Butterflies: Slender-bodies diurnal insects having large, broad wings often strikingly colored and patterned.WingPigmentation: Coloration or discoloration of a part by a pigment.Flight, Animal: The use of wings or wing-like appendages to remain aloft and move through the air.Solar System: The group of celestial bodies, including the EARTH, orbiting around and gravitationally bound by the sun. It includes eight planets, one minor planet, and 34 natural satellites, more than 1,000 observed comets, and thousands of lesser bodies known as MINOR PLANETS (asteroids) and METEOROIDS. (From Academic American Encyclopedia, 1983)Animal Migration: Periodic movements of animals in response to seasonal changes or reproductive instinct. Hormonal changes are the trigger in at least some animals. Most migrations are made for reasons of climatic change, feeding, or breeding.Aphrodisiacs: Chemical agents or odors that stimulate sexual desires. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Lepidoptera: A large order of insects comprising the butterflies and moths.Genetic Speciation: The splitting of an ancestral species into daughter species that coexist in time (King, Dictionary of Genetics, 6th ed). Causal factors may include geographic isolation, HABITAT geometry, migration, REPRODUCTIVE ISOLATION, random GENETIC DRIFT and MUTATION.Asclepias: A plant genus of the family ASCLEPIADACEAE. This is the true milkweed; APOCYNUM & EUPHORBIA hirta are rarely called milkweed. Asclepias asthmatica has been changed to TYLOPHORA.Costa RicaOviposition: The process of laying or shedding fully developed eggs (OVA) from the female body. The term is usually used for certain INSECTS or FISHES with an organ called ovipositor where eggs are stored or deposited before expulsion from the body.Color: The visually perceived property of objects created by absorption or reflection of specific wavelengths of light.Sexual Behavior, Animal: Sexual activities of animals.Species Specificity: The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Biological Evolution: The process of cumulative change over successive generations through which organisms acquire their distinguishing morphological and physiological characteristics.Adaptation, Biological: Changes in biological features that help an organism cope with its ENVIRONMENT. These changes include physiological (ADAPTATION, PHYSIOLOGICAL), phenotypic and genetic changes.Animal Communication: Communication between animals involving the giving off by one individual of some chemical or physical signal, that, on being received by another, influences its behavior.Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism Analysis: The detection of RESTRICTION FRAGMENT LENGTH POLYMORPHISMS by selective PCR amplification of restriction fragments derived from genomic DNA followed by electrophoretic analysis of the amplified restriction fragments.Genome, Insect: The genetic complement of an insect (INSECTS) as represented in its DNA.PanamaGenes, Insect: The functional hereditary units of INSECTS.Moths: Insects of the suborder Heterocera of the order LEPIDOPTERA.Ecosystem: A functional system which includes the organisms of a natural community together with their environment. (McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Military Facilities: Areas designated for use by the armed forces personnel.Population Dynamics: The pattern of any process, or the interrelationship of phenomena, which affects growth or change within a population.Insect Proteins: Proteins found in any species of insect.Geography: The science dealing with the earth and its life, especially the description of land, sea, and air and the distribution of plant and animal life, including humanity and human industries with reference to the mutual relations of these elements. (From Webster, 3d ed)Biodiversity: The variety of all native living organisms and their various forms and interrelationships.Photoreceptor Cells, Invertebrate: Specialized cells in the invertebrates that detect and transduce light. They are predominantly rhabdomeric with an array of photosensitive microvilli. Illumination depolarizes invertebrate photoreceptors by stimulating Na+ influx across the plasma membrane.Obsessive Hoarding: Persistent difficulty discarding or parting with possessions, regardless of the value of these possessions. Epidemiological studies suggest that hoarding occurs in 2-5% of the population and can lead to substantial distress and disability, as well as serious public health consequences.Birds: Warm-blooded VERTEBRATES possessing FEATHERS and belonging to the class Aves.Video Games: A form of interactive entertainment in which the player controls electronically generated images that appear on a video display screen. This includes video games played in the home on special machines or home computers, and those played in arcades.Game Theory: Theoretical construct used in applied mathematics to analyze certain situations in which there is an interplay between parties that may have similar, opposed, or mixed interests. In a typical game, decision-making "players," who each have their own goals, try to gain advantage over the other parties by anticipating each other's decisions; the game is finally resolved as a consequence of the players' decisions.Parenting: Performing the role of a parent by care-giving, nurturance, and protection of the child by a natural or substitute parent. The parent supports the child by exercising authority and through consistent, empathic, appropriate behavior in response to the child's needs. PARENTING differs from CHILD REARING in that in child rearing the emphasis is on the act of training or bringing up the children and the interaction between the parent and child, while parenting emphasizes the responsibility and qualities of exemplary behavior of the parent.Child Welfare: Organized efforts by communities or organizations to improve the health and well-being of the child.Search Engine: Software used to locate data or information stored in machine-readable form locally or at a distance such as an INTERNET site.Child Health Services: Organized services to provide health care for children.Parents: Persons functioning as natural, adoptive, or substitute parents. The heading includes the concept of parenthood as well as preparation for becoming a parent.Information Storage and Retrieval: Organized activities related to the storage, location, search, and retrieval of information.Internet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.Quercus: A plant genus of the family FAGACEAE that is a source of TANNINS. Do not confuse with Holly (ILEX).Insecticides: Pesticides designed to control insects that are harmful to man. The insects may be directly harmful, as those acting as disease vectors, or indirectly harmful, as destroyers of crops, food products, or textile fabrics.Psychotria: A plant genus of the family RUBIACEAE. Members contain psychotridine and brachycerine (indole alkaloids).Wasps: Any of numerous winged hymenopterous insects of social as well as solitary habits and having formidable stings.Plant Leaves: Expanded structures, usually green, of vascular plants, characteristically consisting of a bladelike expansion attached to a stem, and functioning as the principal organ of photosynthesis and transpiration. (American Heritage Dictionary, 2d ed)Plant Tumors: A localized proliferation of plant tissue forming a swelling or outgrowth, commonly with a characteristic shape and unlike any organ of the normal plant. Plant tumors or galls usually form in response to the action of a pathogen or a pest. (Holliday, P., A Dictionary of Plant Pathology, 1989, p330)Metamorphosis, Biological: Profound physical changes during maturation of living organisms from the immature forms to the adult forms, such as from TADPOLES to frogs; caterpillars to BUTTERFLIES.Silk: A continuous protein fiber consisting primarily of FIBROINS. It is synthesized by a variety of INSECTS and ARACHNIDS.Fukushima Nuclear Accident: Nuclear power accident that occurred following the Tohoku-Kanto earthquake of March 11, 2011 in the northern region of Japan.Cesium Radioisotopes: Unstable isotopes of cesium that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. Cs atoms with atomic weights of 123, 125-132, and 134-145 are radioactive cesium isotopes.Radiation Monitoring: The observation, either continuously or at intervals, of the levels of radiation in a given area, generally for the purpose of assuring that they have not exceeded prescribed amounts or, in case of radiation already present in the area, assuring that the levels have returned to those meeting acceptable safety standards.JapanNuclear Power Plants: Facilities that convert NUCLEAR ENERGY into electrical energy.

Ultrabithorax function in butterfly wings and the evolution of insect wing patterns. (1/710)

BACKGROUND: . The morphological and functional evolution of appendages has played a critical role in animal evolution, but the developmental genetic mechanisms underlying appendage diversity are not understood. Given that homologous appendage development is controlled by the same Hox gene in different organisms, and that Hox genes are transcription factors, diversity may evolve from changes in the regulation of Hox target genes. Two impediments to understanding the role of Hox genes in morphological evolution have been the limited number of organisms in which Hox gene function can be studied and the paucity of known Hox-regulated target genes. We have therefore analyzed a butterfly homeotic mutant 'Hindsight', in which portions of the ventral hindwing pattern are transformed to ventral forewing identity, and we have compared the regulation of target genes by the Ultrabithorax (Ubx) gene product in Lepidopteran and Dipteran hindwings. RESULTS: . We show that Ubx gene expression is lost from patches of cells in developing Hindsight hindwings, correlating with changes in wing pigmentation, color pattern elements, and scale morphology. We use this mutant to study how regulation of target genes by Ubx protein differs between species. We find that several Ubx-regulated genes in the Drosophila haltere are not repressed by Ubx in butterfly hindwings, but that Distal-less (Dll) expression is regulated by Ubx in a unique manner in butterflies. CONCLUSIONS: . The morphological diversification of insect hindwings has involved the acquisition of different sets of target genes by Ubx in different lineages. Changes in Hox-regulated target gene sets are, in general, likely to underlie the morphological divergence of homologous structures between animals.  (+info)

Interaction of process partitions in phylogenetic analysis: an example from the swallowtail butterfly genus Papilio. (2/710)

In this study, we explored how the concept of the process partition may be applied to phylogenetic analysis. Sequence data were gathered from 23 species and subspecies of the swallowtail butterfly genus Papilio, as well as from two outgroup species from the genera Eurytides and Pachliopta. Sequence data consisted of 1,010 bp of the nuclear protein-coding gene elongation factor-1 alpha (EF-1 alpha) as well as the entire sequences (a total of 2,211 bp) of the mitochondrial protein-coding genes cytochrome oxidase I and cytochrome oxidase II (COI and COII). In order to examine the interaction between the nuclear and mitochondrial partitions in a combined analysis, we used a method of visualizing branch support as a function of partition weight ratios. We demonstrated how this method may be used to diagnose error at different levels of a tree in a combined maximum-parsimony analysis. Further, we assessed patterns of evolution within and between subsets of the data by implementing a multipartition maximum-likelihood model to estimate evolutionary parameters for various putative process partitions. COI third positions have an estimated average substitution rate more than 15 times that of EF-1 alpha, while COII third positions have an estimated average substitution rate more than 22 times that of EF-1 alpha. Ultimately, we found that although the mitochondrial and nuclear data were not significantly incongruent, homoplasy in the fast-evolving mitochondrial data confounded the resolution of basal relationships in the combined unweighted parsimony analysis despite the fact that there was relatively strong support for the relationships in the nuclear data. We conclude that there may be shortcomings to the methods of "total evidence" and "conditional combination" because they may fail to detect or accommodate the type of confounding bias we found in our data.  (+info)

Inbreeding of bottlenecked butterfly populations. Estimation using the likelihood of changes in marker allele frequencies. (3/710)

Polymorphic enzyme and minisatellite loci were used to estimate the degree of inbreeding in experimentally bottlenecked populations of the butterfly, Bicyclus anynana (Satyridae), three generations after founding events of 2, 6, 20, or 300 individuals, each bottleneck size being replicated at least four times. Heterozygosity fell more than expected, though not significantly so, but this traditional measure of the degree of inbreeding did not make full use of the information from genetic markers. It proved more informative to estimate directly the probability distribution of a measure of inbreeding, sigma2, the variance in the number of descendants left per gene. In all bottlenecked lines, sigma2 was significantly larger than in control lines (300 founders). We demonstrate that this excess inbreeding was brought about both by an increase in the variance of reproductive success of individuals, but also by another process. We argue that in bottlenecked lines linkage disequilibrium generated by the small number of haplotypes passing through the bottleneck resulted in hitchhiking of particular marker alleles with those haplotypes favored by selection. In control lines, linkage disequilibrium was minimal. Our result, indicating more inbreeding than expected from demographic parameters, contrasts with the findings of previous (Drosophila) experiments in which the decline in observed heterozygosity was slower than expected and attributed to associative overdominance. The different outcomes may both be explained as a consequence of linkage disequilibrium under different regimes of inbreeding. The likelihood-based method to estimate inbreeding should be of wide applicability. It was, for example, able to resolve small differences in sigma2 among replicate lines within bottleneck-size treatments, which could be related to the observed variation in reproductive viability.  (+info)

An ultraviolet absorbing pigment causes a narrow-band violet receptor and a single-peaked green receptor in the eye of the butterfly Papilio. (4/710)

The distal photoreceptors in the tiered retina of Papilio exhibit different spectral sensitivities. There are at least two types of short-wavelength sensitive receptors: an ultraviolet receptor with a normal spectral shape and a violet receptor with a very narrow spectral bandwidth. Furthermore, a blue receptor, a double-peaked green receptor and a single-peaked green receptor exist. The violet receptor and single-peaked green receptor are only found in ommatidia that fluoresce under ultraviolet illumination. About 28% of the ommatidia in the ventral half of the retina exhibit the UV-induced fluorescence. The fluorescence originates from an ultraviolet-absorbing pigment, located in the most distal 70 microns of the ommatidium, that acts as an absorption filter, both for a UV visual pigment, causing the narrow spectral sensitivity of the violet receptor, and for a green visual pigment, causing a single-peaked green receptor.  (+info)

Molecular cloning of an apoptosis-inducing protein, pierisin, from cabbage butterfly: possible involvement of ADP-ribosylation in its activity. (5/710)

