Butanones, also known as methyl ethyl ketone or MEK, are organic compounds consisting of a four-carbon chain with a ketone functional group located at the second carbon atom, classified as dimethyl ketones, and commonly used in industrial and laboratory settings as solvents and chemical intermediates.
A class of compounds that contain a -NH2 and a -NO radical. Many members of this group have carcinogenic and mutagenic properties.
Substances that increase the risk of NEOPLASMS in humans or animals. Both genotoxic chemicals, which affect DNA directly, and nongenotoxic chemicals, which induce neoplasms by other mechanism, are included.
Organic compounds with the general formula R-NCS.
A plant genus of the family SOLANACEAE. Members contain NICOTINE and other biologically active chemicals; its dried leaves are used for SMOKING.
Derivatives of GLUCURONIC ACID. Included under this heading are a broad variety of acid forms, salts, esters, and amides that include the 6-carboxy glucose structure.
Plants or plant parts which are harmful to man or other animals.
The chemical alteration of an exogenous substance by or in a biological system. The alteration may inactivate the compound or it may result in the production of an active metabolite of an inactive parent compound. The alterations may be divided into METABOLIC DETOXICATION, PHASE I and METABOLIC DETOXICATION, PHASE II.
F344 rats are an inbred strain of albino laboratory rats (Rattus norvegicus) that have been widely used in biomedical research due to their consistent and reliable genetic background, which facilitates the study of disease mechanisms and therapeutic interventions.
A species of the genus ERYTHROCEBUS, subfamily CERCOPITHECINAE, family CERCOPITHECIDAE. It inhabits the flat open arid country of Africa. It is also known as the patas monkey or the red monkey.
Ribulose substituted by one or more phosphoric acid moieties.
Inbred strain A mice are genetically identical descendants of a single founder mouse, produced by many generations of brother-sister matings, primarily used in biomedical research for their genetic uniformity and experimental reproducibility.
Tumors or cancer of the LUNG.
Compounds with a six membered aromatic ring containing NITROGEN. The saturated version is PIPERIDINES.
The N-glucuronide conjugate of cotinine is a major urinary metabolite of NICOTINE. It thus serves as a biomarker of exposure to tobacco SMOKING. It has CNS stimulating properties.
Nicotine is highly toxic alkaloid. It is the prototypical agonist at nicotinic cholinergic receptors where it dramatically stimulates neurons and ultimately blocks synaptic transmission. Nicotine is also important medically because of its presence in tobacco smoke.
Nutritional factor found in milk, eggs, malted barley, liver, kidney, heart, and leafy vegetables. The richest natural source is yeast. It occurs in the free form only in the retina of the eye, in whey, and in urine; its principal forms in tissues and cells are as FLAVIN MONONUCLEOTIDE and FLAVIN-ADENINE DINUCLEOTIDE.
A potent mutagen and carcinogen. It is a public health concern because of its possible effects on industrial workers, as an environmental pollutant, an as a component of tobacco smoke.
A product of fermentation. It is a component of the butanediol cycle in microorganisms. In mammals it is oxidized to carbon dioxide.
Agents that reduce the frequency or rate of spontaneous or induced tumors independently of the mechanism involved.
Enzymes of the isomerase class that catalyze the transfer of acyl-, phospho-, amino- or other groups from one position within a molecule to another. EC 5.4.
Powdered or cut pieces of leaves of NICOTIANA TABACUM which are inhaled through the nose, chewed, or stored in cheek pouches. It includes any product of tobacco that is not smoked.
'Ketones' are organic compounds with a specific structure, characterized by a carbonyl group (a carbon double-bonded to an oxygen atom) and two carbon atoms, formed as byproducts when the body breaks down fats for energy due to lack of glucose, often seen in diabetes and starvation states.
Either of the pair of organs occupying the cavity of the thorax that effect the aeration of the blood.
Placing of a hydroxyl group on a compound in a position where one did not exist before. (Stedman, 26th ed)
A nitrosamine derivative with alkylating, carcinogenic, and mutagenic properties. It causes serious liver damage and is a hepatocarcinogen in rodents.
A colorless liquid used as a solvent and an antiseptic. It is one of the ketone bodies produced during ketoacidosis.
A large group of cytochrome P-450 (heme-thiolate) monooxygenases that complex with NAD(P)H-FLAVIN OXIDOREDUCTASE in numerous mixed-function oxidations of aromatic compounds. They catalyze hydroxylation of a broad spectrum of substrates and are important in the metabolism of steroids, drugs, and toxins such as PHENOBARBITAL, carcinogens, and insecticides.
The products of chemical reactions that result in the addition of extraneous chemical groups to DNA.
'Smoke' is a complex mixture of gases, fine particles, and volatile compounds, generally produced by combustion of organic substances, which can contain harmful chemicals known to have adverse health effects.
Artifactual vesicles formed from the endoplasmic reticulum when cells are disrupted. They are isolated by differential centrifugation and are composed of three structural features: rough vesicles, smooth vesicles, and ribosomes. Numerous enzyme activities are associated with the microsomal fraction. (Glick, Glossary of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 1990; from Rieger et al., Glossary of Genetics: Classical and Molecular, 5th ed)
Tumors or cancer of the NOSE.
Guanine is a purine nucleobase, one of the four nucleobases in the nucleic acid of DNA and RNA, involved in forming hydrogen bonds between complementary base pairs in double-stranded DNA molecules.
An enzyme that catalyzes the formation of riboflavin from two molecules of 6,7-dimethyl-8-ribityllumazine, utilizing a four-carbon fragment from one molecule which is transferred to the second molecule. EC 2.5.1.9.
Viscous materials composed of complex, high-molecular-weight compounds derived from the distillation of petroleum or the destructive distillation of wood or coal. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
A plasticizer used in most plastics and found in water, air, soil, plants and animals. It may have some adverse effects with long-term exposure.
A naturally occurring furocoumarin compound found in several species of plants, including Psoralea corylifolia. It is a photoactive substance that forms DNA ADDUCTS in the presence of ultraviolet A irradiation.
Organic derivatives of thiocyanic acid which contain the general formula R-SCN.
4-carbon straight chain aliphatic hydrocarbons substituted with two hydroxyl groups. The hydroxyl groups cannot be on the same carbon atom.
Contamination of the air by tobacco smoke.
Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.
A microanalytical technique combining mass spectrometry and gas chromatography for the qualitative as well as quantitative determinations of compounds.
Liquid chromatographic techniques which feature high inlet pressures, high sensitivity, and high speed.
Closed vesicles of fragmented endoplasmic reticulum created when liver cells or tissue are disrupted by homogenization. They may be smooth or rough.
A superfamily of hundreds of closely related HEMEPROTEINS found throughout the phylogenetic spectrum, from animals, plants, fungi, to bacteria. They include numerous complex monooxygenases (MIXED FUNCTION OXYGENASES). In animals, these P-450 enzymes serve two major functions: (1) biosynthesis of steroids, fatty acids, and bile acids; (2) metabolism of endogenous and a wide variety of exogenous substrates, such as toxins and drugs (BIOTRANSFORMATION). They are classified, according to their sequence similarities rather than functions, into CYP gene families (>40% homology) and subfamilies (>59% homology). For example, enzymes from the CYP1, CYP2, and CYP3 gene families are responsible for most drug metabolism.
Reduction of pharmacologic activity or toxicity of a drug or other foreign substance by a living system, usually by enzymatic action. It includes those metabolic transformations that make the substance more soluble for faster renal excretion.
An alcohol produced from mint oils or prepared synthetically.
The phenomenon whereby compounds whose molecules have the same number and kind of atoms and the same atomic arrangement, but differ in their spatial relationships. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 5th ed)
An oleanolic acid from GLYCYRRHIZA that has some antiallergic, antibacterial, and antiviral properties. It is used topically for allergic or infectious skin inflammation and orally for its aldosterone effects in electrolyte regulation.
Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases that catalyzes the reversible conversion of CORTISOL to the inactive metabolite CORTISONE. Enzymes in this class can utilize either NAD or NADP as cofactors.
A genus of the family Muridae having three species. The present domesticated strains were developed from individuals brought from Syria. They are widely used in biomedical research.
The covalent bonding of an alkyl group to an organic compound. It can occur by a simple addition reaction or by substitution of another functional group.
Widely distributed enzymes that carry out oxidation-reduction reactions in which one atom of the oxygen molecule is incorporated into the organic substrate; the other oxygen atom is reduced and combined with hydrogen ions to form water. They are also known as monooxygenases or hydroxylases. These reactions require two substrates as reductants for each of the two oxygen atoms. There are different classes of monooxygenases depending on the type of hydrogen-providing cosubstrate (COENZYMES) required in the mixed-function oxidation.
A phase transition from liquid state to gas state, which is affected by Raoult's law. It can be accomplished by fractional distillation.
Alkyl compounds containing a hydroxyl group. They are classified according to relation of the carbon atom: primary alcohols, R-CH2OH; secondary alcohols, R2-CHOH; tertiary alcohols, R3-COH. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)
Synthetic or naturally occurring substances related to coumarin, the delta-lactone of coumarinic acid.
The proximal portion of the respiratory passages on either side of the NASAL SEPTUM. Nasal cavities, extending from the nares to the NASOPHARYNX, are lined with ciliated NASAL MUCOSA.
A benign epithelial tumor with a glandular organization.
The infusion of leaves of CAMELLIA SINENSIS (formerly Thea sinensis) as a beverage, the familiar Asian tea, which contains CATECHIN (especially epigallocatechin gallate) and CAFFEINE.
Organic compounds which contain selenium as an integral part of the molecule.
The volatile portions of substances perceptible by the sense of smell. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)
A nucleoside consisting of the base guanine and the sugar deoxyribose.
The oxygen-carrying proteins of ERYTHROCYTES. They are found in all vertebrates and some invertebrates. The number of globin subunits in the hemoglobin quaternary structure differs between species. Structures range from monomeric to a variety of multimeric arrangements.
The location of the atoms, groups or ions relative to one another in a molecule, as well as the number, type and location of covalent bonds.
Tests of chemical substances and physical agents for mutagenic potential. They include microbial, insect, mammalian cell, and whole animal tests.
Addition of methyl groups. In histo-chemistry methylation is used to esterify carboxyl groups and remove sulfate groups by treating tissue sections with hot methanol in the presence of hydrochloric acid. (From Stedman, 25th ed)
Carbon monoxide (CO). A poisonous colorless, odorless, tasteless gas. It combines with hemoglobin to form carboxyhemoglobin, which has no oxygen carrying capacity. The resultant oxygen deprivation causes headache, dizziness, decreased pulse and respiratory rates, unconsciousness, and death. (From Merck Index, 11th ed)
A mass spectrometry technique used for analysis of nonvolatile compounds such as proteins and macromolecules. The technique involves preparing electrically charged droplets from analyte molecules dissolved in solvent. The electrically charged droplets enter a vacuum chamber where the solvent is evaporated. Evaporation of solvent reduces the droplet size, thereby increasing the coulombic repulsion within the droplet. As the charged droplets get smaller, the excess charge within them causes them to disintegrate and release analyte molecules. The volatilized analyte molecules are then analyzed by mass spectrometry.
Experimentally induced new abnormal growth of TISSUES in animals to provide models for studying human neoplasms.
Measurable and quantifiable biological parameters (e.g., specific enzyme concentration, specific hormone concentration, specific gene phenotype distribution in a population, presence of biological substances) which serve as indices for health- and physiology-related assessments, such as disease risk, psychiatric disorders, environmental exposure and its effects, disease diagnosis, metabolic processes, substance abuse, pregnancy, cell line development, epidemiologic studies, etc.
A deoxyribonucleotide polymer that is the primary genetic material of all cells. Eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms normally contain DNA in a double-stranded state, yet several important biological processes transiently involve single-stranded regions. DNA, which consists of a polysugar-phosphate backbone possessing projections of purines (adenine and guanine) and pyrimidines (thymine and cytosine), forms a double helix that is held together by hydrogen bonds between these purines and pyrimidines (adenine to thymine and guanine to cytosine).
Chromatographic techniques in which the mobile phase is a liquid.
Tritium is an isotope of hydrogen (specifically, hydrogen-3) that contains one proton and two neutrons in its nucleus, making it radioactive with a half-life of about 12.3 years, and is used in various applications including nuclear research, illumination, and dating techniques due to its low energy beta decay.
A large lobed glandular organ in the abdomen of vertebrates that is responsible for detoxification, metabolism, synthesis and storage of various substances.
A subfamily in the family MURIDAE, comprising the hamsters. Four of the more common genera are Cricetus, CRICETULUS; MESOCRICETUS; and PHODOPUS.
One of the two major classes of cholinergic receptors. Nicotinic receptors were originally distinguished by their preference for NICOTINE over MUSCARINE. They are generally divided into muscle-type and neuronal-type (previously ganglionic) based on pharmacology, and subunit composition of the receptors.
A malignant epithelial tumor with a glandular organization.
A chemical reaction in which an electron is transferred from one molecule to another. The electron-donating molecule is the reducing agent or reductant; the electron-accepting molecule is the oxidizing agent or oxidant. Reducing and oxidizing agents function as conjugate reductant-oxidant pairs or redox pairs (Lehninger, Principles of Biochemistry, 1982, p471).
Fractionation of a vaporized sample as a consequence of partition between a mobile gaseous phase and a stationary phase held in a column. Two types are gas-solid chromatography, where the fixed phase is a solid, and gas-liquid, in which the stationary phase is a nonvolatile liquid supported on an inert solid matrix.

