Endoscopes for the visualization of the interior of the bronchi.
The technology of transmitting light over long distances through strands of glass or other transparent material.
Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the bronchi.
The presence of an infectious agent on instruments, prostheses, or other inanimate articles.
Radiography of the bronchial tree after injection of a contrast medium.
'Hospital Bed Capacity, 100 to 299' refers to the medical facility's capacity to accommodate patients, specifically within the range of 100 to 299 beds, which allows for a moderate-sized hospital setting, enabling it to provide care for a substantial number of patients while maintaining relatively close proximity between healthcare professionals and individuals under their supervision.
Complexes of iodine and non-ionic SURFACE-ACTIVE AGENTS acting as carrier and solubilizing agent for the iodine in water. Iodophors usually enhance bactericidal activity of iodine, reduce vapor pressure and odor, minimize staining, and allow wide dilution with water. (From Merck Index, 11th ed)
Rendering pathogens harmless through the use of heat, antiseptics, antibacterial agents, etc.
The larger air passages of the lungs arising from the terminal bifurcation of the TRACHEA. They include the largest two primary bronchi which branch out into secondary bronchi, and tertiary bronchi which extend into BRONCHIOLES and PULMONARY ALVEOLI.
Inanimate objects that become enclosed in the body.
Expectoration or spitting of blood originating from any part of the RESPIRATORY TRACT, usually from hemorrhage in the lung parenchyma (PULMONARY ALVEOLI) and the BRONCHIAL ARTERIES.
A procedure involving placement of a tube into the trachea through the mouth or nose in order to provide a patient with oxygen and anesthesia.
Tracheal neoplasms are abnormal growths or tumors that develop within the trachea, which can be benign or malignant, and have the potential to obstruct the airway and impair respiratory function.
Methods of creating machines and devices.
Endoscopes used for examining the interior of the stomach.
Endoscopes for examining the pleural cavity.
Washing out of the lungs with saline or mucolytic agents for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes. It is very useful in the diagnosis of diffuse pulmonary infiltrates in immunosuppressed patients.
A single lung lesion that is characterized by a small round mass of tissue, usually less than 1 cm in diameter, and can be detected by chest radiography. A solitary pulmonary nodule can be associated with neoplasm, tuberculosis, cyst, or other anomalies in the lung, the CHEST WALL, or the PLEURA.
Tumors or cancer of the BRONCHI.
Any hindrance to the passage of air into and out of the lungs.
The destroying of all forms of life, especially microorganisms, by heat, chemical, or other means.
Infections with bacteria of the genus SERRATIA.
A subspecialty of internal medicine concerned with the study of the RESPIRATORY SYSTEM. It is especially concerned with diagnosis and treatment of diseases and defects of the lungs and bronchial tree.
Evaluation, planning, and use of a range of procedures and airway devices for the maintenance or restoration of a patient's ventilation.
The washing of a body cavity or surface by flowing water or solution for therapy or diagnosis.
'Hospital Bed Capacity, 500 and over' refers to the maximum number of hospital beds equaling or exceeding 500 that are medically staffed and equipped to provide patient care and accommodation within a healthcare facility.
Removal and examination of tissue obtained through a transdermal needle inserted into the specific region, organ, or tissue being analyzed.
A type of oropharyngeal airway that provides an alternative to endotracheal intubation and standard mask anesthesia in certain patients. It is introduced into the hypopharynx to form a seal around the larynx thus permitting spontaneous or positive pressure ventilation without penetration of the larynx or esophagus. It is used in place of a facemask in routine anesthesia. The advantages over standard mask anesthesia are better airway control, minimal anesthetic gas leakage, a secure airway during patient transport to the recovery area, and minimal postoperative problems.
Tracheal stenosis is a medical condition characterized by an abnormal narrowing or constriction of the lumen of the trachea, which can lead to respiratory distress and other related symptoms.
A membrane in the midline of the THORAX of mammals. It separates the lungs between the STERNUM in front and the VERTEBRAL COLUMN behind. It also surrounds the HEART, TRACHEA, ESOPHAGUS, THYMUS, and LYMPH NODES.

Extensive cross-contamination of specimens with Mycobacterium tuberculosis in a reference laboratory. (1/100)

A striking increase in the numbers of cultures positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis was noticed in a mycobacterial reference laboratory in Campinas, Sao Paulo State, Brazil, in May 1995. A contaminated bronchoscope was the suspected cause of the increase. All 91 M. tuberculosis isolates grown from samples from patients between 8 May and 18 July 1995 were characterized by spoligotyping and IS6110 fingerprinting. Sixty-one of the 91 isolates had identical spoligotype patterns, and the pattern was arbitrarily designated S36. The 61 specimens containing these isolates had been processed and cultured in a 21-day period ending on 1 June 1995, but only 1 sample was smear positive for acid-fast bacilli. The patient from whom this sample was obtained was considered to be the index case patient and had a 4+ smear-positive lymph node aspirate that had been sent to the laboratory on 10 May. Virtually all organisms with spoligotype S36 had the same IS6110 fingerprint pattern. Extensive review of the patients' charts and investigation of laboratory procedures revealed that cross-contamination of specimens had occurred. Because the same strain was grown from all types of specimens, the bronchoscope was ruled out as the outbreak source. The most likely source of contamination was a multiple-use reagent used for specimen processing. The organism was cultured from two of the solutions 3 weeks after mock contamination. This investigation strongly supports the idea that M. tuberculosis grown from smear-negative specimens should be analyzed by rapid and reliable strain differentiation techniques, such as spoligotyping, to help rule out laboratory contamination.  (+info)

Placement of left-sided double-lumen endobronchial tubes: comparison of clinical and fibreoptic-guided placement. (2/100)

We have compared a new intubation manoeuvre using a fibreoptic bronchoscope with conventional blind placement of a double-lumen tube. Thirty adult patients who presented for thoracoscopy requiring one-lung ventilation underwent endobronchial intubation with a double-lumen tube inserted either in the conventional blind way or using a fibreoptic bronchoscope. There were four misplacements of the double-lumen tube using the conventional method but none using the bronchoscope. In addition, the bronchoscope allowed more rapid intubation (mean 106 vs 347 s). The results suggest that the fibreoptic-guided method of inserting the double-lumen tube was a satisfactory alternative to the conventional one.  (+info)

Peripheral airway findings in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease using an ultrathin bronchoscope. (3/100)

The authors performed bronchoscopic examination using an ultrathin bronchoscope to determine the characteristics of the peripheral airways in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The study population comprised 13 healthy control subjects, 10 patients with chronic bronchitis without airflow limitation, and 20 patients with COPD. The COPD patients were divided clinically into 10 with chronic bronchitis and 10 with pulmonary emphysema. The peripheral airways were examined using an ultrathin bronchoscope. In chronic bronchitis, peripheral airways of the 11th or 12th generation showed a high frequency of obstruction and mucosal changes such as granulation. In pulmonary emphysema, the peripheral airways frequently showed a net-like appearance of the bronchial epithelium and obstruction at the 11th or 12th generation. Morphological changes of the small airways in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease can be detected by an ultrathin bronchoscope, and this method is likely to be useful for investigating the small airways in vivo.  (+info)

Influence of airway-occluding instruments on airway pressure during jet ventilation for rigid bronchoscopy. (4/100)

