Interpersonal Relations: The reciprocal interaction of two or more persons.Psychotherapy: A generic term for the treatment of mental illness or emotional disturbances primarily by verbal or nonverbal communication.Psychotherapeutic Processes: Experiential, attitudinal, emotional, or behavioral phenomena occurring during the course of treatment. They apply to the patient or therapist (i.e., nurse, doctor, etc.) individually or to their interaction. (American Psychological Association: Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994)Conflict (Psychology): The internal individual struggle resulting from incompatible or opposing needs, drives, or external and internal demands. In group interactions, competitive or opposing action of incompatibles: antagonistic state or action (as of divergent ideas, interests, or persons). (from Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, 10th ed)Personal Construct Theory: A psychological theory based on dimensions or categories used by a given person in describing or explaining the personality and behavior of others or of himself. The basic idea is that different people will use consistently different categories. The theory was formulated in the fifties by George Kelly. Two tests devised by him are the role construct repertory test and the repertory grid test. (From Stuart Sutherland, The International Dictionary of Psychology, 1989)Borderline Personality Disorder: A personality disorder marked by a pattern of instability of interpersonal relationships, self-image, and affects, and marked impulsivity beginning by early adulthood and present in a variety of contexts. (DSM-IV)Empathy: An individual's objective and insightful awareness of the feelings and behavior of another person. It should be distinguished from sympathy, which is usually nonobjective and noncritical. It includes caring, which is the demonstration of an awareness of and a concern for the good of others. (From Bioethics Thesaurus, 1992)Trust: Confidence in or reliance on a person or thing.Social Behavior: Any behavior caused by or affecting another individual, usually of the same species.Love: Affection; in psychiatry commonly refers to pleasure, particularly as it applies to gratifying experiences between individuals.Models, Psychological: Theoretical representations that simulate psychological processes and/or social processes. These include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Social Perception: The perceiving of attributes, characteristics, and behaviors of one's associates or social groups.Narcissism: A psychoanalytic term meaning self-love.Communication: The exchange or transmission of ideas, attitudes, or beliefs between individuals or groups.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Stress, Psychological: Stress wherein emotional factors predominate.Personality Disorders: A major deviation from normal patterns of behavior.Object Attachment: Emotional attachment to someone or something in the environment.Social Identification: The process by which an aspect of self image is developed based on in-group preference or ethnocentrism and a perception of belonging to a social or cultural group. (From APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed.)Self Concept: A person's view of himself.Life Change Events: Those occurrences, including social, psychological, and environmental, which require an adjustment or effect a change in an individual's pattern of living.Violence: Individual or group aggressive behavior which is socially non-acceptable, turbulent, and often destructive. It is precipitated by frustrations, hostility, prejudices, etc.Personality: Behavior-response patterns that characterize the individual.Social Support: Support systems that provide assistance and encouragement to individuals with physical or emotional disabilities in order that they may better cope. Informal social support is usually provided by friends, relatives, or peers, while formal assistance is provided by churches, groups, etc.Physician-Patient Relations: The interactions between physician and patient.Psychiatric Status Rating Scales: Standardized procedures utilizing rating scales or interview schedules carried out by health personnel for evaluating the degree of mental illness.Professional-Patient Relations: Interactions between health personnel and patients.Hostility: Tendency to feel anger toward and to seek to inflict harm upon a person or group.Personality Development: Growth of habitual patterns of behavior in childhood and adolescence.Social Adjustment: Adaptation of the person to the social environment. Adjustment may take place by adapting the self to the environment or by changing the environment. (From Campbell, Psychiatric Dictionary, 1996)Psychotherapy, Brief: Any form of psychotherapy designed to produce therapeutic change within a minimal amount of time, generally not more than 20 sessions.Mental Healing: The use of mind to cure disease, particularly physical illness.Patient Satisfaction: The degree to which the individual regards the health care service or product or the manner in which it is delivered by the provider as useful, effective, or beneficial.Depressive Disorder: An affective disorder manifested by either a dysphoric mood or loss of interest or pleasure in usual activities. The mood disturbance is prominent and relatively persistent.Personality Tests: Standardized objective tests designed to facilitate the evaluation of personality.Personality Assessment: The determination and evaluation of personality attributes by interviews, observations, tests, or scales. Articles concerning personality measurement are considered to be within scope of this term.Emotions: Those affective states which can be experienced and have arousing and motivational properties.Personality Inventory: Check list, usually to be filled out by a person about himself, consisting of many statements about personal characteristics which the subject checks.Friends: Persons whom one knows, likes, and trusts.Assertiveness: Strongly insistent, self-assured, and demanding behavior.Domestic Violence: Deliberate, often repetitive physical, verbal, and/or other types of abuse by one or more members against others of a household.Depressive Disorder, Major: Marked depression appearing in the involution period and characterized by hallucinations, delusions, paranoia, and agitation.Psychometrics: Assessment of psychological variables by the application of mathematical procedures.Depression: Depressive states usually of moderate intensity in contrast with major depression present in neurotic and psychotic disorders.Psychoanalytic Therapy: A form of psychiatric treatment, based on Freudian principles, which seeks to eliminate or diminish the undesirable effects of unconscious conflicts by making the patient aware of their existence, origin, and inappropriate expression in current emotions and behavior.Social Distance: The degree of closeness or acceptance an individual or group feels toward another individual or group.Projective Techniques: Techniques to reveal personality attributes by responses to relatively unstructured or ambiguous stimuli.Psychological Theory: Principles applied to the analysis and explanation of psychological or behavioral phenomena.Adaptation, Psychological: A state of harmony between internal needs and external demands and the processes used in achieving this condition. (From APA Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic: A class of traumatic stress disorders with symptoms that last more than one month. There are various forms of post-traumatic stress disorder, depending on the time of onset and the duration of these stress symptoms. In the acute form, the duration of the symptoms is between 1 to 3 months. In the chronic form, symptoms last more than 3 months. With delayed onset, symptoms develop more than 6 months after the traumatic event.Loneliness: The state of feeling sad or dejected as a result of lack of companionship or being separated from others.Sex Offenses: Any violation of established legal or moral codes in respect to sexual behavior.Social Environment: The aggregate of social and cultural institutions, forms, patterns, and processes that influence the life of an individual or community.Hospital-Patient Relations: Interactions between hospital staff or administrators and patients. Includes guest relations programs designed to improve the image of the hospital and attract patients.Continuity of Patient Care: Health care provided on a continuing basis from the initial contact, following the patient through all phases of medical care.Affect: The feeling-tone accompaniment of an idea or mental representation. It is the most direct psychic derivative of instinct and the psychic representative of the various bodily changes by means of which instincts manifest themselves.Psychotherapy, Group: A form of therapy in which two or more patients participate under the guidance of one or more psychotherapists for the purpose of treating emotional disturbances, social maladjustments, and psychotic states.Introversion (Psychology): A state in which attention is largely directed inward upon one's self.Crime Victims: Individuals subjected to and adversely affected by criminal activity. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994)Extraversion (Psychology): A state in which attention is largely directed outward from the self.Cognitive Therapy: A direct form of psychotherapy based on the interpretation of situations (cognitive structure of experiences) that determine how an individual feels and behaves. It is based on the premise that cognition, the process of acquiring knowledge and forming beliefs, is a primary determinant of mood and behavior. The therapy uses behavioral and verbal techniques to identify and correct negative thinking that is at the root of the aberrant behavior.Prejudice: A preconceived judgment made without factual basis.Family Relations: Behavioral, psychological, and social relations among various members of the nuclear family and the extended family.Dentist-Patient Relations: The psychological relations between the dentist and patient.Games, Experimental: Games designed to provide information on hypotheses, policies, procedures, or strategies.Stress Disorders, Traumatic: Anxiety disorders manifested by the development of characteristic symptoms following a psychologically traumatic event that is outside the normal range of usual human experience. Symptoms include re-experiencing the traumatic event, increased arousal, and numbing of responsiveness to or reduced involvement with the external world. Traumatic stress disorders can be further classified by the time of onset and the duration of these symptoms.Race Relations: Cultural contacts between people of different races.United StatesLongitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Mother-Child Relations: Interaction between a mother and child.Aggression: Behavior which may be manifested by destructive and attacking action which is verbal or physical, by covert attitudes of hostility or by obstructionism.Culture: A collective expression for all behavior patterns acquired and socially transmitted through symbols. Culture includes customs, traditions, and language.Defense Mechanisms: Unconscious process used by an individual or a group of individuals in order to cope with impulses, feelings or ideas which are not acceptable at their conscious level; various types include reaction formation, projection and self reversal.Self Report: Method for obtaining information through verbal responses, written or oral, from subjects.Qualitative Research: Any type of research that employs nonnumeric information to explore individual or group characteristics, producing findings not arrived at by statistical procedures or other quantitative means. (Qualitative Inquiry: A Dictionary of Terms Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 1997)Antisocial Personality Disorder: A personality disorder whose essential feature is a pervasive pattern of disregard for, and violation of, the rights of others that begins in childhood or early adolescence and continues into adulthood. The individual must be at least age 18 and must have a history of some symptoms of CONDUCT DISORDER before age 15. (From DSM-IV, 1994)Character: In current usage, approximately equivalent to personality. The sum of the relatively fixed personality traits and habitual modes of response of an individual.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Expressed Emotion: Frequency and quality of negative emotions, e.g., anger or hostility, expressed by family members or significant others, that often lead to a high relapse rate, especially in schizophrenic patients. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 7th ed)Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders: Categorical classification of MENTAL DISORDERS based on criteria sets with defining features. It is produced by the American Psychiatric Association. (DSM-IV, page xxii)Stereotyping: An oversimplified perception or conception especially of persons, social groups, etc.Family: A social group consisting of parents or parent substitutes and children.Grief: Normal, appropriate sorrowful response to an immediate cause. It is self-limiting and gradually subsides within a reasonable time.Clinical Competence: The capability to perform acceptably those duties directly related to patient care.Morale: The prevailing temper or spirit of an individual or group in relation to the tasks or functions which are expected.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Personal Satisfaction: The individual's experience of a sense of fulfillment of a need or want and the quality or state of being satisfied.Factor Analysis, Statistical: A set of statistical methods for analyzing the correlations among several variables in order to estimate the number of fundamental dimensions that underlie the observed data and to describe and measure those dimensions. It is used frequently in the development of scoring systems for rating scales and questionnaires.Peer Group: Group composed of associates of same species, approximately the same age, and usually of similar rank or social status.Rejection (Psychology): Non-acceptance, negative attitudes, hostility or excessive criticism of the individual which may precipitate feelings of rejection.Power (Psychology): The exertion of a strong influence or control over others in a variety of settings--administrative, social, academic, etc.Spouses: Married persons, i.e., husbands and wives, or partners. Domestic partners, or spousal equivalents, are two adults who have chosen to share their lives in an intimate and committed relationship, reside together, and share a mutual obligation of support for the basic necessities of life.Interview, Psychological: A directed conversation aimed at eliciting information for psychiatric diagnosis, evaluation, treatment planning, etc. The interview may be conducted by a social worker or psychologist.Spouse Abuse: Deliberate severe and repeated injury to one domestic partner by the other.Focus Groups: A method of data collection and a QUALITATIVE RESEARCH tool in which a small group of individuals are brought together and allowed to interact in a discussion of their opinions about topics, issues, or questions.Professional Competence: The capability to perform the duties of one's profession generally, or to perform a particular professional task, with skill of an acceptable quality.Binge-Eating Disorder: A disorder associated with three or more of the following: eating until feeling uncomfortably full; eating large amounts of food when not physically hungry; eating much more rapidly than normal; eating alone due to embarrassment; feeling of disgust, DEPRESSION, or guilt after overeating. Criteria includes occurrence on average, at least 2 days a week for 6 months. The binge eating is not associated with the regular use of inappropriate compensatory behavior (i.e. purging, excessive exercise, etc.) and does not co-occur exclusively with BULIMIA NERVOSA or ANOREXIA NERVOSA. (From DSM-IV, 1994)Bereavement: Refers to the whole process of grieving and mourning and is associated with a deep sense of loss and sadness.Homicide: The killing of one person by another.Gender Identity: A person's concept of self as being male and masculine or female and feminine, or ambivalent, based in part on physical characteristics, parental responses, and psychological and