An antiseptic and disinfectant aromatic alcohol.
Benzene derivatives that include one or more hydroxyl groups attached to the ring structure.
Red dye, pH indicator, and diagnostic aid for determination of renal function. It is used also for studies of the gastrointestinal and other systems.
Phenols substituted with one or more chlorine atoms in any position.
A family of 3,3-bis(p-hydroxyphenyl)phthalides. They are used as CATHARTICS, indicators, and COLORING AGENTS.
A sulfotransferase that catalyzes the sulfation of a phenol in the presence of 3'-phosphoadenylylsulfate as sulfate donor to yield an aryl sulfate and adenosine 3',5'-bisphosphate. A number of aromatic compounds can act as acceptors; however, organic hydroxylamines are not substrates. Sulfate conjugation by this enzyme is a major pathway for the biotransformation of phenolic and catechol drugs as well as neurotransmitters. EC 2.8.2.1.
A group of 1,2-benzenediols that contain the general formula R-C6H5O2.
Elimination of ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTANTS; PESTICIDES and other waste using living organisms, usually involving intervention of environmental or sanitation engineers.
Methyl, propyl, butyl, and ethyl esters of p-hydroxybenzoic acid. They have been approved by the FDA as antimicrobial agents for foods and pharmaceuticals. (From Hawley's Condensed Chemical Dictionary, 11th ed, p872)
Toxic, volatile, flammable liquid hydrocarbon byproduct of coal distillation. It is used as an industrial solvent in paints, varnishes, lacquer thinners, gasoline, etc. Benzene causes central nervous system damage acutely and bone marrow damage chronically and is carcinogenic. It was formerly used as parasiticide.
Widely distributed enzymes that carry out oxidation-reduction reactions in which one atom of the oxygen molecule is incorporated into the organic substrate; the other oxygen atom is reduced and combined with hydrogen ions to form water. They are also known as monooxygenases or hydroxylases. These reactions require two substrates as reductants for each of the two oxygen atoms. There are different classes of monooxygenases depending on the type of hydrogen-providing cosubstrate (COENZYMES) required in the mixed-function oxidation.
An enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of catechol to muconic acid with the use of Fe3+ as a cofactor. This enzyme was formerly characterized as EC 1.13.1.1 and EC 1.99.2.2.
A genus of gram-negative, rod-shaped bacteria able to anaerobically oxidize and degrade toluene.
Catalyzes the oxidation of catechol to 2-hydroxymuconate semialdehyde in the carbazole and BENZOATE degradation via HYDROXYLATION pathways. It also catalyzes the conversion of 3-methylcatechol to cis, cis-2-hydroxy-6-oxohept-2,4-dienoate in the TOLUENE and XYLENE degradation pathway. This enzyme was formerly characterized as EC 1.13.1.2.
Oxidases that specifically introduce DIOXYGEN-derived oxygen atoms into a variety of organic molecules.
An insecticide and herbicide that has also been used as a wood preservative. Pentachlorphenol is a widespread environmental pollutant. Both chronic and acute pentachlorophenol poisoning are medical concerns. The range of its biological actions is still being actively explored, but it is clearly a potent enzyme inhibitor and has been used as such as an experimental tool.
An enzyme that catalyzes the cleavage of tyrosine to phenol, pyruvate, and ammonia. It is a pyridoxal phosphate protein. The enzyme also forms pyruvate from D-tyrosine, L-cysteine, S-methyl-L-cysteine, L-serine, and D-serine, although at a slower rate. EC 4.1.99.2.
A group of compounds that are derivatives of methoxybenzene and contain the general formula R-C7H7O.
A genus of gram-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacteria widely distributed in nature. Some species are pathogenic for humans, animals, and plants.
A mitosporic fungal genus causing opportunistic infections, endocarditis, fungemia, a hypersensitivity pneumonitis (see TRICHOSPORONOSIS) and white PIEDRA.
A class of chemicals that contain an anthracene ring with a naphthalene ring attached to it.
An agent thought to have disinfectant properties and used as an expectorant. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p747)
A fungistatic compound that is widely used as a food preservative. It is conjugated to GLYCINE in the liver and excreted as hippuric acid.
An enzyme of the oxidoreductase class that catalyzes the reaction between L-tyrosine, L-dopa, and oxygen to yield L-dopa, dopaquinone, and water. It is a copper protein that acts also on catechols, catalyzing some of the same reactions as CATECHOL OXIDASE. EC 1.14.18.1.
Excessive lateral nail growth into the nail fold. Because the lateral margin of the nail acts as a foreign body, inflammation and granulation may result. It is caused by improperly fitting shoes and by improper trimming of the nail.
A by-product of the destructive distillation of coal used as a topical antieczematic. It is an antipruritic and keratoplastic agent used also in the treatment of psoriasis and other skin conditions. Occupational exposure to soots, tars, and certain mineral oils is known to be carcinogenic according to the Fourth Annual Report on Carcinogens (NTP 85-002, 1985) (Merck Index, 11th ed).
Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)
Naturally occurring complex liquid hydrocarbons which, after distillation, yield combustible fuels, petrochemicals, and lubricants.
Substances or materials used in the course of housekeeping or personal routine.
The ability to detect scents or odors, such as the function of OLFACTORY RECEPTOR NEURONS.
The care and management of property.
Size and composition of the family.
Hospital department which manages and provides the required housekeeping functions in all areas of the hospital.
State plans prepared by the State Health Planning and Development Agencies which are made up from plans submitted by the Health Systems Agencies and subject to review and revision by the Statewide Health Coordinating Council.
Elements, compounds, mixtures, or solutions that are considered severely harmful to human health and the environment. They include substances that are toxic, corrosive, flammable, or explosive.
An infant during the first month after birth.
Federal program, created by Public Law 89-97, Title XIX, a 1965 amendment to the Social Security Act, administered by the states, that provides health care benefits to indigent and medically indigent persons.
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
A group of metabolites derived from THYROXINE and TRIIODOTHYRONINE via the peripheral enzymatic removal of iodines from the thyroxine nucleus. Thyronine is the thyroxine nucleus devoid of its four iodine atoms.
An alcoholic beverage usually made from malted cereal grain (as barley), flavored with hops, and brewed by slow fermentation.
The act or practice of killing or allowing death from natural causes, for reasons of mercy, i.e., in order to release a person from incurable disease, intolerable suffering, or undignified death. (from Beauchamp and Walters, Contemporary Issues in Bioethics, 5th ed)
A plant species of the genus CYNARA, family ASTERACEAE. The flower bud is the familiar artichoke eaten as a vegetable.
The 4-aminomethyl form of VITAMIN B 6. During transamination of amino acids, PYRIDOXAL PHOSPHATE is transiently converted into pyridoxamine phosphate.
The attitude of a significant portion of a population toward any given proposition, based upon a measurable amount of factual evidence, and involving some degree of reflection, analysis, and reasoning.
Caution should be taken while using TRIzol (due to the phenol and chloroform). Exposure to TRIzol can be a serious health ... Exposure can lead to serious chemical burns and permanent scarring. A lab coat, gloves and a plastic apron are recommended. ... The correct name of the method is guanidinium thiocyanate-phenol-chloroform extraction. The use of TRIzol can result in DNA and ... The smell of the phenol is extremely strong. TRIzol works by maintaining RNA integrity during tissue homogenization, while at ...
The smoke from burning fruit bodies was inhaled by those with sore throats. Scrapings from slightly charred fruit bodies were ... These include the natural phenol hispidin, bio-active styrylpyrones called phelligridins, and bio-active isolates called ...