We have previously reported that the cabbage butterfly, Pieris rapae, contains a 98-kDa protein, named pierisin, that induces apoptosis in a variety of human cancer cell lines. In the present study, sequencing and cloning of a cDNA encoding pierisin was accomplished. PCR-direct sequencing showed that the gene encodes an 850-amino acid protein with a calculated molecular weight of 98,081. An intact clone at the amino acid level encompassing the entire coding region was obtained by recombination of two independent clones, and the molecular mass of its in vitro expressed protein was about 100 kDa on SDS/PAGE, the same as that of purified native pierisin. The expressed protein induced apoptosis in human gastric carcinoma TMK-1 and cervical carcinoma HeLa cells, like the native protein, indicating functional activity. The deduced amino acid sequence of pierisin showed 32% homology with a 100-kDa mosquitocidal toxin from Bacillus sphaericus SSII-1. In addition, pierisin showed regional sequence similarities with ADP-ribosylating toxins, such as the A subunit of cholera toxin. A glutamic acid residue at the putative NAD-binding site, conserved in all ADP-ribosylating toxins, was also found in pierisin. Substitution of another amino acid for glutamic acid 165 resulted in a great decrease in cytotoxicity and induction of apoptosis. Moreover, inhibitors of ADP-ribosylating enzymes reduced pierisin-induced apoptosis. These results suggest that the apoptosis-inducing protein pierisin might possess ADP-ribosylation activity that leads to apoptosis of the cells.  (+info)

Monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus L.) use a magnetic compass for navigation. (6/710)

Fall migratory monarch butterflies, tested for their directional responses to magnetic cues under three conditions, amagnetic, normal, and reversed magnetic fields, showed three distinct patterns. In the absence of a magnetic field, monarchs lacked directionality as a group. In the normal magnetic field, monarchs oriented to the southwest with a group pattern typical for migrants. When the horizontal component of the magnetic field was reversed, the butterflies oriented to the northeast. In contrast, nonmigratory monarchs lacked directionality in the normal magnetic field. The results are a direct demonstration of magnetic compass orientation in migratory insects.  (+info)

Ectopic gene expression and homeotic transformations in arthropods using recombinant Sindbis viruses. (7/710)

BACKGROUND: The morphological diversity of arthropods makes them attractive subjects for studying the evolution of developmental mechanisms. Comparative analyses suggest that arthropod diversity has arisen largely as a result of changes in expression patterns of genes that control development. Direct analysis of how a particular gene functions in a given species during development is hindered by the lack of broadly applicable techniques for manipulating gene expression. RESULTS: We report that the Arbovirus Sindbis can be used to deliver high levels of gene expression in vivo in a number of non-host arthropod species without causing cytopathic effects in infected cells or impairing development. Using recombinant Sindbis virus, we investigated the function of the homeotic gene Ultrabithorax in the development of butterfly wings and beetle embryos. Ectopic Ultrabithorax expression in butterfly forewing imaginal discs was sufficient to cause the transformation of characteristic forewing properties in the adult, including scale morphology and pigmentation, to those of the hindwing. Expression of Ultrabithorax in beetle embryos outside of its endogenous expression domain affected normal development of the body wall cuticle and appendages. CONCLUSIONS: The homeotic genes have long been thought to play an important role in the diversification of arthropod appendages. Using recombinant Sindbis virus, we were able to investigate homeotic gene function in non-model arthropod species. We found that Ultrabithorax is sufficient to confer hindwing identity in butterflies and alter normal development of anterior structures in beetles. Recombinant Sindbis virus has broad potential as a tool for analyzing how the function of developmental genes has changed during the diversification of arthropods.  (+info)

Sex-ratio-distorting Wolbachia causes sex-role reversal in its butterfly host. (8/710)

Sex-role-reversed mating systems in which females compete for males and males may be choosy are usually associated with males investing more than females in offspring. We report that sex-role reversal may also be caused by selfish genetic elements which distort the sex ratio towards females. Some populations of the butterflies Acraea encedon and Acraea encedana are extremely female biased because over 90% of females are infected with a Wolbachia bacterium that is maternally inherited and kills male embryos. Many females in these populations are virgins suggesting that their reproductive success may be limited by access to males. These females form lekking swarms at landmarks in which females exhibit behaviours which we interpret as functioning to solicit matings from males. The hypothesis that female A. encedon swarm in order to mate is supported by the finding that, in release recapture experiments, mated females tend to leave the swarm while unmated females remained. This behaviour is a sex-role-reversed form of a common mating system in insects in which males form lekking swarms at landmarks and compete for females. Female lekking swarms are absent from less female-biased populations and here the butterflies are instead associated with resources in the form of the larval food plant.  (+info)

*Butterflies, Flowers

"Butterflies, Flowers, Volume 8". Viz Media. Retrieved April 21, 2014. Aoki, Deb (June 24, 2010). "Butterflies, Flowers Volumes ... Beasi, Melinda (December 5, 2009). "Butterflies, Flowers, Volume 1". Manga Bookshelf. Retrieved November 12, 2016. Butterflies ... Butterflies, Flowers (Japanese: 蝶よ花よ, Hepburn: Chō yo Hana yo) is a manga series written and illustrated by Yuki Yoshihara, ... "Butterflies, Flowers, Volume 1". Viz Media. Retrieved April 21, 2014. 蝶よ花よ 2 (in Japanese). Shogakukan. Retrieved April 21, ...

*Nabokov's Butterflies

The book also contains an addendum compiled by Pyle that lists butterflies described by VN and butterflies named after him. The ... Nabokov's Butterflies is a book edited and annotated by Brian Boyd and Robert Michael Pyle that examines and presents Vladimir ... Nabokov's Butterflies, edited by Brian Boyd and Robert Michael Pyle. Beacon Press, Boston, 2000. ISBN 0-8070-8540-5. ... The book contains a chapter by Boyd discussing the literary treatment of butterflies in VN's work labeled Nabokov, Literature, ...

*Bombs & Butterflies

... is the fifth studio album by the Athens, Georgia-based band Widespread Panic. The band started recording ...

*Butterflies India

Thus was born Butterflies with the core value and belief that it must be a democratic organisation and children's voices have ... The idea behind Butterflies began in the 1980s, when Ms.Rita Panicker Pinto began interacting with children living on the ... Butterflies is also a member of Family for Every Child, a global alliance of local civil society organisations working together ... Butterflies is also a member of Family for Every Child, a global alliance of local civil society organisations working together ...

*The Butterflies

... may refer to: The Butterflies (play), an 1894 Broadway show by Henry Guy Carleton Las Hermanas Mirabals, also ... known as the Mirabal sisters, a group of four Dominican political dissidents active in the 1960s The Butterflies, a 1960s-era ...

*The Butterflies (play)

The Butterflies is an American play. It was featured on Broadway in 1894 and starred Maude Adams. It was written by Henry Guy ... "The Butterflies". Internet Broadway Database. The Broadway League. Retrieved October 2, 2013. Pearson's Magazine. Pearson ... The Butterflies at the Internet Broadway Database Bookmice.net. ...

*Sleeps with Butterflies

"purchase "Sleeps With Butterflies" from the iTunes Music Store". Retrieved 2005-01-12. ""Sleeps With Butterflies" moves up to # ... "Sleeps with Butterflies" is a song written and recorded by Tori Amos. It served as the first single from her album The ... For the "Sleeps with Butterflies" video, Amos remains mostly stationary, standing, sitting, or lying down, and Kato's work was ... "Tori Performed 'Sleeps with Butterflies' on Live with Regis & Kelly". The Dent. Retrieved 2005-02-23. "Details and photos from ...

*Evolution of butterflies

Butterfly evolution is the origin and diversification of butterflies through geologic time and over a large portion of the ... The butterflies form the clade Rhopalocera, which is composed of three superfamilies: Hedyloidea (the moth butterfly family ... Of the 220,000 species of Lepidoptera, about 45,000 species are butterflies, which probably evolved from moths. Butterflies are ... and the prospect of a stable butterfly classification based on strongly supported clades is seemingly within reach. Butterfly ...

*Butterflies Go Free

Play media Butterflies Go Free (French: Papillons en liberte) is an annual exhibit at the Jardin Botanique de Montreal, ... The insects are purchased in caterpillar and egg form from sustainable butterfly farms. The exhibit, which was first shown in ... Press release (in French) Official site Official website List of species present in Butterflies Go Free. ... featuring thousands of live tropical butterflies and moths released in the Grande Serre of the exhibition greenhouses. ...

*Bullfrogs and Butterflies

AKA Bullfrogs and Butterflies II: God Loves Fun) Bullfrogs and Butterflies III (AKA Bullfrogs and Butterflies III: God is Great ... Bullfrogs and Butterflies IV (AKA Bullfrogs and Butterflies IV: I've Been Born Again) Bullfrogs and Butterflies II - Nominated ... Agapeland Bullfrogs and Butterflies (AKA Bullfrogs and Butterflies: God is My Friend) (contains some re-recordings of tracks ... Bullfrogs and Butterflies is a series of Agapeland related Christian albums by the musical group Candle. The series was an ...

*Plague of Butterflies

II - Plague Of Butterflies The second chapter of the song begins as the man returns to his village where we learn that a plague ... Plague Of Butterflies is the first EP by the melodic death metal/doom metal band Swallow the Sun. It was released on September ... We also learn that Evael is cursed with carrying butterflies wherever she goes and is not forgiven as the woods say, but the ... The only living things apart from him left in the village are butterflies, which are in great number. He still remains in the ...

*Ocean Butterflies International

In 1986, Ocean Butterflies was founded in Singapore as Ocean Butterflies Production Pte Ltd. In 1990, Ocean Butterflies ... Ocean Butterflies International comprises 5 major enterprises Ocean Butterflies Music: music label, artiste management, music ... Ocean Butterflies International (Chinese: 海蝶國際集團) is an independent Asian music and entertainment company specializing in ... Ocean Butterflies Communications: product branding, marketing and event organization Touch Music Publishing handles the ...

*Butterflies and Elvis

... is the debut studio album by Icelandic singer Yohanna, released by Warner Music in Sweden and still being ... "Butterflies and Elvis" (Lee Horrocks,Johanna Gudrun Jonsdottir) - 4:49 "Funny Thing Is" (Lee Horrocks,Johanna Gudrun Jonsdottir ... "Butterflies and Elvis" (Lee Horrocks,Johanna Gudrun Jonsdottir) - 4:49 "Funny Thing Is" (Lee Horrocks,Johanna Gudrun Jonsdottir ...

*List of extinct butterflies

Some other extinct butterflies are prehistoric. See prehistoric butterflies. This is a list of recently extinct butterflies, ... The Butterflies of Great Britain and Ireland. The Moths and Butterflies of Great Britain and Ireland Vol. 7, part 1 ( ... Prehistoric butterflies World Conservation Monitoring Centre 1996. Libythea cinyras. In: IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. ...

*Butterflies Are Free (play)

The butterflies are free. Mankind will surely not deny to Harold Skimpole what it concedes to the butterflies." After twelve ... Butterflies Are Free is a play by Leonard Gershe. Loosely based on the life of attorney Harold Krents, the plot revolves around ... Check date values in: ,access-date= (help) Butterflies Are Free at the Internet Broadway Database. ...

*Butterflies of New Zealand

Butterflies and moths New Zealand Entomological Society Monarch Butterfly NZ Trust. ... The butterflies of New Zealand include many endemic species as well as introduced and migrant species. Lepidoptera, which ... The majority of New Zealand invertebrates are found in forests so it is likely that some butterflies became extinct due to the ... Very little is known about any butterfly extinctions since human settlement of New Zealand since they leave few remains. ...

*Butterflies (Tone Damli song)

Butterflies". VG-lista. iTunes - Music - Butterflies - Single by Tone Damli. ... "Butterflies" is a song by Norwegian singer Tone Damli from her third studio album I Know (2009). It was released in Norway on 9 ...

*Butterflies (Van Gogh series)

This grouping includes two butterfly paintings: Two White Butterflies and Grass and Butterflies. She found the paintings seem ... Two White Butterflies also Garden with Butterflies Spring 1889 Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam (F402) Grass and Butterflies (b/w ... Grass and Butterflies, made in Arles, is part of a private collection. Grass and Butterflies (b/w photo) April, 1889 Private ... In The Existential Butterfly, a book of poetry about butterflies and nature, Curtis Farmwald wrote of van Gogh's Poppies and ...

*Butterflies (Michael Jackson song)

"Butterflies" (Master Mix) (featuring Eve) - 3:47 A2. "Butterflies" (Michael a cappella) - 2:13 B1. "Butterflies" (Eve a ... "Butterflies" has a moderately slowly tempo and its metronome is ninety-two beats per minute. Lyrically, "Butterflies" describes ... "MICHAEL JACKSON - BUTTERFLIES (CHANSON)". LesCharts.com. Hung Medien. Retrieved 2010-05-08. "Michael Jackson - Butterflies ( ... Promo CD single (Epic ESK 54863) "Butterflies" (album version) - 4:40 Michael Jackson - Butterflies (Track Masters Remix) A1. " ...

*Butterflies of Sri Lanka

Out of these 1903 species, 208 species are butterflies and 1695 species are moths. The family-wise number of butterfly species ... Sri Lanka is home to 245 species of butterflies with 23 of these being endemic to the island. Of the 245 species, 76 are listed ... ISBN 0-947352-35-X Henry, G. M. R., Woodhouse, L. G. O. (1942) The Butterfly Fauna of Ceylon. Colombo ; Ceylon. 153pp. Moore, F ... Michael van der Poorten discovered a new species of Sri Lankan butterfly, the first such discovery in 60 years. The species has ...

