Brucellaceae: A family of gram-negative coccoid to rod-shaped bacteria in the order Rhizobiales. They are obligate parasites chiefly of warm-blooded VERTEBRATES. Many are pathogenic.Ochrobactrum: A genus of the family BRUCELLACEAE comprising obligately aerobic gram-negative rods with parallel sides and rounded ends.Brucella melitensis: A species of the genus BRUCELLA whose natural hosts are sheep and goats. Other mammals, including humans, may be infected. In general, these organisms tend to be more virulent for laboratory animals than BRUCELLA ABORTUS and may cause fatal infections.Brucella: A genus of gram-negative, aerobic bacteria that causes BRUCELLOSIS. Its cells are nonmotile coccobacilli and are animal parasites and pathogens. The bacterium is transmissible to humans through contact with infected dairy products or tissue.Brucellosis: Infection caused by bacteria of the genus BRUCELLA mainly involving the MONONUCLEAR PHAGOCYTE SYSTEM. This condition is characterized by fever, weakness, malaise, and weight loss.Brucella abortus: A species of the genus BRUCELLA whose natural hosts are cattle and other bovidae. Abortion and placentitis are frequently produced in the pregnant animal. Other mammals, including humans, may be infected.Databases, Protein: Databases containing information about PROTEINS such as AMINO ACID SEQUENCE; PROTEIN CONFORMATION; and other properties.Western Australia: A state in western Australia. Its capital is Perth. It was first visited by the Dutch in 1616 but the English took possession in 1791 and permanent colonization began in 1829. It was a penal settlement 1850-1888, became part of the colonial government in 1886, and was granted self government in 1890. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p1329)Australia: The smallest continent and an independent country, comprising six states and two territories. Its capital is Canberra.Directories as Topic: Lists of persons or organizations, systematically arranged, usually in alphabetic or classed order, giving address, affiliations, etc., for individuals, and giving address, officers, functions, and similar data for organizations. (ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Santalaceae: A plant family of the order Santalales, subclass Rosidae, class Magnoliopsida. They are parasites that form connections (haustoria) to their hosts to obtain water and nutrients. The one-seeded fruit may be surrounded by a brightly colored nut-like structure.MiningCommitment of Mentally Ill: Legal process required for the institutionalization of a patient with severe mental problems.Oceanic Ancestry Group: Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the islands of the central and South Pacific, including Micronesia, Melanesia, Polynesia, and traditionally Australasia.Lymphogranuloma Venereum: Subacute inflammation of the inguinal lymph glands caused by certain immunotypes of CHLAMYDIA TRACHOMATIS. It is a sexually transmitted disease in the U.S. but is more widespread in developing countries. It is distinguished from granuloma venereum (see GRANULOMA INGUINALE), which is caused by Calymmatobacterium granulomatis.Chlamydia trachomatis: Type species of CHLAMYDIA causing a variety of ocular and urogenital diseases.Chlamydia Infections: Infections with bacteria of the genus CHLAMYDIA.Trachoma: A chronic infection of the CONJUNCTIVA and CORNEA caused by CHLAMYDIA TRACHOMATIS.Proctitis: INFLAMMATION of the MUCOUS MEMBRANE of the RECTUM, the distal end of the large intestine (INTESTINE, LARGE).Chlamydia: A genus of the family CHLAMYDIACEAE whose species cause a variety of diseases in vertebrates including humans, mice, and swine. Chlamydia species are gram-negative and produce glycogen. The type species is CHLAMYDIA TRACHOMATIS.Gonorrhea: Acute infectious disease characterized by primary invasion of the urogenital tract. The etiologic agent, NEISSERIA GONORRHOEAE, was isolated by Neisser in 1879.Bacteria: One of the three domains of life (the others being Eukarya and ARCHAEA), also called Eubacteria. They are unicellular prokaryotic microorganisms which generally possess rigid cell walls, multiply by cell division, and exhibit three principal forms: round or coccal, rodlike or bacillary, and spiral or spirochetal. Bacteria can be classified by their response to OXYGEN: aerobic, anaerobic, or facultatively anaerobic; by the mode by which they obtain their energy: chemotrophy (via chemical reaction) or PHOTOTROPHY (via light reaction); for chemotrophs by their source of chemical energy: CHEMOLITHOTROPHY (from inorganic compounds) or chemoorganotrophy (from organic compounds); and by their source for CARBON; NITROGEN; etc.; HETEROTROPHY (from organic sources) or AUTOTROPHY (from CARBON DIOXIDE). They can also be classified by whether or not they stain (based on the structure of their CELL WALLS) with CRYSTAL VIOLET dye: gram-negative or gram-positive.Click Chemistry: Organic chemistry methodology that mimics the modular nature of various biosynthetic processes. It uses highly reliable and selective reactions designed to "click" i.e., rapidly join small modular units together in high yield, without offensive byproducts. In combination with COMBINATORIAL CHEMISTRY TECHNIQUES, it is used for the synthesis of new compounds and combinatorial libraries.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.RNA, Ribosomal, 16S: Constituent of 30S subunit prokaryotic ribosomes containing 1600 nucleotides and 21 proteins. 16S rRNA is involved in initiation of polypeptide synthesis.DNA, Ribosomal: DNA sequences encoding RIBOSOMAL RNA and the segments of DNA separating the individual ribosomal RNA genes, referred to as RIBOSOMAL SPACER DNA.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Reagent Kits, Diagnostic: Commercially prepared reagent sets, with accessory devices, containing all of the major components and literature necessary to perform one or more designated diagnostic tests or procedures. They may be for laboratory or personal use.Brucella canis: A species of gram-negative bacteria infecting DOGS, the natural hosts, and causing canine BRUCELLOSIS. It can also cause a mild infection in humans.National Library of Medicine (U.S.): An agency of the NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH concerned with overall planning, promoting, and administering programs pertaining to advancement of medical and related sciences. Major activities of this institute include the collection, dissemination, and exchange of information important to the progress of medicine and health, research in medical informatics and support for medical library development.Brucella Vaccine: A bacterial vaccine for the prevention of brucellosis in man and animal. Brucella abortus vaccine is used for the immunization of cattle, sheep, and goats.Malta: An independent state consisting of three islands in the Mediterranean Sea, south of Sicily. Its capital is Valetta. The major island is Malta, the two smaller islands are Comino and Gozo. It was a Phoenician and Carthaginian colony, captured by the Romans in 218 B.C. It was overrun by Saracens in 870, taken by the Normans in 1090, and subsequently held by the French and later the British who allotted them a dominion government in 1921. It became a crown colony in 1933, achieving independence in 1964. The name possibly comes from a pre-Indoeuropean root mel, high, referring to its rocks, but a more picturesque origin derives the name from the Greek melitta or melissa, honey, with reference to its early fame for its honey production. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p719 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p330)Northern IrelandEncyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Military Medicine: The practice of medicine as applied to special circumstances associated with military operations.Hospitals, Military: Hospitals which provide care for the military personnel and usually for their dependents.African Horse Sickness: An insect-borne reovirus infection of horses, mules and donkeys in Africa and the Middle East; characterized by pulmonary edema, cardiac involvement, and edema of the head and neck.African horse sickness virus: A species of ORBIVIRUS that causes disease in horses, mules, and donkeys. Via its principal vector CULICOIDES, it can also infect dogs, elephants, camels, cattle, sheep, goats, and, in special circumstances, humans.Alphaproteobacteria: A class in the phylum PROTEOBACTERIA comprised mostly of two major phenotypes: purple non-sulfur bacteria and aerobic bacteriochlorophyll-containing bacteria.Access to Information: Individual's rights to obtain and use information collected or generated by others.Journal Impact Factor: A quantitative measure of the frequency on average with which articles in a journal have been cited in a given period of time.Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.Peer Review, Research: The evaluation by experts of the quality and pertinence of research or research proposals of other experts in the same field. Peer review is used by editors in deciding which submissions warrant publication, by granting agencies to determine which proposals should be funded, and by academic institutions in tenure decisions.Publishing: "The business or profession of the commercial production and issuance of literature" (Webster's 3d). It includes the publisher, publication processes, editing and editors. Production may be by conventional printing methods or by electronic publishing.AT Rich Sequence: A nucleic acid sequence that contains an above average number of ADENINE and THYMINE bases.Scrub Typhus: An acute infectious disease caused by ORIENTIA TSUTSUGAMUSHI. It is limited to eastern and southeastern Asia, India, northern Australia, and the adjacent islands. Characteristics include the formation of a primary cutaneous lesion at the site of the bite of an infected mite, fever lasting about two weeks, and a maculopapular rash.Typhus, Endemic Flea-Borne: An infectious disease clinically similar to epidemic louse-borne typhus (TYPHUS, EPIDEMIC LOUSE-BORNE), but caused by RICKETTSIA TYPHI, which is transmitted from rat to man by the rat flea, XENOPSYLLA CHEOPIS.Typhus, Epidemic Louse-Borne: The classic form of typhus, caused by RICKETTSIA PROWAZEKII, which is transmitted from man to man by the louse Pediculus humanus corporis. This disease is characterized by the sudden onset of intense headache, malaise, and generalized myalgia followed by the formation of a macular skin eruption and vascular and neurologic disturbances.Orientia tsutsugamushi: A gram-negative, rod-shaped to coccoid bacterium. It is the etiologic agent of SCRUB TYPHUS in humans and is transmitted by mites from rodent reservoirs.Rickettsia typhi: The etiologic agent of murine typhus (see TYPHUS, ENDEMIC FLEA-BORNE).Rickettsia prowazekii: A species of gram-negative, aerobic bacteria that is the etiologic agent of epidemic typhus fever acquired through contact with lice (TYPHUS, EPIDEMIC LOUSE-BORNE) as well as Brill's disease.

Description of Pseudochrobactrum kiredjianiae sp. nov. (1/9)

A Gram-negative, rod-shaped, oxidase-positive, non-spore-forming, non-motile bacterium (strain CCUG 49584(T)), isolated from a seafood processing plant sample in New Zealand, was subjected to a polyphasic taxonomic study. On the basis of 16S rRNA and recA gene sequence similarities, the isolate was allocated to the genus Pseudochrobactrum. This was confirmed by fatty acid data (major fatty acids: C(18 : 1)omega7c and C(19 : 0) cyclo omega8c), a polar lipid profile exhibiting major characteristics of Pseudochrobactrum (phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylmonomethylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine), quinone system Q-10 and a polyamine pattern with the predominant compounds spermidine and putrescine. DNA-DNA hybridization with the type strains of the two established species of Pseudochrobactrum and physiological and biochemical data clearly differentiated the isolate from established Pseudochrobactrum species. As a consequence, this organism represents a novel species, for which the name Pseudochrobactrum kiredjianiae sp. nov. is proposed, with the type strain CCUG 49584(T) (=CIP 109227(T)).  (+info)

Brevundimonas lenta sp. nov., isolated from soil. (2/9)

A Gram-negative, rod-shaped, Brevundimonas-like bacterial strain, DS-18(T), was isolated from soil in Dokdo, Korea, and its exact taxonomic position was investigated by using a polyphasic approach. Strain DS-18(T) grew optimally at pH 6.5-7.0 and 25 degrees C without NaCl. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain DS-18(T) belonged to the genus Brevundimonas. Strain DS-18(T) contained Q-10 as the predominant ubiquinone and C(18 : 1)omega7c and C(16 : 0) as the major fatty acids. The DNA G+C content was 68.7 mol%. Strain DS-18(T) exhibited levels of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity of 96.3-98.7 % to the type strains of Brevundimonas species and Mycoplana bullata. Mean DNA-DNA relatedness values between strain DS-18(T) and the type strains of phylogenetically related Brevundimonas species and M. bullata were in the range 15-32 %. Strain DS-18(T) differed from Brevundimonas species and M. bullata in several phenotypic characteristics. On the basis of phenotypic, phylogenetic and genetic data, strain DS-18(T) represents a novel species of the genus Brevundimonas, for which the name Brevundimonas lenta sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is DS-18(T) (=KCTC 12871(T) =JCM 14602(T)).  (+info)

Daeguia caeni gen. nov., sp. nov., isolated from sludge of a textile dye works. (3/9)

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Pseudochrobactrum glaciei sp. nov., isolated from sea ice collected from Peter the Great Bay of the Sea of Japan. (4/9)

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Pseudochrobactrum lubricantis sp. nov., isolated from a metal-working fluid. (5/9)

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Brevundimonas naejangsanensis sp. nov., a proteolytic bacterium isolated from soil, and reclassification of Mycoplana bullata into the genus Brevundimonas as Brevundimonas bullata comb. nov. (6/9)

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Paenochrobactrum gallinarii gen. nov., sp. nov., isolated from air of a duck barn, and reclassification of Pseudochrobactrum glaciei as Paenochrobactrum glaciei comb. nov. (7/9)

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Cr(VI) resistance and removal by indigenous bacteria isolated from chromium-contaminated soil. (8/9)

The removal of toxic Cr(VI) by microorganisms is a promising approach for Cr(VI) pollution remediation. In the present study, four indigenous bacteria, named LY1, LY2, LY6, and LY7, were isolated from Cr(VI)-contaminated soil. Among the four Cr(VI)-resistant isolates, strain LY6 displayed the highest Cr(VI)-removing ability, with 100 mg/l Cr(VI) being completely removed within 144 h. It could effectively remove Cr(VI) over a wide pH range from 5.5 to 9.5, with the optimal pH of 8.5. The amount of Cr(VI) removed increased with initial Cr(VI) concentration. Data from the time-course analysis of Cr(VI) removal by strain LY6 followed first-order kinetics. Based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence, strain LY6 was identified as Pseudochrobactrum asaccharolyticum, a species that had never been reported for Cr(VI) removal before. Transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis further confirmed that strain LY6 could accumulate chromium within the cell while conducting Cr(VI) removal. The results suggested that the indigenous bacterial strain LY6 would be a new candidate for potential application in Cr(VI) pollution bioremediation.  (+info)

DOVER - The Great Bay Municipal Coalition intends to file a motion of reconsideration after Merrimack County Superior Court declined to issue judgment last week on whether the state Department of Environmental Services was required to follow the New Hampshire Administrative Rulemaking procedures in developing and imposing nutrient criteria for the Great Bay estuary.This case began when the Great Bay Municipal Coalition, comprising Dover, Portsmouth, Rochester, Exeter and Newmarket, said
DOVER - The Great Bay Municipal Coalition officially filed a motion for reconsideration after a judges recent ruling declining to determine if the state Department of Environmental Services was required to follow the New Hampshire Administrative Rulemaking procedures in developing and imposing nutrient criteria for the Great Bay Estuary.