We measured changes in airway pressure (Paw) caused by microsurgical instruments introduced into a rigid bronchoscope during high frequency jet ventilation (HFJV). With approval of the institutional Ethics Committee, 10 adults undergoing elective tracheobronchial endoscopy and endosonography during general anaesthesia were investigated. Inflation of an endosonography probe balloon in the left main stem bronchus caused airway obstruction. Pressure measurements proximal and distal to the obstruction were compared after three degrees of obstruction (0%, 50% and 90%) and with two different driving pressure settings. Airway obstruction increased the mean (SD) peak inspiratory pressure (PIP) from 7.5 (2.6) to 9.5 (3.5) mm Hg for 2 atm (P = 0.0008) and from 9.7 (3.7) to 13.0 (5.1) mm Hg for 3 atm (P = 0.0001). Airway obstruction did not alter peripheral PIP (7.2 (4.1) to 7.1 (3.7) mm Hg for 2 atm and 8.8 (4.3) to 9.4 (5.2) mm for 3 atm), but resulted in an end-expiratory pressure (EEP) beyond the narrowing being significantly greater than in the unobstructed airway (2.5 (3.4) to 5.5 (3.7) mm Hg for 2 atm; P = 0.0005) and 3.2 (3.6) to 8.0 (4.3) mm for 3 atm; P < 0.0001). Severe airway narrowing increases inspiratory pressure proximal and expiratory pressure distal to the obstruction in relation to the applied driving pressure. Since the distal EEP never exceeded PIP, even near-total airway obstruction should not cause severe lung distension or barotrauma in subjects with normal lungs.  (+info)

Flexible fiberoptic bronchoscopy. Anesthesia, technique and results. (5/100)

During a period of three years, 256 diagnostic bronchoscopies were done with flexible fiberoptic bronchoscopes at a Veterans Administration hospital. In all of these procedures, topical cocaine hydrochloride anesthesia was used, and it proved satisfactory and free of any undesirable side effects. The peroral route using an endotracheal tube is preferred for flexible bronchofiberscopy. Fluoroscopic guidance is essential in examining peripheral lung lesions. A 70 percent positive yield was obtained for patients with peripheral carcinoma of the lung as contrasted to a 47 percent yield when the tissue specimens were obtained blindly.  (+info)

Identification of a contaminating Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain with a transposition of an IS6110 insertion element resulting in an altered spoligotype. (6/100)

Molecular fingerprinting with the IS6110 insertion sequence is useful for tracking transmission of Mycobacterium tuberculosis within a population or confirming specimen contamination in the laboratory or through instrumentation. Secondary typing with other molecular methods yields additional information as to the relatedness of strains with similar IS6110 fingerprints. Isolated, relatively rare, random events within the M. tuberculosis genome alter molecular fingerprinting patterns with any of the methods; therefore, strains which are different by two or more typing methods are usually not considered to be closely related. In this report, we describe two strains of M. tuberculosis, obtained from the same bronchoscope 2 days apart, that demonstrated unique molecular fingerprinting patterns by two different typing methods. They were closely linked through the bronchoscope by a traditional epidemiologic investigation. Genetic analysis of the two strains revealed that a single event, the transposition of an IS6110 insertion sequence in one of the strains, accounted for both the differences in the IS6110 pattern and the apparent deletion of a spacer in the spoligotype. This finding shows that a single event can change the molecular fingerprint of a strain in two different molecular typing systems, and thus, molecular typing cannot be the only means used to track transmission of this organism through a population. Traditional epidemiologic techniques are a necessary complement to molecular fingerprinting so that radical changes within the fingerprint pattern can be identified.  (+info)

Ultrathin bronchoscopy as an adjunct to standard bronchoscopy in the diagnosis of peripheral lung lesions. A preliminary report. (7/100)

BACKGROUND: The role of the standard bronchoscope as a method of diagnosis of peripheral lung lesions is limited. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the role of the ultrathin bronchoscope as an adjunct to standard bronchoscopy in the diagnosis of peripheral lung lesions. METHODS: Seventeen consecutive patients with a peripheral lung lesion on chest radiography or chest CT. All patients underwent a bronchoscopic examination with a standard size bronchoscope, and if there was no evidence of endobronchial lesion, these patients were subsequently examined with an Olympus 3C40 ultrathin bronchoscope (external diameter of 3.6 mm). Under fluoroscopic guidance, cytological brushing samples were taken with the ultrathin bronchoscope followed by a reexamination with the standard bronchoscope which followed the same 'pathway' to the lesion established by the 3C40 ultrathin bronchoscope. Transbronchial biopsies (TBB) and cytological samples were taken with the standard bronchoscope. RESULTS: The size of the lesions ranged from 1.5 to 7.0 cm. A positive bronchoscopic diagnosis by TBB was obtained in 11 out of 17 patients (64.7%) and a diagnosis of atypical cells suspicious for malignancy noted in a further 3 patients. For lesions less than 3 cm in size, a positive diagnosis by TBB was achieved in 7 out of 10 of these cases. The lesion was directly visualized with the ultrathin bronchoscope in 4 cases. CONCLUSIONS: Ultrathin bronchoscopy appears to be a useful adjunct to standard bronchoscopy by providing an accurate pathway to the lesion in question. However, further studies with larger patient groups are warranted.  (+info)

Endoluminal stent graft repair of aortobronchial fistulas. (8/100)

OBJECTIVE: To describe our experience with endoluminal stent graft repair of aortobronchial fistulas. METHODS: We reviewed the records of patients treated with endoluminal stent grafting of aortobronchial fistulas at a private teaching hospital. All patients underwent the following diagnostic studies: computed tomography, angiography, bronchoscopy, and transesophageal echocardiography. With standard endovascular techniques, two different devices were implanted. RESULTS: Between March 1997 and October 2000, we treated four patients with postsurgical fistulas. The patients were diagnosed with hemoptysis between 3 and 23 years after aortic replacement grafting for thoracic aneurysms. Diagnostic studies varied in their ability to find the fistula. Transesophageal echocardiography most reliably demonstrated the fistula in the patients. All were successfully treated by exclusion with endoluminal stent grafting. The patients had no complications and no further episodes of hemoptysis. CONCLUSION: Endoluminal stent grafting of aortobronchial fistulas is feasible and may become the preferred method of management in patients at high risk.  (+info)

A bronchoscope is a medical device that is used to examine the airways and lungs. It is a long, thin, flexible tube that is equipped with a light and a camera at its tip. The bronchoscope is inserted through the nose or mouth and down the throat, allowing the doctor to visualize the trachea, bronchi, and smaller branches of the airway system.

Bronchoscopes can be used for diagnostic purposes, such as to take tissue samples (biopsies) or to investigate the cause of symptoms like coughing up blood or difficulty breathing. They can also be used for therapeutic purposes, such as to remove foreign objects from the airways or to place stents to keep them open.

There are several types of bronchoscopes, including flexible bronchoscopes and rigid bronchoscopes. Flexible bronchoscopes are more commonly used because they are less invasive and can be used to examine smaller airways. Rigid bronchoscopes, on the other hand, are larger and stiffer, and are typically used for more complex procedures or in emergency situations.

It is important to note that the use of bronchoscopes requires specialized training and should only be performed by healthcare professionals with the appropriate expertise.

Fiber optic technology in the medical context refers to the use of thin, flexible strands of glass or plastic fibers that are designed to transmit light and images along their length. These fibers are used to create bundles, known as fiber optic cables, which can be used for various medical applications such as:

1. Illumination: Fiber optics can be used to deliver light to hard-to-reach areas during surgical procedures or diagnostic examinations.
2. Imaging: Fiber optics can transmit images from inside the body, enabling doctors to visualize internal structures and tissues. This is commonly used in medical imaging techniques such as endoscopy, colonoscopy, and laparoscopy.
3. Sensing: Fiber optic sensors can be used to measure various physiological parameters such as temperature, pressure, and strain within the body. These sensors can provide real-time data during surgical procedures or for monitoring patients' health status.

Fiber optic technology offers several advantages over traditional medical imaging techniques, including high resolution, flexibility, small diameter, and the ability to bend around corners without significant loss of image quality. Additionally, fiber optics are non-magnetic and can be used in MRI environments without causing interference.

Bronchoscopy is a medical procedure that involves the examination of the inside of the airways and lungs with a flexible or rigid tube called a bronchoscope. This procedure allows healthcare professionals to directly visualize the airways, take tissue samples for biopsy, and remove foreign objects or secretions. Bronchoscopy can be used to diagnose and manage various respiratory conditions such as lung infections, inflammation, cancer, and bleeding. It is usually performed under local or general anesthesia to minimize discomfort and risks associated with the procedure.