Slow oxidation of acetoxime and methylethyl ketoxime to the corresponding nitronates and hydroxy nitronates by liver microsomes from rats, mice, and humans. (1/233)

Acetoxime and methylethyl ketoxime (MEKO) are tumorigenic in rodents, inducing liver tumors in male animals. The mechanisms of tumorigenicity for these compounds are not well defined. Oxidation of the oximes to nitronates of secondary-nitroalkanes, which are mutagenic and tumorigenic in rodents, has been postulated to play a role in the bioactivation of ketoximes. In these experiments, we have compared the oxidation of acetoxime and methylethyl ketoxime to corresponding nitronates in liver microsomes from different species. The oximes were incubated with liver microsomes from mice, rats, and several human liver samples. After tautomeric equilibration and extraction with n-hexane, 2-nitropropane and 2-nitrobutane were quantitated by GC/MS-NCI (limit of detection of 250 fmol/injection volume). In liver microsomes, nitronate formation from MEKO and acetoxime was dependent on time, enzymatically active proteins, and the presence of NADPH. Nitronate formation was increased in liver microsomes of rats pretreated with inducers of cytochrome P450 and reduced in the presence of inhibitors (n-octylamine and diethyldithiocarbamate). Rates of oxidation of MEKO (Vmax) were 1.1 nmol/min/mg (mice), 0.5 nmol/min/mg (humans), and 0.1 nmol/min/mg (rats). In addition to nitronates, several minor metabolites were also enzymatically formed (two diastereoisomers of 3-nitro-2-butanol, 2-hydroxy-3-butanone oxime and 2-nitro-1-butanol). Acetoxime was also metabolized to the corresponding nitronate at rates approximately 50% of those observed with MEKO oxidation in the three species examined. 2-Nitro-1-propanol was identified as a minor product formed from acetoxime. No sex differences in the capacity to oxidize acetoxime and MEKO were observed in the species examined. The observed results show that formation of sec-nitronates from ketoximes occurs slowly, but is not the only pathway involved in the oxidative biotransformation of these compounds. Due to the lack of sex-specific oxidative metabolism, other metabolic pathways or mechanisms of tumorigenicity not involving bioactivation may be involved in the sex-specific tumorigenicity of ketoximes in rodents.  (+info)

A placebo-controlled study of interaction between nabumetone and acenocoumarol. (2/233)

AIMS: The use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in patients treated with oral anticoagulants is generally discouraged due to the risk of interactions that could increase the risk of bleeding complications. Available data suggest the NSAID, nabumetone, does not produce such an interaction. We investigated whether nabumetone would interact with acenocoumarol, an oral anticoagulant widely used in some European countries. METHODS: A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study was conducted evaluating nabumetone (1-2 g daily for up to 4 weeks) in osteoarthritis patients with thromboembolic risk previously stabilized on acenocoumarol. The primary efficacy end point was the proportion of patients whose International Normalized Ratio (INR) remained within established margins and whose acenocoumarol dose was not changed. Fifty-six patients were randomized to receive nabumetone (n=27) or placebo (n=29). RESULTS: Eighteen patients in each group (67% for nabumetone and 62% for placebo) completed the study without showing INR or acenocoumarol dose changes, and were considered as study successes. Nine patients (33%) with nabumetone and 11 (38%) with placebo were considered study failures in the intention-to-treat analysis (one patient on nabumetone and four on placebo did not complete the study due to reasons not related to INR and acenocoumarol dose changes). No significant differences were found between groups with regard to study successes. There were two minor bleeding complications, one in each group. Six patients per group presented with eight adverse experiences in each group. CONCLUSIONS: Treatment with nabumetone did not alter INR levels compared with placebo in patients stabilized on oral acenocoumarol who require NSAID therapy. These results suggest that nabumetone does not produce a clinically relevant interaction with acenocoumarol. In orally anticoagulated patients without other associated risk factors, treatment with nabumetone for up to 4 weeks does not require increased monitoring of INR levels.  (+info)

Urinary volatile constituents of the lion, Panthera leo. (3/233)

The volatile components of urine from lions were investigated using GC-MS headspace techniques. Fifty-five compounds were found in the urine samples. Seven potential species-identifying compounds were found. Male lion scent marks overlapped significantly more in compound composition with other males than they did with female marks. A similar relationship was not found for the females. Males had a significantly higher absolute content of 2-butanone in their urine than females, and females had a significantly higher relative content of acetone than males. Samples from 13/16 individual lions overlapped more within the individual than they did with samples from the other individuals, but only seven significantly so.  (+info)

A functional arginine residue in rabbit-muscle aldolase. (4/233)

Rabbit muscle aldolase is irreversibly modified by the arginine-selective alpha-dicarbonyl, phenylglyoxal, loss of activity correlating with the unique modifications of one arginine residue per subunit, as determined by amino acid analysis, and (7-14C)phenylglyoxal incorporation. The affinity of the modified enzyme for dihydroxyacetone phosphate is significantly reduced while substantial protection against inactivation is afforded by fructose 1,6-disphosphate, dihydroxyacetone phosphate or phosphate ion. The nature of the substrate C-1 phosphate binding site in this enzyme is discussed in the light of these and other results.  (+info)

Effects of nabumetone compared with naproxen on platelet aggregation in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. (5/233)

OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that nabumetone (a partially selective cyclooxygenase-(COX)-2 inhibitor) has less effect on platelet aggregation than naproxen (a non-selective COX-inhibitor) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS: A crossover study in 10 RA patients was performed, using either nabumetone or naproxen for two weeks, and, after a washout period of two weeks, the other drug during another two weeks. Platelet aggregation studies were performed and bleeding time was assessed before and after each treatment period. RESULTS: Maximum platelet aggregation induced by epinephrine and by collagen was significantly more reduced after the use of naproxen than of nabumetone; secondary aggregation induced by ADP and epinephrine disappeared more often by naproxen than by nabumetone. Bleeding times were not influenced. CONCLUSION: COX dependent platelet aggregation in RA patients seems to be more inhibited by naproxen than by nabumetone. This may be relevant for patients requiring non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug treatment but who have an increased risk of bleeding as well.  (+info)

Reductive metabolism In vivo of trans-4-phenyl-3-buten-2-one in rats and dogs. (6/233)

The reductive metabolism in vivo of a flavoring additive, trans-4-phenyl-3-buten-2-one (PBO; trans-methyl styryl ketone) was investigated in rats and dogs. In both species, the double bond-reduced product, 4-phenyl-2-butanone (PBA), was detected by HPLC as the predominant species in blood after i.v. administration of PBO. PBA detected in rat blood was identified by comparison to the authentic sample. In contrast, the carbonyl-reduced product, trans-4-phenyl-3-buten-2-ol (PBOL) was also detected as a minor metabolite of PBO in both species. The area under the curve of PBOL in rat blood was only 3% of that of PBA. PBO was mutagenic in the Ames test using Salmonella typhimurium TA 100 when S-9 mix was added, but PBA and PBOL were not. It appears that PBO is mainly metabolized to PBA in vivo in rats and dogs as a detoxification pathway.  (+info)

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and renal response to exercise: a comparison of indomethacin and nabumetone. (7/233)

Nabumetone, a newer non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) which preferentially blocks cyclo-oxygenase-2 activity, may be less nephrotoxic than indomethacin. This study tested whether nabumetone has effects different from those of indomethacin on exercise-induced changes in renal function and the renin-aldosterone system. In a randomized fashion, ten subjects were studied after indomethacin (100 mg), nabumetone (1 g) or no medication (control) administered orally at 22.00 hours on the day before each study day, and again at 8.00 hours upon arrival at the laboratory. Renal function was studied at baseline, during graded 20-min exercise sessions at 25%, 50% and 75% of the maximal oxygen uptake rate, and subsequently during two 1-h recovery periods. Heart rate, arterial blood pressure, cardiac output and plasma catecholamines at rest and during exercise were not altered by indomethacin or nabumetone. Indomethacin decreased urinary rates of excretion of 6-oxo-prostaglandin F(1alpha) (6-oxo-PGF(1alpha)) and thromboxane B(2) in all study periods. Nabumetone decreased 6-oxo-PGF(1alpha) excretion during and after exercise. Excretion rates for PGE(2) did not change. Neither indomethacin nor nabumetone changed baseline values or exercise-induced decreases in renal plasma flow or glomerular filtration rate. Indomethacin, but not nabumetone, decreased sodium excretion, urine flow rate and free water clearance. The renal response to exercise, however, remained unchanged. In contrast with nabumatone, indomethacin decreased the plasma renin concentration. Thus, during exercise, nabumetone may decrease the excretion of 6-oxo-PGF(1alpha) by inhibition of cyclo-oxygenase-1 or by inhibition of specific exercise-induced activation of cyclo-oxygenase-2, or both. None of the drugs changed the renal response to exercise. Inhibition by indomethacin of angiotensin II and thromboxane A(2) synthesis may, during exercise, counterbalance renal vasoconstriction caused by blockade of vasodilatory prostaglandins.  (+info)