See Great Phenol Plot. At the time, phenol was obtained from coal as a co-product of coke ovens and the manufacture of gas for ... Picric acid-soaked gauze was also commonly stocked in first aid kits from that period as a burn treatment. It was notably used ... The aromatic ring of phenol is activated towards electrophilic substitution reactions, and attempted nitration of phenol, even ... Thomas Edison needed phenol to manufacture phonograph records. He responded by undertaking production of phenol at his Silver ...
... formed from an elimination reaction of phenol with formaldehyde. It was developed by Belgian-born chemist Leo Baekeland in New ... Nick Manoloff was born Nicola Manoloff on April 3, 1898, in Bulgaria. He immigrated to the east coast of the United States in ... They had a son, Nicki Manoloff, born in Chicago in 1937, and two daughters, Bernice and Denna. Manoloff invented the Nick ... It is a thermosetting phenol formaldehyde resin, ...
The patient usually feels a warm or burning sensation. Phenol used to be a deep chemical peel. Early phenol peel solutions were ... The term "phenol-croton oil peel" has replaced the vague term "phenol peel" in medical literature. It was originally used on a ... An examination of the phenol-croton oil peel: part IV. Face peel results with different concentrations of phenol and croton oil ... More dramatic changes to the skin require multiple peels over time.[citation needed] A phenol-croton oil is a type of chemical ...
This is the perfluorinated analogue of phenol. It is a white odorless solid that melts just above room temperature. With a pKa ... "severe skin burns and eye damage." Jones, Keith; DeAmicis, Carl (2009). "Pentafluorophenol". Encyclopedia of Reagents for ... of 5.5, it is one of the most acidic phenols. Pentafluorophenol is used to prepare pentafluorophenyl esters, which are active ...
It is used for treating the pain of minor burns, poison ivy, poison oak, itching, minor skin wounds or insect bites. The active ... ingredients are camphor (3%), phenol (2.5%), tannic acid (2.2%) and zinc oxide (6.6%). TV ads on The Hollywood Palace in 1967 ...
When the compound burns, it produces toxic gases. It also corrodes the respiratory tract. The compound is also a lacrimator. It ... It was intended to be used on amines, alcohols, thiols, and phenols. Trifluoroacetyl chloride is typically stored as a liquid ...
A phenol (1) is deprotonated with a base such as DABCO or NaH and reacted with a thiocarbamoyl chloride (2) to form an O-aryl ... Burns, Matthew; Lloyd-Jones, G. C.; Moseley, J. D.; Renny, J. S. (2010). "The Molecularity of the Newman−Kwart Rearrangement". ... Newman, M. S.; Karnes, H. A. (1966). "The Conversion of Phenols to Thiophenols via Dialkylthiocarbamates". J. Org. Chem. 31 (12 ... Melvin S. Newman, Frederick W. Hetzel (1971). "Thiophenols from Phenols: 2-Naphthalenethiol". Org. Synth. 51: 139. doi:10.15227 ...
Li, Gerard; Saad, Sonia; Oliver, Brian; Chen, Hui (2018). "Heat or Burn? Impacts of Intrauterine Tobacco Smoke and E-Cigarette ... Possible developmental toxicants include phthalates, phenols, sunscreens, pesticides, halogenated flame retardants, ... The emissions of a heat-not-burn tobacco product contains toxicants. Most heavy metals are toxicants. Diesel exhaust contains ...
It is compounded of phenols such as guaiacol, cresol, xylenol and creosol (not to be confused with cresol). ... Wood-tar creosote is a colourless to yellowish greasy liquid with a smoky odor, produces a sooty flame when burned, and has a ... If sufficient oxygen is present, the wood will burn when it reaches a temperature of about 400-500 °C and the catch fire and ... This is the well known exothermic reaction which takes place in the burning of charcoal. At this stage evolution of ...
When working with phenol in a laboratory situation, PEG 300 can be used on phenol skin burns to deactivate any residual phenol ... "Efficacy of topical phenol decontamination strategies on severity of acute phenol chemical burns and dermal absorption: in ... Dimethyl ethers of PEG are the key ingredient of Selexol, a solvent used by coal-burning, integrated gasification combined ...
Sacchi was born in Milan and studied for her PhD at the University of Milan in 1972, investigating the genetics of yeast. She ... She is the co-discoverer of the acid guanidinium thiocyanate-phenol-chloroform extraction method to extract RNA from biological ... Nicoletta Sacchi (born August 20, 1949) is an Italian professor of oncology at the Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center. ... "The single-step method of RNA isolation by acid guanidinium thiocyanate-phenol-chloroform extraction: twenty-something years on ...
Exposure to 26% Creolin disinfectant (26% phenol) produces vomiting, coughing, stridor, tissue sloughing and first degree burns ... The ideal concentration for the manufacture of disinfectants is a phenol content of 15% on the product. In this way, when the ... These can cause harm due to the toxicity of phenol. "Creolina: Qué es y para qué sirve". Retrieved 26 January 2017. Flint, ... It is composed mainly of phenol (phenolic acid) and cresol (cresylic acid). It is a very powerful disinfectant, of natural ...
... and on the synthesis of phenols. Cohen was born in Boston, the son of a furrier from England, and was the first in his family ...
... was born on 8 December 1914 in Posen, a Polish-Prussian province, and graduated in medicine in either 1938 or ... He became a key player in the organisation and administration of killings by phenol. The practice may have been used to cover ... Establishing a TB ward, he perfected the technique before killing all those on the ward by injecting lethal doses of phenol ... He conducted human medical experimentation at Auschwitz and introduced the procedure there of injecting lethal doses of phenol ...
Some of these substances are caustic and can burn the exoskeleton of ants and other insect predators, and the skin and eyes of ... Among the many irritant and toxic chemicals found in these secretions are alkaloids, benzoquinones, phenols, terpenoids, and ... This is called millipede burn. First aid consists of flushing the area thoroughly with water; further treatment is aimed at ... Hudson, B.; Parsons, G. (1997). "Giant millipede 'burns' and the eye". Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine ...
He had three daughters, Eva, born in 1939, Monika, born in 1942 and Hillevi, born in 1944. Gábor Kornél Tolnai entered the ... The United States Patent and Trademark Office granted Baekeland a patent for a "Method of making insoluble products of phenol ... Kornél Tolnai was born in 1902 in Budapest in Hungary and took his Diploma Engineer's degree at the Technical University of ... Gábor Kornél Tolnai, born November 22, 1902 in Budapest, died on February 3, 1982 in Stockholm, was a Hungarian-Swedish Diploma ...
January 13 - Dorothea Bate (born 1878), British paleozoologist. April 6 - Robert Broom (born 1866), Scottish-born South African ... "Protein Measurement with the Folin Phenol Reagent" (PDF). Journal of Biological Chemistry. 193 (1): 265-75. PMID 14907713. ... April 9 - Vilhelm Bjerknes (born 1862), Norwegian physicist and meteorologist. April 22 - Horace Donisthorpe (born 1870), ... October 4 - Henrietta Lacks (born 1921), African American source of the HeLa cell line. Lowry, Oliver H.; Rosebrough, Nira J.; ...
Some North American ham and bacon makers smoke their products over burning corncobs. Peat is burned to dry and smoke the barley ... Phenol and other phenolic compounds in wood smoke are both antioxidants, which slow rancidification of animal fats, and ... Smoking is the process of flavoring, browning, cooking, or preserving food by exposing it to smoke from burning or smoldering ... Woods that are high in lignin content tend to burn hot; to keep them smoldering requires restricted oxygen supplies or a high ...
The formulation contains the medicinal ingredients Phenol 0.5%, Camphor 0.5% and Zinc Oxide 1.25%. Mecca Ointment is currently ... is the product name of a first aid ointment used for the temporary relief of pain and/or itching associated with minor burns, ...