social pressures. It is the internal experience of gender role.Shame: An emotional attitude excited by realization of a shortcoming or impropriety.Obsessive Behavior: Persistent, unwanted idea or impulse which is considered normal when it does not markedly interfere with mental processes or emotional adjustment.Students: Individuals enrolled in a school or formal educational program.Facial Expression: Observable changes of expression in the face in response to emotional stimuli.Quality of Health Care: The levels of excellence which characterize the health service or health care provided based on accepted standards of quality.Wounds, Gunshot: Disruption of structural continuity of the body as a result of the discharge of firearms.Martial Arts: Activities in which participants learn self-defense mainly through the use of hand-to-hand combat. Judo involves throwing an opponent to the ground while karate (which includes kung fu and tae kwon do) involves kicking and punching an opponent.Schizotypal Personality Disorder: A personality disorder in which there are oddities of thought (magical thinking, paranoid ideation, suspiciousness), perception (illusions, depersonalization), speech (digressive, vague, overelaborate), and behavior (inappropriate affect in social interactions, frequently social isolation) that are not severe enough to characterize schizophrenia.Patient-Centered Care: Design of patient care wherein institutional resources and personnel are organized around patients rather than around specialized departments. (From Hospitals 1993 Feb 5;67(3):14)Family Conflict: Struggle or disagreement between parents, parent and child or other members of a family.Depression, Postpartum: Depression in POSTPARTUM WOMEN, usually within four weeks after giving birth (PARTURITION). The degree of depression ranges from mild transient depression to neurotic or psychotic depressive disorders. (From DSM-IV, p386)Sociometric Techniques: Methods for quantitatively assessing and measuring interpersonal and group relationships.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Rape: Unlawful sexual intercourse without consent of the victim.Mental Disorders: Psychiatric illness or diseases manifested by breakdowns in the adaptational process expressed primarily as abnormalities of thought, feeling, and behavior producing either distress or impairment of function.African Americans: Persons living in the United States having origins in any of the black groups of Africa.Aspirations (Psychology): Strong desires to accomplish something. This usually pertains to greater values or high ideals.Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Arousal: Cortical vigilance or readiness of tone, presumed to be in response to sensory stimulation via the reticular activating system.Anxiety: Feeling or emotion of dread, apprehension, and impending disaster but not disabling as with ANXIETY DISORDERS.Individuality: Those psychological characteristics which differentiate individuals from one another.Goals: The end-result or objective, which may be specified or required in advance.Psychological Tests: Standardized tests designed to measure abilities, as in intelligence, aptitude, and achievement tests, or to evaluate personality traits.Countertransference (Psychology): Conscious or unconscious emotional reaction of the therapist to the patient which may interfere with treatment. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed.)Marriage: The social institution involving legal and/or religious sanction whereby individuals are joined together.Suicide: The act of killing oneself.Health Communication: The transfer of information from experts in the medical and public health fields to patients and the public. The study and use of communication strategies to inform and influence individual and community decisions that enhance health.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Transference (Psychology): The unconscious transfer to others (including psychotherapists) of feelings and attitudes which were originally associated with important figures (parents, siblings, etc.) in one's early life.Anxiety Disorders: Persistent and disabling ANXIETY.Adolescent Behavior: Any observable response or action of an adolescent.Motivation: Those factors which cause an organism to behave or act in either a goal-seeking or satisfying manner. They may be influenced by physiological drives or by external stimuli.Anxiety, Separation: Anxiety experienced by an individual upon separation from a person or object of particular significance to the individual.Mothers: Female parents, human or animal.Identification (Psychology): A process by which an individual unconsciously endeavors to pattern himself after another. This process is also important in the development of the personality, particularly the superego or conscience, which is modeled largely on the behavior of adult significant others.Interprofessional Relations: The reciprocal interaction of two or more professional individuals.Psychology: The science dealing with the study of mental processes and behavior in man and animals.Nurse Administrators: Nurses professionally qualified in administration.Social Desirability: A personality trait rendering the individual acceptable in social or interpersonal relations. It is related to social acceptance, social approval, popularity, social status, leadership qualities, or any quality making him a socially desirable companion.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Algorithms: A procedure consisting of a sequence of algebraic formulas and/or logical steps to calculate or determine a given task.Role: The expected and characteristic pattern of behavior exhibited by an individual as a member of a particular social group.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Mood Disorders: Those disorders that have a disturbance in mood as their predominant feature.Parent-Child Relations: The interactions between parent and child.Child Abuse: Abuse of children in a family, institutional, or other setting. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994)Thinking: Mental activity, not predominantly perceptual, by which one apprehends some aspect of an object or situation based on past learning and experience.Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Ego: The conscious portion of the personality structure which serves to mediate between the demands of the primitive instinctual drives, (the id), of internalized parental and social prohibitions or the conscience, (the superego), and of reality.Cultural Diversity: Coexistence of numerous distinct ethnic, racial, religious, or cultural groups within one social unit, organization, or population. (From American Heritage Dictionary, 2d college ed., 1982, p955)Guilt: Subjective feeling of having committed an error, offense or sin; unpleasant feeling of self-criticism. These result from acts, impulses, or thoughts contrary to one's personal conscience.Substance-Related Disorders: Disorders related to substance abuse.Emotional Intelligence: The ability to understand and manage emotions and to use emotional knowledge to enhance thought and deal effectively with tasks. Components of emotional intelligence include empathy, self-motivation, self-awareness, self-regulation, and social skill. Emotional intelligence is a measurement of one's ability to socialize or relate to others.Internal-External Control: Personality construct referring to an individual's perception of the locus of events as determined internally by his or her own behavior versus fate, luck, or external forces. (ERIC Thesaurus, 1996).Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Cooperative Behavior: The interaction of two or more persons or organizations directed toward a common goal which is mutually beneficial. An act or instance of working or acting together for a common purpose or benefit, i.e., joint action. (From Random House Dictionary Unabridged, 2d ed)Internet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.Personal Space: Invisible boundaries surrounding the individual's body which are maintained in relation to others.Health Promotion: Encouraging consumer behaviors most likely to optimize health potentials (physical and psychosocial) through health information, preventive programs, and access to medical care.Attitude: An enduring, learned predisposition to behave in a consistent way toward a given class of objects, or a persistent mental and/or neural state of readiness to react to a certain class of objects, not as they are but as they are conceived to be.Schizophrenic Psychology: Study of mental processes and behavior of schizophrenics.Problem Solving: A learning situation involving more than one alternative from which a selection is made in order to attain a specific goal.Anger: A strong emotional feeling of displeasure aroused by being interfered with, injured or threatened.Mass Media: Instruments or technological means of communication that reach large numbers of people with a common message: press, radio, television, etc.Nonverbal Communication: Transmission of emotions, ideas, and attitudes between individuals in ways other than the spoken language.Social Isolation: The separation of individuals or groups resulting in the lack of or minimizing of social contact and/or communication. This separation may be accomplished by physical separation, by social barriers and by psychological mechanisms. In the latter, there may be interaction but no real communication.Bullying: Aggressive behavior intended to cause harm or distress. The behavior may be physical or verbal. There is typically an imbalance of power, strength, or status between the target and the aggressor.Primary Health Care: Care which provides integrated, accessible health care services by clinicians who are accountable for addressing a large majority of personal health care needs, developing a sustained partnership with patients, and practicing in the context of family and community. (JAMA 1995;273(3):192)Dominance-Subordination: Relationship between individuals when one individual threatens or becomes aggressive and the other individual remains passive or attempts to escape.Videotape Recording: Recording of visual and sometimes sound signals on magnetic tape.Happiness: Highly pleasant emotion characterized by outward manifestations of gratification; joy.Social Values: Abstract standards or empirical variables in social life which are believed to be important and/or desirable.Suicide, Attempted: The unsuccessful attempt to kill oneself.Juvenile Delinquency: The antisocial acts of children or persons under age which are illegal or lawfully interpreted as constituting delinquency.Elephantiasis: Hypertrophy and thickening of tissues from causes other than filarial infection, the latter being described as ELEPHANTIASIS, FILARIAL.Adolescent Psychology: Field of psychology concerned with the normal and abnormal behavior of adolescents. It includes mental processes as well as observable responses.Nurse-Patient Relations: Interaction between the patient and nurse.Mental Health: The state wherein the person is well adjusted.Somatotypes: Particular categories of body build, determined on the basis of certain physical characteristics. The three basic body types are ectomorph (thin physique), endomorph (rounded physique), and mesomorph (athletic physique).Imitative Behavior: The mimicking of the behavior of one individual by another.Psychoanalytic Interpretation: Utilization of Freudian theories to explain various psychologic aspects of art, literature, biographical material, etc.Universities: Educational institutions providing facilities for teaching and research and authorized to grant academic degrees.Health Services Accessibility: The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.Psychopathology: The study of significant causes and processes in the development of mental illness.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Attitude to Health: Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.Models, Statistical: Statistical formulations or analyses which, when applied to data and found to fit the data, are then used to verify the assumptions and parameters used in the analysis. Examples of statistical models are the linear model, binomial model, polynomial model, two-parameter model, etc.Battered Women: Women who are physically and mentally abused over an extended period, usually by a husband or other dominant male figure. Characteristics of the battered woman syndrome are helplessness, constant fear, and a perceived inability to escape. (From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 3d ed)Software: Sequential operating programs and data which instruct the functioning of a digital computer.Body Image: Individuals' concept of their own bodies.Self Efficacy: Cognitive mechanism based on expectations or beliefs about one's ability to perform actions necessary to produce a given effect. It is also a theoretical component of behavior change in various therapeutic treatments. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994)Alcoholism: A primary, chronic disease with genetic, psychosocial, and environmental factors influencing its development and manifestations. The disease is often progressive and fatal. It is characterized by impaired control over drinking, preoccupation with the drug alcohol, use of alcohol despite adverse consequences, and distortions in thinking, most notably denial. Each of these symptoms may be continuous or periodic. (Morse & Flavin for the Joint Commission of the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence and the American Society of Addiction Medicine to Study the Definition and Criteria for the Diagnosis of Alcoholism: in JAMA 1992;268:1012-4)Facial Injuries: General or unspecified injuries to the soft tissue or bony portions of the face.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Behavior: The observable response of a man or animal to a situation.Models, Theoretical: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of systems, processes, or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Dysthymic Disorder: Chronically depressed mood that occurs for most of the day more days than not for at least 2 years. The required minimum duration in children to make this diagnosis is 1 year. During periods of depressed mood, at least 2 of the following additional symptoms are present: poor appetite or overeating, insomnia or hypersomnia, low energy or fatigue, low self esteem, poor concentration or difficulty making decisions, and feelings of hopelessness. (DSM-IV)Family Practice: A medical specialty concerned with the provision of continuing, comprehensive primary health care for the entire family.Program Evaluation: Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.
The lie catcher must make an effort to consider the possibility that a sign of an emotion is not a clue to deceit but a clue to ... Interpersonal deception theory is the fundamental deception that can occur between two (or more) people face to face, and is ... Othello made the mistake of assuming that he understood the source of Desdemona's anguish. He assumed that his wife's sobs when ... The three differ in that falsification creates a fiction, concealment hides a secret, and equivocation dodges the issue, yet ...
Interpersonal Communication (3rd ed.). McGraw-Hill Education. p. 302. DeVito, J. A. (1993). Messages: Building Interpersonal ... Created by and named after communication scholar Mark L. Knapp, the model suggests that all of the steps should be done one at ... Sequencing makes forecasting adjacent stages easier. Skipping steps is risky due to potentially losing information that would ... There is usually a turning point that happens in this stage that signals a change in the relationship, making the relationship ...
Create and maintain goodwill. Inexpensive and convenient. Formal communication. Independent of interpersonal skills. Business ...
A framework is created whereby plans and decisions are made.. *Mid and lower-level management may add their own plans to the ... interpersonal: used to communicate, motivate, mentor and delegate. *diagnostic: ability to visualize appropriate responses to a ... This typically involves making a profit (for the shareholders), creating valued products at a reasonable cost (for customers), ... They also make decision and share ideas with top managers.. Lower[edit]. Lower managers include supervisors, section leaders, ...