Safety and efficacy of nabumetone in osteoarthritis: emphasis on gastrointestinal safety. (8/233)

AIM: To compare the efficacy and gastrointestinal (GI) safety of nabumetone with two comparator non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), diclofenac SR and piroxicam. METHODS: Two randomized, double-blind, multicentre, parallel group trials were carried out in patients with moderate to severe osteoarthritis of the hip or knee. During the 6 month treatment phase, the safety and efficacy of nabumetone (1500-2000 mg/day) was compared to diclofenac SR (100 mg/day) or piroxicam (20-30 mg/day). GI safety was evaluated by reviewing all adverse events reported during the trials and presenting all cases of ulcers (complicated and uncomplicated), as well as other bleeding events that may have been associated with NSAID administration. RESULTS: Most of the efficacy parameters showed no significant differences between the NSAIDs, although diclofenac SR was significantly better than nabumetone in one of 18 efficacy parameters. Nabumetone-treated patients experienced significantly fewer ulcer and bleeding events compared to patients treated with the comparator NSAIDs [1.1% (4/348) vs. 4.3% (15/346), P = 0.01]. Bleeding events, including outright upper or lower GI bleeding or a significant decline in haemoglobin, occurred in significantly fewer patients treated with nabumetone than with the comparator NSAIDs [1.1% (4/348) vs. 3.5% (12/346), P < 0.05]. More importantly, complications associated with either ulcers (perforation) or bleeding (leading to hospitalization or withdrawal) occurred in significantly fewer patients receiving nabumetone [0% (0/348)] than with comparator NSAIDs [1.4% (5/346), (P < 0.05)]. CONCLUSION: The results suggest that nabumetone was similar in efficacy by most criteria to diclofenac SR and piroxicam in relieving the symptoms of osteoarthritis; however, nabumetone's GI safety profile was generally superior to that of both comparator NSAIDs. In the pooled analysis, nabumetone was associated with a significantly lower total incidence of ulcers and bleeding events, and a significantly lower incidence of complications associated with these events.  (+info)

Butanones are a group of chemical compounds that contain a ketone functional group and have the molecular formula C4H8O. They are also known as methyl ethyl ketones or MEKs. The simplest butanone is called methyl ethyl ketone (MEK) or 2-butanone, which has a chain of four carbon atoms with a ketone group in the second position. Other butanones include diethyl ketone (3-pentanone), which has a ketone group in the third position, and methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) or 4-methyl-2-pentanone, which has a branched chain with a ketone group in the second position.

Butanones are commonly used as solvents in various industrial applications, such as paint thinners, adhesives, and cleaning agents. They have a characteristic odor and can be harmful if ingested or inhaled in large quantities. Exposure to butanones can cause irritation of the eyes, skin, and respiratory tract, and prolonged exposure may lead to neurological symptoms such as dizziness, headache, and nausea.

Nitrosamines are a type of chemical compound that are formed by the reaction between nitrous acid (or any nitrogen oxide) and secondary amines. They are often found in certain types of food, such as cured meats and cheeses, as well as in tobacco products and cosmetics.

Nitrosamines have been classified as probable human carcinogens by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Exposure to high levels of nitrosamines has been linked to an increased risk of cancer, particularly in the digestive tract. They can also cause DNA damage and interfere with the normal functioning of cells.

In the medical field, nitrosamines have been a topic of concern due to their potential presence as contaminants in certain medications. For example, some drugs that contain nitrofurantoin, a medication used to treat urinary tract infections, have been found to contain low levels of nitrosamines. While the risk associated with these low levels is not well understood, efforts are underway to minimize the presence of nitrosamines in medications and other products.

Carcinogens are agents (substances or mixtures of substances) that can cause cancer. They may be naturally occurring or man-made. Carcinogens can increase the risk of cancer by altering cellular DNA, disrupting cellular function, or promoting cell growth. Examples of carcinogens include certain chemicals found in tobacco smoke, asbestos, UV radiation from the sun, and some viruses.

It's important to note that not all exposures to carcinogens will result in cancer, and the risk typically depends on factors such as the level and duration of exposure, individual genetic susceptibility, and lifestyle choices. The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) classifies carcinogens into different groups based on the strength of evidence linking them to cancer:

Group 1: Carcinogenic to humans
Group 2A: Probably carcinogenic to humans
Group 2B: Possibly carcinogenic to humans
Group 3: Not classifiable as to its carcinogenicity to humans
Group 4: Probably not carcinogenic to humans

This information is based on medical research and may be subject to change as new studies become available. Always consult a healthcare professional for medical advice.

Isothiocyanates are organic compounds that contain a functional group made up of a carbon atom, a nitrogen atom, and a sulfur atom, with the formula RN=C=S (where R can be an alkyl or aryl group). They are commonly found in cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli, brussels sprouts, and wasabi. Isothiocyanates have been studied for their potential health benefits, including their anticancer and anti-inflammatory properties. However, they can also be toxic in high concentrations.

Tobacco is not a medical term, but it refers to the leaves of the plant Nicotiana tabacum that are dried and fermented before being used in a variety of ways. Medically speaking, tobacco is often referred to in the context of its health effects. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), "tobacco" can also refer to any product prepared from the leaf of the tobacco plant for smoking, sucking, chewing or snuffing.

Tobacco use is a major risk factor for a number of diseases, including cancer, heart disease, stroke, lung disease, and various other medical conditions. The smoke produced by burning tobacco contains thousands of chemicals, many of which are toxic and can cause serious health problems. Nicotine, one of the primary active constituents in tobacco, is highly addictive and can lead to dependence.

Glucuronates are not a medical term per se, but they refer to salts or esters of glucuronic acid, a organic compound that is a derivative of glucose. In the context of medical and biological sciences, glucuronidation is a common detoxification process in which glucuronic acid is conjugated to a wide variety of molecules, including drugs, hormones, and environmental toxins, to make them more water-soluble and facilitate their excretion from the body through urine or bile.

The process of glucuronidation is catalyzed by enzymes called UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs), which are found in various tissues, including the liver, intestines, and kidneys. The resulting glucuronides can be excreted directly or further metabolized before excretion.

Therefore, "glucuronates" can refer to the chemical compounds that result from this process of conjugation with glucuronic acid, as well as the therapeutic potential of enhancing or inhibiting glucuronidation for various clinical applications.

'Toxic plants' refer to those species of plants that contain toxic substances capable of causing harmful effects or adverse health reactions in humans and animals when ingested, touched, or inhaled. These toxins can cause a range of symptoms from mild irritation to serious conditions such as organ failure, paralysis, or even death depending on the plant, the amount consumed, and the individual's sensitivity to the toxin.

Toxic plants may contain various types of toxins, including alkaloids, glycosides, proteins, resinous substances, and essential oils. Some common examples of toxic plants include poison ivy, poison oak, nightshade, hemlock, oleander, castor bean, and foxglove. It is important to note that some parts of a plant may be toxic while others are not, and the toxicity can also vary depending on the stage of growth or environmental conditions.

If you suspect exposure to a toxic plant, it is essential to seek medical attention immediately and, if possible, bring a sample of the plant for identification.

Biotransformation is the metabolic modification of a chemical compound, typically a xenobiotic (a foreign chemical substance found within an living organism), by a biological system. This process often involves enzymatic conversion of the parent compound to one or more metabolites, which may be more or less active, toxic, or mutagenic than the original substance.

In the context of pharmacology and toxicology, biotransformation is an important aspect of drug metabolism and elimination from the body. The liver is the primary site of biotransformation, but other organs such as the kidneys, lungs, and gastrointestinal tract can also play a role.

Biotransformation can occur in two phases: phase I reactions involve functionalization of the parent compound through oxidation, reduction, or hydrolysis, while phase II reactions involve conjugation of the metabolite with endogenous molecules such as glucuronic acid, sulfate, or acetate to increase its water solubility and facilitate excretion.

F344 is a strain code used to designate an outbred stock of rats that has been inbreeded for over 100 generations. The F344 rats, also known as Fischer 344 rats, were originally developed at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and are now widely used in biomedical research due to their consistent and reliable genetic background.

Inbred strains, like the F344, are created by mating genetically identical individuals (siblings or parents and offspring) for many generations until a state of complete homozygosity is reached, meaning that all members of the strain have identical genomes. This genetic uniformity makes inbred strains ideal for use in studies where consistent and reproducible results are important.

F344 rats are known for their longevity, with a median lifespan of around 27-31 months, making them useful for aging research. They also have a relatively low incidence of spontaneous tumors compared to other rat strains. However, they may be more susceptible to certain types of cancer and other diseases due to their inbred status.

It's important to note that while F344 rats are often used as a standard laboratory rat strain, there can still be some genetic variation between individual animals within the same strain, particularly if they come from different suppliers or breeding colonies. Therefore, it's always important to consider the source and history of any animal model when designing experiments and interpreting results.

'Erythrocebus patas' is a scientific name for the Patas monkey, also known as the hussar monkey or red monkey. It belongs to the family Cercopithecidae and is native to the savannas and woodlands of central Africa. The Patas monkey is known for its long legs, slender body, and reddish-brown fur. It is the fastest primate, capable of reaching speeds up to 34 miles per hour (55 kilometers per hour).

The medical community may not have a specific definition related to 'Erythrocebus patas' as it is primarily studied by zoologists and biologists. However, understanding the characteristics and habits of this species can contribute to broader scientific knowledge and potentially inform research in fields such as comparative medicine or evolutionary biology.

Ribulose phosphates are organic compounds that play a crucial role in the Calvin cycle, which is a part of photosynthesis. The Calvin cycle is the process by which plants, algae, and some bacteria convert carbon dioxide into glucose and other simple sugars.

Ribulose phosphates are sugar phosphates that contain five carbon atoms and have the chemical formula C5H10O5P. They exist in two forms: ribulose 5-phosphate (Ru5P) and ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP).

Ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate is the starting point for carbon fixation in the Calvin cycle. In this process, an enzyme called RuBisCO (ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase) catalyzes the reaction between RuBP and carbon dioxide to form two molecules of 3-phosphoglycerate, which are then converted into glucose and other sugars.

Ribulose phosphates are also involved in other metabolic pathways, such as the pentose phosphate pathway, which generates reducing power in the form of NADPH and produces ribose-5-phosphate, a precursor for nucleotide synthesis.

Inbred A mice are a strain of laboratory mice that have been produced by many generations of brother-sister matings. This results in a high degree of genetic similarity among individuals within the strain, making them useful for research purposes where a consistent genetic background is desired. The Inbred A strain is maintained through continued brother-sister mating. It's important to note that while these mice are called "Inbred A," the designation does not refer to any specific medical condition or characteristic. Instead, it refers to the breeding practices used to create and maintain this particular strain of laboratory mice.