As a result of the 1996 fire, about 50,000 tons of oil products were burned, since even the soil was saturated with volatile ... hydrogen sulfide and phenol more than 1.5 times. In the residential areas of the Krasnoarmeysky district of Volgograd, located ...
Miles Thomas Chairman of BOAC was born here.. *Andy Radford (1962-2011) Journalist and author of 6 books lived here until his ... The company later expanded into the production of coal tar, and carbolic acid (phenol). The site soon became the world's ... Peter Halliday (1924-2012) Actor well known for various appearances in British television series Doctor Who was born here. ... leading producer of phenol. In 1919 the US chemical company Monsanto entered into a partnership with Graesser's chemical works ...
... taken to the Kampinos Forest and burned with a mixture of phenol and lysol. The perpetrators had actually been ordered by their ... Burning liquid of Cpt. Piotrowski), "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2011-07-04. Retrieved 2010-07-10. CS1 maint ... to have Krupski strip completely naked before the acid was dumped on him so that the mixture would burn through his skin, ...
... the group would be rendered unconscious with an injection of phenol, then burned alive. Born: James Levine, music director for ... Born: Tenzin Palmo, English-born Tibetan Buddhist nun, as Diane Perry in Woolmers Park, Hertfordshire. Florence Ballard, one of ... Born: Colin Baker, British TV actor best known as the sixth Dr. Who; in London The first automatic payroll tax in the United ... Born: Joan Van Ark, American TV actress (Knots Landing), in New York City The British troopship SS Yoma was torpedoed and sunk ...
Phenol" due to her activism as a citizen representative during 1991 Nakdong River phenol contamination incident. She first ... Kim Eun-kyung (Korean: 김은경; Hanja: 金恩京; born 9 June 1956) is a South Korean politician who served as President Moon Jae-in's ...
... phenol, propranolol Benzodiazepine withdrawal, botanicals Ethanol withdrawal Lithium, lidocaine Lindane, lead ABCDEFGHI: Acute ... punctures Burns Tenderness Lacerations Swelling & symmetry OTIS CAMPBELL Organophosphates Tricyclic antidepressants Isoniazid, ...
... may refer to : Otto Folin (1867-1934), a Swedish-born American chemist Folin's reagent, a reagent to detect level of ... a French oceanographer a suffix found in natural phenol names (as in punicafolin or taxifolin) to specify the leaf origin of ...
Dioxins are also generated in reactions that do not involve burning - such as chlorine bleaching fibers for paper or textiles, ... A chemical plant Khimprom in Ufa, Russia released phenol into the water tributaries in the Spring of 1990. An investigation ... Since 1987, however, backyard barrel burning has showed almost no decrease, and is now the largest source of dioxin emissions, ... Dioxins are produced in small concentrations when organic material is burned in the presence of chlorine, whether the chlorine ...
Some North American ham and bacon makers smoke their products over burning corncobs. Peat is burned to dry and smoke the barley ... Phenol and other phenolic compounds in wood smoke are both antioxidants, which slow rancidification of animal fats, and ... A pellet smoker is a temperature controlled smoker that burns wood pellets made of dried out sawdust, about an inch long and 1/ ... Woods that are high in lignin content tend to burn hot; to keep them smoldering requires restricted oxygen supplies or a high ...
Note: Phenol liquefies by mixing with about 8% water.] ... skin burns; dermatitis; ochronosis; tremor, convulsions, ...
Most people begin to smell phenol in air at about 40 parts of phenol per billion parts of air (ppb), and begin to smell phenol ... Phenol evaporates more slowly than water, and a moderate amount can form a solution with water. Phenol can catch on fire. ... Phenol has a distinct odor that is sickeningly sweet and tarry. ... Phenol is a colorless-to-white solid when pure; however, the ... in water at about 1�8 parts of phenol per million parts of water (ppm; 1 ppm is 1,000 times more than 1 ppb). These levels ...
Decomposes on burning. This produces toxic fumes including nitrogen oxides. Formula: C7H9NO. Molecular mass: 123.2 Melting ... Some statements made on this card are based on information available for p-(Methylamino)phenol sulfate.. See ICSC 1528. ...
Skin exposure to high levels of phenol has resulted in liver damage, diarrhea, dark urine, and hemolytic anemia. Phenol has ... Phenol is a manufactured substance found in a number of consumer products. ... Ingestion of concentrated phenol can produce internal burns. Phenol has been found in at least 595 of the 1,678 National ... and burning eyes. People who had skin exposure to high amounts of phenol had skin burns, liver damage, dark urine, irregular ...
"Phenol burn". Burns: Journal of the International Society for Burn Injuries. 32 (4): 517-21. doi:10.1016/j.burns.2005.12.016. ... PhenolsEdit. Main article: Phenols. The word phenol is also used to refer to any compound that contains a six-membered aromatic ... Phenol is also used as a preservative in some vaccines.[25]. Phenol spray is used medically to help sore throat.[26] It is the ... Phenol is reduced to benzene when it is distilled with zinc dust, or when phenol vapour is passed over granules of zinc at 400 ...
Exposure to phenol may cause irritation to the skin, eyes, nose, throat, and nervous system. Some symptoms of exposure to ... Phenol (C6H6O or C6H5OH) is a colorless to light-pink, crystalline solid with a sweet, acrid odor. ... phenol are weight loss, weakness, exhaustion, muscle aches, and pain ... Severe exposure can cause liver and/or kidney damage, skin burns, tremor, convulsions, and twitching. Workers may be harmed ...
Shop a large selection of products and learn more about Phenol/Chloroform/Isoamyl Alcohol (25:24:1 Mixture, pH 6.7/8.0, Liq.), ... Causes severe eye and skin irritation with possible burns. Irritating to respiratory system. Danger of serious damage to health ... Phenol/Chloroform/Isoamyl Alcohol (25:24:1 Mixture, pH 6.7/8.0, Liq.), Fisher BioReagents ... Phenol/Chloroform/Isoamyl Alcohol (25:24:1 Mixture, pH 6.7/8.0, Liq.), Fisher BioReagents ...
DiscoverNoise - PHENOL demos Videos. PHENOL Modular Synth. Spotlight: Tom Third. Spotlight: Kat Burns. Spotlight: Carl Didur ... Price and Availability , Accessories , PHENOL Manual , Sounds , Videos , PHENOL FAQ The PHENOL Kickstarter was a success! Thank ... All PHENOL documentation is available online. Click here for the full PHENOL manual with links to demonstration videos. *PHENOL ... PHENOL Prototype - Jam 2. (Random Transfer at the controls) Music by PHENOL Users. Know of anything we should link here? Let us ...
Causes severe skin burns and eye damage. May cause respiratory irritation. Precautionary Statements: P210-P233-P235-P240-P241- ...
"Phenol burn". Burns: Journal of the International Society for Burn Injuries. 32 (4): 517-21. doi:10.1016/j.burns.2005.12.016. ... "Phenol". Sigma-Aldrich Co., Phenol. Retrieved on 2013-07-20. "Phenol". Immediately Dangerous to Life or Health Concentrations ( ... Repeated or prolonged skin contact with phenol may cause dermatitis, or even second and third-degree burns. Inhalation of ... Phenol spray, usually at 1.4% phenol as an active ingredient, is used medically to help sore throat. It is the active ...
Learn why phenols is a word you must know, and an ingredient you should be very wary of, when it comes to cleaning your home ... Phenols and Pets. Cedar and pine shavings commonly used for animal bedding often also contain phenols to control odors and give ... Nonyl phenol ethoxylate, a common ingredient in laundry detergents and all-purpose cleaners, is banned in Europe, and ... The Health Dangers of Phenols Found in. Common Household Cleaners. by www.SixWise.com ...