Weinstein and Deutschberger (1964), and later McCall and Simmons (1966), built on this work by elaborating the interpersonal ... Swann, W. B., Jr., Milton, L. P., & Polzer, J. T. (2000). Should we create a niche or fall in line? Identity negotiation and ... Secord, P. E, & Backman, C. W. (1965). An interpersonal approach to personality. In B. Maher (Ed.), Progress in experimental ... Snyder, M., & Klein, O. (2005). Construing and constructing others: On the reality and the generality of the behavioral ...
This has made it difficult for some relationships to grow and or has created conflict because the expectation of attention has ... EVT does not fully account for the overwhelming prevalence of reciprocity that has been found in interpersonal interactions. ... Meaning, this will make for a more positive expectancy violation, in the workplace especially. EVT is also used as a framework ... Expectancy violations theory builds upon a number of communication axioms. EVT assumes that humans have two competing needs: A ...
He has made contributions to the scientific field of social and personal relationships. He attended Bristol Grammar School and ... Theory and Practice in Interpersonal Attraction. London: Academic Press, 1977. Duck, Steve. Personal Relationships and Personal ... becoming most closely associated with models of Interpersonal communication relationship dissolution and in particular with ... Constructs; A Study of Friendship Formation. London: J. Wiley, 1973. Alusine M. Kanu (29 December 2008). Reflections in ...
Making friends in cyberspace. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, Vol. 1, Issue 4. Pigg, K.E., Crank, L. D., 2004. ... Sociability, Interpersonal Relations, and the Internet. American Behavioral Scientist, Vol. 45, No. 3, pp. 420-435. Oxford ... The lower entrance barriers to the community have made it easier to be a part of many different communities. This goes hand in ... Since social capital is built of trust, rules, norms and networks, it can be said that the social capital of communities has ...
Burch, Michelle; Coleman, Michelle Burch (2004-08-01). Interpersonal Communication: Building Your Foundations for Success. ... An effort to build others' views of you. Desire not to hurt someone who is sharing experiences. Individuals who are pseudo- ... Instead of making eye contact, listeners might focus on the speaker's mustache or beard instead of actively listening. Facial ... This lack of self-confidence could lead to other distractions made by the speaker. While these physical flaws may lead to ...
Minihomepy addressed the desire for interpersonal communication. Minihomepies were easy to create and maintain. Minihomepies ... He wanted to create an Internet community that allowed people to form close relationships, rather than a community where people ... If the request is accepted, the ilchons can see the content of each other's minihomepy that are not made available to those who ... No significant change was made to the site after the union. As of 2011, Cyworld had over 25 million members. As Facebook began ...
Abdellah created a typology of twenty-one areas of focus for the nurse. These problems were divided into three classes: ... physical, sociological and emotional needs of the patient; the types of nurse-patient interpersonal relationships; and common ...
PI began with a focus on intra- and inter-personal contexts, but has been applicable in many contexts, including interpersonal ... Einhorn, H. J., & Hogarth, R. M. (1987). Decision making under ambiguity. In R. M. Hogarth & M. W. Reder (Eds.), Rational ... As mentioned above, Problematic Integration Theory is a type of communication theory that examines how we make meaning of ... In M. E. Roloff & G. R. Miller (Eds.), Interpersonal processes: New directions in communication research. Beverly Hills, CA: ...
Using small groups for class building will make the class stronger as a whole and give the classes a stronger understanding of ... Interpersonal and small group skills. In cooperative learning groups students are required to learn academic subject matter ( ... decision-making, trust-building, communication, and conflict-management skills. Teachers have to teach teamwork skills just as ... Positive interdependence creates a commitment to other people's success as well as one's own and is the basis of cooperative ...
... that human beings are able to make some interpersonal comparisons of utility because they share some common backgrounds, ... Sen proposes interpersonal utility comparisons based on a wide range of data. His theory is concerned with access to advantage ... Apologists of the interpersonal comparison of utility have argued that Robbins claimed too much. John Harsanyi agrees that full ... VI ____, 1938, "Interpersonal Comparisons of Utility: A Comment," Economic Journal, 43(4), 635-41 Amartya K. Sen, 1970 [1984], ...
To create the disconfirmation, after a few trials the experimenters paired a new outcome with a previous stimulus. When this is ... Miller, D. T., & Turnbull, W. (1986). Expectancies and interpersonal processes. Annual Review of Psychology, 37(1), 233-256.. ... The self-concept is often induced as well by creating a strong expectancy toward a certain outcome. For example, in Carlsmith ... A later study by Pyszcynski and Greenberg took a more direct approach by creating an expectancy in participants, either ...
"When I make plans, I am certain that I can make them work"). It could be argued that any development of a work self-efficacy ... Self-efficacy has also been studied as a moderator of sensitivity and interpersonal communication especially among young people ... While the debate on the value of a general self-efficacy construct goes on, there is also the question of whether there might ... When it comes to work, for example, there is interest in knowing what makes some workers more capable of adjusting to new work ...
Taking personal time for building interpersonal relationships.. History of travel. Travel dates back to antiquity where wealthy ...
... or regulating affective state during decision making." Hoarders had normal levels of activity in those regions when making ... Grisham Jessica R.; Steketee Gail; Frost Randy F. (2008). "Interpersonal problems and emotional intelligence in compulsive ... Develop decision-making skills. Declutter the home during in-home visits by a therapist or professional organizer. Gain and ... Facing their real issues may be too difficult for them, so they "create" a kind of "artificial" problem (in their case, ...
Any change usually makes some people better off while making others worse off, so these tests ask what would happen if the ... This function embodies value judgements about interpersonal utility. The social welfare function shows the relative importance ... This occurs when no consumer can be made better off without making others worse off. The marginal rate of transformation in ... a situation is optimal only if no individuals can be made better off without making someone else worse off. This ideal state of ...