Equipment contamination in a medical context refers to the presence of harmful microorganisms, such as bacteria, viruses, or fungi, on the surfaces of medical equipment or devices. This can occur during use, storage, or transportation of the equipment and can lead to the transmission of infections to patients, healthcare workers, or other individuals who come into contact with the contaminated equipment.

Equipment contamination can occur through various routes, including contact with contaminated body fluids, airborne particles, or environmental surfaces. To prevent equipment contamination and the resulting infection transmission, it is essential to follow strict infection control practices, such as regular cleaning and disinfection of equipment, use of personal protective equipment (PPE), and proper handling and storage of medical devices.

Bronchography is a medical imaging technique that involves the injection of a contrast material into the airways (bronchi) of the lungs, followed by X-ray imaging to produce detailed pictures of the bronchial tree. This diagnostic procedure was commonly used in the past to identify abnormalities such as narrowing, blockages, or inflammation in the airways, but it has largely been replaced by newer, less invasive techniques like computed tomography (CT) scans and bronchoscopy.

The process of bronchography involves the following steps:

1. The patient is sedated or given a local anesthetic to minimize discomfort during the procedure.
2. A radiopaque contrast material is introduced into the bronchi through a catheter that is inserted into the trachea, either via a nostril or through a small incision in the neck.
3. Once the contrast material has been distributed throughout the bronchial tree, X-ray images are taken from various angles to capture detailed views of the airways.
4. The images are then analyzed by a radiologist to identify any abnormalities or irregularities in the structure and function of the bronchi.

Although bronchography is considered a relatively safe procedure, it does carry some risks, including allergic reactions to the contrast material, infection, and bleeding. Additionally, the use of ionizing radiation during X-ray imaging should be carefully weighed against the potential benefits of the procedure.

'Hospital bed capacity, 100 to 299' is a range referring to the number of hospital beds available for patient care within a healthcare facility. In this context, the capacity falls between one hundred and two hundred ninety-nine beds. This capacity can vary based on several factors, including the size of the hospital, the services offered, and the needs of the population it serves. It is essential to monitor hospital bed capacity to ensure adequate resources are available to manage patient care during normal operations and in times of crisis or surge, such as a natural disaster or pandemic.

Iodophors are antiseptic solutions or preparations that contain iodine complexed with a solubilizing agent, usually a nonionic surfactant. The most common example is povidone-iodine (polyvinylpyrrolidone-iodine). Iodophors are widely used for skin disinfection before surgical procedures and injections, as well as for the treatment of wounds and burns.

The advantage of iodophors over traditional tincture of iodine is that they provide a more sustained release of iodine, which results in a longer-lasting antimicrobial effect while being less irritating to the skin. The complexation with the solubilizing agent also helps to reduce staining of the skin and clothing compared to traditional iodine solutions.

Disinfection is the process of eliminating or reducing harmful microorganisms from inanimate objects and surfaces through the use of chemicals, heat, or other methods. The goal of disinfection is to reduce the number of pathogens to a level that is considered safe for human health. Disinfection is an important step in preventing the spread of infectious diseases in healthcare settings, food processing facilities, and other environments where there is a risk of infection transmission.

It's important to note that disinfection is not the same as sterilization, which is the complete elimination of all microorganisms, including spores. Disinfection is generally less effective than sterilization but is often sufficient for most non-critical surfaces and objects. The choice between disinfection and sterilization depends on the level of risk associated with the item or surface being treated and the intended use of that item or surface.

"Bronchi" are a pair of airways in the respiratory system that branch off from the trachea (windpipe) and lead to the lungs. They are responsible for delivering oxygen-rich air to the lungs and removing carbon dioxide during exhalation. The right bronchus is slightly larger and more vertical than the left, and they further divide into smaller branches called bronchioles within the lungs. Any abnormalities or diseases affecting the bronchi can impact lung function and overall respiratory health.

"Foreign bodies" refer to any object or substance that is not normally present in a particular location within the body. These can range from relatively harmless items such as splinters or pieces of food in the skin or gastrointestinal tract, to more serious objects like bullets or sharp instruments that can cause significant damage and infection.

Foreign bodies can enter the body through various routes, including ingestion, inhalation, injection, or penetrating trauma. The location of the foreign body will determine the potential for harm and the necessary treatment. Some foreign bodies may pass through the body without causing harm, while others may require medical intervention such as removal or surgical extraction.

It is important to seek medical attention if a foreign body is suspected, as untreated foreign bodies can lead to complications such as infection, inflammation, and tissue damage.

Hemoptysis is the medical term for coughing up blood that originates from the lungs or lower respiratory tract. It can range in severity from streaks of blood mixed with mucus to large amounts of pure blood. Hemoptysis may be a sign of various underlying conditions, such as bronchitis, pneumonia, tuberculosis, cancer, or blood disorders. Immediate medical attention is required when hemoptysis occurs, especially if it's in significant quantities, to determine the cause and provide appropriate treatment.

Intubation, intratracheal is a medical procedure in which a flexible plastic or rubber tube called an endotracheal tube (ETT) is inserted through the mouth or nose, passing through the vocal cords and into the trachea (windpipe). This procedure is performed to establish and maintain a patent airway, allowing for the delivery of oxygen and the removal of carbon dioxide during mechanical ventilation in various clinical scenarios, such as:

1. Respiratory failure or arrest
2. Procedural sedation
3. Surgery under general anesthesia
4. Neuromuscular disorders
5. Ingestion of toxic substances
6. Head and neck trauma
7. Critical illness or injury affecting the airway

The process of intubation is typically performed by trained medical professionals, such as anesthesiologists, emergency medicine physicians, or critical care specialists, using direct laryngoscopy or video laryngoscopy to visualize the vocal cords and guide the ETT into the correct position. Once placed, the ETT is secured to prevent dislodgement, and the patient's respiratory status is continuously monitored to ensure proper ventilation and oxygenation.

Tracheal neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors in the trachea, which is the windpipe that carries air from the nose and throat to the lungs. These growths can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). Malignant tracheal neoplasms are relatively rare and can be primary (originating in the trachea) or secondary (spreading from another part of the body, such as lung cancer). Primary tracheal cancers can be squamous cell carcinoma, adenoid cystic carcinoma, mucoepidermoid carcinoma, or sarcomas. Symptoms may include cough, difficulty breathing, wheezing, or chest pain. Treatment options depend on the type, size, and location of the neoplasm and can include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or a combination of these approaches.

Equipment design, in the medical context, refers to the process of creating and developing medical equipment and devices, such as surgical instruments, diagnostic machines, or assistive technologies. This process involves several stages, including:

1. Identifying user needs and requirements
2. Concept development and brainstorming
3. Prototyping and testing
4. Design for manufacturing and assembly
5. Safety and regulatory compliance
6. Verification and validation
7. Training and support

The goal of equipment design is to create safe, effective, and efficient medical devices that meet the needs of healthcare providers and patients while complying with relevant regulations and standards. The design process typically involves a multidisciplinary team of engineers, clinicians, designers, and researchers who work together to develop innovative solutions that improve patient care and outcomes.

A gastroscope is a type of endoscope that is used to examine the inside of the stomach. It is a long, thin, flexible tube with a light and camera at the end, which allows doctors to view the lining of the stomach in detail on a screen. Gastroscopes are commonly used to diagnose and monitor conditions such as gastritis, ulcers, and stomach cancer. They can also be used to take tissue samples for biopsy or to perform certain treatments, such as removing polyps or cauterizing bleeding vessels.

A thoracoscope is not a medical condition, but a medical device used in the field of thoracic surgery. It is a type of endoscope that allows surgeons to view the inside of the chest cavity (thorax) through small incisions. The thoracoscope has a light source and a camera at its tip, which transmits images to a video monitor. This enables the surgeon to inspect the lungs, pleura, mediastinum, and diaphragm, take biopsies, and perform various surgical procedures, such as pleurodesis or lung resection, minimizing invasiveness and promoting faster recovery compared to traditional open thoracotomy.

Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) is a medical procedure in which a small amount of fluid is introduced into a segment of the lung and then gently suctioned back out. The fluid contains cells and other materials that can be analyzed to help diagnose various lung conditions, such as inflammation, infection, or cancer.

The procedure is typically performed during bronchoscopy, which involves inserting a thin, flexible tube with a light and camera on the end through the nose or mouth and into the lungs. Once the bronchoscope is in place, a small catheter is passed through the bronchoscope and into the desired lung segment. The fluid is then introduced and suctioned back out, and the sample is sent to a laboratory for analysis.

BAL can be helpful in diagnosing various conditions such as pneumonia, interstitial lung diseases, alveolar proteinosis, and some types of cancer. It can also be used to monitor the effectiveness of treatment for certain lung conditions. However, like any medical procedure, it carries some risks, including bleeding, infection, and respiratory distress. Therefore, it is important that the procedure is performed by a qualified healthcare professional in a controlled setting.

A Solitary Pulmonary Nodule (SPN) is a single, round or oval-shaped lung shadow that measures up to 3 cm in diameter on a chest radiograph. It is also known as a "coin lesion" due to its appearance. SPNs are usually discovered incidentally during routine chest X-rays or CT scans. They can be benign or malignant, and their nature is determined through further diagnostic tests such as PET scans, biopsies, or follow-up imaging studies.

Bronchial neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors in the bronchi, which are the large airways that lead into the lungs. These neoplasms can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). Malignant bronchial neoplasms are often referred to as lung cancer and can be further classified into small cell lung cancer and non-small cell lung cancer, depending on the type of cells involved.

Benign bronchial neoplasms are less common than malignant ones and may include growths such as papillomas, hamartomas, or chondromas. While benign neoplasms are not cancerous, they can still cause symptoms and complications if they grow large enough to obstruct the airways or if they become infected.

Treatment for bronchial neoplasms depends on several factors, including the type, size, location, and stage of the tumor, as well as the patient's overall health and medical history. Treatment options may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or a combination of these approaches.

Airway obstruction is a medical condition that occurs when the normal flow of air into and out of the lungs is partially or completely blocked. This blockage can be caused by a variety of factors, including swelling of the tissues in the airway, the presence of foreign objects or substances, or abnormal growths such as tumors.

When the airway becomes obstructed, it can make it difficult for a person to breathe normally. They may experience symptoms such as shortness of breath, wheezing, coughing, and chest tightness. In severe cases, airway obstruction can lead to respiratory failure and other life-threatening complications.

There are several types of airway obstruction, including:

1. Upper airway obstruction: This occurs when the blockage is located in the upper part of the airway, such as the nose, throat, or voice box.
2. Lower airway obstruction: This occurs when the blockage is located in the lower part of the airway, such as the trachea or bronchi.
3. Partial airway obstruction: This occurs when the airway is partially blocked, allowing some air to flow in and out of the lungs.
4. Complete airway obstruction: This occurs when the airway is completely blocked, preventing any air from flowing into or out of the lungs.

Treatment for airway obstruction depends on the underlying cause of the condition. In some cases, removing the obstruction may be as simple as clearing the airway of foreign objects or mucus. In other cases, more invasive treatments such as surgery may be necessary.

Sterilization, in a medical context, refers to the process of eliminating or removing all forms of microbial life, including fungi, bacteria, viruses, spores, and any other biological agents from a surface, object, or environment. This is typically achieved through various methods such as heat (using autoclaves), chemical processes, irradiation, or filtration.

In addition, sterilization can also refer to the surgical procedure that renders individuals unable to reproduce. This is often referred to as "permanent contraception" and can be performed through various methods such as vasectomy for men and tubal ligation for women. It's important to note that these procedures are typically permanent and not easily reversible.

Serratia infections are caused by bacteria named Serratia marcescens, which belongs to the family Enterobacteriaceae. These gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic bacilli can be found in various environments, including water, soil, and food. While they are a part of the normal gut flora in humans and animals, Serratia species can cause infections under certain circumstances, such as impaired immune function or when introduced into sterile sites like the bloodstream, urinary tract, or lungs.

Serratia infections can manifest as:

1. Pneumonia: A lower respiratory tract infection that causes cough, chest pain, and difficulty breathing.
2. Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs): Bacterial invasion of the urinary system, leading to symptoms like dysuria, frequency, urgency, and cloudy or foul-smelling urine.
3. Bloodstream infections (Bacteremia/Septicemia): Invasion of the bloodstream by Serratia species, which can result in fever, chills, and sepsis.
4. Wound infections: Localized infection of wounds or surgical sites, causing pain, redness, swelling, and pus discharge.
5. Eye infections (Conjunctivitis/Keratitis): Bacterial invasion of the eye, leading to symptoms like redness, pain, tearing, and discharge.
6. Central Nervous System (CNS) infections: Rare but severe complications include meningitis or brain abscesses.

Serratia infections can be challenging to treat due to their resistance to multiple antibiotics, including first-line agents like ampicillin and cephalosporins. Therefore, healthcare providers often rely on carbapenems, fluoroquinolones, or aminoglycosides for treatment. Prompt diagnosis and appropriate antimicrobial therapy are crucial to ensure favorable outcomes in patients with Serratia infections.

Pulmonary medicine is a medical specialty that deals with the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of diseases and conditions affecting the respiratory system, including the lungs, trachea, bronchi, bronchioles, and alveoli. Pulmonologists are specialists who treat a wide range of respiratory disorders such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, bronchitis, pneumonia, lung cancer, sleep-disordered breathing, tuberculosis, and interstitial lung diseases. They use various diagnostic techniques including chest X-rays, CT scans, pulmonary function tests, bronchoscopy, and sleep studies to evaluate and manage respiratory disorders. Pulmonologists also provide care for patients who require long-term mechanical ventilation or oxygen therapy.

Airway management is a set of procedures and techniques used to maintain or restore the flow of air into and out of the lungs, ensuring adequate ventilation and oxygenation of the body. This is critical in medical emergencies such as respiratory arrest, cardiac arrest, trauma, and other situations where a patient may have difficulty breathing on their own.

Airway management includes various interventions, such as:

1. Basic airway maneuvers: These include chin lift, jaw thrust, and suctioning to clear the airway of obstructions.
2. Use of adjuncts: Devices like oropharyngeal (OPA) and nasopharyngeal airways (NPA) can be used to maintain an open airway.
3. Bag-valve-mask (BVM) ventilation: This is a technique where a mask is placed over the patient's face, and positive pressure is applied to the bag to help move air in and out of the lungs.
4. Endotracheal intubation: A flexible plastic tube is inserted through the mouth or nose and advanced into the trachea (windpipe) to secure the airway and allow for mechanical ventilation.
5. Supraglottic airway devices (SADs): These are alternatives to endotracheal intubation, such as laryngeal mask airways (LMAs), that provide a temporary seal over the upper airway to facilitate ventilation.
6. Surgical airway: In rare cases, when other methods fail or are not possible, a surgical airway may be established by creating an opening through the neck (cricothyrotomy or tracheostomy) to access the trachea directly.

Proper airway management requires knowledge of anatomy, understanding of various techniques and devices, and the ability to quickly assess and respond to changing clinical situations. Healthcare professionals, such as physicians, nurses, respiratory therapists, and paramedics, receive extensive training in airway management to ensure competency in managing this critical aspect of patient care.

Therapeutic irrigation, also known as lavage, is a medical procedure that involves the introduction of fluids or other agents into a body cavity or natural passageway for therapeutic purposes. This technique is used to cleanse, flush out, or introduce medication into various parts of the body, such as the bladder, lungs, stomach, or colon.