Lung neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors in the lung tissue. These tumors can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). Malignant lung neoplasms are further classified into two main types: small cell lung carcinoma and non-small cell lung carcinoma. Lung neoplasms can cause symptoms such as cough, chest pain, shortness of breath, and weight loss. They are often caused by smoking or exposure to secondhand smoke, but can also occur due to genetic factors, radiation exposure, and other environmental carcinogens. Early detection and treatment of lung neoplasms is crucial for improving outcomes and survival rates.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Pyridines" is not a medical term. It is a chemical term that refers to a class of organic compounds with the chemical structure of a six-membered ring containing one nitrogen atom and five carbon atoms (heterocyclic aromatic compound).

In a biological or medical context, pyridine derivatives can be found in various natural and synthetic substances. For example, some medications contain pyridine rings as part of their chemical structure. However, "Pyridines" itself is not a medical term or condition.

Cotinine is the major metabolite of nicotine, which is formed in the body after exposure to tobacco smoke or other sources of nicotine. It is often used as a biomarker for nicotine exposure and can be measured in various biological samples such as blood, urine, saliva, and hair. Cotinine has a longer half-life than nicotine, making it a more reliable indicator of long-term exposure to tobacco smoke or nicotine products.

Nicotine is defined as a highly addictive psychoactive alkaloid and stimulant found in the nightshade family of plants, primarily in tobacco leaves. It is the primary component responsible for the addiction to cigarettes and other forms of tobacco. Nicotine can also be produced synthetically.

When nicotine enters the body, it activates the release of several neurotransmitters such as dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin, leading to feelings of pleasure, stimulation, and relaxation. However, with regular use, tolerance develops, requiring higher doses to achieve the same effects, which can contribute to the development of nicotine dependence.

Nicotine has both short-term and long-term health effects. Short-term effects include increased heart rate and blood pressure, increased alertness and concentration, and arousal. Long-term use can lead to addiction, lung disease, cardiovascular disease, and reproductive problems. It is important to note that nicotine itself is not the primary cause of many tobacco-related diseases, but rather the result of other harmful chemicals found in tobacco smoke.

Riboflavin, also known as vitamin B2, is a water-soluble vitamin that plays a crucial role in energy production and cellular function, growth, and development. It is essential for the metabolism of carbohydrates, fats, and proteins, and it helps to maintain healthy skin, hair, and nails. Riboflavin is involved in the production of energy by acting as a coenzyme in various redox reactions. It also contributes to the maintenance of the mucous membranes of the digestive tract and promotes iron absorption.

Riboflavin can be found in a variety of foods, including milk, cheese, leafy green vegetables, liver, kidneys, legumes, yeast, mushrooms, and almonds. It is sensitive to light and heat, so exposure to these elements can lead to its degradation and loss of vitamin activity.

Deficiency in riboflavin is rare but can occur in individuals with poor dietary intake or malabsorption disorders. Symptoms of riboflavin deficiency include inflammation of the mouth and tongue, anemia, skin disorders, and neurological symptoms such as confusion and mood changes. Riboflavin supplements are available for those who have difficulty meeting their daily requirements through diet alone.

Acetoin is a chemical compound that is produced as a metabolic byproduct in certain types of bacteria, including some species of streptococcus and lactobacillus. It is a colorless liquid with a sweet, buttery odor and is used as a flavoring agent in the food industry. In addition to its use as a flavoring, acetoin has been studied for its potential antibacterial properties and its possible role in the development of biofilms. However, more research is needed to fully understand the potential uses and implications of this compound.

Anticarcinogenic agents are substances that prevent, inhibit or reduce the development of cancer. They can be natural or synthetic compounds that interfere with the process of carcinogenesis at various stages, such as initiation, promotion, and progression. Anticarcinogenic agents may work by preventing DNA damage, promoting DNA repair, reducing inflammation, inhibiting cell proliferation, inducing apoptosis (programmed cell death), or modulating immune responses.

Examples of anticarcinogenic agents include chemopreventive agents, such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and retinoids; phytochemicals found in fruits, vegetables, and other plant-based foods; and medications used to treat cancer, such as chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and targeted therapies.

It is important to note that while some anticarcinogenic agents have been shown to be effective in preventing or reducing the risk of certain types of cancer, they may also have potential side effects and risks. Therefore, it is essential to consult with a healthcare professional before using any anticarcinogenic agent for cancer prevention or treatment purposes.

Intramolecular transferases are a specific class of enzymes that catalyze the transfer of a functional group from one part of a molecule to another within the same molecule. These enzymes play a crucial role in various biochemical reactions, including the modification of complex carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids. By facilitating intramolecular transfers, these enzymes help regulate cellular processes, signaling pathways, and metabolic functions.

The systematic name for this class of enzymes is: [donor group]-transferring intramolecular transferases. The classification system developed by the Nomenclature Committee of the International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (NC-IUBMB) categorizes them under EC 2.5. This category includes enzymes that transfer alkyl or aryl groups, other than methyl groups; methyl groups; hydroxylyl groups, including glycosyl groups; and various other specific functional groups.

Examples of intramolecular transferases include:

1. Protein kinases (EC 2.7.11): Enzymes that catalyze the transfer of a phosphate group from ATP to a specific amino acid residue within a protein, thereby regulating protein function and cellular signaling pathways.
2. Glycosyltransferases (EC 2.4): Enzymes that facilitate the transfer of glycosyl groups between donor and acceptor molecules; some of these enzymes can catalyze intramolecular transfers, playing a role in the biosynthesis and modification of complex carbohydrates.
3. Methyltransferases (EC 2.1): Enzymes that transfer methyl groups between donor and acceptor molecules; some of these enzymes can catalyze intramolecular transfers, contributing to the regulation of gene expression and other cellular processes.

Understanding the function and regulation of intramolecular transferases is essential for elucidating their roles in various biological processes and developing targeted therapeutic strategies for diseases associated with dysregulation of these enzymes.

Smokeless tobacco is a type of tobacco that is not burned or smoked. It's often called "spit" or "chewing" tobacco. The most common forms of smokeless tobacco in the United States are snuff and chewing tobacco. Snuff is a finely ground tobacco that can be dry or moist. Dry snuff is sniffed or taken through the nose, while moist snuff is placed between the lower lip or cheek and gum. Chewing tobacco is plugs, leaves, or twists of tobacco that are chewed or sucked on.

Smokeless tobacco contains nicotine, which is addictive. When you use smokeless tobacco, the nicotine is absorbed through the lining of your mouth and goes directly into your bloodstream. This can lead to a rapid increase in nicotine levels in your body, which can make it harder to quit using tobacco.

Smokeless tobacco also contains harmful chemicals that can cause cancer of the mouth, esophagus, and pancreas. It can also cause other health problems, such as gum disease, tooth decay, and precancerous lesions in the mouth. Using smokeless tobacco can also increase your risk of developing heart disease and having a stroke.

Ketones are organic compounds that contain a carbon atom bound to two oxygen atoms and a central carbon atom bonded to two additional carbon groups through single bonds. In the context of human physiology, ketones are primarily produced as byproducts when the body breaks down fat for energy in a process called ketosis.

Specifically, under conditions of low carbohydrate availability or prolonged fasting, the liver converts fatty acids into ketone bodies, which can then be used as an alternative fuel source for the brain and other organs. The three main types of ketones produced in the human body are acetoacetate, beta-hydroxybutyrate, and acetone.

Elevated levels of ketones in the blood, known as ketonemia, can occur in various medical conditions such as diabetes, starvation, alcoholism, and high-fat/low-carbohydrate diets. While moderate levels of ketosis are generally considered safe, severe ketosis can lead to a life-threatening condition called diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) in people with diabetes.

A lung is a pair of spongy, elastic organs in the chest that work together to enable breathing. They are responsible for taking in oxygen and expelling carbon dioxide through the process of respiration. The left lung has two lobes, while the right lung has three lobes. The lungs are protected by the ribcage and are covered by a double-layered membrane called the pleura. The trachea divides into two bronchi, which further divide into smaller bronchioles, leading to millions of tiny air sacs called alveoli, where the exchange of gases occurs.

Hydroxylation is a biochemical process that involves the addition of a hydroxyl group (-OH) to a molecule, typically a steroid or xenobiotic compound. This process is primarily catalyzed by enzymes called hydroxylases, which are found in various tissues throughout the body.

In the context of medicine and biochemistry, hydroxylation can have several important functions:

1. Drug metabolism: Hydroxylation is a common way that the liver metabolizes drugs and other xenobiotic compounds. By adding a hydroxyl group to a drug molecule, it becomes more polar and water-soluble, which facilitates its excretion from the body.
2. Steroid hormone biosynthesis: Hydroxylation is an essential step in the biosynthesis of many steroid hormones, including cortisol, aldosterone, and the sex hormones estrogen and testosterone. These hormones are synthesized from cholesterol through a series of enzymatic reactions that involve hydroxylation at various steps.
3. Vitamin D activation: Hydroxylation is also necessary for the activation of vitamin D in the body. In order to become biologically active, vitamin D must undergo two successive hydroxylations, first in the liver and then in the kidneys.
4. Toxin degradation: Some toxic compounds can be rendered less harmful through hydroxylation. For example, phenol, a toxic compound found in cigarette smoke and some industrial chemicals, can be converted to a less toxic form through hydroxylation by enzymes in the liver.

Overall, hydroxylation is an important biochemical process that plays a critical role in various physiological functions, including drug metabolism, hormone biosynthesis, and toxin degradation.

Dimethylnitrosamine is a chemical compound with the formula (CH3)2NNO. It is a potent carcinogen, and is classified as a Class 1 carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). It is known to cause cancer in various organs, including the liver, kidney, and lungs.

Dimethylnitrosamine is formed when nitrogen oxides react with secondary amines under conditions that are commonly encountered in industrial processes or in certain food preservation methods. It can also be found as a contaminant in some foods and cosmetics.

Exposure to dimethylnitrosamine can occur through inhalation, ingestion, or skin contact. The toxic effects of this compound are due to its ability to form DNA adducts, which can lead to mutations and cancer. It is important to minimize exposure to this compound and to take appropriate safety measures when working with it.

Acetone is a colorless, volatile, and flammable liquid organic compound with the chemical formula (CH3)2CO. It is the simplest and smallest ketone, and its molecules consist of a carbonyl group linked to two methyl groups. Acetone occurs naturally in the human body and is produced as a byproduct of normal metabolic processes, particularly during fat burning.

In clinical settings, acetone can be measured in breath or blood to assess metabolic status, such as in cases of diabetic ketoacidosis, where an excess production of acetone and other ketones occurs due to insulin deficiency and high levels of fatty acid breakdown. High concentrations of acetone can lead to a sweet, fruity odor on the breath, often described as "fruity acetone" or "acetone breath."

Aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylases (AHH) are a group of enzymes that play a crucial role in the metabolism of various aromatic and heterocyclic compounds, including potentially harmful substances such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and dioxins. These enzymes are primarily located in the endoplasmic reticulum of cells, particularly in the liver, but can also be found in other tissues.