... has anyone had a phenol peel completed? Im just wondering your experience and how it impacted scarring/wrinkling. I live in ... always burns, never tans. II. white or fair skin , red or blond hair , blue, hazel, or green eyes. usually burns, tans with ... Phenol Peel Experience Dr Rullan, Chemabrasion, Deep Peel ; Success Story By screwscars, October 12, 2018. in Scar treatments ... Just had a phenol peel. MAJOR downtime...around 9 days before you can really do anything. WELL worth it, though. Got rid of ...
Causes severe skin burns and eye damage.. May cause damage to organs through prolonged or repeated exposure.. Toxic if ...
Causes severe skin burns and eye damage. Causes serious eye damage.. GHS P Statement. P260-P301+P310-P303+P361+P353-P305+P351+ ... 4-1s-1-aminoethyl phenol, s-4-1-aminoethyl phenol, phenol, 4-1s-1-aminoethyl, s-4-1-aminoethyl-phenol, s-4-1-amino-ethyl-phenol ... 4-1s-1-aminoethyl phenol, s-4-1-aminoethyl phenol, phenol, 4-1s-1-aminoethyl, s-4-1-aminoethyl-phenol, s-4-1-amino-ethyl-phenol ... s-4-1-amino-aethyl-phenol, phenol,4-1s-1-aminoethyl, s-4-hydroxy-alpha-methylbenzylamine, phenol, 4-1s-1-aminoethyl-9ci, s-4- ...
... though knockout of agrCA or agrD strongly repressed expression of phenol soluble modulin encoding genes psmα1-4, psmβ1-2 and ... phenol soluble modulins (PSM) transporter encoding genes in the pmt operon, mutation of RNAIII enhanced expression of the genes ... though knockout of agrCA or agrD strongly repressed expression of phenol soluble modulin encoding genes psma1-4, psmb1-2 and ... Mulcahy, L. R., Burns, J. L., Lory, S., and Lewis, K. (2010). Emergence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains producing high levels ...
Aerobically trained muscles burn fat more readily than untrained in us. T F. Nutrition: Concepts and Controversies - Standalone ... Rank the following substituted phenols in order of increasing acidity, and explain your answer:. Organic Chemistry ... What factors make nutritional requirements higher for an infant who was born at 28 weeks gestation? a. Preterm .... Nutrition ...
Phenol. Respiratory irritation, headaches, burning eyes and skin; irregular heart beat. Developmental effects; liver effects. ... Burns skin and eyes; interferes with ability of the blood to carry oxygen (methemoglobinemia and anemia). Spleen and liver ... Phenol, 4-octyl. Endocrine disruption;interference with estrogen signaling. 1806-26-4. ... 4-tert-Octylphenol; 4(1,1,3,3-Tetramethylbutyl) phenol. Endocrine disruption; nervous and reproductive system effects; ...
light smokey phenols. A bit of alcohol. Almost like scotch. m-Prickly carbonation. Slight alcohol burn, but ok for style. Some ... Between the phenols and alcohol, i cant have another.. 440 characters. organicbrewer, Jul 13, 2009 ... Rotten barrels, burnt smokey wood, ok Im gonna stop smelling it for components because its AWFUL.. Taste follows suit, ... The limited amount of carbonation makes this feel a bit thin and there is some alcohol burn.. D: The beer is easy to consume ...
Liu Huiying: born in 1937, Professor. This is a preview of subscription content, log in to check access. ... ferrocenyl phenol glucosidic bond antianemic activity ferrocenyl derivatives organometal glucoside compound Supported by the ...
Chemical burns can be caused by acids or bases that come into contact with tissue. Acids are defined as proton donors (H+), and ... Polyethylene glycol 300 or 400 and isopropyl alcohol have been recommended for the removal of phenols and cresols. If skin ... Large surface burns require the same fluid therapy as that for thermal burns. [19] See Emergent Management of Thermal Burns. ... For severe dermal burns, consult a general surgeon or a burn service. Burns to the hands, face, or perineum may require the ...
Phenol: This nerve blocker can cause burning, tingling, or swelling. In rare cases it can cause motor weakness and sensory loss ...
... is a polymer of phenol with formaldehyde). Exposure of the skin to concentrated phenol solutions causes chemical burns which ... Phenols. The word phenol is also used to refer to any compound which contains a six-membered aromatic ring, bonded directly to ... Phenol has a limited solubility in water (8.3 g/100 ml). It is slightly acidic: the phenol molecule has weak tendencies to lose ... Injections of phenol have occasionally been used as a means of rapid execution. In particular, phenol was used as a means of ...
Fruity phenols and esters, caramel malt, and Belgian yeast.. Medium body with fairly lively carbonation.. Pretty drinkable, and ... Starts off with a dry, roasty, toasty maltiness; fruitiness ranges from burnt raisins to baked apples. Light hopping is there ... S: Fruitty with a hint of mint & phenols, plus green banana. T: Bananas, a touch of minty hops, pears, & apple skins up front. ... Red berries, caramel, and lots of phenols. Some Belgian yeast as well.. Flavor is a bit metallic, but otherwise very good and ...
... which can be used as renewable alternatives to the fossil and toxic phenol compounds widely used in glues. ... Most of this bark is burned as is, or as a processing energy source in pulp mills. More efficient use of the bark would ... alternatives-to-toxic-phenol-compounds-used-in-glues-are-being-developed-from-softwood-tannins ... However, they have huge market potential, since phenol-based glue resins have a global market of around 4 million tonnes per ...
A total of 17 people inhaled the substance or were burned by it. It did not reach the sewerage system nor the surface waters ... Decin, North Bohemia, May 21 (CTK) - The second of the two men hospitalised after a phenol leak in the chemical plant Chemotex ...
Phenol-Formaldehyde Resin (chemical compound) Phenol-formaldehyde resins make excellent wood adhesives for plywood and ... Ernesto Samper Pizano, (born Aug. 3, 1950, Bogota, Colom.), Colombian economist, lawyer, and politician who served as president ... Andres Pastrana Arango, (born August 17, 1954, Bogota, Colombia), Colombian journalist and politician who served as president ... Eduardo Santos Montejo, (born Aug. 28, 1888, Bogotadied March 27, 1974, Bogota), prominent Latin American journalist, president ...
Antibacterial dye. These help to treat wounds and burns.. *Peroxide and permanganate. These are often used in antiseptic ... Halogenated phenol derivative. This is used in medical-grade soaps and cleaning solutions. ... Treating skin infections. You can buy OTC antiseptics to reduce the risk of infection in minor cuts, burns, and wounds. ... Some strong antiseptics can cause chemical burns or severe irritation if applied to skin without being diluted with water. Even ...
Selection of decontaminants for experimental phenol burn wounds Selection of decontaminants for experimental phenol burn wounds ... After phenol burns, early decontamination with water has a poor effect, while Diphoterine can reduce the depth of phenol burns ... p,,b,OBJECTIVE,/b,To investigate the effect of the decontaminants frequently used for phenol burn wounds.,/p,,p,,b,METHODS,/b, ... The central part of the dorsal skin of adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were burned with 90% (W/V)phenol solution for 2 min, and ...
Phenol. This is a strong respiratory irritant. It causes skin burns, kidney damage, and cyanosis in humans. In animals (at very ... 1. Acrylic Acid. This is a respiratory toxin for humans and can cause asthma and severe skin burns. In animals, it causes renal ...