A metal-working water or a metal-working composition which has excellent cooling and lubricating properties and does not exert a harmful influence on the environment. A metal-working water containing sodium ion and one or more kinds selected from the group consisting of fluoride ion, hydrogencarbonate ion and silicon and being adjusted to pH 6.0 to pH 10 can be used as a substitute for a conventional cutting oil. A metal-working composition including a metal-working water with such additive as a rust-preventive agent and being adjusted to pH 6.0 to pH 10 can also be used.
I just arrived at the 4th Annual Lamprey River Symposium at the University of New Hampshire. Stay tuned on Twitter for updates about the latest research on the ecological health of the Lamprey River and its watershed. Update - 10:00 AM Phil Trowbridge is discussing a new NHDES report on nitrogen pollution in the Great Bay…
Learn about Great Bay Community College public health major degree requirements. Qualifications for nursing programs vary widely. Learn about the various medical specializations available within technical training programs.
Learn about Great Bay Community College nursing application. There are accredited nursing certificate programs that can help launch your career, performing a variety of medical services within a hospital setting.
PORTSMOUTH - A Marine who lost his right leg in Afghanistan is charting a new course that is inspiring teachers and officials at Great Bay Community College.
Advanced manufacturing is part of the states largest industry sector, making up 19% of New Hampshires economy. The economic impact of jobs in advanced manufacturing far exceeds that of jobs in other industries. The Advanced Composites Manufacturing program at Great Bay prepares participants with skills and knowledge required for jobs in the high growth fields of composites manufacturing and aerospace. The program is offered at the Colleges Advanced Technology & Academic Center in Rochester, NH. Introductory courses provide opportunities for students to experience working in a modern, clean, hands-on training lab while learning and applying skills critical for success. In addition to a mechanical aptitude, students interested in the program should have keen attention to detail and demonstrate a desire for quality. They must also enjoy learning in a hands-on way and working as part of a team. The program consists of two levels and can be completed in 6 months. The introductory level is designed ...
Salary $230,000 with Comprehensive Benefit and Retirement Programs, PTO, CME credits This is direct hire role. In this position, you will e...
The Brevundimonas are a genus of proteobacteria. They are Gram-negative, non-fermenting, aerobic bacilli. The Brevundimonas species are ubiquitous in the environment but are rarely isolated from clinical samples. Two species of Brevundimonas originally classified under the genus Pseudomonas have been re-classified by Seger et al. as Brevundimonas vesicularis and Brevundimonas diminuta. The name Brevundimonas derives from: Latin adjective brevis, short; Latin feminine gender noun unda, a wave; Latin feminine gender noun monas (μονάς / μονάδα), nominally meaning "a unit", but in effect meaning a bacterium; New Latin feminine gender noun Brevundimonas, bacteria with short wavelength flagella. Members of the genus Brevundimonas can be referred to as brevundimonad (viz. Trivialisation of names). Brevundimonas is one of few bacteria showing high survival rates under simulated Martian conditions. Results from one of these experimental irradiation experiments, combined with previous radiation ...
Article Functional diversity and dynamics of bacterial communities in a membrane bioreactor for the treatment of metal-working fluid wastewater. An extensive microbiological study has been carried out in a membrane bioreactor fed with activated sludg...
During a study of bacterial diversity of soil, a novel strain, CA-15 , was isolated from Kyonggi University forest soil. Cells were aerobic, Gram-stain-negative, motile, non-spore-forming, rod-shaped, oxidase-positive and catalase- negative. Tyrosine was not oxidized but produced red pigmentation on an agar palte. Strain CA-15 hydrolysed Tween 60 and DNA. It grew at 15-35 C (optimum, 25-30 C), pH 6.0-10.0 (optimum, 7.0-9.0) and at 1.5 % (w/v) NaCl concentration. Phylogenetic analysis based on its 16S rRNA gene sequence indicated that strain CA-15 formed a lineage within the family Caulobacteraceae of the class Alphaproteobacteria that was distinct from various species of the genus Brevundimonas. Brevundimonas bullata DSM 7126 was the closest member of strain CA-15 on the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity (98.48 %). Q-10 was only an isoprenoid quinone detected for strain CA-15 . The major polar lipids were 1,2-di-O-acyl-3-O-[d-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)-αd-glucopyranuronosyl]glycerol, ...
Understanding the dynamics of coastal marine communities represents a substantial challenge, and one that is actively pursued globally. Within the United States, several sites have been designated as National Estuarine Research Reserves (NERR) with the idea that concentrated research at these sites will lead to greater understanding of the ecosystem. The Great Bay Estuary of New Hampshire is one of these sites. A wide spectrum of research is conducted within the Great Bay, and substantial financial support is committed to that research on an annual basis. To facilitate the success of these research efforts, it is particularly important to develop a working understanding of the dynamics of marine communities within the Great Bay. Invertebrate communities within the Bay and at other coastal sites are largely composed of open populations whose growth and maintenance depend on settlement of new recruits that may arrive from distant source populations. Larval monitoring programs designed to survey these
Preliminary results from light attenuation sensors on the Great Bay buoy and hyper-spectral imagery of Great Bay. Ru Morrison, UNH Phil Trowbridge, NH DES Tom Gregory, UNH Mike Novak, UNH. 2006. 2007. Discharge ft 3 /s. Great Bay Coastal Buoy Climatology Visualization. Salinity (psu). Slideshow 3206888 by cecily
News from the Strafford Regional Planning Commisison E-Bulletin: The Third Annual Lamprey River Symposium on Friday, January 8, 2010 is just a few weeks away. The all day event will be held at UNH in the MUB room 334/336. Anyone who would like to share their research on water quality, hydrology, water resource issues and management of the…
Thanks to its numerous shops, cafés and hotels, Philipsburg is one of the liveliest places on the island of Saint Martin. Giant cruise ships and luxury yachts cast anchor in the azure blue bay which was discovered in 1493 by Columbus, even though Indians already lived here. Philipsburg is the capital of the Dutch part of the island and is located on the beautiful white sandy beach of Great Bay.
A collaboration between Great Bay Community College and the Seacoast School of Technology in Exeter will soon start to help fill a void in the workforce.
Order 0.5 x 0.75 alloy steel rectangle bar 4142-prehardened and other metal-working products online at OnlineMetals.com®, Thickness: 0.5 inch, Width: 0.75 inch
3M™ Paper Sheet 346U is constructed of aluminum oxide and comes in a range of grades and sizes to accommodate many different projects. The paper backing is durable for coarse sanding, yet flexible enough to be used on curved surfaces. Its cut-rate and durability make this an excellent choice for blending the joints of connecting pieces in wood- and metal-working.
1) Miteva, V.I. and Brenchley, J.E. (2005). "Detection and isolation of ultrasmall microorganisms from a 120,000-year-old Greenland glacier ice core". Applied and Environmental Microbiology, 71(12): 7806-18. doi:10.1128/AEM.71.12.7806-7818.2005 (2) Loveland-Curtze, J., Miteva, V.I. and Brenchley, J.E. (2009). "Herminiimonas glaciei sp. nov., a novel ultramicrobacterium from 3042 m deep Greenland glacial ice". International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology, 59(6): 1272-7. doi:10.1099/ijs.0.001685-0 (3) Lang, E., Swiderski, J., Stackebrandt, E., Schumann, P., Spröer, C. and Sahin, N. (2007). "Herminiimonas saxobsidens sp. nov., isolated from a lichen-colonized rock". International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology, 57(11): 2618-22. doi:10.1099/ijs.0.65163-0 (4) (2009). "Herminiimonas Glaciei - Tiny frozen microbe may be clue to extra-terrestrial life". Science 2.0. Retrieved 2012-10-26. (5) Hoover, R.B. and Pikuta, E.V. (2009). "Life in Ice: Implications to ...