*Ultraviolet communication in butterflies

Butterflies receive ultraviolet signals by utilizing a special photoreceptor pigment in the butterfly eye. The butterfly eye is ... Female White Cabbage Butterflies are not always receptive to male White Cabbage Butterflies and to communicate this message, ... Female White Cabbage Butterflies take advantage of the personal butterfly ultraviolet communication system to also reject males ... Some butterfly species use ultraviolet light as a method of signaling their sex. For example, in the species Eurema lisa, males ...

*Butterflies in the stomach

... is the physical sensation in humans of a "fluttery" feeling in the stomach, caused by a reduction of ... Anxiety Bennett, Howard (May 10, 2010). "Why do you get butterflies in your stomach?". The Washington Post. Retrieved 27 ...

*Butterflies (3+2 song)

"Butterflies" is a song, written by Maxim Fadeev, Robert Wells and Malka Chaplin and performed by Belarusian group 3+2, and was ... Schacht, Andreas (19 March 2010). "Belarus: 3+2 to perform Butterflies in Oslo". European Broadcasting Union. Retrieved 19 ... "Butterflies" in the first semi-final on 25 May. They qualified for the final, for the only second time in the history for ...

*A Plague of Butterflies

"A Plague of Butterflies" was later reprinted in his short story collection Maps in a Mirror. This is the story of a man named ... One day a bunch of butterflies came to Amasa to take him on a journey to Hierusalem - the land of the dead. On the way he met a ... "A Plague of Butterflies" is a short story by American writer Orson Scott Card. It was originally published in an anthology, ... The man also warns Amasa that if he kills a butterfly he will live forever. When Amasa arrives at the city he finds out that ...

