Narrowing of the caliber of the BRONCHI, physiologically or as a result of pharmacological intervention.
Asthma attacks following a period of exercise. Usually the induced attack is short-lived and regresses spontaneously. The magnitude of postexertional airway obstruction is strongly influenced by the environment in which exercise is performed (i.e. inhalation of cold air during physical exertion markedly augments the severity of the airway obstruction; conversely, warm humid air blunts or abolishes it).
Spasmodic contraction of the smooth muscle of the bronchi.
Agents causing the narrowing of the lumen of a bronchus or bronchiole.
Physiologically, the opposition to flow of air caused by the forces of friction. As a part of pulmonary function testing, it is the ratio of driving pressure to the rate of air flow.
A quaternary ammonium parasympathomimetic agent with the muscarinic actions of ACETYLCHOLINE. It is hydrolyzed by ACETYLCHOLINESTERASE at a considerably slower rate than ACETYLCHOLINE and is more resistant to hydrolysis by nonspecific CHOLINESTERASES so that its actions are more prolonged. It is used as a parasympathomimetic bronchoconstrictor agent and as a diagnostic aid for bronchial asthma. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1116)
Tests involving inhalation of allergens (nebulized or in dust form), nebulized pharmacologically active solutions (e.g., histamine, methacholine), or control solutions, followed by assessment of respiratory function. These tests are used in the diagnosis of asthma.
The larger air passages of the lungs arising from the terminal bifurcation of the TRACHEA. They include the largest two primary bronchi which branch out into secondary bronchi, and tertiary bronchi which extend into BRONCHIOLES and PULMONARY ALVEOLI.
A form of bronchial disorder with three distinct components: airway hyper-responsiveness (RESPIRATORY HYPERSENSITIVITY), airway INFLAMMATION, and intermittent AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION. It is characterized by spasmodic contraction of airway smooth muscle, WHEEZING, and dyspnea (DYSPNEA, PAROXYSMAL).
An amine derived by enzymatic decarboxylation of HISTIDINE. It is a powerful stimulant of gastric secretion, a constrictor of bronchial smooth muscle, a vasodilator, and also a centrally acting neurotransmitter.
A chromone complex that acts by inhibiting the release of chemical mediators from sensitized mast cells. It is used in the prophylactic treatment of both allergic and exercise-induced asthma, but does not affect an established asthmatic attack.
Measure of the maximum amount of air that can be expelled in a given number of seconds during a FORCED VITAL CAPACITY determination . It is usually given as FEV followed by a subscript indicating the number of seconds over which the measurement is made, although it is sometimes given as a percentage of forced vital capacity.
The administration of drugs by the respiratory route. It includes insufflation into the respiratory tract.
Agents that cause an increase in the expansion of a bronchus or bronchial tubes.
A common name used for the genus Cavia. The most common species is Cavia porcellus which is the domesticated guinea pig used for pets and biomedical research.
Colloids with a gaseous dispersing phase and either liquid (fog) or solid (smoke) dispersed phase; used in fumigation or in inhalation therapy; may contain propellant agents.
Tendency of the smooth muscle of the tracheobronchial tree to contract more intensely in response to a given stimulus than it does in the response seen in normal individuals. This condition is present in virtually all symptomatic patients with asthma. The most prominent manifestation of this smooth muscle contraction is a decrease in airway caliber that can be readily measured in the pulmonary function laboratory.
A group of compounds that are derivatives of beta-methylacetylcholine (methacholine).
The capability of the LUNGS to distend under pressure as measured by pulmonary volume change per unit pressure change. While not a complete description of the pressure-volume properties of the lung, it is nevertheless useful in practice as a measure of the comparative stiffness of the lung. (From Best & Taylor's Physiological Basis of Medical Practice, 12th ed, p562)
A short-acting beta-2 adrenergic agonist that is primarily used as a bronchodilator agent to treat ASTHMA. Albuterol is prepared as a racemic mixture of R(-) and S(+) stereoisomers. The stereospecific preparation of R(-) isomer of albuterol is referred to as levalbuterol.
A muscarinic antagonist structurally related to ATROPINE but often considered safer and more effective for inhalation use. It is used for various bronchial disorders, in rhinitis, and as an antiarrhythmic.
A pyranoquinolone derivative that inhibits activation of inflammatory cells which are associated with ASTHMA, including eosinophils, neutrophils, macrophages, mast cells, monocytes, and platelets.
A class of cell surface receptors for tachykinins that prefers neurokinin A; (NKA, substance K, neurokinin alpha, neuromedin L), neuropeptide K; (NPK); or neuropeptide gamma over other tachykinins. Neurokinin-2 (NK-2) receptors have been cloned and are similar to other G-protein coupled receptors.
A mammalian neuropeptide of 10 amino acids that belongs to the tachykinin family. It is similar in structure and action to SUBSTANCE P and NEUROKININ B with the ability to excite neurons, dilate blood vessels, and contract smooth muscles, such as those in the BRONCHI.