Weeks Dye Works 30 Count Grasshopper Linen Fabric 8x12. Weeks Dye Works hand dyed, 100% linen fabric is colorfast and great for a variety of cross-stitch and em
The basketball court at Seacoast Sports Clubs Great Bay location was transformed last Saturday as more than 50 weight lifters from seven Northeast states competed in what the events promoters called the first full power meet to be held on the Seacoast.
Define B98. B98 synonyms, B98 pronunciation, B98 translation, English dictionary definition of B98. n a town in W central England, in N Worcestershire: designated a new town in the mid-1960s; metal-working industries. Pop: 74 803
ID HIS7_OCHA4 Reviewed; 202 AA. AC A6WX56; DT 15-JAN-2008, integrated into UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot. DT 21-AUG-2007, sequence version 1. DT 07-JUN-2017, entry version 59. DE RecName: Full=Imidazoleglycerol-phosphate dehydratase {ECO:0000255,HAMAP-Rule:MF_00076}; DE Short=IGPD {ECO:0000255,HAMAP-Rule:MF_00076}; DE EC=4.2.1.19 {ECO:0000255,HAMAP-Rule:MF_00076}; GN Name=hisB {ECO:0000255,HAMAP-Rule:MF_00076}; GN OrderedLocusNames=Oant_0838; OS Ochrobactrum anthropi (strain ATCC 49188 / DSM 6882 / JCM 21032 / NBRC OS 15819 / NCTC 12168). OC Bacteria; Proteobacteria; Alphaproteobacteria; Rhizobiales; OC Brucellaceae; Ochrobactrum. OX NCBI_TaxID=439375; RN [1] RP NUCLEOTIDE SEQUENCE [LARGE SCALE GENOMIC DNA]. RC STRAIN=ATCC 49188 / DSM 6882 / JCM 21032 / NBRC 15819 / NCTC 12168; RX PubMed=21685287; DOI=10.1128/JB.05335-11; RA Chain P.S., Lang D.M., Comerci D.J., Malfatti S.A., Vergez L.M., RA Shin M., Ugalde R.A., Garcia E., Tolmasky M.E.; RT "Genome of Ochrobactrum anthropi ATCC 49188 T, a versatile RT ...
The crabs are very heavily bled - about 30 per cent or more of their blood is taken, and thats a fair amount," says Chris Chabot, professor of neurobiology at PSU and a co-author on the study. "Approximately 20 to 30 per cent of those crabs do not survive, so we were curious if any of the surviving crabs experienced nearly lethal effects from the bleeding," he said.. The study, "Sublethal Behavioral and Physiological Effects of the Biomedical Bleeding Process on the American Horseshoe Crab," was published recently in the journal The Biological Bulletin.. With funding provided by a N.H. Sea Grant development grant, Chabot, Watson and lead author Rebecca Anderson, a PSU graduate student, replicated the biomedical bleeding process to determine the potential impacts on the crabs behavior.. After capturing the crabs in New Hampshires Great Bay and transporting some of them back to Chabots lab at PSU and others to UNHs Jackson Estuarine Laboratory, the researchers monitored their movements for a ...
Oyster aquaculture has grown dramatically in New Hampshire during the past few years. Environmental agencies have begun to view oyster farming in the context of managing nutrient (mainly nitrogen) pollution in the Great Bay Estuary. Our research centers on the possibility that seaweed and oyster aquaculture might be coupled in mutually beneficial ways via integrated multi-trophic aquaculture (IMTA).
ID BRUMB_1_PE1003 STANDARD; PRT; 44 AA. AC BRUMB_1_PE1003; C0RJ20; DT 00-JAN-0000 (Rel. 1, Created) DT 00-JAN-0000 (Rel. 2, Last sequence update) DT 00-JAN-0000 (Rel. 3, Last annotation update) DE SubName: Full=Putative uncharacterized protein; (BRUMB_1.PE1003). GN OrderedLocusNames=BMEA_A1086; OS BRUCELLA MELITENSIS ATCC 23457. OC Bacteria; Proteobacteria; Alphaproteobacteria; Rhizobiales; Brucellaceae; OC Brucella. OX NCBI_TaxID=546272; RN [0] RP -.; RG -.; RL -.; CC -!- SEQ. DATA ORIGIN: Translated from the HOGENOM CDS BRUMB_1.PE1003. CC Brucella melitensis ATCC 23457 chromosome chromosome I, complete sequen CC sequence. CC -!- ANNOTATIONS ORIGIN:C0RJ20_BRUMB CC -!- GENE_FAMILY: HBG000000000 [ FAMILY / ALN / TREE ] DR UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot; C0RJ20; -. DR EMBL; CP001488; ACO00828.1; -; Genomic_DNA. DR RefSeq; YP_002732782.1; NC_012441.1. DR GeneID; 7677846; -. DR GenomeReviews; CP001488_GR; BMEA_A1086. DR KEGG; bmi:BMEA_A1086; -. DR ProtClustDB; CLSK2476470; -. DR HOGENOMDNA; BRUMB_1.PE1003; -. ...
224. Carex Bullata Schk. Button Sedge Fig. 1091 Carex bullata Schk.; Willd. Sp. PI. 4: 309. 1805. Carex Olneyi Boott, 111. Car. 1: 15. 1858. Carex Greenii Boeck. Flora 41: 649. 1858. C. bullata ...
I built this Rhode Island Dye Works boxcar from a kit from a Model Diecasting/Roundhouse that I bought on eBay after kitbasing the company factory. [GPL]. ...
Gómez Bolea, Antonio & Mercedes Barbero Castro. Polycauliona maheui, the basionym of Rhizoplaca maheui comb. nov. Mycotaxon 108: 341-46. 2009.. ABSTRACT: The new combination and lectotypification of Rhizoplaca maheui is introduced for Polycauliona maheui. In addition, Rhizoplaca bullata is declared to be conspecific with Rhizoplaca maheui and is a heterotypic synonym of this last species.. KEYWORDS: lichens, Lecanoraceae, silicicolous. ...
New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services drills on oil spill response, including the impact on Great Bay estuary and the Piscataqua River.
LOCUS SBW13224.1 61 aa PRT BCT 14-DEC-2016 DEFINITION Brucella sp. 10RB9215 hypothetical protein protein. ACCESSION LT599047-28 PROTEIN_ID SBW13224.1 SOURCE Brucella sp. 10RB9215 ORGANISM Brucella sp. 10RB9215 Bacteria; Proteobacteria; Alphaproteobacteria; Rhizobiales; Brucellaceae; Brucella; unclassified Brucella. REFERENCE 1 AUTHORS Blom J. JOURNAL Submitted (05-JUL-2016) to the INSDC. JLU, JLU, Justus-Liebig-University Giessen, Bioinformatics and Systems Biology, Heinrich-Buff-Ring 58, 35392 Giessen, 35390, Germany FEATURES Qualifiers source /organism=Brucella sp. 10RB9215 /chromosome=1 /host=African bull frog, Pyxicephalus edulis /isolate=BR10RB9215WGS1 /mol_type=genomic DNA /collection_date=2009 /db_xref=taxon:1149953 protein /transl_table=11 /locus_tag=BR10RB9215_C10028 /db_xref=UniProtKB/TrEMBL:A0A1M4L950 BEGIN 1 MEGQVIFYKN DRIIYRHHID VQEDDYSKGV NDALIAFQRN YAGFDLASDD IHIRFKKPGD 61 V ...
