horse after it has developed a full mouth. As with aging through observing tooth eruption, this can be imprecise, and may be affected by diet, natural abnormalities, and vices such as cribbing. The importance of dentition in assessing the age of horses led to veterinary dentistry techniques being used as a method of fraud, with owners and traders altering the teeth of horses to mimic the tooth shapes and characteristics of horses younger than the actual age of the equine.[3]. Equine teeth are designed to wear against the tooth above or below as the horse chews, thus preventing excess growth. The upper jaw is wider than the lower one. In some cases, sharp edges can occur on the outside of the upper molars and the inside of the lower molars, as they are unopposed by an opposite ...
Rhizodonts (order Rhizodontida) are an extinct group of predatory tetrapodomorph fishes known from many areas of the world from the Givetian through to the Pennsylvanian - the earliest known species is about 377 million years ago (Mya), the latest around 310 Mya. Rhizodonts lived in tropical rivers and freshwater lakes and were the dominant predators of their age. They reached huge sizes - the largest known species, Rhizodus hibberti from Europe and North America, was an estimated 7 m in length, making it the largest freshwater fish known. The upper jaw had a marginal row of small teeth on the maxilla and premaxilla, medium-sized fangs on the ectopterygoid and dermopalatine bones, and large tusks on the vomers and premaxillae. On the lower jaw were marginal teeth on the dentary, with fangs on the three coronoids and a huge tusk at the symphysial tip of the dentary. Apparently, the left and right mandibles rotated inwards towards each other on biting. This ...
... on yhdysvaltalaisen thrash metal -yhtye Megadethin singlejulkaisu, ja se on järjestyksessään kolmas single Countdown to Extinction -albumilta, joka julkaistiin vuonna 1992. Single julkaistiin 1993. Albumin on kirjoittanut Dave Mustaine. Kappale on yksi albumin nopeatempoisimmista kappaleista. Kappaleen sanoitukset käsittelevät ihmistä, joka yrittää itsemurhaa, mutta epäonnistuu joka kerralla. Mustaine kertoi konsertissa kappaleen kuvaavan hyvin hänen tuonaikaisia päihdeongelmiaan. Konsertissa ennen kappaleen aloitusta hän kertoi kappaleen kertovan, miten hän on halunnut useasti päättää elämänsä, johon ei ole loppujen lopuksi kuitenkaan kyennyt. Suomalainen melodista death metallia soittava yhtye Kalmah on tehnyt kappaleesta cover-version, joka julkaistiin vuonna 2002 albumilla They Will Return. ...
Chu Y.-T., 1935. Comparative studies on the scales and on the pharyngeals and their teeth in Chinese cyprinids, with particular reference to taxonomy and evolution. Biol. Bull. St. John's Univ. Shanghai Núm. 2. i-x + 1-225. ...
What is nutritional calcification? Meaning of nutritional calcification medical term. What does nutritional calcification mean? ... Looking for online definition of nutritional calcification in the Medical Dictionary? nutritional calcification explanation ... Calcification is normal in bones and teeth.. cal·ci·fi·ca·tion. (kalsi-fi-kāshŭn) 1. Deposition of lime or other insoluble ... The condition may be normal, as in bone and tooth formation, or pathologic. ...
Calcification. *Damaged root surfaces and surrounding bone requiring surgery. Are there any risks and complications associated ... Teeth with caps or posts *Cyst or infection which is untreatable with root canal therapy ... A dye is used to detect any cracks or fractures in the tooth. The apicoectomy is stopped if the tooth is found fractured or ... The tooth is numbed and the gum is cut and lifted to access the root of the tooth. ...
Thickening of cortical bone and calcification of ligaments and tendons. Severe pain and stiffness in joints and spine. ... The white opaque areas in the enamel of the teeth are more extensive but do not involve as much as 50 percent of the tooth. ( ... 2. PHOSPHOROUS • Total body content-1kg-80% Bone & Teeth • Mainly an intracellular ion (all cells) • SOURCES:Milk(100mg/dl), ... 4. • Functions: • Bone & Teeth formation • Formation of phospholipids,nucliec acids, phosphoproteins,phosphate esters. • ...