The fluid used in therapeutic irrigation can be sterile saline solution, distilled water, or a medicated solution, depending on the specific purpose of the procedure. The flow and pressure of the fluid are carefully controlled to ensure that it reaches the desired area without causing damage to surrounding tissues.

Therapeutic irrigation is used to treat a variety of medical conditions, including infections, inflammation, obstructions, and toxic exposures. It can also be used as a diagnostic tool to help identify abnormalities or lesions within body cavities.

Overall, therapeutic irrigation is a valuable technique in modern medicine that allows healthcare providers to deliver targeted treatment directly to specific areas of the body, improving patient outcomes and quality of life.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Hospital Bed Capacity, 500 and over" is not a medical term or concept itself. However, I can provide some context related to hospital bed capacity in general.

Hospital bed capacity refers to the total number of beds that are available for patients in a healthcare facility. This includes both regular beds and any specialized beds, such as intensive care unit (ICU) beds.

When we say "500 and over," it's simply indicating a threshold for the size of the hospital. A hospital with a bed capacity of 500 or more is considered a large hospital. This can have implications for the range of services offered, the complexity of cases handled, and the resources available. However, it doesn't change the basic definition or nature of what a hospital bed capacity is.

I hope this helps! If you have any other questions about medical definitions or concepts, feel free to ask.

A needle biopsy is a medical procedure in which a thin, hollow needle is used to remove a small sample of tissue from a suspicious or abnormal area of the body. The tissue sample is then examined under a microscope to check for cancer cells or other abnormalities. Needle biopsies are often used to diagnose lumps or masses that can be felt through the skin, but they can also be guided by imaging techniques such as ultrasound, CT scan, or MRI to reach areas that cannot be felt. There are several types of needle biopsy procedures, including fine-needle aspiration (FNA) and core needle biopsy. FNA uses a thin needle and gentle suction to remove fluid and cells from the area, while core needle biopsy uses a larger needle to remove a small piece of tissue. The type of needle biopsy used depends on the location and size of the abnormal area, as well as the reason for the procedure.

A laryngeal mask is a type of supraglottic airway device that is used in anesthesia and critical care to secure the airway during procedures or respiratory support. It consists of an inflatable cuff that is inserted into the hypopharynx, behind the tongue, and above the laryngeal opening. The cuff forms a low-pressure seal around the laryngeal inlet, allowing for the delivery of ventilated gases to the lungs while minimizing the risk of aspiration.

Laryngeal masks are often used as an alternative to endotracheal intubation, especially in cases where intubation is difficult or contraindicated. They are also used in emergency situations for airway management and during resuscitation efforts. Laryngeal masks come in various sizes and designs, with some models allowing for the placement of a gastric tube to decompress the stomach and reduce the risk of regurgitation and aspiration.

Overall, laryngeal masks provide a safe and effective means of securing the airway while minimizing trauma and discomfort to the patient.

Tracheal stenosis is a medical condition characterized by the abnormal narrowing of the trachea (windpipe), which can lead to difficulty breathing. This narrowing can be caused by various factors such as inflammation, scarring, or the growth of abnormal tissue in the airway. Symptoms may include wheezing, coughing, shortness of breath, and chest discomfort, particularly during physical activity. Treatment options for tracheal stenosis depend on the severity and underlying cause of the condition and may include medications, bronchodilators, corticosteroids, or surgical interventions such as laser surgery, stent placement, or tracheal reconstruction.

The mediastinum is the medical term for the area in the middle of the chest that separates the two lungs. It contains various vital organs and structures, including:

* The heart and its blood vessels
* The trachea (windpipe) and esophagus (tube connecting the throat to the stomach)
* The thymus gland
* Lymph nodes
* Nerves, including the vagus nerve and phrenic nerves
* Connective tissue and fat

The mediastinum is enclosed by the breastbone in front, the spine in back, and the lungs on either side. Abnormalities in the structures contained within the mediastinum can lead to various medical conditions, such as tumors or infections.