Brevundimonas diminuta ATCC ® 19146™ Designation: FDA strain PCI 818 TypeStrain=False Application: Pharmaceutical and Personal Care Filtration sterilization control ref Membrane filter testing ref   ref   ref   ref Sterility assurance ref   ref Testing ref   ref   ref
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Horseshoe crabs can tell us a lot about ecology Every biologist and conservationist knows the importance of charismatic fauna: creatures like koalas or dolphins or blue-footed boobies that the public loves and showers with support. But who would have guessed that something as ungainly and weird as a horseshoe crab-an animal with 10 eyes and blood so unusual it is used to keep infection out of the drug supply-would join this select group? "People love them," agrees Win Watson, who studied this ancient arthropod for his doctoral research three decades ago and has returned to them as a professor of zoology and biological sciences at UNH. "I think theres this sort of ancient look to them, like trilobites. Theyre the closest youre going to come to a dinosaur." He recently co-edited an issue of Current Zoology, which was devoted to horseshoe crab research, including four papers he co-authored on things like their pattern of travels around Great Bay and the chemicals females used to attract males. ...
The biocide 4-chloro-3-methylphenol (CMP, CAS number 59-50-7) is a common additive to metal-working fluids (MWF) and building materials. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) researchers previously identified and quantified CMP in a commercial water-soluble MWF, TRIM VX, and demonstrated irritancy and sensitization potential of both TRIM VX and CMP alone after dermal exposu
This holly resembles boxwood, but its growth habit is lower and more spreading. Leaves are dark green, glossy, small, ovate to elliptic, with slightly scal
12 May 1995 MOLASSESMOLASSES should be applied at 9-18 litres/t of silage, says Dr Keady. The aim is to supply sugar so indigenous bacteria convert it
Juvenile hormone bisepoxide (JHB3) biosynthesis, and its modulation in Drosophila melanogaster and Sarcophaga bullata by Don Xaine Billy; 1 edition; First published in 2006
Curated}} {{Biorealm Genus}} [[Image:brucella_close_up.JPG,thumb,400px,right,Electron micrograph of B. abortus located inside cisternae of Vero cell. Within the perinuclear envelope, the cisternae containing B. abortus are discontinuously lined by ribosomes (arrows). From [http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=2114362 Detilleux et al.]]] ==Classification== ===Higher order taxa:=== Bacteria; Proteobacteria; Alphaproteobacteria; Rhizobiales; Brucellaceae ===Species:=== Brucella abortus, Brucella canis, Brucella cetaceae, Brucella maris , Brucella melitensis, Brucella pinnipediae, Brucella sp. {, , height="10" bgcolor="#FFDF95" align="center" , NCBI: [http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/Taxonomy/Browser/wwwtax.cgi?id=234 Taxonomy] [http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=genomeprj&cmd=Search&dopt=DocSum&term=txid234%5BOrganism:exp%5D Genomes] ,} ==Description and Significance== Brucella sp. causes brucellosis, ...
Thousands of our best-selling products always stocked and ready when you need them, so you dont have to wait for the items you use most. Items are shipped within 48 hours of ordering when order is received electronically or by phone prior to 1:00 pm EST. In-stock promise and 48-hour shipping time excludes hazardous chemicals and exceptional order quantities which will be made available at lead time. Availability subject to change in the event of natural disaster or forces of nature affecting sourcing, shipping, transportation, or availability of living material required for producing saleable goods. Wards Science will contact the customer directly to communicate the occurrence of such an event and provide alternate materials when available. Current stock and availability for all products available online on every product page. ...
Add 3 jars to cart and use discount code 3BHB at checkout for 10% off Add 6 jars to cart and use discount code 6BHB at checkout for 15% off GREAT TASTING KETO POWDER PRODUCT - Custom premium formulation with only natural flavor and unlike other brands we use zero artificial dyes WORKS WELL TO GET AND STAY IN KETOSIS QU
Looking for online definition of brucellae in the Medical Dictionary? brucellae explanation free. What is brucellae? Meaning of brucellae medical term. What does brucellae mean?
In the present work, a simple and a sensitive HPLC method was developed for quantitative determination of four Direct textile dyes (Direct Red 81, Direct Blue 15, Direct Black 22 and Direct Orange 34). The maximum absorbance value for the above mentioned dyes were found to be at 510 nm, 607 nm, 484 nm and 411 nm, with retention times of 15.4, 8.8, 5.8 and 12.7 min, respectively. The mobile phase used was consisting of acetonitrile: water (60:40, v/v) containing 0.45 M N-cetyl-N,N,N-trimehyl ammonium bromide (CTAB). RP C18 column was used with a flow rate of 0.5ml/min. Calibration graphs were found to be linear over the ranges of 0.3-10ppm, 10-30ppm, 0.5-10ppm and 1-12ppm for Direct Red 81, Direct Blue 15, Direct Black 22 and Direct Orange 34, respectively, with limit of detection 0.3ppm, 10ppm, 0.5ppm and 1ppm. The relative standard deviations (RSD%) were found to be 0.92 %, 0.83 %, 1.13 % and 0.34 %, respectively (n=3) with concentrations of 10ppm of each dye. The effect of pH, CTAB ...
Article Distribution of peroxidase activity and polyamine pattern of Heliotropium europeum in potassium deficiency conditions. Polyamines, especially putrescine, are reported to increase in higher plants in response to various stressors, in particula...
On December 1, 2012, our second Gift of Life child, Ferdinand "A.J." Ramirez, arrived with his mother, Marylyn, from Victoria, Tarlac, in the Philippines. A.J. was born with a large hole in his heart a condition, known as, Ventricular Septal Defect (VSD). Diagnosed at five months old, he was now three years old. His physical development reflected the severity of the illness. His breathing and heartbeat were rapid. He was unable to keep down a full meal. For us, it was heartbreaking, for him, it was his life.. His first hurdle was getting to the United States. Then came the news that A.J. may be inoperable. A long week passed before he would undergo a heart catheterization to determine if he was a good candidate for surgery. Thats when he visited our Club for the first time and stole our hearts. The circle of people praying for him grew that day as we all adopted him into our family. As he cleared his second hurdle, the catheterization, we all breathed a little easier. Of course, the big event ...
Methane is a potent greenhouse gas, more than 20 times more efficient than CO2 in trapping solar heat on a short timescale.. Twenty-eight billion tonnes is roughly equivalent to the annual emissions of this powerful greenhouse gas from all the landfills in the world today, which in turn account for about six percent of global methane emissions.. The major contributors are likely to have been deforestation, biomass burning and rice paddies, rather than geological sources such as mud volcanoes, according to the study published in the journal Nature.. Big early increases coincided with the Chinese Han Dynasty (206 BC-220 AD) and the Roman empire (27 BC to the last western emperor in 476 AD), which along with an advanced Indian civilisation at the time chopped down millions of trees to heat homes and power their metal-working industries, often to provide weapons.. "Based on archaeological metal production estimates, we calculate that the charcoal used for metal production at the peak of the Roman ...