Around the age of fifteen, the majority of the permanent teeth are lost [6]. There is a dramatic alveolar bone resorption, ... Figure 4: Cephalogram in case 5 showed no calcification. Alveolar bone destruction and severe periodontal destruction can also ... Palmoplantar lesions are usually presented during the time of tooth eruption between the ages of six months to three years. The ... In three cases, all permanent teeth were exfoliated. In three others, no primary teeth remained. Severe gingivitis was observed ...
Boron deficiency combined with magnesium deficiency is especially damaging to the bones and teeth. ... This then leads to osteoarthritis and other forms of arthritis, osteoporosis and tooth decay. With advancing age high blood ... However, with long-standing severe calcifications, a large amount of calcium cannot be redistributed in a short time. This ... Bone analysis showed that arthritic joints and nearby bones had only half the boron content of healthy joints. Equally, ...
Decreases incidence of tooth decay but high levels can stain or mottle teeth. Causes crippling bone disorder (calcification of ... Causes acute and chronic toxicity; can cause damage to lungs and bones. Possible carcinogen.. ... the bones and joints) at very high levels.. Hardness. Result of metallic ions dissolved in the water; reported as concentration ...
... and tooth formation. Vitamin D is actually a hormone and also helps with mood and mental health, and maintaining a healthy ... Benefits: Teeth, bones, clotting. Daily Needs (Adult): 15 - 20mcg. Daily Needs (Child): 10 - 15mcg. Too Much: Bone ... calcification, constipation, kidney stones. Too Little: Rickets, decreased calcium levels, muscle spasms. Causes of Deficiency: ... Vitamin D helps the body absorb the mineral calcium, which maintains strong bones and teeth. Like all vitamins, D has no ...
Incomplete calcification of teeth. *Prone to cavities. *Increase in tooth movement. Phosphorus *80-90% in bones and teeth ... Stored in teeth and bones Tea, gelatin, seafood, fluoridated water[12] *Prone to cavities ... Before tooth brushes, chewing sticks of different herbal twigs were and are continued to be used to cleanse the teeth. Recent ... 99% stored in teeth and bones *Dairy (cottage cheese, milk, cheddar cheese, yogurt) ...
In severe cases, it can cause changes to bone structure, calcification of ligaments, and crippling effects. ... Clinical dental fluorosis is characterized by staining and pitting of the teeth. In more severe cases, all the enamel may be ... In skeletal fluorosis, fluoride accumulates in the bone progressively over many years, leading to stiffness and pain in the ... Methods outlined in the monograph include: use of crushed clay pots, bone charcoal, contact precipitation, or use of activated ...
Scientists examined the presence of calcifications and the bone level around the teeth. ... She wanted to see if calcifications seen on X-rays over a period of 13 years are associated with the onset of stroke and/or ... Tooth loss increases risk of cardiovascular diseases. Researchers have identified a clear link between periodontis, ... Calcification of the carotid artery is linked to cardiovascular diseases. Periodontitis increases risks for ischemic heart ...
Ingestion of fluoride induces adverse effects not only in teeth and bones, but also in various soft tissues such as brain, ... and bone and tooth development with thresholds for injury."26. To avoid fluorides detrimental effects on the body, avoid ... But calcification has also been observed in young children. About 40 percent of Americans have calcified pineals by age ... Soups and stews made with nourishing bone broth are ideal, as bone broth greatly aids the digestive process. Vegetables should ...
... increases in bone mass and bone density may not appear, but ligaments would reveal calcification." they write. ... Well-known is that fluoride excess irreversibly cripples bones and crumbles teeth (fluorosis). ... in an attempt to reduce tooth decay. ... Fluorides harmful health effects, except to teeth, are rarely ... 3) take forearm X-rays to look for interosseous membrane calcification. The forearm X-ray is essential for diagnosis of ...