The antioxidant potency of 17β-estradiol and related polycyclic phenols has been well established. This property is an ... Wagner, B.A.; Buettner, G.R.; Burns, C.P. Free radical-mediated lipid peroxidation in cells: Oxidizability is a function of ... The antioxidant potency of 17β-estradiol and related polycyclic phenols has been well established. This property is an ... Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships Predicting the Antioxidant Potency of 17β-Estradiol-Related Polycyclic Phenols to ...
  • Ingestion can occur through the use of products such as throat lozenges or sore throat sprays that contain phenol. (cdc.gov)
  • You may be exposed to phenol if you live near landfills or hazardous waste sites that contain phenol or near facilities manufacturing phenol. (cdc.gov)
  • Is there an alternate source of Vit K for neonates which does not contain phenol? (bio.net)
  • Phenol (also called carbolic acid) is an aromatic organic compound with the molecular formula C6H5OH. (wikipedia.org)
  • Phenol , also known under an older name of carbolic acid , is a toxic, colorless crystalline solid with a distinctive sweet tarry odor. (newworldencyclopedia.org)
  • Phenol was also the main ingredient of the Carbolic Smoke Ball, a device sold in London designed to protect the user against influenza and other ailments. (newworldencyclopedia.org)
  • The ''Global and Chinese phenol;carbolic acid Industry, 2011-2021 Market Research Report'' is a professional and in-depth study on the current state of the global phenol;carbolic acid industry with a focus on the Chinese market. (reportsnreports.com)
  • The report provides key statistics on the market status of the phenol;carbolic acid manufacturers and is a valuable source of guidance and direction for companies and individuals interested in the industry.Firstly, the report provides a basic overview of the industry including its definition, applications and manufacturing technology. (reportsnreports.com)
  • Through the statistical analysis, the report depicts the global and Chinese total market of phenol;carbolic acid industry including capacity, production, production value, cost/profit, supply/demand and Chinese import/export. (reportsnreports.com)
  • The report then estimates 2016-2021 market development trends of phenol;carbolic acid industry. (reportsnreports.com)
  • In the end, the report makes some important proposals for a new project of phenol;carbolic acid Industry before evaluating its feasibility. (reportsnreports.com)
  • Overall, the report provides an in-depth insight of 2011-2021 global and Chinese phenol;carbolic acid industry covering all important parameters. (reportsnreports.com)
  • 5.2 Market Competition of phenol;carbolic acid Industry by Country (USA, EU, Japan, Chinese etc. (reportsnreports.com)
  • The simplest of the class is phenol, which is also called carbolic acid C6H5OH. (homedistiller.org)
  • Phenol-formaldehyde resins make excellent wood adhesives for plywood and particleboard because they form chemical bonds with the phenol-like lignin component of wood. (britannica.com)
  • It is also used in the production of drugs (it is the starting material in the industrial production of aspirin ), weedkiller, and synthetic resins ( Bakelite , one of the first synthetic resins to be manufactured, is a polymer of phenol with formaldehyde ). (newworldencyclopedia.org)
  • 4 Although the FDA has acknowledged that vaccine preservatives like phenol and formaldehyde do not necessarily entirely eliminate the risk of contamination, they are still used in vaccine development to prevent contamination from gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, mycobacteria, viruses and some fungi. (greenmedinfo.com)
  • a brand name for any of a series of thermosetting plastics prepared by heating phenol or cresol with formaldehyde and ammonia under pressure: used for radio cabinets, telephone receivers, electric insulators, and molded plastic ware. (dictionary.com)
  • If that's not enough, some air fresheners contain formaldehyde and phenol. (howstuffworks.com)
  • Eventually, he was able to control heat and pressure for a formaldehyde-phenol reaction. (todayinsci.com)
  • Commercial phenol is a liquid that evaporates more slowly than water. (cdc.gov)
  • Phenol evaporates more slowly than water, and a moderate amount can form a solution with water. (cdc.gov)
  • One explanation for why phenol is more acidic than aliphatic compounds containing an -OH group is resonance stabilization of the phenoxide anion by the aromatic ring. (wikipedia.org)
  • Many common disinfectants out there contain phenols-caustic, poisonous and dangerous compounds that are used to cover smells. (sixwise.com)
  • Many common household disinfectants co-ntain phenols-caustic and dangerous compounds that could be harming your family's health. (sixwise.com)
  • In aqueous solution in the pH range ca. 8 - 12 it is in equilibrium with the phenolate anion C6H5O− (also called phenoxide): C6H5OH ⇌ C6H5O− + H+ One explanation for why phenol is more acidic than aliphatic compounds containing an -OH group is resonance stabilization of the phenoxide anion by the aromatic ring. (wikipedia.org)
  • A variety of compounds used in industry, such as cumene hydroperoxide (Cum- OOH), phenol (PhOH), and metal working fluids (MWFs), are toxic to the skin and can result in inflammation, allergic and contact dermatitis, and/or cancer promotion. (cdc.gov)
  • In effect, phenols are a class of organic compounds of which the phenol discussed in this article is the simplest member. (newworldencyclopedia.org)
  • When wood burns, it releases aroma compounds called volatile phenols. (winespectator.com)
  • Finnish softwood bark contains large amounts of water-soluble tannin-polyphenols, which can be used as renewable alternatives to the fossil and toxic phenol compounds widely used in glues. (eurekalert.org)
  • Malodourous compounds, including volatile phenols (VPs) are frequently found at concentrations below their odour thresholds in wine, and may therefore be considered to present no threat to wine quality. (scielo.org.za)
  • Coal tars are complex combinations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), phenols, heterocyclic oxygen, sulfur, and nitrogen compounds. (cdc.gov)
  • Phenols are compounds with a chemical structures composed of aromatic benzene rings with varying numbers of hydroxyl groups attached in various configurations [Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment (CCME), 1999b]. (lsrca.on.ca)
  • Aquatic organisms can degrade phenol through conversion to other compounds and elimination as waste. (lsrca.on.ca)
  • In organic chemistry, phenols, sometimes called phenolics, are a class of chemical compounds consisting of a hydroxyl group (-OH) bonded directly to an aromatic hydrocarbon group. (homedistiller.org)
  • Phenolic compounds are classified as simple phenols or polyphenols based on the number of phenol units in the molecule. (homedistiller.org)
  • The phenolic compounds, in particular phenol and cresol along with eugenol and guaiacol are the source of particularly strong, smoky and bitter flavours and aromas found within whisky. (homedistiller.org)
  • The burning produces the phenolic compounds in the smoke, which are then absorbed by the barley. (homedistiller.org)
  • Phenol, cresols, xylenol and guaiacol are amongst the most important phenolic compounds in whisky, in terms of contribution to flavor. (homedistiller.org)
  • Wine grapes can can absorb certain compounds in smoke, known as volatile phenols, which are produced from burning wood and other materials. (napavalleyregister.com)
  • This public health statement tells you about phenol and the effects of exposure to it. (cdc.gov)
  • Exposure occurs through breathing and dermal contact with contaminated air or by skin contact with products containing phenol. (cdc.gov)
  • Skin exposure to high amounts can produce skin burns, liver damage, dark urine, irregular heart beat, and even death. (cdc.gov)
  • Short-term exposure to phenol in the air can cause respiratory irritation, headaches, and burning eyes. (cdc.gov)
  • People who had skin exposure to high amounts of phenol had skin burns, liver damage, dark urine, irregular heart beat, and some died. (cdc.gov)