A flexible bronchoscope is inserted with the patient in a sitting or supine position. Once the bronchoscope is inserted into ... A flexible bronchoscope is longer and thinner than a rigid bronchoscope. It contains a fiberoptic system that transmits an ... The larger lumen of the rigid bronchoscope (versus the narrow lumen of the flexible bronchoscope) allows for therapeutic ... From this time until the 1970s, rigid bronchoscopes were used exclusively. Chevalier Jackson, refined the rigid bronchoscope in ...
Outpatient pediatric esophagoscopy using a flexible fibreoptic bronchoscope. Design of an insufflation-aspiration adaptor. ...
In 1966, he developed the first flexible bronchoscope in conjunction with Machida Endoscope Co. Ltd (later taken over by Pentax ... His motto was "there is more hope with the bronchoscope". Christoph T. Bolliger; Praveen N. Mathur (2000). Interventional ... This allowed better visualisation of the upper lobe bronchi than is possible with the rigid bronchoscope. Successive ...
Further isolates from clinical specimens were obtained due to the use of contaminated bronchoscopes. Also recovered from ...
Kim, JE; Chang, CH; Nam, YT (2008). "Intubation through a Laryngeal Mask Airway by Fiberoptic Bronchoscope in an Infant with a ... Use of the flexible fiberoptic bronchoscope and similar devices has become among the preferred techniques in the management of ... Rozman, A; Duh, S; Petrinec-Primozic, M; Triller, N (2009). "Flexible bronchoscope damage and repair costs in a bronchoscopy ... Tracheal intubation in the emergency setting can be difficult with the fiberoptic bronchoscope due to blood, vomit, or ...
... bronchoscopes (such as the Negus bronchoscope) and oesophagoscopes. Other surgical innovations developed by Negus included an ... bronchoscopes, oesophagoscopes, an operating table, and tracheotomy equipment. His major publications were The Mechanism of the ...
The procedure is done using a balloon catheter through a bronchoscope and uses radio frequency energy. The bronchoscope is ... A dual-cooled radiofrequency ablation catheter is passed through the bronchoscope to provide the treatment. Gompelmann D, ...
BLVR valves are placed into the lungs using a catheter through a bronchoscope. During the one-hour procedure, the patient ... Endobronchial valves are inserted using a bronchoscope into sections of the lungs damaged by emphysema. Endobronchial valves ...
The flexible fiberoptic bronchoscope or rhinoscope can be used for office-based diagnostics or for tracheal intubation. The ... These include a number of indirect fiberoptic viewing laryngoscopes such as the flexible fiberoptic bronchoscope. ... this is facilitated by fiberoptic bronchoscopes, video laryngoscopes, fiberoptic stylets and mirror or prism optically enhanced ... incorporated a component that the operator could slide out to allow room for passage of an endoracheal tube or bronchoscope. ...
If the bronchoscope is not sterile, saline should initially be used to flush it clean. With the patient under some sort of ... Essentially, the saline source is connected to sterile bronchoscope, as is the specimen collection trap, and then suction ... is a diagnostic method of the lower respiratory system in which a bronchoscope is passed through the mouth or nose into an ... The primary equipment used in BAL includes a fiber-optic bronchoscope, sterile collection traps for collecting test specimens, ...
He wrote no monograph on the bronchoscope, and the omission has been supplied by his pupils. His book, Die Schwebelaryngoscopic ...
Although 1 in 500 chest X-rays show a peripheral lesion, 65% of traditional bronchoscopes fail to reach these distant lesions. ... that extends beyond the reach of the bronchoscope and becomes a pathway to the lesion for subsequent diagnosis and treatment; A ... tracking system that detects a position sensor incorporated into a flexible catheter advanced through a bronchoscope. ...
Placement has been found to be easier with the aid of fiber optical equipment such as a bronchoscope. Currently, flexible ...
Flexible brushes are passed through the bronchoscope, and the bronchial surface is gently abraded to obtain the specimen. ...
... esophagoscopes and bronchoscopes). He developed methods for removing foreign bodies from the esophagus and the airway with ...
Visualising the interior of the bronchi through a bronchoscope passed through the mouth and trachea, procedure is called ...
By the mid-1980s, the flexible fiberoptic bronchoscope had become an indispensable instrument within the pulmonology and ... incorporated a component that the operator could slide out to allow room for passage of an endotracheal tube or bronchoscope. ...
Examples include the cystoscope (bladder), nephroscope (kidney), bronchoscope (bronchus), arthroscope (joints) and colonoscope ...
By the mid-1980s, the flexible fiberoptic bronchoscope had become an indispensable instrument within the pulmonology and ... incorporated a component that the operator could slide out to allow room for passage of an endotracheal tube or bronchoscope. ...
Diagnosis with a flexible bronchoscope, which allows the injury to be visualized directly, is the fastest and most reliable ...
The first prototype of the flexible bronchoscope, invented by Dr. Shigeto Ikeda of Japan, was delivered by the Machida ... p. 1. "History of the Flexible Bronchoscope", by Teruomi Miyazawa, in Interventional Bronchoscopy (Karger Medical and ...
When flexible bronchoscope is used, rigid bronchoscope is typically on standby and readily available as this is the preferred ...
A bronchoscope is used for seeing the lungs and air passages, and a biopsy of the linings of the airway may be taken. ...
... a bronchoscope, or endoscopic instruments. However, worms might be difficult to remove if firmly attached to the bronchial ...
... or bronchoscopes are used. The yield rate of biopsies in small nodules is reported to be between 33 and 50% in tumors smaller ...
Particular requirements for rigid bronchoscopes ISO 8600-3:1997 Part 3: Determination of field of view and direction of view of ...
... the equipment used for artificial ventilation such as endotracheal tubes or bronchoscopes serve as the source of infection and ...
... bronchoscopes MeSH E07.230.220.170 - colposcopes MeSH E07.230.220.180 - culdoscopes MeSH E07.230.220.190 - cystoscopes MeSH ... bronchoscopes MeSH E07.858.240.170 - colposcopes MeSH E07.858.240.180 - culdoscopes MeSH E07.858.240.190 - cystoscopes MeSH ...
... s are typically implanted using a flexible delivery catheter advanced through a bronchoscope in minimally ...
... including the removal of a foreign object with the help of a laryngoscope or bronchoscope. The use of any commercial approved ...
Bronchoscope with high resolution imaging and great operability. ... Slim type bronchoscope with a 3.8mm slim distal end diameter, ... Treatment type bronchoscope with a 2.8mm diameter instrument channel while maintaining the distal end diameter of 5.8mm. ... Standard type bronchoscope with a wide angle image of 140° that further enhances observation, biopsy and treatment capabilities ... Treatment type bronchoscope equipped with a 3.2mm diameter instrument channel providing enhanced suction performance. A wider ...
Bronchoscope with high resolution imaging and great operability. ... Slim type bronchoscope with a 3.8mm slim distal end diameter, ... Treatment type bronchoscope with a 2.8mm diameter instrument channel while maintaining the distal end diameter of 5.8mm. ... Standard type bronchoscope with a wide angle image of 140° that further enhances observation, biopsy and treatment capabilities ... Treatment type bronchoscope equipped with a 3.2mm diameter instrument channel providing enhanced suction performance. A wider ...
... may be done with the use of a flexible bronchoscope, an instrument with a small light and camera which is inserted through ... When a suspicious area is seen, an instrument is channeled through the bronchoscope to take a sample for analysis. ... may be done with the use of a flexible bronchoscope, an instrument with a small light and camera which is inserted through the ...
In addition, the bronchoscopes were reprocessed each night with a standard ethylene oxide gas sterilization cycle. In September ... Beginning in May 1988, bronchoscopes and endoscopes from the surgical service had been reprocessed after each use with a Keymed ... Nelson KE, Larson PA, Schroufngel DE, Jackson J. Transmission of tuberculosis by flexible fiberoptic bronchoscopes. Am Rev ... Nosocomial Infection and Pseudoinfection from Contaminated Endoscopes and Bronchoscopes -- Wisconsin and Missouri Flexible ...
... Clin Chest Med. 2001 Jun;22(2):281-99. doi: 10.1016/s0272-5231(05)70043 ... The flexible bronchoscope for airway management as a diagnostic, therapeutic, and problem-solving tool is not used to the ...
This is one of the reasons why, with the latest sensor bronchoscopes, you can benefit not only from the latest technical ... With the launch of the new "SLIM" sensor bronchoscope, the first model compatible with the ENDOCAM Logic camera platform (HD ... The area of pneumology is currently inconceivable without flexible bronchoscopes, which have now become firmly established as ... This means that the "SLIM" bronchoscope benefits from the extended functionality of the ENDOCAM Logic camera platform, ...