The relevance and valence of disclosures were compared between disclosures made in the classroom and those made on Facebook and ... In L.A. Baxter & D.O. Braithwaite (Eds.), Engaging theories in interpersonal communication: Multiple perspectives (pp. 309-322 ... It is the responsibility of co-owners to decide and make clear if, when, and how information can or should be shared with ... When working to mutually create the boundary of privacy it is key for all parties to have a clear understanding of whether ...
Group members will attempt to make their in-group look better at the expense of the out-group, and similar group members will ... 2002). Capitalizing on Diversity: Interpersonal congruence in small workgroups. Administrative Science Quarterly, 47, 296-324. ... Jehn, K.A., Northcraft, G.B. and Neale, M.A. (1999). Why differences make a difference: A field study of diversity, conflict ... The information and decision-making theory predicts that availability of information due to diverse backgrounds will increase ...
After making a series of item-confidence judgments, if people try to estimate the number of items they got right, they do not ... "Egocentric interpretations of fairness and interpersonal conflict" (PDF). Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes ... Put another way, the error rate was 20% when subjects expected it to be 0%. In a series where subjects made true-or-false ... This phenomenon is most likely to occur on hard tasks, hard items, when failure is likely or when the individual making the ...
In the low-level condition, the experimenter's dialogue was concise (to the point of rudeness) and he even made a point of ... Sinclair, S., & Huntsinger, J. (2006). The interpersonal basis of self-stereotyping. In S. Levin and C. van Laar (Eds.), ... In addition, these shared ideas create a person's comprehension of their environment and world as a whole. Individuals believe ... To emphasize this action, the experimenter made a comment about not knowing why the other experimenters insisted on giving ...
... this construct is also influenced by interpersonal components. Because there is not a hard-and-fast rule for defining certain ... The broaden-and-build theory of PA suggests that PA broadens people's momentary thought-action repertoires and builds their ... Fredrickson, Barbara L. (March 2001). "The Role of Positive Emotions in Positive Psychology: The Broaden-and-Build Theory of ... Positive affectivity is a managerial and organizational behavior tool used to create positive environments in the workplace. ...
Simple Strategies to Help Your Child Make Friends. New York: Little, Brown. Selman, R. L. (1980). The Growth of Interpersonal ... "How children make friends (part 2)". Kennedy-Moore, E. (2012). "How children make friends (part 3)". Elman, N. M. & Kennedy- ... "Can we make ourselves happier?". BBC News. 1 July 2013. Brendgen, M.; Vitaro, F.; Bukowski, W. M.; Dionne, G.; Tremblay, R. E ... Williams, Alex (13 July 2012). "Friends of a Certain Age: Why Is It Hard To Make Friends Over 30?". The New York Times. ...
This dialogue frequently makes use of slang words invented by the author, as a substitute for words that were, in the 1970s, ... The Schrödinger's Cat Trilogy is a fictional story, with much interpersonal dialogue between characters. ... She makes the whole law system into three different laws: victimless crimes, which have no punishment; crimes against property ... In case a censorship case was brought against the book, Wilson made use of the names of Supreme Court Justices as "stand ins" ...
... create mentally unbearable condition, therefore the child is likely to mentally create a parent figure that will lead the ... has a pattern of troubled or/and unstable interpersonal relationships, low ability to attain intimacy ... Building some level of trust is possible with some patients, however its important to constantly reassure who is in the ... The gods punished him by making him fall in love with his own reflection in the pool. Narcissus pined away & became the flower ...
Did the Great Recession Create an (Interpersonal) Bond Crisis?. Our reserves of trust can be affected by economic conditions. ... In a speech made before the recession, Robert Putnam-the "bowling alone" guy-asked if a multi-ethnic society might see more " ... This finding could provide support for the general notion of "hunkering down," which makes sense in this context both for ... And when (or if) public assistance kicks in, thats "associated with a small increase of perceptions on interpersonal trust," ...
The short-term nature of IPT and its emphasis on loss and relationship makes it particularly suitable for interpersonal crises ... Interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) is one method of dealing with this suffering, and it is of particular relevance because it ...
Interpersonal Interpersonal Communication: Building Relationships Chapter 2 What is interpersonal What is interpersonal ... Interpersonal Interpersonal Communication: Building Relationships Chapter 2 What is interpersonal What is interpersonal ... Can control us as much as we control them Are constructed and maintained through communication Interpersonal Profiles ... psychological Interpersonal Communication is… Interpersonal Communication is… Referring to dyadic communication in which two ...
Building Interpersonal Relations in the Classroom outlines diverse strategies for making the teacher-student relationship a ... Building Interpersonal Relations in the Classroom outlines teacher behaviours and strategies that create productive and ... Strategies to make the teacher-student relationship a pathway to success. Go to the heart of effective teaching. ... enjoyable interpersonal relations with learners. Good relations foster better behaviour, more effort and improved performance; ...
Interpersonal Factors in the Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Voriconazole: Are CYP2C19 Genotypes Enough for Us to Make ... Title:Interpersonal Factors in the Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Voriconazole: Are CYP2C19 Genotypes Enough for Us ... Xuefeng Zhong, Xunliang Tong, Yang Ju, Xiaoman Du and Yanming Li*, "Interpersonal Factors in the Pharmacokinetics and ... CYP2C19 genotype represents the main part of the interpersonal variability related to voriconazole blood concentrations. Thus ...
Create the exceptional. No Limits.. ©. ... Interpersonal Violence Support. Drop in or call us if you need ... Interpersonal Violence Prevention and Support. Sexual assault and other forms of interpersonal violence are never the ... Report Interpersonal Violence. Its important to immediately report incidents of assault or other interpersonal violence ... We offer services for survivors and those who are helping to support a victim of interpersonal violence. ...
6. Social structure and decision-making in an MBA cohort. 7. The social networks of low and high self-monitors. 8. Centrality ... Interpersonal Networks in Organizations. Cognition, Personality, Dynamics, and Culture. £24.99. Part of Structural Analysis in ... By focusing a distinctive research lens on interpersonal networks, they attempt to discover the keys to the whole realm of ... This book brings a social networks perspective to bear on topics of leadership, decision-making, turnover, organizational ...