The AHH enzymes catalyze the addition of a hydroxyl group (-OH) to the aromatic ring structure of these compounds, which is the first step in their biotransformation and eventual elimination from the body. This process can sometimes lead to the formation of metabolites that are more reactive and potentially toxic than the original compound. Therefore, the overall impact of AHH enzymes on human health is complex and depends on various factors, including the specific compounds being metabolized and individual genetic differences in enzyme activity.

DNA adducts are chemical modifications or alterations that occur when DNA molecules become attached to or bound with certain harmful substances, such as toxic chemicals or carcinogens. These attachments can disrupt the normal structure and function of the DNA, potentially leading to mutations, genetic damage, and an increased risk of cancer and other diseases.

DNA adducts are formed when a reactive molecule from a chemical agent binds covalently to a base in the DNA molecule. This process can occur either spontaneously or as a result of exposure to environmental toxins, such as those found in tobacco smoke, certain industrial chemicals, and some medications.

The formation of DNA adducts is often used as a biomarker for exposure to harmful substances, as well as an indicator of potential health risks associated with that exposure. Researchers can measure the levels of specific DNA adducts in biological samples, such as blood or urine, to assess the extent and duration of exposure to certain chemicals or toxins.

It's important to note that not all DNA adducts are necessarily harmful, and some may even play a role in normal cellular processes. However, high levels of certain DNA adducts have been linked to an increased risk of cancer and other diseases, making them a focus of ongoing research and investigation.

'Smoke' is not typically defined in a medical context, but it can be described as a mixture of small particles and gases that are released when something burns. Smoke can be composed of various components including carbon monoxide, particulate matter, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), benzene, toluene, styrene, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Exposure to smoke can cause a range of health problems, including respiratory symptoms, cardiovascular disease, and cancer.

In the medical field, exposure to smoke is often referred to as "secondhand smoke" or "passive smoking" when someone breathes in smoke from another person's cigarette, cigar, or pipe. This type of exposure can be just as harmful as smoking itself and has been linked to a range of health problems, including respiratory infections, asthma, lung cancer, and heart disease.

Microsomes are subcellular membranous vesicles that are obtained as a byproduct during the preparation of cellular homogenates. They are not naturally occurring structures within the cell, but rather formed due to fragmentation of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) during laboratory procedures. Microsomes are widely used in various research and scientific studies, particularly in the fields of biochemistry and pharmacology.

Microsomes are rich in enzymes, including the cytochrome P450 system, which is involved in the metabolism of drugs, toxins, and other xenobiotics. These enzymes play a crucial role in detoxifying foreign substances and eliminating them from the body. As such, microsomes serve as an essential tool for studying drug metabolism, toxicity, and interactions, allowing researchers to better understand and predict the effects of various compounds on living organisms.

Nose neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors in the nasal cavity or paranasal sinuses. These growths can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). Benign neoplasms are typically slow-growing and do not spread to other parts of the body, while malignant neoplasms can invade surrounding tissues and have the potential to metastasize.

Nose neoplasms can cause various symptoms such as nasal congestion, nosebleeds, difficulty breathing through the nose, loss of smell, facial pain or numbness, and visual changes if they affect the eye. The diagnosis of nose neoplasms usually involves a combination of physical examination, imaging studies (such as CT or MRI scans), and biopsy to determine the type and extent of the growth. Treatment options depend on the type, size, location, and stage of the neoplasm and may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or a combination of these approaches.

Guanine is not a medical term per se, but it is a biological molecule that plays a crucial role in the body. Guanine is one of the four nucleobases found in the nucleic acids DNA and RNA, along with adenine, cytosine, and thymine (in DNA) or uracil (in RNA). Specifically, guanine pairs with cytosine via hydrogen bonds to form a base pair.

Guanine is a purine derivative, which means it has a double-ring structure. It is formed through the synthesis of simpler molecules in the body and is an essential component of genetic material. Guanine's chemical formula is C5H5N5O.

While guanine itself is not a medical term, abnormalities or mutations in genes that contain guanine nucleotides can lead to various medical conditions, including genetic disorders and cancer.

Riboflavin synthase is not a term that has a widely accepted or established medical definition. However, riboflavin (also known as vitamin B2) is an essential nutrient that plays a crucial role in energy production and cellular function. Riboflavin synthase is actually a protein involved in the biosynthesis of riboflavin in certain bacteria, but it does not have a direct medical relevance to humans since we cannot synthesize riboflavin and must obtain it through our diet.

Therefore, I would be happy to provide you with some information about riboflavin instead:

Riboflavin is a water-soluble vitamin that is essential for human health. It plays an important role in energy production, cellular function, growth, and development. Riboflavin functions as a cofactor for various enzymes involved in redox reactions, which are chemical reactions that involve the transfer of electrons between molecules.

Riboflavin is found in a variety of foods, including milk, cheese, leafy green vegetables, liver, kidneys, legumes, nuts, and fortified cereals. Riboflavin deficiency is rare in developed countries but can occur in individuals with poor nutrition or certain medical conditions that affect nutrient absorption.

Symptoms of riboflavin deficiency may include:
- Fatigue and weakness
- Mouth and lip sores
- Inflammation of the lining of the mouth and tongue (stomatitis)
- Anemia
- Skin disorders, such as seborrheic dermatitis or angular cheilitis
- Visual disturbances, such as sensitivity to light or blurred vision

Fortunately, riboflavin deficiency is easily treated with dietary changes or supplements. Riboflavin is also available as a dietary supplement and is sometimes used to treat migraines, cataracts, and other medical conditions. However, it's important to consult with a healthcare provider before starting any new supplement regimen.

"Tars" is not a recognized medical term. However, "tarso-" is a prefix in anatomy that refers to the ankle or hind part of an organ. For example, the tarsal bones are the bones that make up the ankle and the rear part of the foot. Additionally, tarsus can refer to the thickened portion of the eyelid which contains the eyelashes. It is important to ensure you have the correct term when seeking medical information.

Dibutyl phthalate (DBP) is a synthetic chemical compound that belongs to a class of chemicals called phthalates. It is a colorless, oily liquid with a mild odor and is widely used as a plasticizer to make plastics more flexible and durable. DBP is commonly added to polyvinyl chloride (PVC) products such as vinyl flooring, wall coverings, shower curtains, and consumer products like cosmetics, personal care products, and cleaning solutions.

In medical terms, DBP has been identified as a reproductive toxicant and endocrine disruptor, which means it can interfere with the body's hormonal system and potentially affect reproductive health. Studies have shown that exposure to DBP during pregnancy may be associated with adverse outcomes such as reduced fetal growth, abnormalities in male reproductive development, and behavioral problems in children.

Therefore, it is important to limit exposure to DBP and other phthalates, especially for pregnant women and young children. Some steps you can take to reduce your exposure include avoiding plastic containers with the recycling codes 3 or 7 (which may contain phthalates), choosing personal care products that are labeled "phthalate-free," and using natural cleaning products whenever possible.

Methoxsalen is a medication that belongs to the class of drugs known as psoralens. It is primarily used in the treatment of skin conditions such as psoriasis and vitiligo.

Methoxsalen works by making the skin more sensitive to ultraviolet light A (UVA) after it is absorbed. This process helps to slow down the growth of affected skin cells, reducing the symptoms of the condition.

The medication is typically taken orally or applied topically to the affected area before UVA light therapy. It's important to note that methoxsalen can increase the risk of skin cancer and cataracts with long-term use, so it should only be used under the close supervision of a healthcare provider.

Thiocyanates are chemical compounds that contain the thiocyanate ion (SCN-), which consists of a sulfur atom, a carbon atom, and a nitrogen atom. The thiocyanate ion is formed by the removal of a hydrogen ion from thiocyanic acid (HSCN). Thiocyanates are used in various applications, including pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, and industrial chemicals. In medicine, thiocyanates have been studied for their potential effects on the thyroid gland and their use as a treatment for cyanide poisoning. However, excessive exposure to thiocyanates can be harmful and may cause symptoms such as irritation of the eyes, skin, and respiratory tract, as well as potential impacts on thyroid function.

Butylene glycols are a type of organic compounds that belong to the class of diols, which are chemical compounds containing two hydroxyl groups. Specifically, butylene glycols are composed of a four-carbon chain with two hydroxyl groups located on adjacent carbon atoms.

There are two isomeric forms of butylene glycol: 1,2-butanediol and 1,3-butanediol.

* 1,2-Butanediol (also known as 1,2-butylene glycol) has the hydroxyl groups on the first and second carbon atoms of the chain. It is a colorless, viscous liquid that is used as a solvent, humectant, and antifreeze in various industrial and cosmetic applications.
* 1,3-Butanediol (also known as 1,3-butylene glycol) has the hydroxyl groups on the first and third carbon atoms of the chain. It is also a colorless, viscous liquid that is used as a solvent, humectant, and antifreeze in various industrial and cosmetic applications.

Butylene glycols are generally considered to be safe for use in cosmetics and other consumer products, although they may cause skin irritation or allergic reactions in some individuals. They are also used as intermediates in the synthesis of other chemicals, such as polyesters and polyurethanes.

Tobacco smoke pollution is not typically defined in medical terms, but it refers to the presence of tobacco smoke in indoor or outdoor environments, which can have negative effects on air quality and human health. It is also known as secondhand smoke or environmental tobacco smoke (ETS). This type of smoke is a mixture of sidestream smoke (the smoke given off by a burning cigarette) and mainstream smoke (the smoke exhaled by a smoker).

The medical community recognizes tobacco smoke pollution as a serious health hazard. It contains more than 7,000 chemicals, hundreds of which are toxic and about 70 that can cause cancer. Exposure to tobacco smoke pollution can cause a range of adverse health effects, including respiratory symptoms, lung cancer, heart disease, and stroke. In children, it can also lead to ear infections, asthma attacks, and sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS).

Therefore, many laws and regulations have been implemented worldwide to protect people from tobacco smoke pollution, such as smoking bans in public places and workplaces.

Smoking is not a medical condition, but it's a significant health risk behavior. Here is the definition from a public health perspective:

Smoking is the act of inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning tobacco that is commonly consumed through cigarettes, pipes, and cigars. The smoke contains over 7,000 chemicals, including nicotine, tar, carbon monoxide, and numerous toxic and carcinogenic substances. These toxins contribute to a wide range of diseases and health conditions, such as lung cancer, heart disease, stroke, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and various other cancers, as well as adverse reproductive outcomes and negative impacts on the developing fetus during pregnancy. Smoking is highly addictive due to the nicotine content, which makes quitting smoking a significant challenge for many individuals.

Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) is a powerful analytical technique that combines the separating power of gas chromatography with the identification capabilities of mass spectrometry. This method is used to separate, identify, and quantify different components in complex mixtures.

In GC-MS, the mixture is first vaporized and carried through a long, narrow column by an inert gas (carrier gas). The various components in the mixture interact differently with the stationary phase inside the column, leading to their separation based on their partition coefficients between the mobile and stationary phases. As each component elutes from the column, it is then introduced into the mass spectrometer for analysis.