A group of LEUKOTRIENES; (LTC4; LTD4; and LTE4) that is the major mediator of BRONCHOCONSTRICTION; HYPERSENSITIVITY; and other allergic reactions. Earlier studies described a "slow-reacting substance of ANAPHYLAXIS" released from lung by cobra venom or after anaphylactic shock. The relationship between SRS-A leukotrienes was established by UV which showed the presence of the conjugated triene. (From Merck Index, 11th ed)
Either of the pair of organs occupying the cavity of the thorax that effect the aeration of the blood.
The cartilaginous and membranous tube descending from the larynx and branching into the right and left main bronchi.
Drugs that bind to but do not activate histamine receptors, thereby blocking the actions of histamine or histamine agonists. Classical antihistaminics block the histamine H1 receptors only.
An acute hypersensitivity reaction due to exposure to a previously encountered ANTIGEN. The reaction may include rapidly progressing URTICARIA, respiratory distress, vascular collapse, systemic SHOCK, and death.
The 10th cranial nerve. The vagus is a mixed nerve which contains somatic afferents (from skin in back of the ear and the external auditory meatus), visceral afferents (from the pharynx, larynx, thorax, and abdomen), parasympathetic efferents (to the thorax and abdomen), and efferents to striated muscle (of the larynx and pharynx).
A pulmonary ventilation rate faster than is metabolically necessary for the exchange of gases. It is the result of an increased frequency of breathing, an increased tidal volume, or a combination of both. It causes an excess intake of oxygen and the blowing off of carbon dioxide.
A biologically active principle of SRS-A that is formed from LEUKOTRIENE D4 via a peptidase reaction that removes the glycine residue. The biological actions of LTE4 are similar to LTC4 and LTD4. (From Dictionary of Prostaglandins and Related Compounds, 1990)
Measurement of the volume of gas in the lungs, including that which is trapped in poorly communicating air spaces. It is of particular use in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and emphysema. (Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)
'Bronchial diseases' is a broad term referring to various medical conditions that affect the bronchial tubes, including inflammation, infection, obstruction or narrowing, leading to symptoms such as coughing, wheezing, and difficulty breathing.
A genus of nematodes of the superfamily ASCARIDOIDEA whose species usually inhabit the intestine.
A synthetic nondepolarizing blocking drug. The actions of gallamine triethiodide are similar to those of TUBOCURARINE, but this agent blocks the cardiac vagus and may cause sinus tachycardia and, occasionally, hypertension and increased cardiac output. It should be used cautiously in patients at risk from increased heart rate but may be preferred for patients with bradycardia. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual, 1992, p198)
A histamine H1 antagonist used in allergic reactions, hay fever, rhinitis, urticaria, and asthma. It has also been used in veterinary applications. One of the most widely used of the classical antihistaminics, it generally causes less drowsiness and sedation than PROMETHAZINE.
A class of drugs designed to prevent leukotriene synthesis or activity by blocking binding at the receptor level.
One of the biologically active principles of SRS-A. It is generated from LEUKOTRIENE C4 after partial hydrolysis of the peptide chain, i.e., cleavage of the gamma-glutamyl portion. Its biological actions include stimulation of vascular and nonvascular smooth muscle, and increases in vascular permeability. (From Dictionary of Prostaglandins and Related Compounds, 1990)
An alkaloid, originally from Atropa belladonna, but found in other plants, mainly SOLANACEAE. Hyoscyamine is the 3(S)-endo isomer of atropine.
A specific subtype of muscarinic receptor found in the lower BRAIN, the HEART and in SMOOTH MUSCLE-containing organs. Although present in smooth muscle the M2 muscarinic receptor appears not to be involved in contractile responses.
A method of studying a drug or procedure in which both the subjects and investigators are kept unaware of who is actually getting which specific treatment.
A histamine H1 antagonist used as the hydrogen fumarate in hay fever, rhinitis, allergic skin conditions, and pruritus. It causes drowsiness.
A selective beta-2 adrenergic agonist used as a bronchodilator and tocolytic.
Measurement of the various processes involved in the act of respiration: inspiration, expiration, oxygen and carbon dioxide exchange, lung volume and compliance, etc.
An alkylamide found in CAPSICUM that acts at TRPV CATION CHANNELS.
An albumin obtained from the white of eggs. It is a member of the serpin superfamily.
The total volume of gas inspired or expired per unit of time, usually measured in liters per minute.
Unstriated and unstriped muscle, one of the muscles of the internal organs, blood vessels, hair follicles, etc. Contractile elements are elongated, usually spindle-shaped cells with centrally located nuclei. Smooth muscle fibers are bound together into sheets or bundles by reticular fibers and frequently elastic nets are also abundant. (From Stedman, 25th ed)
Studies comparing two or more treatments or interventions in which the subjects or patients, upon completion of the course of one treatment, are switched to another. In the case of two treatments, A and B, half the subjects are randomly allocated to receive these in the order A, B and half to receive them in the order B, A. A criticism of this design is that effects of the first treatment may carry over into the period when the second is given. (Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)
Drugs that are used to treat asthma.