  • Exposure to high concentrations of phenol in the air for several weeks caused paralysis and severe injury to the heart, liver, kidneys, and lungs, and in some cases, death. (cdc.gov)
  • Phenol has caused minor birth defects and low birth weight in animals generally at exposure levels that also were toxic to the pregnant mothers. (cdc.gov)
  • Workers may be harmed from exposure to phenol.The level of harm depends upon the dose, duration, and work being done. (cdc.gov)
  • The following resources provide information about occupational exposure to phenol. (cdc.gov)
  • Presents a standard to prevent the adverse effects of exposure to phenol over a working lifetime. (cdc.gov)
  • Prompt wound irrigation is the most critical aspect in limiting the extent of dermal burns from exposure to caustic substances. (medscape.com)
  • pretreatment with DL-buthionine sulfoximine) prior to phenol exposure resulted in the production of significantly more radicals than in animals exposed to phenol alone. (cdc.gov)
  • Phenol has antiseptic properties and was used by Sir Joseph Lister (1827-1912) in his pioneering technique of antiseptic surgery, though the skin irritation caused by continual exposure to phenol eventually led to the substitution of aseptic (germ-free) techniques in surgery. (newworldencyclopedia.org)
  • They suggest that exposures to phenol and cresol occur through skin contact although no link between exposure and cancer could be established. (cdc.gov)
  • The new research examined pregnant women's exposure to various phenols and found that the majority of women in the study had detectable levels of BPA in their urine. (eurekalert.org)
  • Levels of the mothers' exposure to BPA and other phenols were gauged from a urine sample taken during pregnancy. (eurekalert.org)
  • However, they say a potential weakness of the work is that they had to rely on measurements of phenols from just one or two urine samples per woman, which only gives a snapshot of recent exposure. (eurekalert.org)
  • Currently, there is no general consensus regarding a safe level of exposure to phenols, but recently the EU general court classified BPA among the list of 'very high concern' chemicals. (eurekalert.org)
  • Ms Abellan and her colleagues plan to continue this work by analysing BPA exposure and its effects on different wheezing patterns across childhood, as well as studying the effects of the other phenols that they found in lower concentrations. (eurekalert.org)
  • Phenol is the strongest of the chemical solutions used for deep peeling to treat coarse facial wrinkles, areas of blotchy or discolored skin caused by sun exposure, and pre-cancerous growths. (bodyaesthetic.com)
  • Exposure can lead to serious chemical burns and permanent scarring. (wikipedia.org)
  • International organizations such as Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) [ 1 ] have documented phenol toxicity and recommend the monitoring of phenol exposure for groups at risk. (biology-online.org)
  • In exposure- and risk- evaluation, the monitoring of phenol by peripheral biomarker has several advantages over technical assessment of exposure. (biology-online.org)
  • The urine methyl hippuric level is an acceptable peripheral biomarker for phenol exposure [ 1 ]. (biology-online.org)
  • It was concluded that the phenol can be used for crude phenol exposure categorizations. (biology-online.org)
  • High phenol exposure among the population living in the urban area of big city can be expected. (biology-online.org)
  • We recommend that annual check up and monitoring for phenol exposure among the people living in the area with traffic jam should be set as primary prevention of occupational - related toxicity for them. (biology-online.org)
  • If you work in an industry that uses phenol, please read chemical labels and the accompanying Safety Data Sheet for hazard information. (cdc.gov)
  • The company uses phenol in the production of special chemical substances. (praguemonitor.com)
  • Polyethylene glycol 300 or 400 and isopropyl alcohol have been recommended for the removal of phenols and cresols. (medscape.com)
  • Burning peat generates phenols, in particular cresols and xylenols. (whisky.fr)
  • In animals, breathing air with high levels of phenol resulted in irritation of the lungs. (cdc.gov)
  • Causes severe eye and skin irritation with possible burns. (fishersci.com)
  • Some strong antiseptics can cause chemical burns or severe irritation if applied to skin without being diluted with water. (healthline.com)
  • Exposed workers were more likely to experience ringing in the ears, eye irritation, muscle twitching, and higher urine phenol concentrations than unexposed workers. (cdc.gov)
  • Inhalation of dust will produce irritation to gastro-intestinal or respiratory tract, characterized by burning, sneezing and coughing. (greenmedinfo.com)
  • Phenol also has a soothing local anaesthetic effect that helps to numb pain and relieve the itching and irritation related to minor skin injuries. (naturesbest.co.uk)
  • Some forms of phenol topical are used inside the mouth to provide temporary relief of minor mouth pain or irritation, sore throat, or canker sore pain. (everydayhealth.com)
  • A recent study indicated that levels of phenols were generally very low in Lake Simcoe and its streams. (lsrca.on.ca)
  • WS had the high levels of phenols due to the using of phenolic pesticides during wheat growth process. (aaqr.org)
  • Phenol has a distinct odor that is sickeningly sweet and tarry. (cdc.gov)
  • Phenol (C 6 H 6 O or C 6 H 5 OH) is a colorless to light-pink, crystalline solid with a sweet, acrid odor. (cdc.gov)
  • It is a colorless or pale yellowish liquid, and has a characteristic smoky odor and burnt taste. (cdc.gov)
  • I have no relief from my nose burning, coughing, migraine headaches, and this terrible chemical odor. (medhelp.org)
  • This process, called glycosylation, renders the phenols no longer volatile, meaning their smokiness cannot be detected by smell or taste. (winespectator.com)
  • However, once the grapes are fermented, the acidity in the resulting wine will begin to break these bonds, rendering the phenols volatile once again. (winespectator.com)
  • However, even if some volatile phenols from the smoke [are] absorbed in the wine, we do not expect any glycosylation to take place. (winespectator.com)
  • Large amounts of phenol are produced in the United States. (cdc.gov)
  • We do not know whether children would be more sensitive than adults to the effects of phenol. (cdc.gov)
  • The MSDS does not address the effects of phenol via injection. (greenmedinfo.com)
  • Phenol is an aromatic organic compound with the molecular formula C 6 H 5 OH. (wikipedia.org)
  • Phenol is an organic compound appreciably soluble in water, with about 84.2 g dissolving in 1000 mL (0.895 M ). Homogeneous mixtures of phenol and water at phenol to water mass ratios of ~2.6 and higher are possible. (wikipedia.org)
  • S)-4-(1-Aminoethyl)phenol is used as an intermediate in organic synthesis. (fishersci.ca)
  • In designing a photocatalytic oxidation system, the immobilized photocatalyst technique becomes highly profitable due to its promising capability in treating organic pollutants such as phenols in wastewater. (mdpi.com)
  • 2008). Generally degradation of phenols in soils is too rapid to permit leaching of phenols to groundwater especially in soils with significant organic matter content (Dobbins et al. (lsrca.on.ca)
  • Phenols and phthalates (PAEs) are always linked with the formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOA), while the water soluble ions (WSIs) are connected to the formation of secondary inorganic aerosols (SIA). (aaqr.org)
  • Previous research reported the secondary organic aerosol (SOA) could formed by oxidation of phenol, guaiacol (2-methoxyphenol), and syringol (2,6-dimethoxyphenol) from biomass burning (Yee et al . (aaqr.org)
  • Phenol is used primarily in the production of phenolic resins and in the manufacture of nylon and other synthetic fibers. (cdc.gov)
  • However, they have huge market potential, since phenol-based glue resins have a global market of around 4 million tonnes per year and a value of EUR 10 billion. (eurekalert.org)
  • Phenols are chemicals most commonly used in the production of resins which are used in the construction, automotive and appliance industries. (lsrca.on.ca)