Read Comprehensive Guide to Interpersonal Psychotherapy now at Questia. ... Comprehensive Guide to Interpersonal Psychotherapy - 2000, Page x by Myrna M. Weissman, John C. Markowitz, Gerald L. Klerman. ... Creating Notes and Highlights. Select text, then choose a color or click Add note & highlight in the highlight menu. ... Comprehensive Guide to Interpersonal Psychotherapy. By Myrna M. Weissman; John C. Markowitz et al. , Go to book overview ...
Building Interpersonal Skills * {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/2\/23\/Live-with-Asperger%27s-Syndrome- ... Know that you dont need to make eye contact if it makes you uncomfortable. While most non-autistics like eye contact, it can ... Build upon your skills. *Being disabled doesnt make you a weak or lesser person-its just one aspect of who you are. You can ... It would make sense to read articles about listening, but it wouldnt make sense to push yourself to work too hard and risk ...
How to Be More Confident, Stop Fear and Social Anxiety Alpha Male Incorporated: Eliminate Fear, Build Confidence, Make More ... How to Be More Confident, Stop Fear and Social Anxiety Alpha Male Incorporated: Eliminate Fear, Build Confidence, Make More ... You can learn everything you can about how to make women want you and still fail to master the inner game of being a man who ... You can learn everything you can about how to make women want you and still fail to master the inner game of being a man who ...
Classroom built around discussion areas where you can engage with classmates and instructors. ... Build industry skills or earn continuing education credits in a variety of fields. ... Build skills or earn continuing education credits. Start Anytime. Most tutorials completed in a few hours. Quick self study on ... Interpersonal Communication (Self-Paced Tutorial) Details. Continuing Education. .ui-autocomplete { overflow-y: auto; text- ...
... but extraordinary teams happen only with intentional team building. Read on to find out more. ... Building a successful business requires a top-notch team, ... Interpersonal Relations. Colleagues do not need to be friends ... Team Building Will Benefit Your Business. Team building is something that has been scientifically shown to benefit a wide range ... But those individuals become a great team only when team building gives them opportunities to create a real and effective ...
THE IMPORTANCE OF INTERPERSONAL TRUST. Roger Mayer, North Carolina State University, discussed the components of trust and ... Based on feedback from you, our users, weve made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of ... Trustworthiness: Mayer stated that this construct comprises the set of characteristics of a trustee that makes the trustor ... Therefore, she said, building trust in every aspect of the intelligence analysis process is critical to generating the kind of ...
Interpersonal Skills Questionnaire (ISQ). Thousands of general practitioners, GP registrars, nurses and other health ... It is designed to give health professionals feedback on their interpersonal skills during consultation. ... professionals have benefited from the information provided by their Interpersonal Skills Questionnaire (ISQ) results. ISQ has ...
In the social realm, when we interactively coordinate our embodied sense-making, we participate in each others sense-making. ... the interactive coordination of embodied sense-making activities with others lets us participate in each others sense-making ( ... On this foundation, bridges can be built between autistic people and their often non-autistic context, and quality of life ... Applying the concepts of enaction to autism, I show:How embodiment and sense-making connect, i.e., how autistic particularities ...
How can we send the right signals in interpersonal and romantic relationships? ... Behaving to Build Trust and Attraction. Given the results above, we can now categorize many of the interpersonal techniques and ... Behaviors to Build Trust and Attraction. Sending the right signals in interpersonal and romantic relationships.. Posted Jun 30 ... To Build Trust: Use more indirect behaviors. Specifically, smile and make eye contact to let them know you are interested in ...
"Study participants would go out of their way to make clear that they were not judging other peoples choices," Romo says. ... Weight Loss Involves Overcoming Interpersonal Challenges. By Rick Nauert PhD Associate News Editor ... The study also uncovered strategies that people use to navigate interpersonal challenges related to losing weight and keeping ... The paper, "An Examination of How People Who Have Lost Weight Communicatively Negotiate Interpersonal Challenges to Weight ...
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Emotional Intelligence: Building Interpersonal Relationships. Through their co-curricular experience at Gettysburg, students ... Build strong interpersonal connections with students who are different from themselves (Connection) ... Be able to find a common ground and build rapport by managing relationships and building networks (Social Skill) ... Resolve conflicts among values that may arise in the decision making process in a way that recognizes and respects both ...
Interpersonal Communications. 9678 Conduct a formal meeting (level 5) View details ». Joinery Core Skills. 28227 Use tools and ... Furniture Making. 2216 Recognise and confirm furniture job specifications (level 2) View details » ... 21929 Make safety preparations for sailing a dinghy (level 2) View details » ... 2199 Use and maintain hand tools for furniture making (level 2) View details » ...
Although school climate has been assessed via interpersonal subsystems (i.e., student-student and student-teacher relationships ... Building a Bond: Longitudinal Relations between Interpersonal School Climate, Student Awareness and Reporting of Violence, and ... Although school climate has been assessed via interpersonal subsystems (i.e., student-student and student-teacher relationships ...
There are above given aspects that makes a bigger impact. Hence they should be given the equal priority as your technical ... Make sure it matches with the given time-limit. Prepare yourself to complete it half-an-hour before time as revising the work ... First thing that makes an impact, positive or negative, when you enter the office or conference room or the interview room. ... How to Create a Personal Development Plan for performance reviews. by Mohan Kumar. 14 ...
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Taking the time to get to know who your employees are will make them feel valued. This is not to say that every employee will ... forms of communication a manager will engage in on a daily basis is interpersonal communication. Interpersonal communication ... Types of Communication: Interpersonal, Non-Verbal, Written & Oral Related Study Materials. *Related ... Interpersonal communication can be described as communication between a small group of individuals, typically in a face-to-face ...