*Butterfly

... some of the Nagas of Manipur claim ancestry from a butterfly. In some cultures, butterflies symbolise rebirth. The butterfly is ... Each species of butterfly has its own host plant range and while some species of butterfly are restricted to just one species ... Diderot's Encyclopédie cites butterflies as a symbol for the soul. A Roman sculpture depicts a butterfly exiting the mouth of a ... Black grass-dart butterfly (Ocybadistes knightorum) is a butterfly of the Hesperiidae family. It is endemic to New South Wales ...
North American monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) undergo a spectacular fall migration. In contrast to summer butterflies, migrants are juvenile hormone (JH) deficient, which leads to reproductive diapause and increased longevity. Migrants also utilize time-compensated sun compass orientation to help them navigate to their overwintering grounds. Here, we describe a brain expressed sequence tag (EST) resource to identify genes involved in migratory behaviors. A brain EST library was constructed from summer and migrating butterflies. Of 9,484 unique sequences, 6068 had positive hits with the non-redundant protein database; the EST database likely represents ∼52% of the gene-encoding potential of the monarch genome. The brain transcriptome was cataloged using Gene Ontology and compared to Drosophila. Monarch genes were well represented, including those implicated in behavior. Three genes involved in increased JH activity (allatotropin, juvenile hormone acid methyltransfersase, and takeout) were
Scientists estimate that there are 28,000 species of butterflies around the world . • Most butterflies are found in rainforests but can live in all the climates and altitudes of the world. • Butterflies migrate to avoid the cold. • Many believe that butterflies got their name because they flew around the buckets of milk on the farms. While the milk was being beaten in butter, many noticed that these flying insects would appear and soon were called butterflies. • Butterflies have three body parts , like all the other insects: the head, the chest (chest) and the abdomen (bottom). The four wings of the butterfly and the six legs are attached to the thorax. • Butterflies are colorful for many reasons . The colors help to attract a mate, absorb heat and color also helps to blend into the flowers when they feed. • As the caterpillar grows, the skin will move and squeeze to get rid of your skin. When the caterpillar has grown several thousand times its original size, it enters a stage of ...
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The monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) is emerging as a model organism to study the mechanisms of circadian clocks and animal navigation, and the genetic underpinnings of long-distance migration. The initial assembly of the monarch genome was released in 2011, and the biological interpretation of the genome focused on the butterflys migration biology. To make the extensive data associated with the genome accessible to the general biological and lepidopteran communities, we established MonarchBase (available at http://monarchbase.umassmed.edu). The database is an open-access, web-available portal that integrates all available data associated with the monarch butterfly genome. Moreover, MonarchBase provides access to an updated version of genome assembly (v3) upon which all data integration is based. These include genes with systematic annotation, as well as other molecular resources, such as brain expressed sequence tags, migration expression profiles and microRNAs. MonarchBase utilizes a variety of
The nano-photonic structures on the wings of three Papilionidae butterflies, Papilio blumei, Papilio ulysses and Papilio peranthus, were investigated. It was observed that the photonic structure is multi-layer with alternate air and cuticle layers forming one-dimensional photonic crystal. The multi-layer structures of the three butterflies differ subtly but are sufficient to account for the differences in their iridescence. The subtleness is more obvious in their polarized reflection results. We performed the simulation of polarized reflection using characteristic matrix method with parameters obtained from SEM images of butterfly wing scales cross-section. The simulated reflection spectra are matched with the experimental spectra to derive the effective refractive index of the air lamina in the butterfly wing scales. It shows that through varying the optical thickness and periodicities in air/cuticle bilayer stacks, the iridescent color of these three Papilionidae butterflies appear different. ...
Pipevine Swallowtail Butterfly Stock Photo. csp21821478 - Pipevine Swallowtail Butterfly or Blue Swallowtail or Battus philenor rests on some leaves. Affordable Royalty Free Stock Photography. Downloads for just $2.50, with thousands of images added daily. Subscriptions available for just $39.00. Our stock photo image search engine contains royalty free photos, vector clip art images, clipart illustrations.
Seasonal polyphenism demonstrates an organisms ability to respond to predictable environmental variation with alternative phenotypes, each presumably better suited to its respective environment. However, the molecular mechanisms linking environmental variation to alternative phenotypes via shifts in development remain relatively unknown. Here we investigate temporal gene expression variation in the seasonally polyphenic butterfly Bicyclus anynana. This species shows drastic changes in eyespot size depending on the temperature experienced during larval development. The wet season form (larvae reared over 24 degrees C) has large ventral wing eyespots while the dry season form (larvae reared under 19 degrees C) has much smaller eyespots. We compared the expression of three proteins, Notch, Engrailed, and Distal-less, in the future eyespot centers of the two forms to determine if eyespot size variation is associated with heterochronic shifts in the onset of their expression. For two of these ...
South Floridas climate offers gardeners the opportunity to attract butterflies every month of the year. There are about 160 species of butterflies in Florida. You can make them a part of your garden. First some facts about our flying friends. Butterflies do not bite or carry disease. In their adult form they do no harm. Butterflies are cold blooded; they do not produce metabolic heat like humans, so they must rely on the sun to raise their body temperature so they can move about. Some bask with their wings open, others with wings shut. Many butterflies are territorial and fight, chasing others out of their territory. Butterflies can see ultraviolet light (light invisible to the human eye) which makes the markings on flowers very vivid to them and guides them to the nectar tubes. Some butterflies have ultraviolet reflectants or markings on their own wings which are visible only to other butterflies. Butterflies are pollinators. While they are not as abundant as bees, they do offer a particularly ...
A majority of the known Colias species (Lepidoptera: Pieridae, Coliadinae) occur in the mountainous regions of Central-Asia, vast areas that are hard to access, rendering the knowledge of many species limited due to the lack of extensive sampling. Two gene regions, the mitochondrial COI barcode region and the nuclear ribosomal protein RpS2 gene region were used for exploring the utility of these DNA markers for species identification. A comprehensive sampling of COI barcodes for Central-Asian Colias butterflies showed that the barcodes facilitated identification of most of the included species. Phylogenetic reconstruction based on parsimony and Neighbor-Joining recovered most species as monophyletic entities. For the RpS2 gene region species-specific sequences were registered for some of the included Colias spp. Nevertheless, this gene region was not deemed useful as additional molecular barcode. A parsimony analysis of the combined COI and RpS2 data did not support the current subgeneric
What is the difference between butterflies, moths, and skippers?. Butterflies: drink and rest with their wings up, but sun themselves with their wings outstretched. They have smooth antennae with a knob at the end. Their body hardens into a chrysalis for metamorphosis. They are active in the daytime. Some can be quite colourful.. Moths: rest with their wings outstretched along their back, or tented. Have feathery antennae. They spin a cocoon with silk for metamorphosis, and some species are active during the night, while others are active during the day. They are usually muted colours. Their bodies are usually fuzzier and plumper than that of butterflies.. Skippers: are often considered a mix between butterflies and moths. They rest usually with their wings angled upwards, sometimes outstretched, although parted, and rarely completely folded upwards. Like butterflies, they are active during the day, and have smooth antennae with a club end, although the club is often hooked. Like moths they are ...
Moth and butterfly are common names given to insects of the order Lepidoptera. There is no strong scientific basis for these terms. There is an evolutionary continuum from the most ancient moth group to the most sophisticated butterfly group. Some moths are more closely related to butterflies than to other moths.. There are some general differences between moths and butterflies. Moths usually hold their wings flat while resting, have feathery antennae, and are active at night. Butterflies tend to be more brightly coloured, have clubbed antennae, hold their wings erect while at rest, and are active by day. But there are exceptions to these generalisations. Many New Zealand moths fly during the day or at dusk. The black mountain ringlet butterfly holds its wings flat while at rest. Some New Zealand butterflies are drab, and most people would call them moths. One sure way to distinguish the two in New Zealand (this does not apply globally) is that all native butterflies have clubbed ...
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To assess the change in the size of the eastern North American monarch butterfly summer population, studies have used long-term data sets of counts of adult butterflies or eggs per milkweed stem. Despite the observed decline in the monarch population as measured at overwintering sites in Mexico, these studies found no decline in summer counts in the Midwest, the core of the summer breeding range, leading to a suggestion that the cause of the monarch population decline is not the loss of Midwest agricultural milkweeds but increased mortality during the fall migration. Using these counts to estimate population size, however, does not account for the shift of monarch activity from agricultural fields to non-agricultural sites over the past 20 years, as a result of the loss of agricultural milkweeds due to the near-ubiquitous use of glyphosate herbicides. We present the counter-hypotheses that the proportion of the monarch population present in non-agricultural habitats, where counts are made, has increased
The Monarch Butterfly. The knowledge of citizen scientists, biologists, and naturalists informs this books coverage of every aspect of the monarch butterflys life cycle (breeding, migration, and overwintering) from the perspective of every established monarch population...
Amazing pictures of 5 Unique Pictures Of Dogs In Animal Shelters is totally great for your biological science knowledge. The image Resolution 500 x 484 px and the image size only 188 kb. Click the thumbnail to see the larger version.. Tagged with: blue dog pictures for sale, bulldog puppies for sale, dog for sale pictures, dogs for sale pictures, english bulldog for sale, .. ...
Discover Lifes page about the biology, natural history, ecology, identification and distribution of lepidoptera, swallowtail butterfly larvae image
Report sightings of migrating Monarch Butterflies. Journey North citizen scientists track monarch butterfly migration each fall and spring as Monarch Butterflies at Sanctuary in Mexico migrate to and from Mexico.
Monarch butterflies who have dark orange wings fly further than those with light orange wings, a new study has revealed.. Previous work has shown that monarch colouring is intended to warn their predators about their bitter taste and toxicity, and that migratory butterflies are darker coloured than non-migratory ones, suggesting an association between darker colour and increased fitness.. The current work, led by Andrew Davis of the University of Georgia, provides further evidence for this association.. The researchers tested 121 captive monarchs in an apparatus called a tethered flight mill, where they can quantify butterfly flight speed, duration, and distance, and found that those with darker orange wings overall flew longer distances than those with lighter wings.. "Butterfly researchers dont often look closely at colour variation between individuals of the same species. The results of this project will pave the way for a new line of inquiry into the significance of butterfly wing colour," ...
The Nymphalidae are members of the Superfamily Papilionoidea, the true butterflies. Distributed worldwide, butterflies of this family are especially rich in the tropics. They are highly variable, and there are more species in this family than in any other. Adults vary in size from small to large, and their front legs are reduced, unable to be used for walking. Wing shape is also highly variable: some species have irregular margins (anglewings and commas), and others have long taillike projections (daggerwings). Browns, oranges, yellows, and blacks are frequent colors, while iridescent colors such as purples and blues are rare. Adults of some groups are the longest-lived butterflies, surviving 6-11 months. Adult feeding behavior depends on the species, where some groups primarily seek flower nectar while others only feed on sap flows, rotting fruit, dung, or animal carcasses. Males exhibit perching and patrolling behaviors when seeking mates. Egg-laying varies widely, as some species lay eggs in ...
Heliconius cydno, the cydno longwing, is a nymphalid butterfly that ranges from Mexico to northern South America. It is typically found in the forest understory and deposits its eggs on a variety of plants of the genus Passiflora. It is a member of the Heliconiinae subfamily of Central and South America, and it is the only heliconiine that can be considered oligophagous. H. cydno is also characterized by hybridization and Müllerian mimicry. Wing coloration plays a key role in mate choice and has further implications in regards to sympatric speciation. Macrolide scent gland extracts and wing-clicking behavior further characterize this species. Listed alphabetically: H. c. alithea Hewitson, 1869 H. c. barinasensis Masters, 1973 H. c. chioneus Bates, 1864 H. c. cordula Neustetter, 1913 H. c. cydnides Staudinger, 1885 H. c. cydno Doubleday, 1847 H. c. hermogenes Hewitson, 1858 H. c. gadouae Brown & Fernández, 1985 H. c. galanthus Bates, 1864 H. c. lisethae Neukirchen, 1995 H. c. pachinus Salvin, ...
A moth is an insect closely related to the butterfly. Both are of the order Lepidoptera. The division of lepidopterans into moths and butterflies is a popular, not a scientific distinction. While butterflies are considered to be a natural group-having descended from a single common ancestor-moths are an artificial group, defined as any lepidopteran that is not a butterfly. However, neither hold formal taxonomic rank.. Popularly defined, most species of Lepidoptera are moths, and about 70 of the 80 families of the order. Butterflies can be considered to be a small group that arose from within the "moths.". In general, moths are considered to be distinct from butterflies in that moths are chiefly nocturnal, while butterflies are diurnal; moths have comb-like or feathery antennae while butterflies have thin, slender, and filamentous antennae; and moths have a stouter and more furry-looking body, duller coloring, and proportionately smaller wings than butterflies. However, there are many exceptions ...
The breeding of common butterflies for export plus their by-products help to fund the Centers host-plant research, development and the breeding of rare butterflies. Only hand bred sources, not those captured from the wild, are used by the Center to protect the butterfly population. Only the surplus from these hand bred butterflies are used for making by-products for both the local and foreign markets ...
To learn more, I recommend the new Butterflies of Illinois: A Field Guide by Michael Jeffords, Susan Post, and James Wiker. This beautiful book contains descriptions, field photos, and life-size specimen photos of all Illinois butterfly species.. I also encourage you to visit the Kim St John Butterfly Habitat at Wildlife Prairie Park. The house showcases native Illinois butterflies using a modest structure of metal hoops covered with netting. The house covers 2,600 square feet and is filled with larval and nectar plants.. Finally, reduce pesticide use and use more native plants. Butterflies are insects and are susceptible to most insecticides. Many insects feed on the native plants they evolved with over time. Although adult butterflies feed on many different types of nectar, their larvae need specific (and often) native plants in order to survive.. Plant your own butterfly garden this summer. Then, sit back and enjoy the show. Butterfly gardening is very rewarding.. ...
Atmospheric Nostalgia. Butterflies are powerful symbols in many cultures, often believed to represent material or spiritual transformation. In Greek, the word psyche means both butterfly and soul. Butterflies start life as eggs that hatch into caterpillars (larvae). As the caterpillars grow, they molt (shed their skins) several times until their final molt produces a chrysalis, or pupa. When the butterfly is truly formed, it emerges from the chrysalis and pumps fluid from its body into its wings. Adult butterflies live anywhere from one week to six or eight months.. Butterflies are threatened by loss of habitat due to human development, and by environmental factors such as pollution, pesticides, and genetically modified crops. While many gardeners strive to attract butterflies, some destroy the larvae because they do not recognize them as immature butterflies.. This card features three species of butterfly found in North America: the Viceroy, Western Tiger Swallowtail, and Malachite. The ...
Many insect species have a well-developed visual system with the capacity to see colour, i.e. objects in their environment are discriminated by their spectral content. Butterflies are considered to be highly visual animals and are generally believed to possess colour vision. Nevertheless, definitive evidence for colour vision was only recently obtained for two papilionid species, the Japanese yellow swallowtail Papilio xuthus (Kinoshita et al., 1999) and the Australian orchard butterfly Papilio aegeus (Kelber and Pfaff, 1999). In the classical example of insect colour vision, the honeybee Apis mellifera, three photoreceptors form the standard set of photoreceptors underlying colour vision, with spectral sensitivities in the ultraviolet, blue and green, respectively (Menzel and Backhaus, 1989), corresponding well with the absorption spectra of three identified rhodopsins (Townson et al., 1998). These rhodopsins are assumed to be expressed in anatomically well-defined photoreceptors (Menzel and ...