  • One study showed polyethylene glycol no more efficacious than copious water irrigation for phenol exposures. (medscape.com)
  • According to the National Institutes of Health, phenol is toxic and people who are hypersensitive to it could experience death or serious side effects at very low exposures. (sixwise.com)
  • Although the EPA adds that no published studies indicate concerning developmental or reproductive effects of manufactured phenol exposures in humans, if ingested, phenol has severe effects on animal health, so it is reasonable to be concerned about its potential adverse effects on human health. (greenmedinfo.com)
  • Operators had higher urine phenol concentrations than maintenance workers. (cdc.gov)
  • All three workers with hematuria had high urine phenol concentrations. (cdc.gov)
  • The average (mean ± SD) phenol concentration among these subjects was 7.4 ± 2.2 mg/g of urine creatinine. (biology-online.org)
  • Here, the author studied the urine phenol level among healthy subjects in urban area in Bangkok. (biology-online.org)
  • The active ingredient is phenol, an acid banned from cosmetics in the EU, and the burning. (nypost.com)
  • Guaiacol was present in most samples at peri- or supra-threshold levels, but was not correlated with taint unless in combination with other phenols, in which case it was associated with 'smoky', 'ashy' and 'herbaceous' attributes. (scielo.org.za)
  • The pyrolysis of lignin within natural wood can result in the emission of methoxyphenols such as guaiacol (2-methoxyphenol), syringol (2,6-dimethoxyphenol), and their derivatives, which are identified as the potential tracers for wood burning (Liu et al . (aaqr.org)
  • Phenol/Chloroform/Isoamyl Alcohol (25:24:1 Mixture, pH 6.7/8.0, Liq. (fishersci.com)
  • particularly if the phenol is mixed with chloroform (a commonly used mixture in molecular biology for DNA purification). (newworldencyclopedia.org)
  • The correct name of the method is guanidinium thiocyanate-phenol-chloroform extraction. (wikipedia.org)
  • Caution should be taken while using TRIzol (due to the phenol and chloroform). (wikipedia.org)
  • Chomczynski P, Sacchi N. Single-step method of RNA isolation by acid guanidinium thiocyanate-phenol-chloroform extraction. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ingestion of concentrated phenol can produce internal burns. (cdc.gov)
  • Ingestion of high concentrations of phenol has resulted in internal burns and death. (cdc.gov)
  • ingestion causes tissue burns. (downtoearth.org)
  • You may be exposed to phenol if you undergo "chemical peels" to remove skin lesions with phenol-containing products or are treated for chronic pain or spasticity with injections of phenol. (cdc.gov)
  • Deeper burns usually require subcutaneous injections of calcium gluconate. (medscape.com)
  • Injections of phenol have occasionally been used as a means of rapid execution . (newworldencyclopedia.org)
  • Phenol injections were given to thousands of people in concentration camps, especially at Auschwitz-Birkenau. (newworldencyclopedia.org)
  • Due to phenol's toxic chemical effect on the central nervous system leading to sudden collapse and loss of consciousness, phenol injections were used as a method of execution in the Third Reich during World War II. (greenmedinfo.com)
  • 9 Phenol injections were used in 1939 as part of Action T4, which was a program of forced euthanasia of those the state considered to be undesireable. (greenmedinfo.com)
  • Causes severe skin burns and eye damage. (alfa.com)
  • The central part of the dorsal skin of adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were burned with 90% (W/V) phenol solution for 2 min, and water , 75% ethanol , polyethylene glycol 400 (PEG400), and Diphoterine were applied for decontamination for 15 min. (bvsalud.org)
  • The changes in wounds were observed, and the depth of skin burns at 24 hours after treatment and changes in six indicators of organ injuries , i.e., serum levels of total bilirubin (TBil), creatinine (Crea), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), alanine aminotransferase (AST), creatine kinase (CK), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), at 6 hours after treatment were compared. (bvsalud.org)
  • This is a respiratory toxin for humans and can cause asthma and severe skin burns. (pioneerthinking.com)
  • It causes skin burns, kidney damage, and cyanosis in humans. (pioneerthinking.com)
  • may cause pulmonary edema and skin burns. (downtoearth.org)
  • AmeriGel® Wound Dressing is an FDA-approved, antimicrobial hydrogel indicated for stage I-IV pressure ulcers, venous stasis ulcers, diabetic skin ulcers, 1st and 2nd degree burns, post-surgical incisions with dehiscence, cuts and abrasions. (schoolhealth.com)
  • Stage I - IV pressure ulcers, venous stasis ulcers, diabetic skin ulcers, 1st and 2nd degree burns, post surgical incisions, cuts and abrasions. (schoolhealth.com)
  • Acids and Alkalis can damage the skin by burning it. (imperial.ac.uk)
  • Phenol is hazardous when comes into contact with the skin or eyes or is ingested or inhaled. (greenmedinfo.com)
  • Type VI skin rarely burns. (obagi.com)
  • Type VI skin never burns. (obagi.com)
  • Germolene Antiseptic Cream is a non-greasy, local anaesthetic used to ease pain and help prevent infections of minor cuts and grazes, minor burns, scalds, blisters, stings and insect bites, spots and chapped or rough skin. (naturesbest.co.uk)
  • Germolene Antiseptic Cream is a dual-action, non-greasy cream for the effective treatment of minor cuts and grazes, minor burns, scalds and blisters, stings and insect bites, spots and chapped or rough skin. (naturesbest.co.uk)
  • A chemical peel relies on a chemical solution -- either phenol or trichloroacetic acid (TCA) -- to smooth the texture of facial skin by removing its damaged outer layers. (bodyaesthetic.com)
  • A phenol peel produces dramatic improvement in the surface of the skin, with fewer lines and wrinkles and more even skin tone. (bodyaesthetic.com)
  • Since phenol sometimes lightens the treated areas, your natural skin pigmentation may be a determining factor as to whether a phenol peel is appropriate for you. (bodyaesthetic.com)
  • With a phenol peel, the new skin frequently loses its ability to make pigment (will not tan). (bodyaesthetic.com)
  • Even though TCA is milder than phenol, it may also produce some unintended color changes in the skin. (bodyaesthetic.com)
  • Phenol topical is used on the skin to help protect skin from infection in minor cuts, scrapes, or burns. (everydayhealth.com)
  • Phenol topical may be applied to the skin as needed. (everydayhealth.com)
  • Before using phenol topical on the skin, you may first apply a small amount of this medicine to make sure you won't have a skin reaction. (everydayhealth.com)
  • Do not use phenol topical in the mouth if you are using a form that is made for use only on the skin. (everydayhealth.com)
  • Some forms of phenol topical can stain skin and clothing. (everydayhealth.com)
  • Bleach does the trick to make our clothes sparkling white, but it is a strong corrosive that can also irritate or burn the skin and eyes. (howstuffworks.com)
  • Touch phenol and your skin may swell, burn, crack, and peel, or you may break out in hives. (howstuffworks.com)
  • The toxicity includes CNS depression and other symptoms such as skin burns, nausea, profuse sweating [ 1 ]. (biology-online.org)
  • Phenol can have beneficial effects when used medically as an antiseptic or anesthetic. (cdc.gov)
  • Phenol is used as a disinfectant and is found in a number of consumer products. (cdc.gov)
  • Phenols can also act as a disinfectant such as in household cleaning products, which can contribute these chemicals to municipal wastewater treatment facilities through household drains. (lsrca.on.ca)
  • Even the Environmental Protection Agency lists disinfectants that contain phenols as "corrosive and toxic. (sixwise.com)
  • For the group of chemicals containing a phenol group, see Phenols . (wikipedia.org)
  • BPA is one of a group of chemicals called phenols that are used in the manufacture of food containers, cans, plastic bottles, toys and some types of paper. (eurekalert.org)