The mass spectrometer ionizes the sample, breaks it down into smaller fragments, and measures the mass-to-charge ratio of these fragments. This information is used to generate a mass spectrum, which serves as a unique "fingerprint" for each compound. By comparing the generated mass spectra with reference libraries or known standards, analysts can identify and quantify the components present in the original mixture.

GC-MS has wide applications in various fields such as forensics, environmental analysis, drug testing, and research laboratories due to its high sensitivity, specificity, and ability to analyze volatile and semi-volatile compounds.

High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) is a type of chromatography that separates and analyzes compounds based on their interactions with a stationary phase and a mobile phase under high pressure. The mobile phase, which can be a gas or liquid, carries the sample mixture through a column containing the stationary phase.

In HPLC, the mobile phase is a liquid, and it is pumped through the column at high pressures (up to several hundred atmospheres) to achieve faster separation times and better resolution than other types of liquid chromatography. The stationary phase can be a solid or a liquid supported on a solid, and it interacts differently with each component in the sample mixture, causing them to separate as they travel through the column.

HPLC is widely used in analytical chemistry, pharmaceuticals, biotechnology, and other fields to separate, identify, and quantify compounds present in complex mixtures. It can be used to analyze a wide range of substances, including drugs, hormones, vitamins, pigments, flavors, and pollutants. HPLC is also used in the preparation of pure samples for further study or use.

Microsomes, liver refers to a subcellular fraction of liver cells (hepatocytes) that are obtained during tissue homogenization and subsequent centrifugation. These microsomal fractions are rich in membranous structures known as the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), particularly the rough ER. They are involved in various important cellular processes, most notably the metabolism of xenobiotics (foreign substances) including drugs, toxins, and carcinogens.

The liver microsomes contain a variety of enzymes, such as cytochrome P450 monooxygenases, that are crucial for phase I drug metabolism. These enzymes help in the oxidation, reduction, or hydrolysis of xenobiotics, making them more water-soluble and facilitating their excretion from the body. Additionally, liver microsomes also host other enzymes involved in phase II conjugation reactions, where the metabolites from phase I are further modified by adding polar molecules like glucuronic acid, sulfate, or acetyl groups.

In summary, liver microsomes are a subcellular fraction of liver cells that play a significant role in the metabolism and detoxification of xenobiotics, contributing to the overall protection and maintenance of cellular homeostasis within the body.

The Cytochrome P-450 (CYP450) enzyme system is a group of enzymes found primarily in the liver, but also in other organs such as the intestines, lungs, and skin. These enzymes play a crucial role in the metabolism and biotransformation of various substances, including drugs, environmental toxins, and endogenous compounds like hormones and fatty acids.

The name "Cytochrome P-450" refers to the unique property of these enzymes to bind to carbon monoxide (CO) and form a complex that absorbs light at a wavelength of 450 nm, which can be detected spectrophotometrically.

The CYP450 enzyme system is involved in Phase I metabolism of xenobiotics, where it catalyzes oxidation reactions such as hydroxylation, dealkylation, and epoxidation. These reactions introduce functional groups into the substrate molecule, which can then undergo further modifications by other enzymes during Phase II metabolism.

There are several families and subfamilies of CYP450 enzymes, each with distinct substrate specificities and functions. Some of the most important CYP450 enzymes include:

1. CYP3A4: This is the most abundant CYP450 enzyme in the human liver and is involved in the metabolism of approximately 50% of all drugs. It also metabolizes various endogenous compounds like steroids, bile acids, and vitamin D.
2. CYP2D6: This enzyme is responsible for the metabolism of many psychotropic drugs, including antidepressants, antipsychotics, and beta-blockers. It also metabolizes some endogenous compounds like dopamine and serotonin.
3. CYP2C9: This enzyme plays a significant role in the metabolism of warfarin, phenytoin, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).
4. CYP2C19: This enzyme is involved in the metabolism of proton pump inhibitors, antidepressants, and clopidogrel.
5. CYP2E1: This enzyme metabolizes various xenobiotics like alcohol, acetaminophen, and carbon tetrachloride, as well as some endogenous compounds like fatty acids and prostaglandins.

Genetic polymorphisms in CYP450 enzymes can significantly affect drug metabolism and response, leading to interindividual variability in drug efficacy and toxicity. Understanding the role of CYP450 enzymes in drug metabolism is crucial for optimizing pharmacotherapy and minimizing adverse effects.

Metabolic detoxification, in the context of drugs, refers to the series of biochemical processes that the body undergoes to transform drugs or other xenobiotics into water-soluble compounds so they can be excreted. This process typically involves two phases:

1. Phase I Detoxification: In this phase, enzymes such as cytochrome P450 oxidases introduce functional groups into the drug molecule, making it more polar and reactive. This can result in the formation of metabolites that are less active than the parent compound or, in some cases, more toxic.

2. Phase II Detoxification: In this phase, enzymes such as glutathione S-transferases, UDP-glucuronosyltransferases, and sulfotransferases conjugate these polar and reactive metabolites with endogenous molecules like glutathione, glucuronic acid, or sulfate. This further increases the water solubility of the compound, allowing it to be excreted by the kidneys or bile.

It's important to note that while these processes are essential for eliminating drugs and other harmful substances from the body, they can also produce reactive metabolites that may cause damage to cells and tissues if not properly regulated. Therefore, maintaining a balance in the activity of these detoxification enzymes is crucial for overall health and well-being.

Menthol is a compound obtained from the crystals of the mint plant (Mentha arvensis). It is a white, crystalline substance that is solid at room temperature but becomes a clear, colorless, oily liquid when heated. Menthol has a cooling and soothing effect on mucous membranes, which makes it a common ingredient in over-the-counter products used to relieve symptoms of congestion, coughs, and sore throats. It is also used as a topical analgesic for its pain-relieving properties and as a flavoring agent in various products such as toothpaste, mouthwashes, and candies.

Stereoisomerism is a type of isomerism (structural arrangement of atoms) in which molecules have the same molecular formula and sequence of bonded atoms, but differ in the three-dimensional orientation of their atoms in space. This occurs when the molecule contains asymmetric carbon atoms or other rigid structures that prevent free rotation, leading to distinct spatial arrangements of groups of atoms around a central point. Stereoisomers can have different chemical and physical properties, such as optical activity, boiling points, and reactivities, due to differences in their shape and the way they interact with other molecules.

There are two main types of stereoisomerism: enantiomers (mirror-image isomers) and diastereomers (non-mirror-image isomers). Enantiomers are pairs of stereoisomers that are mirror images of each other, but cannot be superimposed on one another. Diastereomers, on the other hand, are non-mirror-image stereoisomers that have different physical and chemical properties.

Stereoisomerism is an important concept in chemistry and biology, as it can affect the biological activity of molecules, such as drugs and natural products. For example, some enantiomers of a drug may be active, while others are inactive or even toxic. Therefore, understanding stereoisomerism is crucial for designing and synthesizing effective and safe drugs.

Glycyrrhetinic acid is defined medically as a pentacyclic triterpenoid derived from glycyrrhizin, which is found in the root of licorice plants. It has been used in traditional medicine for its anti-inflammatory and expectorant properties.

Glycyrrhetinic acid works by inhibiting the enzyme 11-beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, which is responsible for converting cortisol to cortisone. This can lead to increased levels of cortisol in the body, which can have various effects, including lowering potassium levels and increasing sodium levels, leading to fluid retention and high blood pressure in some individuals.

In addition to its use in traditional medicine, glycyrrhetinic acid has been studied for its potential benefits in treating a variety of conditions, including cancer, HIV, and hepatitis. However, more research is needed to confirm these potential benefits and to fully understand the risks and side effects associated with its use.

11-Beta-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (11-β-HSDs) are a group of enzymes that play a crucial role in the metabolism of steroid hormones, particularly cortisol and cortisone, which belong to the class of glucocorticoids. These enzymes exist in two isoforms: 11-β-HSD1 and 11-β-HSD2.

1. 11-β-HSD1: This isoform is primarily located within the liver, adipose tissue, and various other peripheral tissues. It functions as a NADPH-dependent reductase, converting inactive cortisone to its active form, cortisol. This enzyme helps regulate glucocorticoid action in peripheral tissues, influencing glucose and lipid metabolism, insulin sensitivity, and inflammation.
2. 11-β-HSD2: This isoform is predominantly found in mineralocorticoid target tissues such as the kidneys, colon, and salivary glands. It functions as a NAD+-dependent dehydrogenase, converting active cortisol to its inactive form, cortisone. By doing so, it protects the mineralocorticoid receptor from being overstimulated by cortisol, ensuring aldosterone specifically binds and activates this receptor to maintain proper electrolyte and fluid balance.

Dysregulation of 11-β-HSDs has been implicated in several disease states, including metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and psychiatric disorders. Therefore, understanding the function and regulation of these enzymes is essential for developing novel therapeutic strategies to treat related conditions.

"Mesocricetus" is a genus of rodents, more commonly known as hamsters. It includes several species of hamsters that are native to various parts of Europe and Asia. The best-known member of this genus is the Syrian hamster, also known as the golden hamster or Mesocricetus auratus, which is a popular pet due to its small size and relatively easy care. These hamsters are burrowing animals and are typically solitary in the wild.

Alkylation, in the context of medical chemistry and toxicology, refers to the process of introducing an alkyl group (a chemical moiety made up of a carbon atom bonded to one or more hydrogen atoms) into a molecule, typically a biomolecule such as a protein or DNA. This process can occur through various mechanisms, including chemical reactions with alkylating agents.

In the context of cancer therapy, alkylation is used to describe a class of chemotherapeutic drugs known as alkylating agents, which work by introducing alkyl groups onto DNA molecules in rapidly dividing cells. This can lead to cross-linking of DNA strands and other forms of DNA damage, ultimately inhibiting cell division and leading to the death of cancer cells. However, these agents can also affect normal cells, leading to side effects such as nausea, hair loss, and increased risk of infection.

It's worth noting that alkylation can also occur through non-chemical means, such as in certain types of radiation therapy where high-energy particles can transfer energy to electrons in biological molecules, leading to the formation of reactive radicals that can react with and alkylate DNA.

Mixed Function Oxygenases (MFOs) are a type of enzyme that catalyze the addition of one atom each from molecular oxygen (O2) to a substrate, while reducing the other oxygen atom to water. These enzymes play a crucial role in the metabolism of various endogenous and exogenous compounds, including drugs, carcinogens, and environmental pollutants.

MFOs are primarily located in the endoplasmic reticulum of cells and consist of two subunits: a flavoprotein component that contains FAD or FMN as a cofactor, and an iron-containing heme protein. The most well-known example of MFO is cytochrome P450, which is involved in the oxidation of xenobiotics and endogenous compounds such as steroids, fatty acids, and vitamins.

MFOs can catalyze a variety of reactions, including hydroxylation, epoxidation, dealkylation, and deamination, among others. These reactions often lead to the activation or detoxification of xenobiotics, making MFOs an important component of the body's defense system against foreign substances. However, in some cases, these reactions can also produce reactive intermediates that may cause toxicity or contribute to the development of diseases such as cancer.

Volatilization, in the context of pharmacology and medicine, refers to the process by which a substance (usually a medication or drug) transforms into a vapor state at room temperature or upon heating. This change in physical state allows the substance to evaporate and be transferred into the air, potentially leading to inhalation exposure.