... field corrective action to address complaints of endobronchial combustion occurring when laser-compatible bronchoscopes are ... Olympus bronchoscopes are intended for use in endoscopic diagnosis and treatment within the airways and the tracheobronchial ... Olympus has not evaluated any other lasers for compatibility with the indicated bronchoscope models. ... Olympus Issues Voluntary Labeling Update for Bronchoscopes Used with Laser Therapy Equipment ...
Thoracoscopy: assessment of a physician service and comparison of a flexible bronchoscope used as a thoracoscope with a rigid ... Thoracoscopy: assessment of a physician service and comparison of a flexible bronchoscope used as a thoracoscope with a rigid ... A rigid thoracoscope was compared with a fibreoptic bronchoscope used as a flexible thoracoscope and the diagnostic adequacy of ... The rigid thoracoscope proved a more satisfactory instrument but the fibreoptic bronchoscope, with minor adaptations, may be ...
... Trachea Instrument. Dysfunction Diagnostic Therapeutic Apparatus Drying Oven Dental Equipment Dental Chair. ... Bronchoscope. Laryngoscope. Arthroscope. Maxillary Endoscope. Ventriculoscope. Rhinolaryngoscope. Endoscope Acessories. ...
Bronchoscopes - MedDirect is NZs No.1 Online Medical Product Directory - find New Zealand Medical Companies supplying products ... Bronchoscope Ambu aScope2, aScope3 and aScope3 Slim sterile single-use flexible intubation Bronchoscopes. Easy to transport and ...
Medical electronic video bronchoscope flexible fiber video bronchoscope with 1.5/2.0/2.2/2.4/2.6 working channel. Desccription: ...
Search bronchoscope Tenders from Bihar State. View Tenders published by Government of Bihar for bronchoscope. ... 35551966 bids are invited for paediatric fibre optic flexible bronchoscope paediatric fibre optic flexible bronchoscope , camc ... respiratory medicine 591 peak flow meters 592 nebulizer 593 pulse oximeter 594 fiber optic bronchoscope 595 rigid bronchoscope ... laparoscopic stapling devices 1 fiber optic bronchoscope 2 rigid bronchoscope 1 peak flow meters 2 nebulizers 3 intercostal ...
... - Factory, Suppliers, Manufacturers from. Our target is to consolidate and improve the quality and ... FDA updates recommendations on reprocessing flexible bronchoscopes , Health Leaders Media. Analysis , Author: AJ Plunkett , ... FDA Portable USB Flexible Video Bronchoscope Anesthesia/Anaesthesia Airway Management System for Intubation in Clinical / ... Electronic Gastroscope Instrument with SD Record Card with Rigid Endoscopy Connection Bronchoscope Colonoscope ...
Please contact us to learn about our full range of Endoscopy Masks & Bronchoscope Airway products.. ...
The BF-1T180 Bronchoscope is ideal for therapeutic procedures because it has a wide 3.0 mm viewing channel with excellent image ... Olympus BF-1T180 Bronchoscopes The BF-1T180 Bronchoscope is ideal for therapeutic procedures because it has a wide 3.0 mm ...
OPTICAL SYSTEM Field Of View - 100º Direction Of View - Forward INSERTION TUBE Outer Diameter - 4.9mm LENGTH Working Length - 60cm BIOPSY CHANNEL Main Channel Size - 2.2mm
Field Of View 100º Direction Of View - Forward Depth Of Field 3-50mm
The Olympus BF-XP160F EVIS EXERA Video Bronchoscope has an ultra-thin 2.8 mm insertion tube, making it ideal for bronchoscopy ... Olympus BF-XP160F EVIS EXERA Video Bronchoscope Features. * Bright Video Images with Less Weight: With the versatility of a ... The Olympus BF-XP160F EVIS EXERA Video Bronchoscope is a light, ergonomically designed bronchofibervideoscope. This innovative ...
Detachable Bronchoscope With a Disposable Insertion Tube. Tyler P. Carlson, Chad W. Moen, Taylor D. Soli, Michael A. Greminger ... Detachable Bronchoscope With a Disposable Insertion Tube. / Carlson, Tyler P.; Moen, Chad W.; Soli, Taylor D. et al. In: ... Detachable Bronchoscope With a Disposable Insertion Tube. Journal of Medical Devices, Transactions of the ASME. 2015 Jun 1;9(2 ... Detachable Bronchoscope With a Disposable Insertion Tube. In: Journal of Medical Devices, Transactions of the ASME. 2015 ; Vol ...
Optical Forceps For Bronchoscope Manufacturer In India, ENT Optical Biopsy Forceps Exporter, Rigid Bronchoscope Optical Forceps ... Optical Forceps For Bronchoscope. Ask for Catalogue Product Code :- 22I03. Rigid Bronchoscope is designed for use in ... Optical Forceps For Bronchoscope. Home ENT Division Bronchoscopy Optical Forceps For Bronchoscope ... Rigid Bronchoscope is designed for use in interventional bronchoscopy. It combines innovative features for easier handling and ...
The Ascope 4 Broncho Regular endoscope is a single-use, flexible, ready-to-go bronchoscopy solution. With a working channel width of 2.2 mm, it is ideal for a wide range of procedures, including: Intubation Management of retained secretion BAL and BW procedures Protected specimen brush sampling PDT procedures Training
CO2 LASER BRONCHOSCOPE SYSTEM. Page Type. Cleared 510(K). PDF. FDA Hosted PDF. * The FDA doesnt provide PDFs for all ... CO2 LASER BRONCHOSCOPE SYSTEM. Page Type. Cleared 510(K). PDF. FDA Hosted PDF. * The FDA doesnt provide PDFs for all ...
... bronchoscope, the newest addition to its robust EBUS portfolio of devices for minimally invasive lung cancer diagnosis and ... this new EBUS-TBNA bronchoscope has the flexibility to ensure the correct positioning of the scope tip relative to the target. ... The BF-UC190F EBUS bronchoscope is the newest addition to the robust Olympus EBUS portfolio of devices for the minimally ... "The BF-UC190F bronchoscope is a valuable advancement in the use of EBUS-TBNA for the diagnosis and staging of lung cancer." ...
TRACHEOSCOPE AND BRONCHOSCOPES FOR USE WITHOUT A LARYNGOSCOPE. Arch Otolaryngol. 1928;7(6):634-636. doi:10.1001/archotol. ...
HOPKINS II.Autoclavable Bronchoscope.50 cm.Green.. Intended use/discipline. SURGICAL. MEDICAL. VETERINARY. USED MEDICAL. ... Karl Storz 10320AA, 5.5 mm 0º HOPKINS II Autoclavable Bronchoscope, 50 cm, Green. $1,495 (USD). ... Karl Storz 10320AA, 5.5 mm 0º HOPKINS II Autoclavable Bronchoscope, 50 cm, Green. ...
Ambu recently announced that its single-use bronchoscope and specimen sampling system won CE mark approval. ... Ambu secures CE mark for single-use bronchoscope and sampling system. September 29, 2021. By Danielle Kirsh ... It launched its first single-use flexible bronchoscope, aScope, in 2009 and has a broad range of single-use pulmonology devices ... Ambu recently announced that its single-use bronchoscope and specimen sampling system won CE mark approval. ...
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  • Slim type bronchoscope with a 3.8mm slim distal end diameter, suitable for pediatric bronchoscopy. (fujifilm.com)
  • Rigid Bronchoscope is designed for use in interventional bronchoscopy. (advinhealthcare.com)
  • Bronchoscopy is a procedure to look directly at the airways in the lungs using a thin, lighted tube (bronchoscope). (rochester.edu)
  • During bronchoscopy, a thin tube (bronchoscope) is passed through your nose or mouth, down your throat and into your lungs. (stelizabeth.com)
  • Bronchoscopy is most commonly performed using a flexible bronchoscope. (stelizabeth.com)
  • The flexible bronchoscope for airway management as a diagnostic, therapeutic, and problem-solving tool is not used to the degree that it deserves. (nih.gov)
  • Please contact us to learn about our full range of Endoscopy Masks & Bronchoscope Airway products. (murraysurgical.ie)
  • The rigid bronchoscope is a hollow metal tube used for inspecting the lower airway. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, in certain situations, such as if there's a lot of bleeding in your lungs or a large object is stuck in your airway, a rigid bronchoscope may be needed. (stelizabeth.com)
  • During some procedures, special devices may be passed through the bronchoscope, such as a tool to obtain a biopsy, an electrocautery probe to control bleeding or a laser to reduce the size of an airway tumor. (stelizabeth.com)
  • Thoracoscopy: assessment of a physician service and comparison of a flexible bronchoscope used as a thoracoscope with a rigid thoracoscope. (bmj.com)
  • A rigid thoracoscope was compared with a fibreoptic bronchoscope used as a flexible thoracoscope and the diagnostic adequacy of biopsy specimens obtained with the two instruments assessed. (bmj.com)
  • The rigid thoracoscope proved a more satisfactory instrument but the fibreoptic bronchoscope, with minor adaptations, may be used for thoracoscopy. (bmj.com)
  • 36241812 bids are invited for rigid bronchoscope (q3) total quantity : 1. (tendersinbihar.com)
  • The construction of bronchoscopes ranges from rigid metal tubes with attached lighting devices to flexible optical fiber instruments with realtime video equipment. (wikipedia.org)
  • Killian used a rigid bronchoscope to remove a pork bone. (wikipedia.org)
  • From this time until the 1970s, rigid bronchoscopes were used exclusively. (wikipedia.org)
  • Chevalier Jackson, refined the rigid bronchoscope in the 1920s, using this rigid tube to visually inspect the trachea and mainstem bronchi. (wikipedia.org)
  • The larger lumen of the rigid bronchoscope (versus the narrow lumen of the flexible bronchoscope) allows for therapeutic approaches such as electrocautery to help control the bleeding. (wikipedia.org)
  • A flexible bronchoscope is longer and thinner than a rigid bronchoscope. (wikipedia.org)
  • Most flexible bronchoscopes also include a channel for suctioning or instrumentation, but these are significantly smaller than those in a rigid bronchoscope. (wikipedia.org)