High in the eucalyptus trees in coastal southern California, a cluster of migrating monarch butterflies formed huddled masses, as if to brave the chill. I could appreciate their need for warmth as my own wind-chilled fingers refused to move, making the delicate task of handling one of the netted butterflies even more challenging.
Modeling population dynamics that include mutualistic interactions is an important and complex problem in theoretical biology and quantitative ecology. Mutualistic interactions, which are generally considered relationships in which two or more species benefit from each others presence, play a significant role in determining population dyanmics, and are essential to fully understanding the dynamics of interacting species. However, mutualistic interactions are a historically understudied topic in ecology; accurately describing populations in multi-species interactions is inherently challenging (Hastings & Powell, 1991), and models describing these populations increase greatly in complexity as the intricacy and interdependence of the relationship increases. As such, there have been relatively few attempts within the field to fully account for the particulars of these relationships. Through numerical simulation of lycaenid butterfly and aphid populations together with deterministic and stochastic ...
When exposed to butterflies with four brilliant ultraviolet-reflecting spots for only three hours, females no longer show preference for the type of males found in the wild. But females initially exposed to drabber males with one or zero spots did not change their original preferences.. "There is a bias in what females learn, and they learn extra ornamentation is better," said Antónia Monteiro, EEB professor and senior author of the paper.. The findings that social environment can change mating preference of female butterflies helps explain how novel wing patterns evolve, say the researchers Now Westerman wants to discover how female butterflies learn to make these choices.. "What we have found is a previously unexplored mechanism for biasing the evolution of morphological diversity," Westerman said. "We are now investigating what other cues are being evaluated during the learning period and what prevents females from mating with members of other species.". Study was funded by the National ...
The monarch butterfly is sometimes called the milkweed butterfly because its ... http://www.zoomschool.com/subjects/butterfly/species/Monarch.shtml ... – A free PowerPoint PPT presentation (displayed as a Flash slide show) on PowerShow.com - id: 6fd80-NTUxN
Spicebush Swallowtail Butterfly, Papilio Troilus, Larva or Caterpillar Photographic Print by Gary Meszaros. Find art you love and shop high-quality art prints, photographs, framed artworks and posters at Art.com. 100% satisfaction guaranteed.
British butterfly larvae and pupae, historical illustration of the larvae and pupae of butterflies that were known to occur in the British Isles in the 19th century. The larvae here are: 1. Swallowtail (Papilio machaeon), 2. Orange tip (Euchloe cardamines), 3. Silver-washed fritillary (Argynnis paphia), 4. Peacock butterfly (Vanessa io), 5. Purple emperor (Apatura iris) and 6. Duke of Burgundy fritillary (Hamearis lucina). The pupae are: 7. Swallowtail (Papilio machaeon), 8. Orange tip (Euchloe cardamines), 9. Silver- washed fritillary (Argynnis paphia), 10. Purple emperor (Apatura iris), 11. Duke of Burgundy fritillary (Hamearis lucina) and 12. Dingy skipper (Nisoniades tages). Taken from: British Butterflies and Moths by William Furneaux, which was published in 1897. - Stock Image Z355/1850
Download bug, butterfly, flying insect, insect, monarch, monarch butterfly icon in .PNG or .ICO format. Icon designed by Kristian Pettyjohn found in the icon set Insects - Essentials
From the UNIVERSITY OF EAST ANGLIA and the department of interchangeable lexicon comes this study that may have merit, except they cant seem to decide if it is weather or climate having an effect by the way they word it.. Research into extreme weather effects may explain recent butterfly decline. Researchers investigated the impact of Extreme Climatic Events (ECEs) on butterfly populations. The study shows that the impact can be significantly positive and negative, but questions remain as to whether the benefits outweigh the negative effects.. While it is well known that changes to the mean climate can affect ecosystems, little is known about the impact of short-term extreme climatic events (ECEs) such as heatwaves, heavy rainfall or droughts.. Osgur McDermott-Long, PhD student and lead author from the School of Environmental Sciences at UEA, said: "This is the first study to examine the effects of extreme climate events across all life stages of the UK butterflies from egg to adult butterfly. ...
When planting for butterflies and to attract butterflies to your garden it is important to plan for all four stages of a butterflys life: adult, egg, caterpillar, and chrysalis.. When you spend the time to attract butterflies to your garden, it can be a rewarding experience. Adult butterflies feed on nectar, which is obtained from flowering plants. In due course the adults lay their eggs, which need an unobtrusive leafy or grassy spot. When caterpillars hatch from the eggs, they will need all kinds of plant protein (although some are carnivorous) to prepare for the day when they form a chrysalis, and the whole process begins again.. One group of nectar-producing plants native to Australia is Micromelum minutum, small trees or shrubs of the citrus family Rutaceae. These plants are more commonly known as Lime Berry, Micromelum, Tulibas Tilos, Talafalu and Chememar. Other native Australians are Bursaria spinosa (Sweet Bursaria, Christmas Bush, Blackthorn, Prickly Box), Leptospermum (Teatree), ...
Oberhauser, K.S., O. R. Taylor, S. M. Reppert, H. Dingle, K. R. Nail, R. M. Pyle, C. Stenoien. 2013. Are monarch butterflies true navigators? The jury is still out. PNAS 110(39):E3680.. Diffendorfer J.E., Loomis J.B., Ries L., Oberhauser K.S., Lopez-Hoffman L., Semmens D., Semmens B., Butterfield B., Bagstad K., Goldstein J., Wiederholt R., Mattsson B., Thogmartin W.E. 2013. National valuation of monarch butterflies indicates an untapped potential for incentive-based conservation. Conservation Letters. DOI: 10.1111/conl.12065.. Zipkin, E., L. Ries, R. Reeves, J. Reetz, K.S. Oberhauser. 2012. Tracking climate impacts on the migratory monarch butterfly. Global Change Biology 18:3039-3049. Pleasants, J., K.S. Oberhauser. 2012. Milkweed loss in agricultural fields because of herbicide use: Effect on the monarch butterfly population. Insect Conservation and Diversity. DOI:10.1111/j.1752-4598.2012.00196.x. Oberhauser, K.S., G. Lebuhn. 2012 . Insects and plants: Engaging undergraduates in authentic ...
Western Monarch Butterfly Count Join the local team conducting the Western Monarch Butterfly Count of overwintering western monarch butterflies at Elwood Grove and other nearby locations. Documentation helps us understand the declines in monarch butterfly populations. For more information, please email the regional coordinator, Charis van der Heide. Find out more information
Common blue butterflies (Polyommatus icarus) sequester flavonoids from their larval host plants and allocate these UV-absorbing pigments to the wings. In field experiments using dummies constructed from female butterflies, mate-searching males inspected flavonoid-rich dummies more intensively than those with little or no flavonoids. Flavonoid content as signalled by UV-wing pattern may indicate ontogenetically determined female quality or enhance detectability to males. ...
And in adult stage they only sip nectar from flowers vegetation and trees. This gives them the necessary nutrients to endure mate and reproduce. Many butterflies also derive various minerals and vitamins such as sodium and amino acids from mud puddles and wetlands. Mud puddling is nonetheless restricted to male butterflies.. A butterflys antenna is sensitive to touch and style. Mouthparts of grownup butterflies is named proboscis which is developed for sucking fluid nutrients like nectar sugar prosperous liquid present in flowers and vegetation. Most butterflies thrive on nectar from plants but some also suck juices from more than ripe or rotten fruits bird droppings and animal dung.. ...
The yellow tip Anthocharis scolymus has a heterogeneous retina with two types of ommatidia, details of which we have identified by light and electron microscopy. Using light microscopic histology, the ommatidial types are characterized by a difference in color and distribution of the perirhabdomeral pigment clusters (Fig. 2). Combined histology and fluorescence microscopy reveals that the trapezoidal ommatidial type emits strong fluorescence under 420 nm excitation light (Fig. 3). Electron microscopy further reveals that the ommatidial types differ in the shape of the rhabdom and the arrangement of the rhabdomeral microvilli (Fig. 4).. The eye heterogeneity of Anthocharis scolymus with two ommatidial types seems rather simple, for other insect species so far studied have three or more types of ommatidia. In another pierid butterfly, Pieris rapae crucivora, three types of ommatidia are evident, even by light microscopy, from three distinct patterns of pigment clusters: trapezoidal, square and ...
Of the many creatures at home in the garden, few can match the grace and beauty of butterflies. They are important pollinators and a delight to see in any garden.. A garden that includes plants for the entire life cycle will attract a variety of native butterflies. Butterfly larvae need host plants for food and as a place to pupate, while adult butterflies require nectar sources for food and plants for egg-laying.. Tips for Planting a Butterfly Garden. ...
Its easy to plan a garden that will encourage butterflies to visit. The key is to provide a combination of nectar plants on which the butterflies can feed and larval food plants that will encourage them to reproduce in the area.. Butterfly Gardening. Butterflies are most active throughout the summer, particularly late summer, so plan your garden to have plenty of nectar-producing flowers over the course of the summer and early fall.. Most butterflies like full sunshine, so yard gardens or plants on the deck should be in full sun if possible. However, if you live near the woods, you may be able to attract members of the few species that prefer shade.. Natural Pest Control. When caring for a butterfly garden, it is important not to use pesticides or anything else that might be harmful to butterflies. Instead, you can plant marigold and mint, which act as natural insect repellents. If you have a large yard, planting onions throughout at random intervals will repel pests and stop the spread of root ...
Glanville Fritillary Melitaea cinxia. Larvae are pupating. Please email to check availability before ordering. Thank you.. Feed on Narrow-leaved Plantain. Easiest to keep on potted foodplant, enclosed in a sleeve. The larvae are gregarious, living in a tight bunch at the base of the plant, and spreading out more as they grow larger. The ginger head capsule and jet black body distinguish these larvae from other species. In Britain this species lives mainly on the Isle of Wight coast, but they have been established elsewhere in Britain. Maybe they could be encouraged in more localities.. These larvae will produce butterflies this spring.. ...
Mimicry where warning signals in different species evolve to look similar has long served as a paradigm of convergent evolution. However, little is known about the genes that underlie the evolution of mimetic phenotypes nor to what extent the same or different genes drive such convergent evolution. Here, we characterize one of the major genes that controls mimetic wing pattern evolution in Heliconius butterflies. Mapping, gene expression, and population genetic work all identify a single gene, optix, that controls radically variable red wing patterns across multiple species of Heliconius. Our results show that the cis-regulatory evolution of a single transcription factor can repeatedly drive the convergent evolution of complex color patterns in distantly related species, thus blurring the distinction between convergence and homology.. ...
The Radiating Butterflies Group studies the parallel radiations of some 300 species of mycalesine butterflies (Nymphalidae: Satyrinae) that inhabit the forests and savannah habitats of the old world tropics. Our aim is to reveal the patterns and processes of ecological speciation in this diverse group of tropical butterflies.. We are assembling several extensive datasets for these radiations, covering major traits both with respect to adaptation to ecological environments and to the acquisition of reproductive isolation.. For more information click here.. ...
who directs the conservation group Monarch Watch. "Should they be there? Probably not. But will they do immense harm? Probably not.". If monarch populations keep falling, the coastal regions could become more important, Dr. Oberhauser said. Migration can limit disease by weeding out the sick and allowing butterflies to leave contaminated plants behind. If year-round milkweed changes the migratory behavior of enough monarchs, she said, "it could have really far-reaching impacts.". So far, evidence that monarchs stop migrating to breed is indirect. "People plant tropical milkweed and then we see monarchs reproducing when they should be migrating or overwintering," Dr. Altizer said. "There needs to be more experimental work done.". And that is why Ms. Satterfield drove all night to catch butterflies in Texas. The monarchs she collected in Dallas and at another site without tropical milkweed will help her assess the plants effects at four coastal sites where it is common. She plans to analyze ...
Discover Lifes page about the biology, natural history, ecology, identification and distribution of Danaus plexippus, Monarch, larvae image
For a variety of personal reasons I havent been able to download the photos from my big camera since mid June so here are some very out of date sightings of moths and butterflies from Ffos Las. It has bean a dreadful summer so far as far as the butterflies are concerned with numbers much lower than in previous years and some species such as wall brown not seen at all when they have been seen regularly in previous years ...
Olfaction is in many species the most important sense, essential for food search, mate finding, and predator avoidance. Butterflies have been considered a microsmatic group of insects that mainly rely on vision due to their diurnal lifestyle. However, an emerging number of studies indicate that butterflies indeed use the sense of smell for locating food and oviposition sites. To unravel the neural substrates for olfaction, we performed an anatomical study of 2 related butterfly species that differ in food and host plant preference. We found many of the anatomical structures and pathways, as well as distribution of neuroactive substances, to resemble that of their nocturnal relatives among the Lepidoptera. The 2 species differed in the number of one type of olfactory sensilla, thus indicating a difference in sensitivity to certain compounds. Otherwise no differences could be observed. Our findings suggest that the olfactory system in Lepidoptera is well conserved despite the long evolutionary ...
After it eats for about two weeks non-stop it looks for a place to pupate. It hangs down in a "J" under a branch or ledge. After about one to two days inside, the caterpillar will change into a green chrysalis with gold spots. Then in about one to three weeks the chrysalis will become transparent with the case thinning out. The monarch butterfly will emerge out. The monarch butterfly will have strong wings because they migrate, so in the beginning as a butterfly, large amounts of liquid is pumped from the body to the wings. The male butterflies are distinct from the females in that they have a black spot in the third vein of each hind wing. This spot produces perfume that attracts a female. Now as an adult butterfly, they can drink any type of nectar not just specifically milkweed, whereas in the larval stage they can only feed on milkweed. The butterfly in the larval stage took in enough milkweed poison to last for its entire life. Therefore, birds and other predators have learned to stay away ...
Although it is widely agreed that data from multiple sources are necessary to confidently resolve phylogenetic relationships, procedures for accommodating and incorporating heterogeneity in such data remained underdeveloped. We explored the use of partitioned, model-based analyses of heterogeneous molecular data in the context of a phylogenetic study of swallowtail butterflies (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae).
Perisama bomplandii, the Bomplandis perisama, is a species of butterfly belonging to the family Nymphalidae. P. b. bomplandii (Colombia, Venezuela) P. b. equatorialis (Guénée, 1872) (Ecuador) P. b. albipennis Butler, 1873 (Peru, Ecuador) P. b. parabomplandii Dognin, 1899 (Colombia) P. b. ultramarina Oberthür, 1916 (Ecuador) P. b. venezuelana Viette, 1958 (Venezuela) P. b. reyi Attal & Crosson du Cormier, 2003 (Venezuela) The wingspan of Perisama bomplandii is about 45-50 millimetres (1.8-2.0 in). These butterflies are the largest of all Perisama genus. Coloration and pattern of these butterflies are quite variable depending on subspecies. Usually the uppersides of the wings are blue black. The forewings are crossed obliquely from the costal margin to the inner margin by wide bands of golden green or blue. Close to the apex sometimes there is a small white spot. On the uppersides of the hindwings the outer margins are bordered with greenish or blueish. At the base there is a brilliant blue. ...
The large white butterfly ( Pieris brassicae L) first invaded northernmost Japan from Siberia around 1994, and after a few years, began to expand its range. The wasp, Cotesia glomerata (L) parasitizes
Each fall, the entire monarch butterfly population of the Eastern United States and Canada funnels into a handful of oyamel pine groves in Michoacan, Mexico, to weather the winter months. Each spring, the butterflies mate and fly north to repopulate the continent in short generational bursts. The monarchs flying south in the fall are three generations removed from those that made the trip the previous year. With no parents to guide its way, a migrating monarch has only its genes to steer it to its Mexican overwintering site. Monarchs orient using the sun as a guidepost. Because the sun appears to move across the sky throughout the day, the butterflies must keep track of time in order to correctly interpret the suns position. Although this so-called "time-compensated sun compass" was demonstrated in 1997, little was known about how it worked. Steven Reppert, a neurobiologist at the University of Massachusetts Medical School in Worcester, MA, is working to change that. His lab seeks to understand ...