It is food for the parathyroid gland and helps get the calcium to the bone and teeth. http://www.educate-yourself.org/cn/ ... Boron deficiency combined with magnesium deficiency is especially damaging to the bones and teeth. ... This then leads to osteoarthritis and other forms of arthritis, osteoporosis and tooth decay. With advancing age, high blood ... Breast cancer is related to calcifications in the breast. In my opinion, it is more important to normalize the calcium- ...
... such as bones and teeth, calcification as result of pathology, or soft tissues and biomaterials stained with radiographic ... mature bone) and low-contrast (implants, tooth enamel) scans. ... phenotype characterization of bones and teeth in animal models ... mouse femur trabecular bone: ,0.5% for mineral density, ,0.7% for trabecular bone volume fraction, relative bone surface, ... In a typical mouse bone characterization the resolution used is 6µm (for femur/tibia) or 10µm (for knee). ...
The remainder accumulates in your teeth and bones,6 pineal gland,7 and other tissues-including your blood vessels, where it can ... Fluoride is added to drinking water in an albeit futile attempt to prevent a disease (tooth decay), and as such becomes a ... contribute to calcification. According to a 500-page long scientific review8 by the National Research Council of the National ... Research links fluoridated water consumption to thyroid dysfunction, ADHD, reduced IQ, bone fluorosis, increased bone fracture ...
... which help maintain normal bone formation and density. ... Bones, Hair, Teeth and Fingernails Formula Tincture, 2 fl oz. ... Boron is essential to bone metabolism and calcification of bones, and helps prevent osteoporosis, arthritis, and tooth decay.. ... This formula is very high in minerals and helps to nourish bones, hair and teeth and fingernails.. Availability: Yes. Retail: $ ... Bone, Flesh & Cartilage Formula Ointment, Natures Way - 2 oz.. Bone Flesh and Cartilage, from Natures Way, is a time-tested ...
Bone Calcium is a unique nutritional supplement formulated with calcium-rich, high collagen Microcrystalline Hydroxypatite (MCH ... Boron is essential to bone metabolism and calcification of bones, and helps prevent osteoporosis, arthritis, and tooth decay.. ... Just An Ounce, Calcium and Magnesium Liquid can help with the development of strong bones and teeth, also prevents muscle ... Calcium Complex Bone Formula, 100 caps. Natures Way Calcium Complex Bone Formula provides the key minerals and trace elements ...
Fluoride plays a role in the mineralization of your bones and teeth, a process essential for keeping them hard and strong. ... These bacteria break down carbs and produce organic acids that can damage tooth enamel, the mineral-rich outer layer of a tooth ... Advanced cases may eventually cause altered bone structure and calcification of ligaments. ... It only occurs in children during the development of teeth.. Skeletal Fluorosis. Skeletal fluorosis is a bone disease that ...
Vitamin D is required for the proper calcification of teeth and bones - still need the calcium too! ... Cereal 2 This cereal is designed for someone with a sweet tooth (children!), the carbohydrate content from the original grain ... Wounds fail to heal properly and bone fails to rebuild properly too and you are further likely to suffer from anaemia and ... However, there are lots of additives in the way of vitamins and minerals like iron and calcium for bone growth ...
It is marked by mottling of the teeth and, when severe, calcification of the ligaments. ... Fluorosis is a disturbance of dental enamel caused by excessive exposure to high concentrations of fluoride during tooth growth ... ranging from fluorosis to serious bone degeneration. ... Does fluoride help strengthen teeth and prevent cavities? Yes, ...
13 Because of the resilient bone surrounding the primary teeth, the majority of injuries are tooth luxations.2,13,14 ... Pulp calcification: the pulp chamber and root canal are obliterated due to progressive hard tissue deposition. ... Extrusive luxation: tooth displacement out of the alveolus.. Avulsion: tooth prematurely lost if compared with the homologous ... Crown discoloration: hange in the crown coloration; tooth presenting darker tones when compared to the adjacent teeth. ...