  • A paediatric rigid bronchoscope shoved through the granulation tissue, finally established oxygenation. (jaccr.com)
  • There are 2 types of bronchoscopes: flexible and rigid. (rochester.edu)
  • A rigid bronchoscope is a straight tube. (rochester.edu)
  • In most cases, the flexible bronchoscope is used, not the rigid bronchoscope. (rochester.edu)
  • Currently, doctors use an instrument called a bronchoscope to carry out an examination of the lungs and air passages. (leeds.ac.uk)
  • To delve deeper into the lungs, a catheter or fine tube - measuring about 2 millimetres in diameter - is passed through the bronchoscope and then on and into the smaller tubes of the lungs. (leeds.ac.uk)
  • This is done so oxygen can be sent right into your lungs while the bronchoscope is in place. (rochester.edu)
  • The images are downloaded into a computer which helps navigate the bronchoscope into the smaller airways of the lungs. (epnet.com)
  • A light and a small camera on the bronchoscope allow the provider to look inside the lungs' airways. (stelizabeth.com)
  • The solution was used daily for disinfecting semicritical equipment such as endoscopes and bronchoscopes. (cdc.gov)
  • In use evaluation of Perasafe compared with Cidex in fibreoptic bronchoscope disinfection. (bvsalud.org)
  • Plain endotracheal tube (ETT) intubation guided by a fiberoptic bronchoscope through Ambu ® AuraGain TM was demonstrated in a pediatric manikin to the participants before training. (ekja.org)
  • The flexible fiberoptic bronchoscope increases test effectiveness. (family-health-information.com)
  • Ambu aScope2, aScope3 and aScope3 Slim sterile single-use flexible intubation Bronchoscopes. (meddirect.co.nz)
  • Ambu recently announced that its single-use bronchoscope and specimen sampling system won CE mark approval. (medicaltubingandextrusion.com)
  • Ambu ® aScope ™ 4 Broncho is a family of single-use sterile bronchoscopes that can be used for a wide range of procedures throughout the hospital. (ambu.com)
  • It launched its first single-use flexible bronchoscope, aScope, in 2009 and has a broad range of single-use pulmonology devices on the market. (medicaltubingandextrusion.com)
  • With the aScope 4 Broncho solution, you get a brand-new, sterile bronchoscope straight from the pack every time. (ambu.com)
  • Treatment type bronchoscope equipped with a 3.2mm diameter instrument channel providing enhanced suction performance. (fujifilm.com)
  • Standard type bronchoscope with a slim distal end diameter suitable for observation, biopsy and treatment. (fujifilm.com)
  • Standard type bronchoscope with a wide angle image of 140° that further enhances observation, biopsy and treatment capabilities. (fujifilm.com)
  • Lung or bronchial biopsy (tissue samples taken to diagnose or rule out disease) may be done with the use of a flexible bronchoscope, an instrument with a small light and camera which is inserted through the nose or mouth. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Olympus announced today the market launch of the FDA 510(k)-cleared BF-UC190F endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS) bronchoscope, the newest addition to its robust EBUS portfolio of devices for minimally invasive lung cancer diagnosis and staging via needle biopsy. (olympusamerica.com)
  • We are very excited to launch this next-generation EBUS bronchoscope, which will further the ability of physicians to biopsy mediastinal and hilar lymph nodes through a minimally invasive procedure," said Lynn Ray, Vice President and General Manager of the Global Respiratory Business Unit for Olympus Corporation. (olympusamerica.com)
  • Beginning in May 1988, bronchoscopes and endoscopes from the surgical service had been reprocessed after each use with a Keymed Auto Disinfector 2 (manufactured by Olympus Corporation), which washed the endoscopes with a detergent solution, disinfected with 2.0% glutaraldehyde, and rinsed with tap water. (cdc.gov)
  • 36044003 tender for reputed/ registered supplier/ manufacturers for new bronchoscope for surgical oncology dept and equipments for pain clinic unit of palliative care. (tendersinbihar.com)
  • In my study of this new EBUS-TBNA bronchoscope, I found that the sharper puncture angle greatly improves the ability of physicians to puncture the lymph node precisely without needing to use more force or to alter technique," said Kazuhiro Yasufuku, MD, PhD, FRCSC, Professor and Chair of Thoracic Surgery at the University of Toronto and the William Coco Chair in Surgical Innovation for Lung Cancer at the University Health Network. (olympusamerica.com)
  • Glutaraldehyde is used as a cold sterilant to disinfect and clean heat-sensitive equipment such as dialysis instruments, surgical instruments, suction bottles, bronchoscopes, endoscopes, and ear, nose, and throat instruments. (cdc.gov)
  • July 3, 2023) - Olympus Corporation has announced a voluntary field corrective action to address complaints of endobronchial combustion occurring when laser-compatible bronchoscopes are used during therapeutic procedures in combination with laser therapy equipment or argon plasma coagulation (APC). (olympusamerica.com)
  • Olympus notified customers in the U.S. by letter on June 8, 2023, requesting that health care personnel treating patients using an Olympus bronchofiberscope or bronchovideoscope carefully read the full Medical Device Corrective Action and addendum detailing compatible laser types and ensure all personnel are completely knowledgeable and thoroughly aware that Olympus laser compatible bronchoscopes are compatible only with Nd: YAG laser or 810 nm diode lasers. (olympusamerica.com)
  • Treatment type bronchoscope with a 2.8mm diameter instrument channel while maintaining the distal end diameter of 5.8mm. (fujifilm.com)
  • Fiberoptic scopes have been superseded by bronchoscopes with a charge coupled device (CCD) video chip located at their distal end. (wikipedia.org)
  • Olympus bronchoscopes are intended for use in endoscopic diagnosis and treatment within the airways and the tracheobronchial tree. (olympusamerica.com)
  • An instrument (bronchoscope) is inserted into the airways, usually through the nose or mouth, or occasionally through a tracheostomy. (wikipedia.org)
  • The BF-1T180 Bronchoscope is ideal for therapeutic procedures because it has a wide 3.0 mm viewing channel with excellent image quality that is compatible with a wide range of endoscopic instrumentation, including electrosurgical and laser devices. (fyendoscopy.com)
  • In people with lung cancer, a bronchoscope with a built-in ultrasound probe may be used to check the lymph nodes in the chest. (stelizabeth.com)
  • 39237967 bids are invited for flexible fiber optic video bronchoscope (q3) total quantity : 1. (tendersinbihar.com)
  • With the launch of the new "SLIM" sensor bronchoscope, the first model compatible with the ENDOCAM Logic camera platform (HD and 4K) has now been added to the flexible sensor bronchoscope family. (richard-wolf.com)
  • This means that the "SLIM" bronchoscope benefits from the extended functionality of the ENDOCAM Logic camera platform, including the save function for images and video sequences, as well as the option to connect to the core nova OR integration. (richard-wolf.com)
  • The bronchoscope tube will be inserted through the mouth. (epnet.com)
  • This tube is called a bronchoscope. (alberta.ca)
  • The BF-UC190F EBUS bronchoscope is the newest addition to the robust Olympus EBUS portfolio of devices for the minimally invasive diagnosis and staging of lung cancer. (olympusamerica.com)
  • The BF-UC190F bronchoscope is a valuable advancement in the use of EBUS-TBNA for the diagnosis and staging of lung cancer. (olympusamerica.com)
  • But doctors are limited in how they can move a bronchoscope, making it difficult to navigate the instrument and the catheter to where they are needed. (leeds.ac.uk)
  • Olympus has not evaluated any other lasers for compatibility with the indicated bronchoscope models. (olympusamerica.com)
  • Additionally, Olympus is reminding users to pay careful attention to warnings in the Operation Manual on laser cauterization with Olympus bronchoscopes. (olympusamerica.com)
  • The Olympus BF-XP160F EVIS EXERA Video Bronchoscope is a light, ergonomically designed bronchofibervideoscope. (mfimedical.com)
  • The attachment of non-Olympus accessories to the bronchoscope s instrument channel port may have resulted in more applied force than expected and lead to loosening of the instrument channel port. (fda.gov)
  • It is done with a tool called a bronchoscope. (epnet.com)
  • The doctor puts the bronchoscope into your mouth or nose and down your throat. (alberta.ca)
  • What's more, cost-effectiveness and a space-saving, compact design for the Camera Controller were key priorities when it came to creating the ENDOCAM Flex HD bronchoscope range. (richard-wolf.com)
  • One of our single-use bronchoscopes is always available, easy to set up, and it requires zero handling or reprocessing after use. (ambu.com)
  • This is one of the reasons why, with the latest sensor bronchoscopes, you can benefit not only from the latest technical features, but also from a particularly ergonomic design. (richard-wolf.com)
  • This model enables users to practice the insertion of ultrafine bronchoscope. (anatomywarehouse.com)
  • High-resolution bronchoscope to support efficient treatment. (fujifilm.com)