  • Intuitional predictions about trust behavior made by either researchers or research subjects themselves often turn out to be incorrect. (nap.edu)
  • Meanwhile, techniques used to mitigate discomfort tended to focus on making excuses for changes in behavior. (psychcentral.com)
  • Montoya, Kershaw, and Prosser (2018) note that making eye contact, smiling, laughter , and copying the behavior of others has this general effect. (psychologytoday.com)
  • Recent shifts in public health approaches to reduce and prevent obesity and chronic diseases expand the focus from individual- chronic disease encourage interventions to include multiple levels level behavior change interventions to multilevel interventions en- of the social ecological model. (cdc.gov)
  • Can Interpersonal Behavior Influence the Persistence and Adherence to Physical Exercise Practice in Adults? (frontiersin.org)
  • According to the literature, few studies have analyzed interpersonal thwarting behavior and the way this relates to basic psychological needs' frustration. (frontiersin.org)
  • Structured around descriptions of twenty-one of the most common situations that people encounter in everyday life, the authors aim to provide readers with the tools needed to understand how those situations influence interpersonal behavior. (fishpond.com.au)
  • Enaction defines cognition as sense-making: the way cognitive agents meaningfully connect with their world, based on their needs and goals as self-organizing, self-maintaining, embodied agents. (frontiersin.org)
  • The RAND Education Assessment Finder is a web-based tool that provides information about assessments of K-12 students' interpersonal, intrapersonal, and higher-order cognitive competencies. (rand.org)
  • Jointly developed with members of the Assessment Work Group, this document provides practical guidance for practitioners who are interested in using student assessments of interpersonal, intrapersonal, and higher-order cognitive competencies to guide their practice. (rand.org)
  • The RAND Education Assessment Finder includes measures of interpersonal (i.e., social), intrapersonal (i.e., emotional), and higher-order cognitive competencies, whereas the AWG SEL Assessment Guide includes only the first two of those three categories. (rand.org)
  • Validated instruments assessed faith communities' evidence supports the effectiveness of faith-based health promo- policies and environments and participants' interpersonal and indi- tion initiatives (5-8). (cdc.gov)
  • The Insights System is built around the model of personality first identified by the Swiss psychologist Carl Gustav Jung. (issuu.com)
  • The proposal is based on the enactive approach to cognition, which uses the notion of sense-making to define cognition as the meaningful way in which an agent connects with her world. (frontiersin.org)
  • The paper, "An Examination of How People Who Have Lost Weight Communicatively Negotiate Interpersonal Challenges to Weight Management," is in press in the journal Health Communication . (psychcentral.com)
  • I try to get across the basic idea that there is not something called 'depression' or 'major depressive disorder' or 'depressive illness' inside people that causes them to feel depressed - the mistake that so many mental health professionals, encouraged by big pharma reps, seem to make. (madinamerica.com)
  • Mental health nursing is a highly rewarding career where you can make a real difference. (kingston.ac.uk)
  • AMA President Barbara L. McAneny, MD, says the AMA is fighting the forces that make the U.S. health system so dysfunctional. (ama-assn.org)
  • This training curriculum for tuberculosis (TB) health care workers in Ukraine introduces principles of interpersonal communication and counselling of clients on TB and HIV. (comminit.com)
  • Recognising the potential interpersonal impact of IBS and referring patients to appropriate services where necessary could improve patient health outcomes as well as the doc-tor-patient relationship. (racgp.org.au)
  • With an aging population - one that represents a major public health challenge in the twenty-first century - Carey Candrian argues that examining the care we provide for individuals, especially aging individuals, is fundamental to creating a developed, ethical, and engaged society. (peterlang.com)
  • It does not provide formal guidelines or recommendations for making health care decisions. (oncolink.org)
  • Currently, there is little evidence for how effective interprofessional teamwork happens and little is known about how to create high-functioning teams in the primary health care setting. (cambridge.org)
  • Consultation to assist in the recognition of mental health concerns of residents and fellows and, if necessary, in making decisions about how best to address the situation. (stanford.edu)
  • Organizations that make an effort to reconcile the differences and emphasize the similarities among the various generations will be rewarded with intergenerational harmony and increased productivity. (baselinemag.com)
  • While all five of these methods are common methods of testing intensification efforts, it's important to note that endurance, separation, and triangle tests are generally the least constructive, and can even be destructive when it comes to building the relationship. (wikipedia.org)
  • The language used to talk about death holds consequences and opportunities for understanding and making decisions about care practices. (peterlang.com)
  • This chapter explores using the learning partnerships model in the classroom to engage in the development of how one makes meaning, so as to develop critical thinking. (igi-global.com)
  • Of course I go on to talk about the various factors that make one person only a bit depressed and another very depressed after the same depressing thing has happened. (madinamerica.com)
  • To identify the limits and parameters of current knowledge in a variety of Gastrointestinal and Hepatic disorders, in order to make informed recommendations about prevention, diagnostic and therapeutic options to patients based on available scientific evidence. (rochester.edu)
  • To make informed recommendations about prevention, diagnostic and therapeutic options to patients based on available scientific evidence. (rochester.edu)
  • Tapping the power of community building assets to strengthen substance abuse prevention. (springer.com)
  • This includes operational quality management to assure appropriate quality of the finished products manufactured within the value stream, adherence to any applicable CSL standards and procedures, review and approval of related records, support and approval of quality risk assessments, non-conformances, investigations, CAPAs, and change controls, and monitoring and continuous improvement of quality performance metrics. (biospace.com)
  • To provide counsellors with an increased understanding of the concept of resiliency as well as to encourage the application of resiliency to practice, a visual model is provided from which counsellors can organize 'resiliency' as a construct. (springer.com)
  • Thank you to our community and to all of our readers who are working to aid others in this time of crisis, and to all of those who are making personal sacrifices for the good of their communities. (wikihow.com)
  • Beauty therapists use a variety of face and body treatments and techniques to make their clients feel good and look their best. (coursesforsuccess.com.au)
  • Don't melt down yourself when the stress builds up. (hubpages.com)
  • Although families may be able to adapt, build resilience, and develop greater emotional growth and togetherness as a result of the disability, they may also experience an on-going stress as they move through the life cycles of their own development and that of their child (DeMarie & LeRoux, 2002). (ncset.org)
  • In addition, the authors thank the support of the Generalitat de Catalunya Research Group, GRUP DE RECERCA I INNOVACIÓ EN DISSENYS (GRID). (springer.com)
  • The SIM New Brunswick Award was created to support students, from New Brunswick, who are pursuing the MLIS or combined degree at Dalhousie University. (dal.ca)
  • A solid research base and an appendix on research techniques make this book suitable for a graduate studies course. (indigo.ca)