Colourtex is the largest dyestuff company serving the textile and leather industry with textile dyes & chemicals, non textile dyes, organic pigments, specialty chemicals, disperse dyes, Acid dyes, basic dyes, VAT dyes, & solvent dyes
Plum Street Samplers Sheep Heap - Cross Stitch Pattern. Model stitched over two on 36 Ct. Oaken by Picture this Plus, using Weeks Dye Works and Classic Colorwor
Eggerthella lenta is an anaerobic, non-sporulating, gram positive bacillus in the Coriobacteriaceae family. The aim of this study was to describe the clinical features of the authors cases of E. Lenta bacteraemia, and further define their microbiological characteristics using modern microbiological techniques.
Eggerthella lenta ATCC ® 43055™ Designation: MSMC 77-67 TypeStrain=False Application: Quality control strain Susceptibility testing
A urinary tract infection (UTI) is an infection that affects part of the urinary tract.[1] When it affects the lower urinary tract it is known as a bladder infection (cystitis) and when it affects the upper urinary tract it is known as a kidney infection (pyelonephritis).[9] Symptoms from a lower urinary tract infection include pain with urination, frequent urination, and feeling the need to urinate despite having an empty bladder.[1] Symptoms of a kidney infection include fever and flank pain usually in addition to the symptoms of a lower UTI.[9] Rarely the urine may appear bloody.[6] In the very old and the very young, symptoms may be vague or non-specific.[1][10] The most common cause of infection is Escherichia coli, though other bacteria or fungi may rarely be the cause.[2] Risk factors include female anatomy, sexual intercourse, diabetes, obesity, and family history.[2] Although sexual intercourse is a risk factor, UTIs are not classified as sexually transmitted infections (STIs).[11] ...
The word cholera is from Greek: χολέρα kholera from χολή kholē "bile". Cholera likely has its origins in the Indian subcontinent as evidenced by its prevalence in the region for centuries.[13] Early outbreaks in the Indian subcontinent are believed to have been the result of poor living conditions as well as the presence of pools of still water, both of which provide ideal conditions for cholera to thrive.[71] The disease first spread by trade routes (land and sea) to Russia in 1817, later to the rest of Europe, and from Europe to North America and the rest of the world.[13] Seven cholera pandemics have occurred in the past 200 years, with the seventh pandemic originating in Indonesia in 1961.[72] The first cholera pandemic occurred in the Bengal region of India, near Calcutta starting in 1817 through 1824. The disease dispersed from India to Southeast Asia, the Middle East, Europe, and Eastern Africa.[73] The movement of British Army and Navy ships and personnel is believed to have ...
... (TD) is a stomach and intestinal infection. TD is defined as the passage of unformed stool (one or more by some definitions, three or more by others) while traveling.[2][3] It may be accompanied by abdominal cramps, nausea, fever, and bloating.[3] Occasionally bloody diarrhea may occur.[5] Most travelers recover within four days with little or no treatment.[3] About 10% of people may have symptoms for a week.[3] Bacteria are responsible for more than half of cases.[3] The bacteria enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are typically the most common except in Southeast Asia, where Campylobacter is more prominent.[2][3] About 10% to 20% of cases are due to norovirus.[3] Protozoa such as Giardia may cause longer term disease.[3] The risk is greatest in the first two weeks of travel and among young adults.[2] People affected are more often from the developed world.[2] Recommendations for prevention include eating only properly cleaned and cooked food, drinking bottled water, and ...
Protective levels of anticapsular antibodies are not achieved until 7-14 days following administration of a meningococcal vaccine, vaccination cannot prevent early onset disease in these contacts and usually is not recommended following sporadic cases of invasive meningococcal disease. Unlike developed countries, in sub-Saharan Africa and other under developed countries, entire families live in a single room of a house.[21][22] Meningococcal infection is usually introduced into a household by an asymptomatic person. Carriage then spreads through the household, reaching infants usually after one or more other household members have been infected. Disease is most likely to occur in infants and young children who lack immunity to the strain of organism circulating and who subsequently acquire carriage of an invasive strain.[23] By preventing susceptible contacts from acquiring infection by directly inhibiting colonization. Close contacts are defined as those persons who could have had intimate ...
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... is a large family of Gram-negative bacteria. It was first proposed by Rahn in 1936, and now includes over 30 genera and more than 100 species. Its classification above the level of family is still a subject of debate, but one classification places it in the order Enterobacterales of the class Gammaproteobacteria in the phylum Proteobacteria.[2][3][4][5] Enterobacteriaceae includes, along with many harmless symbionts, many of the more familiar pathogens, such as Salmonella, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella, and Shigella. Other disease-causing bacteria in this family include Enterobacter and Citrobacter. Members of the Enterobacteriaceae can be trivially referred to as enterobacteria or "enteric bacteria",[6] as several members live in the intestines of animals. In fact, the etymology of the family is enterobacterium with the suffix to designate a family (aceae)-not after the genus Enterobacter (which would be "Enterobacteraceae")-and the type genus is Escherichia. ...
... are a class of gram-negative bacteria, and one of the eight classes of the phylum Proteobacteria.[1] The Betaproteobacteria are a class comprising over 75 genera and 400 species of bacteria.[2] Together, the Betaproteobacteria represent a broad variety of metabolic strategies and occupy diverse environments from obligate pathogens living within host organisms to oligotrophic groundwater ecosystems. Whilst most members of the Betaproteobacteria are heterotrophic, deriving both their carbon and electrons from organocarbon sources, some are photoheterotrophic, deriving energy from light and carbon from organocarbon sources. Other genera are autotrophic, deriving their carbon from bicarbonate or carbon dioxide and their electrons from reduced inorganic ions such as nitrite, ammonium, thiosulfate or sulfide [1] - many of these chemolithoautotrophic Betaproteobacteria are economically important, with roles in maintaining soil pH and in elementary cycling. Other economically ...
Toxoplasmosis is becoming a global health hazard as it infects 30-50% of the world human population. Clinically, the life-long presence of the parasite in tissues of a majority of infected individuals is usually considered asymptomatic. However, a number of studies show that this 'asymptomatic infection' may also lead to development of other human pathologies. ... The seroprevalence of toxoplasmosis correlated with various disease burden. Statistical associations does not necessarily mean causality. The precautionary principle suggests however that possible role of toxoplasmosis as a triggering factor responsible for development of several clinical entities deserves much more attention and financial support both in everyday medical practice and future clinical research ...
... [1], previously known as Enterobacter aerogenes, is a Gram-negative, oxidase negative, catalase positive, citrate positive, indole negative, rod-shaped bacterium.[2] The bacterium is approximately 1-3 microns in length, and is capable of motility via peritrichous flagella.[3] K. aerogenes is a nosocomial and pathogenic bacterium that causes opportunistic infections including most types of infections. The majority are sensitive to most antibiotics designed for this bacteria class, but this is complicated by their inducible resistance mechanisms, particularly lactamase, which means that they quickly become resistant to standard antibiotics during treatment, requiring a change in antibiotic to avoid worsening of the sepsis. Some of the infections caused by K. aerogenes result from specific antibiotic treatments, venous catheter insertions, and/or surgical procedures. K. aerogenes is generally found in the human gastrointestinal tract and does not generally cause disease in ...