Tooth Mobility - As gum and bone loss occurs, your tooth has less stability. This may cause your teeth to shift into other ... Even people with exceptional oral hygiene will usually still develop small areas of plaque calcification. These tartar deposits ... Bone grafting is useful when there is advanced bone loss and you are at increased risk to lose teeth. Both of these grafts may ... This condition ultimately leads to bone loss and tooth mobility. Gum disease is the most common cause of tooth loss, so early ...
You should focus on only two or three teeth at a time and apply just enough pressure that the tissue blanches, no more. ... safest way to remove plaque deposits from along the gum lines without causing tooth abrasion or gum recession. Gently angle the ... When tartar is removed from the tooth, it creates a healthy gum environment that helps prevent the loss of bone support. ... Even people with exceptional oral hygiene will usually still develop small areas of plaque calcification. These tartar deposits ...
Low level fluoridation of municipal water exhibits well known alterations in teeth and bone structure and calcification of ... Tooth decay should be minimized more efficiently and safely if desired with addition of fluoride products to childrens teeth ... Fluoride also attaches to calcium anywhere this ion is concentrated throughout the body, including teeth, bones, ligaments, ... as in bone, teeth, ligaments and brain. The usual physiologic response to such an insult is to increase levels of hormones such ...
... as it may reduce bone loss and decrease the risk of bone fractures. It also helps build strong bones, as well as protecting ... For this reason, Miami dentists encourage patients to maintain a diet that is rich in vitamin K to help strengthen tooth enamel ... Vitamin K is also needed for bone health, ... Assure A Smiles mission is to ensure healthy teeth and gums ... calcification of the blood vessels or heart valves, and problems with bone fractures or weak bones.. Those at a higher risk for ...
  • This loss of osteopontin, a known potent inhibitor of mineralization (or calcification) in the skeleton and dentition, normally allows bones and teeth to mineralize and thus harden to meet the biomechanical demands placed on them. (eurekalert.org)
  • The maxillary central incisors followed by maxillary lateral incisors have been reported as the most frequent injured teeth in the primary dentition. (scielo.br)
  • Calcification stages of the mandibular dentition (canines, first premolars, second premolars, second molars and third molars) were rated according to the system of Demirjian. (ispub.com)
  • Nature's Way EFAGold is the highest quality Cod Liver Oil, a natural source of Vitamins A & D, which help maintain normal bone formation and density. (herbalremedies.com)
  • Vitamin A & D are both involved in the cycles of mineral and hormone balance which help to maintain normal bone formation and density. (herbalremedies.com)
  • Bone Flesh and Cartilage, from Nature's Way, is a time-tested herbal healing formula used by tens of thousands. (herbalremedies.com)
  • This synergistic combination of herbs is used traditionally to support and speed the recovery of Bone, Flesh and Cartilage. (herbalremedies.com)
  • This study has attempted to clarify the mechanisms of cartilage-to-bone replacement in endochondral bone formation of long bones and of tooth morphegesis in osteosclerotic (oc/oc) mice by means of light and electron microscopy. (nii.ac.jp)
  • Calcification of growth plate cartilage occurred in the central area of the longitudinal septa, but not in thin transverse septa. (nii.ac.jp)
  • In oc/oc mice, multinucleated osteoclastic cells lacked both ruffled borders and clear zones facing the uncalcified cartilage, but formed only clear zones facing the calcified cartilage and bone matrix. (nii.ac.jp)
  • The results of this latest research by Drs. McKee and Barros will be published in the March issue of the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research . (eurekalert.org)
  • Chemical and physical properties of the extracellular matrix are required for the actin ring formation' Journal of Bone and Mineral Research. (nii.ac.jp)
  • Journal of Bone and Mineral Research. (nii.ac.jp)
  • In three others, no primary teeth remained. (hindawi.com)