To the untrained eye, certain butterflies can look essentially identical to corresponding varieties of another species. This way they can evade predators, who wont eat them because the insects theyre copying taste terrible.. Biologists since Darwins time have wondered how these butterflies can so closely mimic the wing and body coloration patterns of an unrelated kind. Now, an international team of researchers has sorted out the genetics, and what it found was not at all what was expected.. Publishing online in the journal Nature, the team found that the varieties of color patterns in butterflies of the genus Heliconius corresponded perfectly with single DNA base differences found in a special set of genes called a supergene. This supergene, named P, consists of only a few gene sets that are shuffled in discrete patterns. Different generations can variously deploy differently ordered gene-blocks so that a single kind can express different color patterns using the same DNA. "Analyses of 31 ...
Monarch butterflies are one of natures most recognizable creatures, known for their bright colors and epic annual migration from the United States and Canada to Mexico. Yet there is much more to the monarch than its distinctive presence and mythic journeying. In Monarchs and Milkweed, Anurag Agrawal presents a vivid investigation into how the monarch butterfly has evolved closely alongside the milkweed-a toxic plant named for the sticky white substance emitted when its leaves are damaged-and how this inextricable and intimate relationship has been like an arms race over the millennia, a battle of exploitation and defense between two fascinating species. Check the PUP blog each Monday for new installments in our "Monarch Monday" blog series by Anurag Agrawal.. What makes monarchs and milkweeds so special?. AA: Monarchs and milkweed are remarkable creatures, theyre on a wild ride! From the monarchs perspective, its only food as a caterpillar is the milkweed plant. This makes them highly ...
Bates, H. W. 1862. Contributions to an insect fauna of the Amazon Valley. Lepidoptera: Heliconidae. Trans. Linn. Soc. Lond. 23:495-566.. Beltr n M, Jiggins CD, Brower AVZ, Bermingham E, Mallet M. 2007. Do pollen feeding, pupal-mating and larval gregariousness have a single origin in Heliconius butterflies? Inferences from multilocus DNA sequence data. Biological Journal of the Linnean Society in press.. Beltr n M, Jiggins CD, Bull V, Linares M, Mallet J, McMillan WO, and Bermingham E. 2002. Phylogenetic discordance at the species boundary: comparative gene genealogies among rapidly radiating Heliconius butterflies. Mol. Biol. Evol. 19: 2176-2190.. Benson WW, Brown KS, Gilbert LE 1976. Coevolution of plants and herbivores: passion flower butterflies. Evolution 29, 659-680.. Brower, A. V. Z. 1997 The evolution of ecologically important characters in Heliconius butterflies (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae): a cladistic review. Zool. J. Linn. Soc. 119, 457-472.. Brower AVZ, and Egan MG. 1997. Cladistics of ...
the Victoria and Albert Museum and the Oak Spring Garden Library. The small book in the Dumbarton Oaks Collection contains eight images of common fruits, flowers, butterflies, and insects painted on a gold ground within black frame borders on vellum. These motifs could have a religious significance. Flowers that are often found in Books of Hours (a type of late medieval prayer book) include roses, carnations, and violets, all symbols of the Virgin Mary. Violets are also an attribute of Jesus, while butterflies are associated with the Resurrection. The images can be characterized as an intermediate ...
Q. Which flowering perennials attract butterflies?-- Trudye Connolly, ChicagoA. Adult butterflies are attracted to large groups of stiff-stemmed plants with nectar-producing flowers protected from
FOREWORD No group of insects is more charismatic than the butterflies. Their size ranges from the tiny jewels like Blues, to the gorgeous Birdwings with a wing-span as great as eight inches. Their glowing colours, and delicate flickering movements catch and charm the eye. No wonder then that they were eagerly collected and studied by early naturalists. The Bombay Natural History Society (BNHS) has been associated with the study of butterflies from the very first. Planters and other members of the BNHS, who were posted in remote areas, when leaving India on retirement, often gave their extensive collections to the Society, providing the foundation of todays large and representative collection. There are specimens in the BNHS Collection, and they are irreplaceable. E.H. Aitken (EHA), the first Honorary Secretary, was a keen butterfly collector, who wrote several papers on them in the Journal. Between 1909 and 1927 a series of papers on Common Butterflies of the Plains of India was published in
Similar Species: In the east, H. leonardus could be confused with the Common Branded Skipper (H.comma) and the Indian Skipper (H. sassacus). Hesperia comma may be distinguished by its greenish underside, and sassacus by its yellowish-orange underside and pale yellow spot band. In the west, subspecies pawnee may be confused with the Ottoe Skipper, Plains Skipper, and Dakota Skipper (H. ottoe, H.assiniboia and H. dacotae); distinguishing characters are given under ottoe. [compare images]. Early Stages: The larvae are pale brown, mottled with reddish brown. The head is black in subspecies leonardus, dark brown in subspecies pawnee. They feed on perennial grasses, including Little Bluestem (Schizachyrium scoparium), Blue Grama (Bouteloua gracilis), and panic grass (Panicum spp.) and hibernate as first- or second-instar larvae, completing most of their growth in their second year.. Abundance: Over the whole range H. leonardus is locally common but never abundant.. Flight Season: Both subspecies fly ...
BACKGROUND: In the fall, Eastern North American monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) undergo a magnificent long-range migration. In contrast to spring and summer butterflies, fall migrants are juvenile hormone deficient, which leads to reproductive arrest and increased longevity. Migrants also use a time-compensated sun compass to help them navigate in the south/southwesterly direction en route for Mexico. Central issues in this area are defining the relationship between juvenile hormone status and oriented flight, critical features that differentiate summer monarchs from fall migrants, and identifying molecular correlates of behavioral state. RESULTS: Here we show that increasing juvenile hormone activity to induce summer-like reproductive development in fall migrants does not alter directional flight behavior or its time-compensated orientation, as monitored in a flight simulator. Reproductive summer butterflies, in contrast, uniformly fail to exhibit directional, oriented flight. To define
New Haven, Conn. - At the very heart of some of the most brilliant colors on the wings of butterflies lie bizarre structures, a multidisciplinary team of Yale researchers has found. These structures are intriguing the teams scientists and engineers, who want to use them to harness the power of light.. The crystal nanostructures that ultimately give butterflies their color are called gryoids. These are "mind-bendingly weird" three-dimensional curving structures that selectively scatter light, said Richard Prum, chair and the William Robertson Coe Professor in the Department of Ornithology, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology. Prum led the Yale team, which reported its findings online in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.. Prum over the years became fascinated with the properties of the colors on butterfly wings and enlisted researchers to help study them from the Departments of Chemical Engineering, Physics and Mechanical Engineering, as well as the Yale School of Engineering and ...
Definition of get butterflies in our stomach in the Idioms Dictionary. get butterflies in our stomach phrase. What does get butterflies in our stomach expression mean? Definitions by the largest Idiom Dictionary.
Associate Professor Sonia Altizers students and laboratory staff assisted with sequences of the monarch life cycle. "People in my lab guided the photographers and assistants and provided materials to them to film monarch eggs, larvae, pupation, adults laying eggs, praying mantis eating monarchs, and more," said Altizer, an expert on monarch butterflies.She has conducted substantial research on the variation among monarch butterflies across their worldwide range, and the ecological and evolutionary consequences of their long-distance migration, particularly as it relates to host-parasite interactions. Her study of the relationship between migration distance and monarch butterfly wing shape, co-authored with Andy Davis, assistant research scientist in the Odum School, was published in the journal Evolution in Feb. 2010 ...
Associate Professor Sonia Altizers students and laboratory staff assisted with sequences of the monarch life cycle. "People in my lab guided the photographers and assistants and provided materials to them to film monarch eggs, larvae, pupation, adults laying eggs, praying mantis eating monarchs, and more," said Altizer, an expert on monarch butterflies.She has conducted substantial research on the variation among monarch butterflies across their worldwide range, and the ecological and evolutionary consequences of their long-distance migration, particularly as it relates to host-parasite interactions. Her study of the relationship between migration distance and monarch butterfly wing shape, co-authored with Andy Davis, assistant research scientist in the Odum School, was published in the journal Evolution in Feb. 2010 ...
Beltr?n M, Jiggins CD, Brower AVZ, Bermingham E, Mallet M. 2007. Do pollen feeding, pupal-mating and larval gregariousness have a single origin in Heliconius butterflies? Inferences from multilocus DNA sequence data. Biological Journal of the Linnean Society in press.. Brower AVZ. 1994. Phylogeny of Heliconius butterflies inferred from mitochondrial DNA sequences (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 3: 159-174.. Brower AVZ, and Egan MG. 1997. Cladistics of Heliconius butterflies and relatives (Nymphalidae: Heliconiiti): the phylogenetic position of Eueides based on sequences from mtDNA and a nuclear gene. Proc. R. Soc. Lond. B 264: 969-977.. Brown KS, Jr. 1981. The biology of Heliconius and related genera. Ann. Rev. Entomol. 26: 427-456.. Emsley M. 1963. A morphological study of imagine Heliconiinae (Lep.: Nymphalidae) with a consideration of the evolutionary relationships within the group. Zoologica NY 48: 85-130.. Emsley MG. 1965. Speciation in Heliconius (Lep., ...
De Roode and Hunter discovered in 2010 that female monarch butterflies infected with the parasite Ophryocystis elektroscirrha prefer to lay their eggs on species of milkweed that will make their caterpillars less sick. Monarchs appear to have evolved the ability to medicate their offspring by choosing milkweed plants with high levels of cardenolides, a class of toxins that appear to kill the parasites ...
This small white butterfly Pieris rapae took about twenty minutes to lay its cluster of eggs on the underside of some broccoli leaves in our garden. Each egg as laid with slow painstaking precision, at the rate of roughly one every twenty seconds. After laying each egg the butterfly withdrew its abdomen back between its wings, then bent it downwards and deposited another. Butterfly eggs have beautifully sculptured chitinous shells and as hatching nears they become more transparent, so that you can see the larva wriggling inside. After hatching, the caterpillars first act is to each its own egg. ...
The Monarch butterfly population has dropped by an average of 40 percent since the beginning of the decade, and one scientist says a leading culprit is the widespread adoption of genetically modified crops -- strains of corn and soybeans with genes added so they are herbicide-tolerant.
Gardeners all over the world are creating safe habitats for butterflies. With the right plants, you can create your own butterfly garden. Learn more about the best plants for attracting butterflies and butterfly host plants in this article.
Here are a few favorite perennials that attract butterflies. Some are nectar sources for mature butterflies, and others are host plants for butterfly larvae. Every good butterfly garden should include both categories. Many of these plants also attract hummingbirds.. Turks cap. Butterfly weed. Yellow thistle. Milkweed. Mexican hat coneflower. Montauk daisy. Pineapple mint. Joanna Reed catmint. De La Mina verbena. Hummingbird trumpet. Joe-pye weed. Cardinal flower. New York ironweed. Herbstonne rudbeckia. Bee balm. Husker Red beardstongue. Echium pininana. ___________________________________________________________________. Find out which plants are perfect companions for your perennials in Perennial Companions.. Grow a broad array of butterfly-attracting annuals, perennials and shades with Shade, Annual and Perennials Garden Wheels.. Use Seeds for a Hummingbird Garden to grow nectar filled blooms that will attract many darting hummingbirds.. Subscribe to our free gardening ...
Common Mormon (Papilio polytes) is a very commonly seen throughout the year in very season. It belongs to species swallowtail butterflies. The male butterfly has only one form while the females have several forms which mimics the other swallowtail butterflies as common rose, crimson rose etc. The females show the patterns similar to the poisonous butterflies as crimson rose with the purpose of avoiding the attention of predators. So far I have recorded three forms of female common mormon as per the observations at the location ; Divulapitiya namely form cyrus, form stichius and form romulus. The form stichius mimics crimson rose butterfly very closely. ...
Butterfly wings may rank among the most delicate structures in nature, but they have given researchers powerful inspiration for new technology that doubles production of hydrogen gas - a green fuel of the future - from water and sunlight.. The researchers presented their findings in San Diego on March 26 at the American Chemical Societys (ACS) 243rd National Meeting & Exposition.. Tongxiang Fan, Ph.D., who reported on the use of two swallowtail butterflies - Troides aeacus (Heng-chun birdwing butterfly) and Papilio helenus Linnaeus (Red Helen) - as models, explained that finding renewable sources of energy is one of the great global challenges of the 21st century. One promising technology involves producing clean-burning hydrogen fuel from sunlight and water. It can be done in devices that use sunlight to kick up the activity of catalysts that split water into its components, hydrogen and oxygen. Better solar collectors are the key to making the technology practical, and Fans team turned to ...
Weve heard that people sometimes self-medicate, but did you know that Monarch butterflies do also? Join Mark Hunter, Henry A. Gleason Collegiate Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, and graduate student Leslie Decker as we discuss the imperiled migratory Monarch population, and the complex relationships among butterflies, host plants, parasites and predators. How might climate change affect these interactions? What can local individuals and organizations do to help these fragile populations?. Science Cafés provide an opportunity for audiences to discuss current science topics with experts in an informal setting. Hors doeuvres at 5:30 PM; program 6:00-7:30 PM.. ...
Monarch butterflies move to the northern range of their breeding territory in the northern United States and Canada from late May through July. One of the most exciting places to see monarchs in the fall is Point Pelee National Park in Ontario, Canada. Point Pelee National Park is a particularly important location for monarchs in the fall. The Great Lakes are a significant barrier to the monarchs southern migration. As they move south, they search for shorter ways across the lake and the Pelee peninsula provides an excellent start! Point Pelees shape funnels the monarchs to the tip. If the weather is cold, they will roost in trees and wait for warmer temperatures and favorable winds to cross the lake. If the weather is warm, they will often go directly across the lake without stopping in the park.. CLICK HERE for a PowerPoint presentation about monarchs in Canada in English.. CLICK HERE for a PowerPoint presentation about monarchs in Canada in French.. Because monarchs breed only where ...
Monarch larva 3D Model available on Turbo Squid, the worlds leading provider of digital 3D models for visualization, films, television, and games.
I write with very exciting news. It was exactly five years ago in October-November 2009 that I started discussing the Butterflies of India website with friends and colleagues in India (I was in Boston those days). A couple of months later we had the first draft of the website online and by January 2011 we were running full steam. For me and perhaps for many of you, the past five years have yielded tremendous insights into butterfly distributions, seasonality, wing pattern variation and many other aspects of the natural history and biology of Indian butterflies through the images and observations that were shared on this ButterflyIndia yahoo group and then posted as a long-term record on the Butterflies of India website. We also reported several species of butterflies new to India, and dozens of rediscoveries. Overall, these five years have been very exciting times and remarkably productive in terms of advancing our current understanding of Indian butterflies. With considerable activity on this ...
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Book The White Butterfly, Lagos on TripAdvisor: See 42 traveler reviews, 32 candid photos, and great deals for The White Butterfly, ranked #91 of 139 specialty lodging in Lagos and rated 3.5 of 5 at TripAdvisor.
Prudic and her collaborator found that the dramatic eyespots on the wings of Bicyclus anynana individuals in the wet season were more effective at fooling mantid insects, the butterflies main predators during rainy times, than the more diffuse wing spots of the dry season forms, which are preyed upon mostly by birds. The researchers even found that pasting wet-season spots onto dry-season butterflies had the same effect. Conversly, dry-season patterns [less-prominent eyespots] served to conceal the butterflies better from birds in its eastern African woodland habitats. "Having the right type of eyespot in the right season allowed the butterflies to live long enough to lay eggs and have more offspring in the next generation," Prudic said. "With the wrong eyespot at the wrong time, they were quickly annihilated by the mantids ...