... , also known simply as typhoid, is a bacterial infection due to Salmonella typhi that causes symptoms.[3] Symptoms may vary from mild to severe and usually begin six to thirty days after exposure.[1][2] Often there is a gradual onset of a high fever over several days.[1] Weakness, abdominal pain, constipation, and headaches also commonly occur.[2][6] Diarrhea is uncommon and vomiting is not usually severe.[6] Some people develop a skin rash with rose colored spots.[2] In severe cases there may be confusion.[6] Without treatment, symptoms may last weeks or months.[2] Other people may carry the bacterium without being affected; however, they are still able to spread the disease to others.[4] Typhoid fever is a type of enteric fever along with paratyphoid fever.[3]. The cause is the bacterium Salmonella typhi, also known as Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi, growing in the intestines and blood.[2][6] Typhoid is spread by eating or drinking food or water contaminated with the feces of ...
Traditionally, gonorrhea was diagnosed with Gram stain and culture; however, newer polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based testing methods are becoming more common.[16][28] In those failing initial treatment, culture should be done to determine sensitivity to antibiotics.[29] Tests that use polymerase chain reaction (PCR, aka nucleic acid amplification) to identify genes unique to N. gonorrhoeae are recommended for screening and diagnosis of gonorrhea infection. These PCR-based tests require a sample of urine, urethral swabs, or cervical/vaginal swabs. Culture (growing colonies of bacteria in order to isolate and identify them) and Gram-stain (staining of bacterial cell walls to reveal morphology) can also be used to detect the presence of N. gonorrhoeae in all specimen types except urine.[30][31] If Gram-negative, oxidase-positive diplococci are visualized on direct Gram stain of urethral pus (male genital infection), no further testing is needed to establish the diagnosis of gonorrhea ...
With a fatality risk approaching 15% within 12 hours of infection, it is crucial to initiate testing as quickly as possible, but not to wait for the results before initiating antibiotic therapy. A small amount of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is sent to the laboratory as soon as possible for analysis. The diagnosis is suspected, when Gram-negative diplococci are seen on Gram stain of a centrifuged sample of CSF; sometimes they are located inside white blood cells. The microscopic identification takes around 1-2 hours after specimen arrival in the laboratory.[3] The gold standard of diagnosis is microbiological isolation of N. meningitidis by growth from a sterile body fluid, which could be CSF or blood.[5] Diagnosis is confirmed when the organism has grown, most often on a chocolate agar plate, but also on Thayer-Martin agar. To differentiate any bacterial growth from other species a small amount of a bacterial colony is tested for oxidase, catalase for which all clinically relevant Neisseria show a ...
Plague has a long history as a biological weapon. Historical accounts from ancient China and medieval Europe detail the use of infected animal carcasses, such as cows or horses, and human carcasses, by the Xiongnu/Huns, Mongols, Turks and other groups, to contaminate enemy water supplies. Han Dynasty General Huo Qubing is recorded to have died of such a contamination while engaging in warfare against the Xiongnu. Plague victims were also reported to have been tossed by catapult into cities under siege. In 1347, the Genoese possession of Caffa, a great trade emporium on the Crimean peninsula, came under siege by an army of Mongol warriors of the Golden Horde under the command of Janibeg. After a protracted siege during which the Mongol army was reportedly withering from the disease, they decided to use the infected corpses as a biological weapon. The corpses were catapulted over the city walls, infecting the inhabitants. This event might have led to the transfer of the plague (Black Death) via ...
... , also known simply as paratyphoid, is a bacterial infection caused by one of the three types of Salmonella enterica.[1] Symptoms usually begin 6-30 days after exposure and are the same as those of typhoid fever.[1][3] Often, a gradual onset of a high fever occurs over several days.[1] Weakness, loss of appetite, and headaches also commonly occur.[1] Some people develop a skin rash with rose-colored spots.[2] Without treatment, symptoms may last weeks or months.[1] Other people may carry the bacteria without being affected; however, they are still able to spread the disease to others.[3] Both typhoid and paratyphoid are of similar severity.[3] Paratyphoid and typhoid fever are types of enteric fever.[7] Paratyphoid is caused by the bacterium Salmonella enterica of the serotypes Paratyphi A, Paratyphi B, or Paratyphi C growing in the intestines and blood.[1] They are usually spread by eating or drinking food or water contaminated with the feces of an infected person.[1] They may ...
Rickettsiaceae, Anaplasmataceae, Rhodospirillaceae, Acetobacteraceae, Bradyrhiozobiaceae, Brucellaceae and Bartonellaceae). ...
... is a Gram-negative coccobacillus from the Brucellaceae family. Along with Brucella melitensis, it is responsible ...
... is a genus of bacteria from the family of Brucellaceae. So far, only one species of this genus is known ( ...
... is a genus of Gram-negative bacteria in the Brucellaceae. The genus has been described by Holmes in 1988 and ...
... is a genus of bacteria from the family of Brucellaceae. LPSN bacterio.net UniProt Kampfer, P.; Scholz, H.; ...
... is a Gram-negative coccobacillus bacterium from the Brucellaceae family. The bacterium causes ovine ...
nov., a novel member of the family Brucellaceae, isolated from human clinical samples". International Journal of Systematic and ...
... is a genus of Gram-negative, oxidase-positive, nonspore-forming, nonmotile bacteria of the family Brucellaceae ...
... is a genus of bacteria from the family of Brucellaceae with one known species (Arsenicitalea aurantiaca). Parte, ...
Pseudochrobactrum is a genus of bacteria from the family of Brucellaceae with one known species (Falsochrobactrum ovis). Parte ...
... is a Gram-negative proteobacterium in the family Brucellaceae that causes brucellosis in dogs and other canids. ...
... is a Gram-negative proteobacterium in the family Brucellaceae, and is one of the causative agents of ...
The Brucellaceae are a family of the Gram-negative Rhizobiales. They are named after Sir David Bruce, a Scottish microbiologist ... "Brucellaceae". www.uniprot.org. "List of Prokaryotic Names with Standing in Nomenclature". Archived from the original on 27 ...
A urinary tract infection (UTI) is an infection that affects part of the urinary tract.[1] When it affects the lower urinary tract it is known as a bladder infection (cystitis) and when it affects the upper urinary tract it is known as a kidney infection (pyelonephritis).[9] Symptoms from a lower urinary tract infection include pain with urination, frequent urination, and feeling the need to urinate despite having an empty bladder.[1] Symptoms of a kidney infection include fever and flank pain usually in addition to the symptoms of a lower UTI.[9] Rarely the urine may appear bloody.[6] In the very old and the very young, symptoms may be vague or non-specific.[1][10] The most common cause of infection is Escherichia coli, though other bacteria or fungi may rarely be the cause.[2] Risk factors include female anatomy, sexual intercourse, diabetes, obesity, and family history.[2] Although sexual intercourse is a risk factor, UTIs are not classified as sexually transmitted infections (STIs).[11] ...
The word cholera is from Greek: χολέρα kholera from χολή kholē "bile". Cholera likely has its origins in the Indian subcontinent as evidenced by its prevalence in the region for centuries.[13] Early outbreaks in the Indian subcontinent are believed to have been the result of poor living conditions as well as the presence of pools of still water, both of which provide ideal conditions for cholera to thrive.[71] The disease first spread by trade routes (land and sea) to Russia in 1817, later to the rest of Europe, and from Europe to North America and the rest of the world.[13] Seven cholera pandemics have occurred in the past 200 years, with the seventh pandemic originating in Indonesia in 1961.[72] The first cholera pandemic occurred in the Bengal region of India, near Calcutta starting in 1817 through 1824. The disease dispersed from India to Southeast Asia, the Middle East, Europe, and Eastern Africa.[73] The movement of British Army and Navy ships and personnel is believed to have ...