  • She said: "Phenols are chemicals that we are continuously exposed to in our daily lives and BPA is the most commonly used phenol. (eurekalert.org)
  • 1 2 Over 3 billion pounds of phenol is produced annually in the United States, making it one of the "high volume" chemicals sold internationally. (greenmedinfo.com)
  • Phenols are among the highest-volume chemicals in production [ 3 ]. (biology-online.org)
  • The sodium salt of phenol, sodium phenoxide , is far more water-soluble. (wikipedia.org)
  • Meanwhile, though knockout of agrCA or agrD strongly repressed expression of phenol soluble modulin encoding genes psmα1-4 , psm β 1-2 and phenol soluble modulins (PSM) transporter encoding genes in the pmt operon, mutation of RNAIII enhanced expression of the genes. (frontiersin.org)
  • It is a mildly acidic, water-soluble chemical that requires safe handling due its ability to cause chemical burns. (greenmedinfo.com)
  • Phenols are highly soluble, and thus sorption to sediment or suspended particulates is not important in the distribution of phenols in aquatic systems. (lsrca.on.ca)
  • Phenol can be made from the partial oxidation of benzene or benzoic acid , by the cumene process, or by the Raschig process. (newworldencyclopedia.org)
  • Other major processes responsible for degradation of phenols in aquatic systems include photooxidation and oxidation (CCME, 1999b). (lsrca.on.ca)
  • Some animals that drank water with very high concentrations of phenol suffered muscle tremors and loss of coordination. (cdc.gov)
  • Because of its very high humidity levels (ranging from 25% to 60%), peat releases very little heat and thick, oily smoke when burnt, which allows the green malt to be partially dried, and in particular, infuses the malt with distinctive smoky qualities. (whisky.fr)
  • During the first ten hours of drying, the peat burns and infuses the moist green malt with its smoke. (whisky.fr)
  • The value used to determine the quantity of peat contained within the malt is phenol PPM (Parts per Million). (whisky.fr)
  • The intensity of aromas transmitted by the peat smoke depends on the quantity of peat used to dry the malt and the burning temperature. (whisky.fr)
  • Islay's smoky style comes from malting barley over burning peat , giving flavours known as phenols. (thewhiskyexchange.com)
  • Most famously is the Peat phenols of Islay Scotch . (homedistiller.org)
  • WS had high phenols contents due to the use of phenolic pesticides. (aaqr.org)
  • Phenol is a colorless-to-white solid when pure. (cdc.gov)
  • If contamination with metallic lithium, sodium, potassium, or magnesium has occurred, irrigation with water can result in a chemical reaction that causes burns to worsen. (medscape.com)
  • This is the well known exothermic reaction which takes place in the burning of charcoal. (wikipedia.org)
  • Reaction mass of phenol and. (europa.eu)
  • In carbon tetrachloride and alkane solvents phenol hydrogen bonds with a wide range of Lewis bases such as pyridine, diethyl ether, and diethyl sulfide. (wikipedia.org)
  • Pets, like humans, are negatively affected by the phenols, and can suffer from many of the same problems as humans including respiratory, liver and kidney problems. (sixwise.com)
  • Phenols are known to be 'endocrine disruptors', which means they can interfere with the hormone system and consequently alter many essential body functions, including the respiratory and immune systems. (eurekalert.org)
  • has anyone had a phenol peel completed? (acne.org)
  • Just had a phenol peel. (acne.org)
  • I believe Kit flew from Singapore to Israel to have the Exoderm Peel performed, which is a type of deep Phenol Peel. (acne.org)
  • Hi all, I just had the phenol peel performed by dr rullan on Tuesday. (acne.org)
  • A full-face phenol peel generally takes 1 or 2 hours. (bodyaesthetic.com)
  • In such cases, the deep phenol peel will be done in the operating room so cardiac function can be carefully monitored. (bodyaesthetic.com)
  • The results of a TCA peel are usually less dramatic than those of a phenol peel, but the recovery time is shorter. (bodyaesthetic.com)
  • You can buy OTC antiseptics to reduce the risk of infection in minor cuts, burns, and wounds. (healthline.com)
  • The antioxidant potency of 17β-estradiol and related polycyclic phenols has been well established. (mdpi.com)
  • 1983), the contamination of an artificial sediment by a coal-liquid consisting primarily of phenols found impairment to larvae growth and spawning of fathead minnows. (lsrca.on.ca)
  • Phenols primarily contribute bitterness and smokiness to a whisky's flavor. (homedistiller.org)
  • Phenol is highly reactive toward electrophilic aromatic substitution as the oxygen atom's pi electrons donate electron density into the ring. (wikipedia.org)
  • The word phenol is also used to refer to any compound which contains a six-membered aromatic ring, bonded directly to a hydroxyl group (-OH). (newworldencyclopedia.org)
  • Phenols, with at least one or more hydroxyl attached to the aromatic group, have unavoidable effects on environment and human health (Wang et al . (aaqr.org)
  • Phenol has been found in at least 595 of the 1,678 National Priority List (NPL) sites identified by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). (cdc.gov)
  • The membrane with the highest photocatalytic performance was obtained at 1.0 wt% of OGCN loading with 35.78% phenol degradation after 6 h. (mdpi.com)
  • Based on the findings, it can be concluded that the optimisation of the OGCN loading in the PES hybrid photocatalytic membrane indeed plays an important role towards enhancing the catalyst distribution, phenol degradation, and acceptable rejection above all considerations. (mdpi.com)
  • In support of the second explanation, the p K a of the enol of acetone in water is 10.9, making it only slightly less acidic than phenol (p K a 10.0). (wikipedia.org)
  • In making this conclusion, we cite the pK a of acetone enol, which is 10.9 (in comparison to phenol with a pK a of 10.0). (newworldencyclopedia.org)
  • In making this conclusion, one can examine the pK a of the enol of acetone , which is 10.9 in comparison to phenol with a pK a of 10.0. (wikidoc.org)
  • NIOSHTIC-2 search results on phenol - A searchable database of worker safety and health publications, documents, grant reports, and journal articles supported in whole or in part by NIOSH. (cdc.gov)
  • A recent in silico comparison of the gas phase acidities of the vinylogues of phenol and cyclohexanol in conformations that allow for or exclude resonance stabilization leads to the inference that about ​ 1 ⁄ 3 of the increased acidity of phenol is attributable to inductive effects, with resonance accounting for the remaining difference. (wikipedia.org)
  • Phenol was first extracted from coal tar , but today is produced on a large scale (about 7 billion kg/year) from petroleum . (wikipedia.org)
  • In its natural form, phenol was initially found in coal tar. (greenmedinfo.com)
  • Phenols are released to the atmosphere from combustion industries (such as coal-fired power production) and to water bodies as waste discharges from industrial facilities (such as pulp and paper mills). (lsrca.on.ca)
  • Industrial combustion can release phenols to the atmosphere, usually from waste incineration (Jay and Stieglitz, 1995) and coal-fired power production (Moreira dos Santos et al. (lsrca.on.ca)
  • It's a waste product that you get from burning coal or from oil. (wfae.org)
  • Is a by-product from burning coal for the production of electricity. (greenspec.co.uk)
  • It is mildly acidic and requires careful handling due to its propensity for causing chemical burns . (wikipedia.org)
  • Mildly acidic, it requires careful handling because it can cause chemical burns. (wikipedia.org)
  • Phenol in soil is likely to move to groundwater. (cdc.gov)
  • Phenols have been detected in groundwater after a spill (Lerner et al. (lsrca.on.ca)
  • 1 2 Manufactured phenol is used as a chemical intermediate to produce industrial commodities such as plastics (BPA) , nylon 6, synthetic fibers, detergents, herbicides, pharmaceutical drugs and vaccines. (greenmedinfo.com)
  • Phenols are a by-product of certain industrial activities and are used for the production of plastics, including nylon and other synthetic fibres. (lsrca.on.ca)
  • Phenol is used to make plastics. (cdc.gov)