In some medical applications, volatilization is used intentionally, such as with essential oils for aromatherapy or topical treatments that utilize a vapor action. However, it can also pose concerns when volatile substances are unintentionally released into the air, potentially leading to indoor air quality issues or exposure risks.

It's important to note that in clinical settings, volatilization is not typically used as a route of administration for medications, as other methods such as oral, intravenous, or inhalation via nebulizers are more common and controlled.

In chemistry, an alcohol is a broad term that refers to any organic compound characterized by the presence of a hydroxyl (-OH) functional group attached to a carbon atom. This means that alcohols are essentially hydrocarbons with a hydroxyl group. The simplest alcohol is methanol (CH3OH), and ethanol (C2H5OH), also known as ethyl alcohol, is the type of alcohol found in alcoholic beverages.

In the context of medical definitions, alcohol primarily refers to ethanol, which has significant effects on the human body when consumed. Ethanol can act as a central nervous system depressant, leading to various physiological and psychological changes depending on the dose and frequency of consumption. Excessive or prolonged use of ethanol can result in various health issues, including addiction, liver disease, neurological damage, and increased risk of injuries due to impaired judgment and motor skills.

It is important to note that there are other types of alcohols (e.g., methanol, isopropyl alcohol) with different chemical structures and properties, but they are not typically consumed by humans and can be toxic or even lethal in high concentrations.

Coumarins are a class of organic compounds that occur naturally in certain plants, such as sweet clover and tonka beans. They have a characteristic aroma and are often used as fragrances in perfumes and flavorings in food products. In addition to their use in consumer goods, coumarins also have important medical applications.

One of the most well-known coumarins is warfarin, which is a commonly prescribed anticoagulant medication used to prevent blood clots from forming or growing larger. Warfarin works by inhibiting the activity of vitamin K-dependent clotting factors in the liver, which helps to prolong the time it takes for blood to clot.

Other medical uses of coumarins include their use as anti-inflammatory agents and antimicrobial agents. Some coumarins have also been shown to have potential cancer-fighting properties, although more research is needed in this area.

It's important to note that while coumarins have many medical uses, they can also be toxic in high doses. Therefore, it's essential to use them only under the guidance of a healthcare professional.

The nasal cavity is the air-filled space located behind the nose, which is divided into two halves by the nasal septum. It is lined with mucous membrane and is responsible for several functions including respiration, filtration, humidification, and olfaction (smell). The nasal cavity serves as an important part of the upper respiratory tract, extending from the nares (nostrils) to the choanae (posterior openings of the nasal cavity that lead into the pharynx). It contains specialized structures such as turbinate bones, which help to warm, humidify and filter incoming air.

An adenoma is a benign (noncancerous) tumor that develops from glandular epithelial cells. These types of cells are responsible for producing and releasing fluids, such as hormones or digestive enzymes, into the surrounding tissues. Adenomas can occur in various organs and glands throughout the body, including the thyroid, pituitary, adrenal, and digestive systems.

Depending on their location, adenomas may cause different symptoms or remain asymptomatic. Some common examples of adenomas include:

1. Colorectal adenoma (also known as a polyp): These growths occur in the lining of the colon or rectum and can develop into colorectal cancer if left untreated. Regular screenings, such as colonoscopies, are essential for early detection and removal of these polyps.
2. Thyroid adenoma: This type of adenoma affects the thyroid gland and may result in an overproduction or underproduction of hormones, leading to conditions like hyperthyroidism (overactive thyroid) or hypothyroidism (underactive thyroid).
3. Pituitary adenoma: These growths occur in the pituitary gland, which is located at the base of the brain and controls various hormonal functions. Depending on their size and location, pituitary adenomas can cause vision problems, headaches, or hormonal imbalances that affect growth, reproduction, and metabolism.
4. Liver adenoma: These rare benign tumors develop in the liver and may not cause any symptoms unless they become large enough to press on surrounding organs or structures. In some cases, liver adenomas can rupture and cause internal bleeding.
5. Adrenal adenoma: These growths occur in the adrenal glands, which are located above the kidneys and produce hormones that regulate stress responses, metabolism, and blood pressure. Most adrenal adenomas are nonfunctioning, meaning they do not secrete excess hormones. However, functioning adrenal adenomas can lead to conditions like Cushing's syndrome or Conn's syndrome, depending on the type of hormone being overproduced.

It is essential to monitor and manage benign tumors like adenomas to prevent potential complications, such as rupture, bleeding, or hormonal imbalances. Treatment options may include surveillance with imaging studies, medication to manage hormonal issues, or surgical removal of the tumor in certain cases.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Tea" is not a medical term. It generally refers to a hot beverage made by infusing the leaves of the tea plant (Camellia sinensis) in hot water. There are various types of tea including black, green, white, oolong, and herbal teas, but these are not medical terms. If you have any medical concerns or questions, I'd be happy to try to help if I can, but it would be helpful if you could provide more context or clarify what you're asking about.

Organoselenium compounds are organic chemicals that contain selenium, a naturally occurring non-metal element, in their structure. Selenium is chemically related to sulfur and can replace it in many organic molecules. Organoselenium compounds have been studied for their potential therapeutic benefits, including antioxidant, anti-cancer, and anti-inflammatory effects. They are also used as catalysts in chemical reactions. These compounds contain at least one carbon atom bonded to selenium, which can take the form of a variety of functional groups such as selenoethers, selenols, and selenoesters.

In the context of medicine, "odors" refer to smells or scents that are produced by certain medical conditions, substances, or bodily functions. These odors can sometimes provide clues about underlying health issues. For example, sweet-smelling urine could indicate diabetes, while foul-smelling breath might suggest a dental problem or gastrointestinal issue. However, it's important to note that while odors can sometimes be indicative of certain medical conditions, they are not always reliable diagnostic tools and should be considered in conjunction with other symptoms and medical tests.

Deoxyguanosine is a chemical compound that is a component of DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid), one of the nucleic acids. It is a nucleoside, which is a molecule consisting of a sugar (in this case, deoxyribose) and a nitrogenous base (in this case, guanine). Deoxyguanosine plays a crucial role in the structure and function of DNA, as it pairs with deoxycytidine through hydrogen bonding to form a rung in the DNA double helix. It is involved in the storage and transmission of genetic information.

Hemoglobin (Hb or Hgb) is the main oxygen-carrying protein in the red blood cells, which are responsible for delivering oxygen throughout the body. It is a complex molecule made up of four globin proteins and four heme groups. Each heme group contains an iron atom that binds to one molecule of oxygen. Hemoglobin plays a crucial role in the transport of oxygen from the lungs to the body's tissues, and also helps to carry carbon dioxide back to the lungs for exhalation.

There are several types of hemoglobin present in the human body, including:

* Hemoglobin A (HbA): This is the most common type of hemoglobin, making up about 95-98% of total hemoglobin in adults. It consists of two alpha and two beta globin chains.
* Hemoglobin A2 (HbA2): This makes up about 1.5-3.5% of total hemoglobin in adults. It consists of two alpha and two delta globin chains.
* Hemoglobin F (HbF): This is the main type of hemoglobin present in fetal life, but it persists at low levels in adults. It consists of two alpha and two gamma globin chains.
* Hemoglobin S (HbS): This is an abnormal form of hemoglobin that can cause sickle cell disease when it occurs in the homozygous state (i.e., both copies of the gene are affected). It results from a single amino acid substitution in the beta globin chain.
* Hemoglobin C (HbC): This is another abnormal form of hemoglobin that can cause mild to moderate hemolytic anemia when it occurs in the homozygous state. It results from a different single amino acid substitution in the beta globin chain than HbS.

Abnormal forms of hemoglobin, such as HbS and HbC, can lead to various clinical disorders, including sickle cell disease, thalassemia, and other hemoglobinopathies.

Molecular structure, in the context of biochemistry and molecular biology, refers to the arrangement and organization of atoms and chemical bonds within a molecule. It describes the three-dimensional layout of the constituent elements, including their spatial relationships, bond lengths, and angles. Understanding molecular structure is crucial for elucidating the functions and reactivities of biological macromolecules such as proteins, nucleic acids, lipids, and carbohydrates. Various experimental techniques, like X-ray crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), are employed to determine molecular structures at atomic resolution, providing valuable insights into their biological roles and potential therapeutic targets.

Mutagenicity tests are a type of laboratory assays used to identify agents that can cause genetic mutations. These tests detect changes in the DNA of organisms, such as bacteria, yeast, or mammalian cells, after exposure to potential mutagens. The most commonly used mutagenicity test is the Ames test, which uses a strain of Salmonella bacteria that is sensitive to mutagens. If a chemical causes an increase in the number of revertants (reversion to the wild type) in the bacterial population, it is considered to be a mutagen. Other tests include the mouse lymphoma assay and the chromosomal aberration test. These tests are used to evaluate the potential genotoxicity of chemicals and are an important part of the safety evaluation process for new drugs, chemicals, and other substances.

Methylation, in the context of genetics and epigenetics, refers to the addition of a methyl group (CH3) to a molecule, usually to the nitrogenous base of DNA or to the side chain of amino acids in proteins. In DNA methylation, this process typically occurs at the 5-carbon position of cytosine residues that precede guanine residues (CpG sites) and is catalyzed by enzymes called DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs).

DNA methylation plays a crucial role in regulating gene expression, genomic imprinting, X-chromosome inactivation, and suppression of repetitive elements. Hypermethylation or hypomethylation of specific genes can lead to altered gene expression patterns, which have been associated with various human diseases, including cancer.

In summary, methylation is a fundamental epigenetic modification that influences genomic stability, gene regulation, and cellular function by introducing methyl groups to DNA or proteins.

Carbon monoxide (CO) is a colorless, odorless, and tasteless gas that is slightly less dense than air. It is toxic to hemoglobic animals when encountered in concentrations above about 35 ppm. This compound is a product of incomplete combustion of organic matter, and is a major component of automobile exhaust.

Carbon monoxide is poisonous because it binds to hemoglobin in red blood cells much more strongly than oxygen does, forming carboxyhemoglobin. This prevents the transport of oxygen throughout the body, which can lead to suffocation and death. Symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning include headache, dizziness, weakness, nausea, vomiting, confusion, and disorientation. Prolonged exposure can lead to unconsciousness and death.

Carbon monoxide detectors are commonly used in homes and other buildings to alert occupants to the presence of this dangerous gas. It is important to ensure that these devices are functioning properly and that they are placed in appropriate locations throughout the building. Additionally, it is essential to maintain appliances and heating systems to prevent the release of carbon monoxide into living spaces.

Mass spectrometry with electrospray ionization (ESI-MS) is an analytical technique used to identify and quantify chemical species in a sample based on the mass-to-charge ratio of charged particles. In ESI-MS, analytes are ionized through the use of an electrospray, where a liquid sample is introduced through a metal capillary needle at high voltage, creating an aerosol of charged droplets. As the solvent evaporates, the analyte molecules become charged and can be directed into a mass spectrometer for analysis.