Butterflies are creatures of transformation. They are beautiful to behold, they are all the colours of the rainbow and they have a stress-relief effect on people. The butterfly symbolises transformation because of her life cycle. The butterfly is also symbolic of metamorphosis, joy, freedom, naturalness, fun, colour, purity, and joyous times.
From: Dr. Karen Oberhauser Last week two U.S. research teams returned from a ten-day sojourn (February 26 - March 7) to the monarch overwintering colonies in Mexico, where we renewed our sense that the migration of the eastern North American population of monarch butterflies is the most amazing biological phenomenon in the world. Our trip was full of incredible biology, wonderful people, good weather, hard work, and a conviction that it will take many years to fully understand everything we observed. Sonia Altizer, Liz Goehring, Kari Guertz, Dr. Karen Oberhauser and Michelle Prysby from the University of Minnesota worked on population monitoring, disease incidence, and reproductive biology, and Dr. Lincoln Brower from the University of Florida and Sweet Briar College and Christopher O Neal from the University of Michigan worked on the availability and importance of nectar sources in the colonies. We were joined by Eduardo Rendon Salinas and Eneida Montesinos Patino from the University of ...
My family often calls to mind the extraordinary feelings of joy they felt when I finally emerged from my week-long comatose slumber. I imagine it was like witnessing a caterpillar coming out of its cocoon, changing from one life form into another. I was transforming into a new form of myself.. When the doctors removed my ventilator, I struggled and gasped for air with every breath. I wonder if a newborn baby feels that way what it takes its first breath of life? I had no short term memory. I saw an object in the corner of the room. It looked like a big box, but there were little people laughing and walking around inside of it. A lot of noise was coming from this strange machine. My visitors were watching it. What was it called? They told me what the name was. It was like hearing the word television for the first time.. It did not feel like I was really me. I touched my head and part of my hair had been shaved so the doctors could drill a hole into my skull. They implanted a gauge that ...
The fluttering of butterflies colored the air around the Baytown Wetlands Center, located on 1724 Market St., as the annual butterfly count began on July 4 and continued until July 14. North American volunteers select a count area with a 15-mile radius and conduct a one-day census of all butterflies observed within that circle. The count program is intended to promote interest in butterflies and provide results useful for scientific monitoring of butterflies. [...] my children and I have planted our own butterfly garden, said Peg Taylor, a volunteer and mother of three. The plants feed the butterflies and make the garden beautiful.
Preliminary findings by Minnesota and South Dakota researchers show a potential risk to monarch butterflies when neonicotinoids are used in plants near milkweed.
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Small white bumps on chin - I have red, inflamed, under the skin and very painful acne, as well as small white bumps on my chin. How do I get rid of it? Very serious. Painful acne may be compounded by allergy to the bacteria that cause it. It is a grave personal and professional liability and you need to be under the care of a competent physician, probably a dermatologist.
ID A0A194QD04_PAPXU Unreviewed; 839 AA. AC A0A194QD04; DT 05-OCT-2016, integrated into UniProtKB/TrEMBL. DT 05-OCT-2016, sequence version 1. DT 07-JUN-2017, entry version 6. DE RecName: Full=V-type proton ATPase subunit a {ECO:0000256,RuleBase:RU361189}; GN ORFNames=RR46_02787 {ECO:0000313,EMBL:KPJ02860.1}; OS Papilio xuthus (Asian swallowtail butterfly). OC Eukaryota; Metazoa; Ecdysozoa; Arthropoda; Hexapoda; Insecta; OC Pterygota; Neoptera; Holometabola; Lepidoptera; Glossata; Ditrysia; OC Papilionoidea; Papilionidae; Papilioninae; Papilio. OX NCBI_TaxID=66420 {ECO:0000313,EMBL:KPJ02860.1, ECO:0000313,Proteomes:UP000053268}; RN [1] {ECO:0000313,EMBL:KPJ02860.1, ECO:0000313,Proteomes:UP000053268} RP NUCLEOTIDE SEQUENCE [LARGE SCALE GENOMIC DNA]. RC STRAIN=Yaa_city_454_Px {ECO:0000313,EMBL:KPJ02860.1}; RC TISSUE=Whole body {ECO:0000313,EMBL:KPJ02860.1}; RX PubMed=26354079; DOI=10.1038/ncomms9212; RA Li X., Fan D., Zhang W., Liu G., Zhang L., Zhao L., Fang X., Chen L., RA Dong Y., Chen Y., Ding ...
Gene maps of monarch butterflies and related species suggest that an ice age shift explains their migrations, a study team suggests.
Little is known about the effect of El Niño Southern Oscillation-induced fires on the genetic diversity of tropical rainforest species. Here, I report on the isolation and characterization of 10 microsatellite loci, five loci each, for two lycaenid butterfly species in East Kalimantan, Indonesia, namely Drupadia theda and Arhopala epimuta, which will be used to specifically study the impact of disturbance on genetic diversity. Microsatellite enrichment was carried out using streptavidin-coated magnetic beads. Positive colonies were identified with the three-primer polymerase chain reaction (PIMA). Cross-species amplifications conducted both within and between genera were successful in 16 out of 20 tests ...
Inbreeding butterflies - a problem for butterfly enthusiasts? It is totally safe to breed sibling butterflies together for a couple of generations. The genetic diversity is great. Although continuing to breed siblings for quite a few generations in a row could lead to serious problems, a couple of generations is fine. If you want to know more of the details of why it is fine, read on!. Quite often enthusiasts gather eggs that are laid by one female (or assumed to be laid by one female). The question is often asked whether breeding the offspring together (siblings) is dangerous for the offspring. Will there be inbreeding problems? Inbreeding often causes unusual traits to occur when both the male and female parent passes a recessive gene to their offspring. Some recessive genes are delightful and do not cause damage or weakness to the offspring. Other recessive genes are deadly, causing death. {Although this paragraph doesnt answer the question, we do want to point out that in the wild, eggs ...
I have butterflies in my stomach….I am loving where the Kaleidoscope of Butterflies quilt has gone. Is it not totally satisfying when something in your head actually turns out how you image!! Well, the quilt top is complete. Kaleidoscope of Butterflies Can I just say, I got to use some of my favorite lines in…
One of the larger sulfur butterfly species, wingspan of butterflies can be over 3 inches. Males are brilliant yellow above with no markings. Females have some black marginal markings. Caterpillars, 1 inch long when fully grown, are pale yellowish green with yellow stripes along their sides. Each body segment is also marked with rows of black dots. Another subspecies, Phoebis sennae marcellina (Cramer), occurs in the Rio Grande Valley. Males are more patterned underneath with orange-brown and females have a warmer shade of yellow on the upper surface and a ground color of pinkish-orange on the underside. Thirty six species of Pieridae, butterflies called "whites" or "sulfurs" occur in Texas. Adults of the alfalfa caterpillar, Colias eurytheme Boisduval, are commonly seen sulfur butterflies. Adults have a 2 inch wingspan and wings are yellow to orange-yellow with black markings along the wing margins (on males, markings are solid and in females, black markings are interrupted by
A monarch born in the fall has two major challenges! In addition to metamorphosis, these butterflies fly 4,000 miles on a two-way migration trek! The Life Cycle of a Butterfly explains butterfly metamorphosis and migration in simple terms. The text is beautifully illustrated with photographs and art, making this book a joy to read. Topics include: where butterflies lay their eggs the eating machine caterpillar the transformation from pupa to chrysalis to butterfly monarch migration butterfly facts and activity suggestions how to protect butterflies
12/10/10. Even animals and insects recognize the healing power of medicinal plants. While mainstream medicine largely continues to deny the inherent healing capacity of natural plants and herbs, the insect world is abuzz with activities that confirm the plant world to be natures medicine cabinet. According to a new study published in the journal Ecology Letters, the Monarch butterfly routinely uses medicinal plants to help its offspring resist disease and infection.. Researchers observed that Monarch butterflies prefer to lay their egg larvae on milkweed leaves, so they decided to investigate why this is the case. They discovered that milkweed plants contain vital compounds that help the larvae to stay healthy.. We have shown that some species of milkweed, the larvas food plants, can reduce parasite infection in monarchs, explained Jaap de Roode, an evolutionary biologist at Emory University, and author of the study. [W]e have also found that infected female butterflies prefer to lay their ...
91 Campbell, B. D., Mitchell, N. D. and Field, T. R. O. (1999). Climate profiles of temperate C 3 and subtropical C 4 species in New Zealand pastures N. Z. J. Agric. Res 42: 223 233. Cevallos, V. E. (2007). Community ecology of Butterflies in Cotopaxi national Park, Ecuador unpublished Ph.D. t hesis University of Florida, Gainesville. Comstock, J. H. and Needham, J. G. (1918). The wings of insects. Am. Nat. 32: 253 257. DAbrera, B. L. (1988) Butterflies of the Neotropical Region. Nymphalidae Satyridae (conc). Hill House Victoria. DeVries, P. J. (1987) The Butterflies of Costa Rica and their Natural History Volume I. Papilionidae, Pieridae and Nymphalidae. Princeton University Press, N J. Dockerty T., Lovett, A. and Watkinson, A. ( 2003) Climate change and nature reser ves: examining the potential impacts, with examples from Great Britain. Glob Environ. Change 13 : 125 135. Duellman, W. E. ( 2004). Frogs of the genus Colostethus (Anura; Dendrobatidae) in the Andes of northern Peru. Sci. Pap. ...
The monarch butterfly is in trouble, and now the U.S. government is stepping in with Canada and Mexico to save the iconic annual migration.
Get this from a library! Moths and butterflies of North America. [Ilka Katherine List; Pedro Julio Gonzales; Stephen Savage; A Natacha Pimentel C] -- See what types of butterflies and moths have in common and how they are different.
Molecular phylogenetic analyses were conducted to determine relationships and to investigate character evolution for the Troidini/Aristolochia interaction, in an attempt to answer the following questions: (1) what is the present pattern of use of Aristolochia by these butterflies; (2) is the pattern we see today related to the phylogeny of plants or to their chemical composition; (3) can the geographical distribution of Aristolochia explain the host plant use observed today; and (4) how did the interaction between Troidini and Aristolochia evolve? Analyses of character optimization suggest that the current pattern of host plant use of these butterflies does not seem to be constrained by the phylogeny of their food plants, neither by the secondary chemicals in these plants nor by their geographical similarity. The current host plant use in these butterflies seems to be simply opportunistic, with species with a wider geographical range using more species of host plants than those with a more ...
This study addressed the possible behaviora induction effects of previous exposure to several specific host plants on subsequent host preference hierarchy and specificity (i.e .. how far down the ranking order a female will go) the most polyphagous swallowtail butterfly in the world, Papilio glaucus (Papilionidae). Multi-choice preference bioassays using individual females in revolving arenas were used to assess one of the potentially most significant non-genetic sources of variation: learned (or induced) oviposition preferences. Results of the 4-choice studies using tulip tree (Liriodendron tulipifera; Magnoliaceae), black cherry (Prunus serotina; Rosaceae), quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides; Salicaceae), and hoptree (Ptelea trifoliata; Rutaceae), fail to show any significant oviposition preference induction with two-day prior exposure to any of the host species tested. It appears that the eastern tiger swallowtail butterfly, while polyphagous as a species (feeding on more than 9 families of
Spring arrived, and along with it Papilio glaucus or the Eastern Tiger Swallowtail, one of our most spectacular butterflies. While adults feed on nectar of a wide variety of flowers, their caterpillars feed on leaves of Tulip trees (Liriodendron tulipifera), Black Cheeries (Prunus serotina), among many others. Choosy they are not!. The common name tells it all: this large butterfly, with a wingspan of up to 5.5 inches, belongs to the family of Swallowtails or Papilionidae (with over 570 species worldwide), and can be found in Eastern North America from Vermont to Florida, and show bold black stripes on their yellow wings ("tiger"), along with elegantly elongated tips at the end of their hindwings ("swallowtail"). They can be observed in a variety of habitats, including woodlands, fields, and in your garden, assuming you planted some butterfly-friendly (and hopefully native) flowers! For more information on how to do that, please see at the reference list.. After emergence from tiny green eggs, ...
Swarm is a research residency for artists interested in insects. The weeklong residency will facilitate 10 excursions into natural habitats and laboratories enriched by biologists, naturalists and experts to learn and collect materials. Outline: Artist talk: Residents are invited to give a private artist talk to share your work with the group. Moths: We will set up a moth lure to observe the local moths with artist Jim des Rivieres who will give a workshop on high resolution scanning of insects. Butterflies: A walk in the field to see local butterflies with a lepidopterist. Bioacoustics: A visit to an Ottawa University laboratory where audible caterpillar communication is studied. Invasive species: A guided hike through the Gatineau Forest with an expert on emerald ash borers. Pests: We will spend an afternoon with a progressive exterminator who will teach about local pests and cutting edge methods of dealing with them. Pinning and preservation: Visit to the Canadian National Collection
Seedling recruitment and establishment are key stages in the growth and maintenance of viable plant populations. Lupinus perennis (Wild blue lupine) is a long-lived oak savanna indicator species and the sole larval food source for several endangered or threatened butterflies. Since L. perennis is known to respond favorably to fire, land managers use a mosaic of controlled burns and field mowings to improve habitat for both plant and butterflies. However, it is unknown whether lupine populations are successfully recruiting and establishing under this management. We quantified natural lupine seedling recruitment and establishment throughout seven sites with known management histories in the Oak Openings region of Northwest Ohio and collected a range of environmental measurements at each seedling and used initial seedling size as a proxy for emergence time. Seedling recruitment and establishment varied across the region. A large fall cohort of lupine seedlings was followed and found to have ...
2Mehmet Akif Inan Training and Research Hospital, Otorhinolaryngology, Şanlıurfa, Turkey Objectives: To investigate the differences between endoscopic and microscopic butterfly cartilage tympanoplasty.. Material and Methods: Eighty-seven patients under endoscopic and microscopic butterfly cartilage tympanoplasty was done. Mean audiometric results were evaluated among the groups before surgery and six months after surgery at 500 Hz, 1000 Hz, 2000 Hz, and 4000 Hz at air and bone conduction thresholds. Air conduction pure tone audiometry (PTA), air-bone gap reduction, air-bone gap (ABG) and hearing gain before and after surgery were calculated after surgery.. Results: No statistically significant difference was found between the groups respectively in terms of the mean ABG before and after surgery (24.9±7.5 dB vs. 23.7±6.5 dB; 16.7 dB ± 5.2 vs. 15.9 dB ±5.8dB). Both groups showed significantly lower ABG after surgery than that before surgery ( ...
A social parasite uses workers of another social insect species to rear its own progeny. They are often so closely related to their hosts that it has been suggested that they could have evolved sympatrically from them. To address the question of whether social parasites evolved from their hosts we present a partial sequence of the mitochondrial 16S rRNA gene for nine species of Polistes, comprising all known species of social parasites, their hosts and two outgroups. Parsimony and maximum-likelihood analyses of the data support monophyly for these social parasites. The trees supporting monophyly are significantly shorter than the trees supporting sympatric speciation of parasites from their hosts. These data support the hypothesis that speciation occurred allopatrically and independently of the evolution of social parasitism. Where the social parasite parasitizes more than one species, the two species used are most closely related to each other. Although social parasites are monophyletic and did ...
Most Wasatch Front wet meadows are found adjacent to valley rivers, ponds, or other valley floor wet areas and are most easily recognized by an abundance of Russian olive trees as well as other plants such as milkweed, (Asclepias speciosa,) bull thistles, (Cirsium vulgare,) wild licorice, (Glycyrrhiza lepidota,) joe-pye weed, (Eupatorium maculatum,) cinquefoil, (Potentilla spp.,) stinging nettle, (Urtica dioica,) sandbar willow, (Salix exigua,) saltcedar, (Tamerisk ramosissima), common reed, (Phragmites australis,) canary grass (Phalaris arundinacea,) and others.. Monarchs, which is one of Northern Utahs migratory species, are especially attracted to wet meadows. Adults of the monarch especially prefer to roost in Russian olive trees to escape the heat of the day. In fact, female Monarchs will often lay their eggs on the milkweeds adjacent to these Russian olive trees as well on milkweeds near nectar sources. Special note: There are small colonies of Bairds Swallowtails, (Papilio bairdi) that ...
Tendon calcification in the shoulder joint. X-ray of a shoulder joint showing acute calcification in the subscapularis tendon. The bone on the left is the humerus, the rounded head of which articulates with the scapula on the right. The calcification is the small white area at the base of the articulation of these two bones. Calcification may occur due to damage to the tendon, and can make movement of the joint very painful and stiff (rheumatism). Treatment is by local corticosteroid injection which reduces inflammation, ultrasound application to disrupt the calcium deposit or, occasionally, surgical removal of the deposit. - Stock Image M110/0347