  • CAH is a serious chronic disorder appearing in children with accelerated dental development and possibly premature loss of primary teeth. (aappublications.org)
  • The records of a total of 111 children (aged 0 to 6 years) seen from 2004 to 2006 in the dental trauma clinic were surveyed, comprising a total of 201 traumatized primary teeth. (scielo.br)
  • In conclusion, traumatisms in primary teeth were more prevalent in boys, and in 0-3-year-old children. (scielo.br)
  • 4,12,13 Because of the resilient bone surrounding the primary teeth, the majority of injuries are tooth luxations. (scielo.br)
  • There are several studies in the literature that evaluate the prevalence of dental traumatism in the primary and permanent dentitions, 1,2,6,12,15,16 although just a few of them present the epidemiology of primary teeth sequelae in face of these traumas. (scielo.br)
  • Using a soft-bristled brush isnt always someones first method of choice, but it is the gentlest, safest way to remove plaque deposits from along the gum lines without causing tooth abrasion or gum recession. (trustedhealthproducts.com)
  • Researchers at McGill University and the Federal University of Sao Paulo have identified that osteopontin, a major bone and tooth substrate protein, plays a role in XLH. (eurekalert.org)
  • In pursuing other factors that might contribute to XLH, we used a variety of research methods to show that PHEX enzymatic activity leads to an essentially complete degradation of osteopontin in bones. (eurekalert.org)
  • In XLH patients lacking functional PHEX enzyme, osteopontin and some of its smaller potent inhibitory peptides are retained and accumulate within the bone. (eurekalert.org)
  • With this new identification of osteopontin as a substrate protein for PHEX," says Professor Barros, "we can begin to develop an enzyme-replacement therapy to treat XLH patients who have nonfunctional PHEX, much as has been done using a different enzyme to treat another rare bone disease called hypophosphatasia. (eurekalert.org)
  • Following exposure to centrifugal force for 1, 2, 6, 8 and 12 h, the protein expression levels of ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK, and the mRNA expression levels of ERK1/2, p38 and osteogenesis associated‑genes [including alkaline phosphatase (ALP), osteopontin (OPN), collagen I (Col I), osteocalcin (OCN) and bone sialoprotein (BSP)] were measured. (spandidos-publications.com)
  • That's why D deficiency can cause rickets in kids or soft bones in adults. (giantmicrobes.com)
  • Diagnosed in toddlers, X-linked hypophosphatemia (XLH) is the most common form of heritable rickets, in which soft bones bend and deform, and tooth abscesses develop because infections penetrate soft teeth that are not properly calcified. (eurekalert.org)
  • Papillon-Lefèvre syndrome (PLS) is a rare, autosomal recessive heterogeneous disorder, which is characterized by palmoplantar hyperkeratosis, early loss of primary and permanent teeth, and associated calcification of the dura mater. (hindawi.com)
  • In three cases, all permanent teeth were exfoliated. (hindawi.com)
  • PLS is characterized by palmoplantar hyperkeratosis, early loss of primary and permanent teeth, and associated calcification of the dura mater [ 2 , 3 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • Around the age of fifteen, the majority of the permanent teeth are lost [ 6 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • Tooth mobility was noticed in the permanent teeth as soon as they erupted, along with bone destruction. (aappublications.org)
  • As the blood supply brings antibodies to attack the biofilm under your gumlines, it destroys the attached gum around the tooth in order to access the area of infection. (trustedhealthproducts.com)
  • When that trauma affects an immature permanent tooth, it can hinder blood supply and root development, resulting in what is essentially a "dead" tooth. (news-medical.net)
  • Now researchers at OHSU in Portland, Oregon, have developed a process by which they can engineer new blood vessels in teeth, creating better long-term outcomes for patients and clinicians. (news-medical.net)
  • Jarrow Forumula provides the best, most highly absorbably, biologically active form of Vitamin K2 that has been clinically proven to REVERSE arterial calcification by up to 50% in test subjects. (iherb.com)