ESI-MS is particularly useful for the analysis of large biomolecules such as proteins, peptides, and nucleic acids, due to its ability to gently ionize these species without fragmentation. The technique provides information about the molecular weight and charge state of the analytes, which can be used to infer their identity and structure. Additionally, ESI-MS can be interfaced with separation techniques such as liquid chromatography (LC) for further purification and characterization of complex samples.

Experimental neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors that are induced and studied in a controlled laboratory setting, typically in animals or cell cultures. These studies are conducted to understand the fundamental mechanisms of cancer development, progression, and potential treatment strategies. By manipulating various factors such as genetic mutations, environmental exposures, and pharmacological interventions, researchers can gain valuable insights into the complex processes underlying neoplasm formation and identify novel targets for cancer therapy. It is important to note that experimental neoplasms may not always accurately represent human cancers, and further research is needed to translate these findings into clinically relevant applications.

A biological marker, often referred to as a biomarker, is a measurable indicator that reflects the presence or severity of a disease state, or a response to a therapeutic intervention. Biomarkers can be found in various materials such as blood, tissues, or bodily fluids, and they can take many forms, including molecular, histologic, radiographic, or physiological measurements.

In the context of medical research and clinical practice, biomarkers are used for a variety of purposes, such as:

1. Diagnosis: Biomarkers can help diagnose a disease by indicating the presence or absence of a particular condition. For example, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is a biomarker used to detect prostate cancer.
2. Monitoring: Biomarkers can be used to monitor the progression or regression of a disease over time. For instance, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels are monitored in diabetes patients to assess long-term blood glucose control.
3. Predicting: Biomarkers can help predict the likelihood of developing a particular disease or the risk of a negative outcome. For example, the presence of certain genetic mutations can indicate an increased risk for breast cancer.
4. Response to treatment: Biomarkers can be used to evaluate the effectiveness of a specific treatment by measuring changes in the biomarker levels before and after the intervention. This is particularly useful in personalized medicine, where treatments are tailored to individual patients based on their unique biomarker profiles.

It's important to note that for a biomarker to be considered clinically valid and useful, it must undergo rigorous validation through well-designed studies, including demonstrating sensitivity, specificity, reproducibility, and clinical relevance.

Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is the genetic material present in the cells of organisms where it is responsible for the storage and transmission of hereditary information. DNA is a long molecule that consists of two strands coiled together to form a double helix. Each strand is made up of a series of four nucleotide bases - adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T) - that are linked together by phosphate and sugar groups. The sequence of these bases along the length of the molecule encodes genetic information, with A always pairing with T and C always pairing with G. This base-pairing allows for the replication and transcription of DNA, which are essential processes in the functioning and reproduction of all living organisms.

Liquid chromatography (LC) is a type of chromatography technique used to separate, identify, and quantify the components in a mixture. In this method, the sample mixture is dissolved in a liquid solvent (the mobile phase) and then passed through a stationary phase, which can be a solid or a liquid that is held in place by a solid support.

The components of the mixture interact differently with the stationary phase and the mobile phase, causing them to separate as they move through the system. The separated components are then detected and measured using various detection techniques, such as ultraviolet (UV) absorbance or mass spectrometry.

Liquid chromatography is widely used in many areas of science and medicine, including drug development, environmental analysis, food safety testing, and clinical diagnostics. It can be used to separate and analyze a wide range of compounds, from small molecules like drugs and metabolites to large biomolecules like proteins and nucleic acids.

Tritium is not a medical term, but it is a term used in the field of nuclear physics and chemistry. Tritium (symbol: T or 3H) is a radioactive isotope of hydrogen with two neutrons and one proton in its nucleus. It is also known as heavy hydrogen or superheavy hydrogen.

Tritium has a half-life of about 12.3 years, which means that it decays by emitting a low-energy beta particle (an electron) to become helium-3. Due to its radioactive nature and relatively short half-life, tritium is used in various applications, including nuclear weapons, fusion reactors, luminous paints, and medical research.

In the context of medicine, tritium may be used as a radioactive tracer in some scientific studies or medical research, but it is not a term commonly used to describe a medical condition or treatment.

The liver is a large, solid organ located in the upper right portion of the abdomen, beneath the diaphragm and above the stomach. It plays a vital role in several bodily functions, including:

1. Metabolism: The liver helps to metabolize carbohydrates, fats, and proteins from the food we eat into energy and nutrients that our bodies can use.
2. Detoxification: The liver detoxifies harmful substances in the body by breaking them down into less toxic forms or excreting them through bile.
3. Synthesis: The liver synthesizes important proteins, such as albumin and clotting factors, that are necessary for proper bodily function.
4. Storage: The liver stores glucose, vitamins, and minerals that can be released when the body needs them.
5. Bile production: The liver produces bile, a digestive juice that helps to break down fats in the small intestine.
6. Immune function: The liver plays a role in the immune system by filtering out bacteria and other harmful substances from the blood.

Overall, the liver is an essential organ that plays a critical role in maintaining overall health and well-being.

Cricetinae is a subfamily of rodents that includes hamsters, gerbils, and relatives. These small mammals are characterized by having short limbs, compact bodies, and cheek pouches for storing food. They are native to various parts of the world, particularly in Europe, Asia, and Africa. Some species are popular pets due to their small size, easy care, and friendly nature. In a medical context, understanding the biology and behavior of Cricetinae species can be important for individuals who keep them as pets or for researchers studying their physiology.

Nicotinic receptors are a type of ligand-gated ion channel receptor that are activated by the neurotransmitter acetylcholine and the alkaloid nicotine. They are widely distributed throughout the nervous system and play important roles in various physiological processes, including neuronal excitability, neurotransmitter release, and cognitive functions such as learning and memory. Nicotinic receptors are composed of five subunits that form a ion channel pore, which opens to allow the flow of cations (positively charged ions) when the receptor is activated by acetylcholine or nicotine. There are several subtypes of nicotinic receptors, which differ in their subunit composition and functional properties. These receptors have been implicated in various neurological disorders, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and schizophrenia.

Adenocarcinoma is a type of cancer that arises from glandular epithelial cells. These cells line the inside of many internal organs, including the breasts, prostate, colon, and lungs. Adenocarcinomas can occur in any of these organs, as well as in other locations where glands are present.

The term "adenocarcinoma" is used to describe a cancer that has features of glandular tissue, such as mucus-secreting cells or cells that produce hormones. These cancers often form glandular structures within the tumor mass and may produce mucus or other substances.

Adenocarcinomas are typically slow-growing and tend to spread (metastasize) to other parts of the body through the lymphatic system or bloodstream. They can be treated with surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, targeted therapy, or a combination of these treatments. The prognosis for adenocarcinoma depends on several factors, including the location and stage of the cancer, as well as the patient's overall health and age.

Oxidation-Reduction (redox) reactions are a type of chemical reaction involving a transfer of electrons between two species. The substance that loses electrons in the reaction is oxidized, and the substance that gains electrons is reduced. Oxidation and reduction always occur together in a redox reaction, hence the term "oxidation-reduction."

In biological systems, redox reactions play a crucial role in many cellular processes, including energy production, metabolism, and signaling. The transfer of electrons in these reactions is often facilitated by specialized molecules called electron carriers, such as nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+/NADH) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD/FADH2).

The oxidation state of an element in a compound is a measure of the number of electrons that have been gained or lost relative to its neutral state. In redox reactions, the oxidation state of one or more elements changes as they gain or lose electrons. The substance that is oxidized has a higher oxidation state, while the substance that is reduced has a lower oxidation state.

Overall, oxidation-reduction reactions are fundamental to the functioning of living organisms and are involved in many important biological processes.

Chromatography, gas (GC) is a type of chromatographic technique used to separate, identify, and analyze volatile compounds or vapors. In this method, the sample mixture is vaporized and carried through a column packed with a stationary phase by an inert gas (carrier gas). The components of the mixture get separated based on their partitioning between the mobile and stationary phases due to differences in their adsorption/desorption rates or solubility.

The separated components elute at different times, depending on their interaction with the stationary phase, which can be detected and quantified by various detection systems like flame ionization detector (FID), thermal conductivity detector (TCD), electron capture detector (ECD), or mass spectrometer (MS). Gas chromatography is widely used in fields such as chemistry, biochemistry, environmental science, forensics, and food analysis.

Evaluates risks to human health and the environment posed by exposure to methyl ethyl ketone. Because of its excellent properties as a solvent, methyl ethyl ketone is widely used in the application of protective coatings ...
Butanones/AE AND nabumetone[NM] AND Human[MH] AND ( drug-induced liver injury OR jaundice/CI OR bile duct diseases/CI OR liver/ ... Butanones/AE AND nabumetone[NM] AND Human[MH] AND ( drug-induced liver injury OR jaundice/CI OR bile duct diseases/CI OR liver/ ...
Butanones [‎1]‎. Byssinosis [‎11]‎. C-Peptide [‎1]‎. C-Reactive Protein [‎2]‎. Cabo Verde [‎4]‎. ...
MeSH Terms: Amino Acids/chemistry*; Butadienes/chemistry; Butadienes/metabolism*; Butanones/chemistry*; Chromatography, High ...
Butanones / pharmacology* Actions. * Search in PubMed * Search in MeSH * Add to Search ...
Butanones,N0000007852, Polyvinyls,N0000007851, Oximes,N0000007850, Butylene Glycols,N0000007849, Aminobenzoic Acids,N0000007848 ...
Butanones - Preferred Concept UI. M0003089. Scope note. Derivatives of butanone, also known as methyl ethyl ketone (with ...
Butanones Preferred Term Term UI T005871. Date01/01/1999. LexicalTag NON. ThesaurusID NLM (1968). ... Butanones Preferred Concept UI. M0003089. Registry Number. 0. Scope Note. Derivatives of butanone, also known as methyl ethyl ... Butanones. Tree Number(s). D02.522.296. Unique ID. D002074. RDF Unique Identifier. http://id.nlm.nih.gov/mesh/D002074 Scope ...
Butanones Preferred Term Term UI T005871. Date01/01/1999. LexicalTag NON. ThesaurusID NLM (1968). ... Butanones Preferred Concept UI. M0003089. Registry Number. 0. Scope Note. Derivatives of butanone, also known as methyl ethyl ... Butanones. Tree Number(s). D02.522.296. Unique ID. D002074. RDF Unique Identifier. http://id.nlm.nih.gov/mesh/D002074 Scope ...
Butanones. General subdivision. adverse effects. --. toxicity.. 650 02 - SUBJECT ADDED ENTRY--TOPICAL TERM. ...
Reduction of isoxazoles to yield amino-butanones.. *Reduction with metal and ammonia to give amino-butenones and enones. ...
This graph shows the total number of publications written about "Benzophenones" by people in UAMS Profiles by year, and whether "Benzophenones" was a major or minor topic of these publications ...
butanones. butcherers. butcheries. butcherings. butchers. butches. butchings. butenes. buteos. butes. butlerages. butleries. ...
Butanones Butea Buthionine Sulfoximine Butirosin Sulfate Butorphanol Butoxamine Butter Butterflies Buttermilk Buttocks ...

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