Learn about the unique life of Costa Rican butterflies - Javis Travel Blog - Go Visit Costa RicaLearn about the unique life of Costa Rican butterflies - Javi's Travel Blog - Go Visit Costa Rica

You know what else is really cool? The species in Costa Rica make up about 90 percent of all Central American butterflies and ... Ive made friends with some butterflies throughout my travels, because I am so intrigued by their patterns and life cycle. ... 18 percent of the worlds species! You can learn so much about these interesting creatures at one of the many butterfly farms ... Did you know that Costa Rica is home to a massive population of butterflies? These colorful creatures float delicately through ...
more infohttps://www.govisitcostarica.com/blog/post/learn-about-costa-rican-butterflies.aspx

Butterflies: guides of species, images and resources.Butterflies: guides of species, images and resources.

Butterflies use the sun to warm in cold climates. As the butterfly ages, the color of the wings fades and becomes irregular . ... Female butterflies are generally larger than males and live longer. It can also to interest Butterflies.wiki is part of a ... Most butterflies live on nectar and pollen from flowers. • Butterflies have a long, flexible tongue , similar to a tube that ... Butterflies migrate to avoid the cold. • Many believe that butterflies got their name because they flew around the buckets of ...
more infohttp://parantar.com/2018/03/06/butterflies-guides-of-species-images-and-resources.html

Asclepias Tuberosa. - A DICTIONARY OF PRACTICAL MATERIA MEDICA By John Henry CLARKE, M.D.
Presented by M di-TAsclepias Tuberosa. - A DICTIONARY OF PRACTICAL MATERIA MEDICA By John Henry CLARKE, M.D. Presented by M di-T

Butterfly-weed. N. O. Asclepiadace . Tincture of fresh root.. Clinical.─Alopecia. Asthma. Bilious fever. Bronchitis. Catarrh. ...
more infohttp://www.homeoint.org/clarke/a/asclep_tub.htm

ASCLEPIAS TUBEROSA - A Text-Book of Materia Medica. By Pr.  Allen
Corson CowperthwaiteASCLEPIAS TUBEROSA - A Text-Book of Materia Medica. By Pr. Allen Corson Cowperthwaite

Butterfly Weed.. General Analysis.-. Acts chiefly on the mucous surfaces, especially of the respiratory organs, and intestinal ...
more infohttp://homeoint.org/seror/cowperthwaite/asc_t.htm

Asclepias incarnata Swamp milkweed from New Moon NurseriesAsclepias incarnata Swamp milkweed from New Moon Nurseries

Plants are also used as an Accent, Butterfly Nectar Plant, Butterfly Host Plant or as part of a Grouping or Mass Planting. It ... Butterflies, bees and moths seek the floral nectar. After flowering 4" seed pods split and release brown seed with silken ... In summer plants are topped by clear white flower clusters which attract flocks of butterflies. Plants thrive in sunny sites ... conventional pesticide treatments should be avoided because they will usually kill the highly desirable Monarch Butterfly ...
more infohttp://newmoonnursery.com/index.cfm/fuseaction/plants.plantDetail/plant_id/360/index.htm

Asclepias speciosa - Biological Sciences - CSU, Chico
		Asclepias speciosa - Biological Sciences - CSU, Chico

In the summer months, when the plant is flowering, you can find a number of butterflies tending the flowers, notably the ... Monarch butterfly. Like all Milkweeds, a white liquid, called latex, is secreted whenever the plant is damaged. Most predators ...
more infohttps://www.csuchico.edu/biol/collections/garden/asclepias-speciosa.shtml

Asclepias speciosa - Showy Milkweed - Asclepiadaceae (The Milkweed Family)Asclepias speciosa - Showy Milkweed - Asclepiadaceae (The Milkweed Family)

Support monarch and other butterflies with Asclepias speciosa, the western North American sister species to the eastern common ... star-shaped flowers which attract butterflies. It is an important food source for Monarch and other butterflies. Showy milkweed ... Attracts: Butterflies. *Habitat: Edges of ponds and moist soils, wet meadows, shallow waters. Banks and flood plains of lakes, ... Asclepias speciosa - Support monarch and other butterflies with Asclepias speciosa, the western North American sister species ...
more infohttps://mailorder.phoenixperennials.com/Asclepias_speciosa_Showy_Milkweed_p/5909.htm

Little Calumet River Prairie & WetlandsLittle Calumet River Prairie & Wetlands

Asclepias syriaca common milkweed Herbaceous YES Asclepias tuberosa butterfly weed; butterly milkweed Herbaceous YES Aster ...
more infohttp://www.nirmi.org/?pageNav=2&dateFilter=2012

Asclepias (U. S. P.)-Asclepias. | Henriettes Herbal HomepageAsclepias (U. S. P.)-Asclepias. | Henriette's Herbal Homepage

For miles along the railways clusters of the rich, deep orange flowers of the butterfly weed, as it is called, bedeck the ... COMMON NAMES: Pleurisy root, Butterfly weed, Orange swallowwort, Wind root, Tuber root. ILLUSTRATIONS: Bigelow, Am. Med. Bot. ... or butterfly weed. It is perhaps best known to the profession, at least to the older physicians, as pleurisy root, a name ... butterfly weed, orange swallow-wort, silkweed, tuber root, wind root, white root, flux root, and Canada root. The official part ...
more infohttps://www.henriettes-herb.com/eclectic/kings/asclepias-tube.html

Butterfly - WikipediaButterfly - Wikipedia

Wikiquote has quotations related to: Butterflies. Wikisource has the text of the 1920 Encyclopedia Americana article Butterfly. ... "British Butterflies: Education: Butterflies in Winter". Retrieved 12 September 2015.. *^ "Camberwell Beauty". NatureGate. ... The Mathematical Butterfly: Simulations Provide New Insights On Flight *^ Larsen, Torben (1994). "Butterflies of Egypt". Saudi ... Black grass-dart butterfly (Ocybadistes knightorum) is a butterfly of the family Hesperiidae. It is endemic to New South Wales ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Butterfly

Attracting ButterfliesAttracting Butterflies

... involves incorporating plants that serve the needs of all life stages of the butterfly. The insects need ... Attracting Butterflies. Brightly colored butterflies can be a welcome addition to your wildlife garden, not only because of ... Butterfly Garden Necessities * Plant native flowering plants - Because many butterflies and native flowering plants have co- ... Butterfly adults generally feed only in the sun. If sun is limited in your landscape, try adding butterfly nectar sources to ...
more infohttp://nwf.org/Garden-for-Wildlife/Wildlife/Attracting-Butterflies

Attracting ButterfliesAttracting Butterflies

... involves incorporating plants that serve the needs of all life stages of the butterfly. The insects need ... Attracting Butterflies. Brightly colored butterflies can be a welcome addition to your wildlife garden, not only because of ... Butterfly Garden Necessities * Plant native flowering plants - Because many butterflies and native flowering plants have co- ... Butterfly adults generally feed only in the sun. If sun is limited in your landscape, try adding butterfly nectar sources to ...
more infohttps://nwf.org/Home/Garden-for-Wildlife/Wildlife/Attracting-Butterflies

Buddleia & Butterflies - BuddleiaBuddleia & Butterflies - Buddleia

Butterfly Bush is a beautiful plant and helps to support the dwindling numbers of butterflies. The purpose of this website is ... Butterflies. In the UK Half of the butterflies are under threat of extinction, and more than 70% are in decline, we can help ... Butterflies love Buddleia because of the nectar, and nectar is the butterflies primary food source that gives them the energy ... "In butterfly bush, butterfly visitation appears to be based on both flower color and nectar qualities. In general, visitation ...
more infohttps://sites.google.com/site/buddleiabush/benefits-of-buddleia

Butterflies of IndiaButterflies of India

The BookReader requires JavaScript to be enabled. Please check that your browser supports JavaScript and that it is enabled in the browser settings. You can also try one of the other formats of the book. ...
more infohttps://archive.org/stream/ButterfliesOfIndia/AntramButterflies

Butterflies (nummer) - WikipediaButterflies (nummer) - Wikipedia

Butterflies deed het het best in het Verenigde Koninkrijk, waar het in de Billboard Hot 100 op de veertiende plek belandde, en ... Butterflies is een lied van de Amerikaanse popster Michael Jackson. Het is geschreven door Andre Harris en Marsha Ambrosius, en ... Unbreakable · Heartbreaker · Invincible · Break Of Dawn · Heaven Can Wait · You Rock My World · Butterflies · Speechless · 2000 ... Overgenomen van "https://nl.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Butterflies_(nummer)&oldid=46452566" ...
more infohttps://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Butterflies_

Birds and ButterfliesBirds and Butterflies

Geocaching is a treasure hunting game where you use a GPS to hide and seek containers with other participants in the activity. Geocaching.com is the listing service for geocaches around the world.
more infohttps://www.geocaching.com/geocache/GC87B5_birds-and-butterflies?guid=be1f515b-f166-438c-ab91-79c8a0378255

Chinese Butterflies | AMNHChinese Butterflies | AMNH

In our rare book collection is a little silk-covered album containing twelve plates of brilliantly colored butterflies painted ... Chinese plates of butterflies) Made in China in the mid-1800s, it is a beautiful example of what is called China trade art, ... Our album includes only butterflies, but the Mets has other insects and even a lizard. Their images seem to be less detailed ... In our rare book collection is a little silk-covered album containing twelve plates of brilliantly colored butterflies painted ...
more infohttps://www.amnh.org/our-research/research-library/library-news/chinese-butterflies

Butterflies - The New York TimesButterflies - The New York Times

To bring butterflies to a garden, one can easily plant black-eyed Susans, butterfly weed, monarda, coneflowers, corepsis - even ... When preferred plants disappear, butterflies are at risk. Adult butterflies sip nectar from many flowers - primarily yellow, ... To the Editor: It was encouraging to read in A World of Butterflies in Florida (Travel, Jan. 28) that Coconut Creek ... a member of the National Wildflower Research Center and received a bibliography and suggestions to help with a home butterfly ...
more infohttps://www.nytimes.com/1990/03/18/travel/l-butterflies-526990.html

Butterflies in the stomach - WikipediaButterflies in the stomach - Wikipedia

Butterflies in the stomach is the physical sensation in humans of a "fluttery" feeling in the stomach, caused by a reduction of ... Look up have butterflies in ones stomach in Wiktionary, the free dictionary.. ... "Why do you get butterflies in your stomach?". The Washington Post. Retrieved 27 January 2013.. ... Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Butterflies_in_the_stomach&oldid=825721436" ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Butterflies_in_the_stomach

Butterflies fight extinction - LA TimesButterflies fight extinction - LA Times

Biologists are ecstatic to learn that the tiny butterfly has occupied an area of coastal sage scrub in Redondo Beach and ... Biologists are ecstatic to learn that the tiny butterfly has occupied an area of coastal sage scrub in Redondo Beach and ... The El Segundo blue butterfly, an insect on the endangered species list, sits on a flowering seacliff buckwheat plant at ... The El Segundo blue butterfly, an insect on the endangered species list, sits on a flowering seacliff buckwheat plant at ...
more infohttp://www.latimes.com/local/la-me-butterfly-pg-photogallery.html

Chapter 6: Cosmic ButterfliesChapter 6: Cosmic Butterflies

Phillip: Paul, I seem to hear the approach of a butterfly.. Paul: There is something called the butterfly effect, which has ... does god play dice . einsteins legacy . cosmic butterflies the big questions . more big questions . davies . adams . links ... Hence the butterfly effect , as it has been dubbed.. Phillip: But it is a metaphor, not a fact.. Paul: Oh, it is a fact. The ... Cosmic Butterflies. Phillip: Ancient cultures viewed nature as a continual struggle between the forces of order and chaos. For ...
more infohttp://www.abc.net.au/science/morebigquestions/stories/s540598.htm

Beyond skulls and butterfliesBeyond skulls and butterflies

Tel Aviv-based tattoo artist Roey Pentagram has had customers with unusual requests. Some have asked for the number tattooed to a parents arm during the Holocaust. "Usually the [customers] parent died, and this is their way of immortalizing them. The number is a memento. The first connotation of this type of tattoo is negative. But for the customer, its part of who their parent was," said Pentagram. Pentagram did the first of these tattoos about eight years ago. Another customer requested a picture of a crab on his chest. Usually when people ask for a crab, its because their astrological sign is Cancer. But not this man. He had just recovered from cancer and got the tattoo as a symbolic way of keeping cancer (the Hebrew word "sartan" is the same for the disease and the star sign) outside of his body, not inside. ...
more infohttps://www.jpost.com/printarticle.aspx?id=132651

Endangered ButterfliesEndangered Butterflies

He studied and named butterflies known as Blues. In his novel Pnin Nabokov wrote:. "A score of small butterflies, all of one ... This butterfly, Karners Blue, named by Nabokov, is among several threatened with extinction. More here. ... Endangered Butterflies. Nabokovs Blues Threatened. Vladimir Nabokov, the famous Russian-American author of Lolita, was also a ...
more infohttps://cseweb.ucsd.edu/~ricko/CSE3/Fall2009/Lab9/DEBUG.html
  • Whether you're going through a hike in the rainforest, or walking through town on your way to dinner, there's a great chance you'll see a few butterflies flapping their jewel-like wings. (govisitcostarica.com)
  • Then, you will go through the butterfly garden, which is my favorite part of the tour because it's an enclosed gardens where butterflies fly around, lay eggs and go about their typical daily life. (govisitcostarica.com)
  • I've made friends with some butterflies throughout my travels, because I am so intrigued by their patterns and life cycle. (govisitcostarica.com)
  • You can learn so much about these interesting creatures at one of the many butterfly farms and conservatories throughout the country. (govisitcostarica.com)
  • Located in El Castillo, the Butterfly Conservatory is home to largest exhibition of butterflies in the country. (govisitcostarica.com)
  • Here you can go on a metamorphosis tour and watch the entire process a butterfly goes through to become a vibrant, beautiful creature. (govisitcostarica.com)
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