OC Bacteria; Proteobacteria; Alphaproteobacteria; Rhizobiales; Brucellaceae; OC Brucella. OX NCBI_TaxID=546272; RN [0] RP -.; ...
This is a shortened version of the first chapter of the ICD-9: Infectious and Parasitic Diseases. It covers ICD codes 001 to 139. The full chapter can be found on pages 49 to 99 of Volume 1, which contains all (sub)categories of the ICD-9. Volume 2 is an alphabetical index of Volume 1. Both volumes can be downloaded for free from the website of the World Health Organisation. ...
OC Bacteria; Proteobacteria; Alphaproteobacteria; Rhizobiales; Brucellaceae; OC Brucella. OX NCBI_TaxID=483179; RN [0] RP -.; ...
Brucellaceae; OC Brucella. OX NCBI_TaxID=204722; RN [1] RP NUCLEOTIDE SEQUENCE [LARGE SCALE GENOMIC DNA]. RC STRAIN=1330; RX ...
Brucellaceae; Brucella. REFERENCE 1 (bases 1 to 2108637) AUTHORS Tae,H., Shallom,S., Settlage,R., Hawkins,G.N., Adams,L.G. and ...
... coccobacilli shaped bacteria assigned to the phylum Proteobacteria and the family Brucellaceae. ...
Rocky Mountain spotted fever (or "black measles" because of its characteristic rash) was recognized in the early 1800s, and in the last 10 years of the 1800s (1890-1900) it became very common, especially in the Bitterroot Valley of Montana. The disease was originally noted to be concentrated on the west-side of the Bitterroot river.[24] Though it would be decades before scientists discovered the tick as the carrier of the disease, in as early as 1866, Doctor John B. Buker (establishing a practice in Missoula, MT) noticed a tick embedded in the skin of one of his patients. His notes were later studied as part of later research.[25] In 1901, Dr. A. F. Longeway was appointed to solve "the black measles problem" in Montana. He in turn enlisted his friend, Dr. Earl Strain to help him. Strain suspected that the illness was from ticks. In 1906, Howard T. Ricketts, a pathologist recruited from the University of Chicago, was the first to establish the identity of the infectious organism (the organism ...
Rickettsiaceae, Anaplasmataceae, Rhodospirillaceae, Acetobacteraceae, Bradyrhiozobiaceae, Brucellaceae and Bartonellaceae). ...
Lineage: cellular organisms; Bacteria; Proteobacteria; Alphaproteobacteria; Rhizobiales; Brucellaceae; Brucella; Brucella ...
Categories: Brucellaceae Image Types: Photo, Illustrations, Video, Color, Black&White, PublicDomain, CopyrightRestricted 96 ...
Parasites of the genus Leishmania cause a broad spectrum of diseases, collectively known as leishmaniasis, in humans worldwide. American cutaneous leishmaniasis is a neglected disease transmitted by sand fly vectors including Lutzomyia intermedia, a proven vector. The female sand fly can acquire or deliver Leishmania spp. parasites while feeding on a blood meal, which is required for nutrition, egg development and survival. The microbiota composition and abundance varies by food source, life stages and physiological conditions. The sand fly microbiota can affect parasite life-cycle in the vector. We performed a metagenomic analysis for microbiota composition and abundance in Lu. intermedia, from an endemic area in Brazil. The adult insects were collected using CDC light traps, morphologically identified, carefully sterilized, dissected under a microscope and the females separated into groups according to their physiological condition: (i) absence of blood meal (unfed = UN); (ii) presence of blood meal
Family: Brucellaceae. Declared Pest, Prohibited - s12 (C1 Prohibited). Common names: undulant fever, contagious abortion, ...
It is a short bacillus, family Brucellaceae, genus Haemophilus, species ducreyi. It is a gram-negative bacillus, intracellular ...
Bru·cel·la/ (broo-sel´ah) a genus of schizomycetes (family Brucellaceae). B. abor´tus causes infectious abortion in cattle and ... Brucella - a genus of encapsulated, nonmotile bacteria (family Brucellaceae) causing infection of the genital organs, the ... A genus of encapsulated, nonmotile bacteria (family Brucellaceae) containing short, rod-shaped to coccoid, gram-negative cells ...
PCC 7822, Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius, Bacillus halodurans, Leuconostoc mesenteroides, Lactococcus garvieae, Brucellaceae, ... PCC 7822, Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius, Bacillus halodurans, Leuconostoc mesenteroides, Lactococcus garvieae, Brucellaceae, ... PCC 7822, Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius, Bacillus halodurans, Leuconostoc mesenteroides, Lactococcus garvieae, Brucellaceae, ... Brucellaceae, Verminephrobacter, and Azoarcus. In the Archaea genera, Methanothermus and Methanocorpusculum were not ...
ಇದಕ್ಕೆ ಪ್ರಮುಖ ಕಾರಣವೆಂದರೆ (60%ರಷ್ಟು ಜಠರದ/ಗ್ಯಾಸ್ಟ್ರಿಕ್‌ಗೆ ಹಾಗೂ ಸುಮಾರು 90%ರಷ್ಟು ಡ್ಯುವೋಡೆನಮ್‌ನ ಹುಣ್ಣು/ವ್ರಣಗಳಿಗೆ) ಹೆಲಿಕೋಬ್ಯಾಕ್ಟರ್‌ ಪೈಲೊರಿ ಯು ಕೋಟರದ ಲೋಳೆಪೊರೆಯನ್ನು ಆಕ್ರಮಿಸಿಕೊಳ್ಳುವದರಿಂದಾಗುವ ಬೇರೂರಿದ/ಸತತವಾಗಿ ಇರುವ ಉರಿಯೂತ. ಪ್ರತಿಕಾಯಗಳು ಕಂಡುಬಂದರೂ ರೋಗನಿರೋಧಕ ವ್ಯವಸ್ಥೆಯು ಸೋಂಕನ್ನು ನಿವಾರಿಸಲಾಗುವುದಿಲ್ಲ. ಆದ್ದರಿಂದ ಬ್ಯಾಕ್ಟೀರಿಯ/ಸೂಕ್ಷ್ಮಜೀವಿ/ಏಕಾಣುಜೀವಿಯು ಬೇರೂರಿದ ಸಕ್ರಿಯ ಜಠರದುರಿತ (ವಿಧ B ...
Family Brucellaceae Brucella Crabtreella Daeguia Falsochrobactrum Mycoplana Ochrobactrum Paenochrobactrum Pseudochrobactrum ...
Brucellaceae ===Species:=== Brucella abortus, Brucella canis, Brucella cetaceae, Brucella maris , Brucella melitensis, ...
Brucella members follow this strategy and are highly virulent, but other Brucellaceae like Ochrobactrum are rhizosphere ...
Brucella is the genus and Brucellaceae is the family of the bacteria which was named after him, in recognition of his ...
Genus of gram-negative, aerobic coccobacilli of the family Brucellaceae, named after Sir David Bruce (1855-1931), a Scottish ...