A family of biologically active peptides sharing a common conserved C-terminal sequence, -Phe-X-Gly-Leu-Met-NH2, where X is either an aromatic or a branched aliphatic amino acid. Members of this family have been found in mammals, amphibians, and mollusks. Tachykinins have diverse pharmacological actions in the central nervous system and the cardiovascular, genitourinary, respiratory, and gastrointestinal systems, as well as in glandular tissues. This diversity of activity is due to the existence of three or more subtypes of tachykinin receptors.
Drugs that selectively bind to but do not activate histamine H1 receptors, thereby blocking the actions of endogenous histamine. Included here are the classical antihistaminics that antagonize or prevent the action of histamine mainly in immediate hypersensitivity. They act in the bronchi, capillaries, and some other smooth muscles, and are used to prevent or allay motion sickness, seasonal rhinitis, and allergic dermatitis and to induce somnolence. The effects of blocking central nervous system H1 receptors are not as well understood.
Inorganic salts of sulfurous acid.
Quinolines are heterocyclic aromatic organic compounds consisting of a two-nitrogened benzene ring fused to a pyridine ring, which have been synthesized and used as building blocks for various medicinal drugs, particularly antibiotics and antimalarials.
A family of biologically active compounds derived from arachidonic acid by oxidative metabolism through the 5-lipoxygenase pathway. They participate in host defense reactions and pathophysiological conditions such as immediate hypersensitivity and inflammation. They have potent actions on many essential organs and systems, including the cardiovascular, pulmonary, and central nervous system as well as the gastrointestinal tract and the immune system.
A phospholipid derivative formed by PLATELETS; BASOPHILS; NEUTROPHILS; MONOCYTES; and MACROPHAGES. It is a potent platelet aggregating agent and inducer of systemic anaphylactic symptoms, including HYPOTENSION; THROMBOCYTOPENIA; NEUTROPENIA; and BRONCHOCONSTRICTION.
Measurement of the maximum rate of airflow attained during a FORCED VITAL CAPACITY determination. Common abbreviations are PEFR and PFR.
Cell surface proteins that bind TACHYKININS with high affinity and trigger intracellular changes influencing the behavior of cells. Three classes of tachykinin receptors have been characterized, the NK-1; NK-2; and NK-3; which prefer, respectively, SUBSTANCE P; NEUROKININ A; and NEUROKININ B.
The interruption or removal of any part of the vagus (10th cranial) nerve. Vagotomy may be performed for research or for therapeutic purposes.
The tubular and cavernous organs and structures, by means of which pulmonary ventilation and gas exchange between ambient air and the blood are brought about.
Measurement of volume of air inhaled or exhaled by the lung.
Analogs and derivatives of atropine.
Any hindrance to the passage of air into and out of the lungs.
A selective histamine H1-receptor antagonist devoid of central nervous system depressant activity. The drug was used for ALLERGY but withdrawn due to causing LONG QT SYNDROME.
Devices that cause a liquid or solid to be converted into an aerosol (spray) or a vapor. It is used in drug administration by inhalation, humidification of ambient air, and in certain analytical instruments.
The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.
AMINO ALCOHOLS containing the ETHANOLAMINE; (-NH2CH2CHOH) group and its derivatives.
A mixture of alkylbenzyldimethylammonium compounds. It is a bactericidal quaternary ammonium detergent used topically in medicaments, deodorants, mouthwashes, as a surgical antiseptic, and as a as preservative and emulsifier in drugs and cosmetics.
Antigen-type substances that produce immediate hypersensitivity (HYPERSENSITIVITY, IMMEDIATE).
Measurement of the amount of air that the lungs may contain at various points in the respiratory cycle.
Drugs that bind to but do not activate CHOLINERGIC RECEPTORS, thereby blocking the actions of ACETYLCHOLINE or cholinergic agonists.
A subclass of muscarinic receptor that mediates cholinergic-induced contraction in a variety of SMOOTH MUSCLES.
Compounds that inhibit or block the activity of NEUROKININ-1 RECEPTORS.
A nonapeptide messenger that is enzymatically produced from KALLIDIN in the blood where it is a potent but short-lived agent of arteriolar dilation and increased capillary permeability. Bradykinin is also released from MAST CELLS during asthma attacks, from gut walls as a gastrointestinal vasodilator, from damaged tissues as a pain signal, and may be a neurotransmitter.
An unstable intermediate between the prostaglandin endoperoxides and thromboxane B2. The compound has a bicyclic oxaneoxetane structure. It is a potent inducer of platelet aggregation and causes vasoconstriction. It is the principal component of rabbit aorta contracting substance (RCS).
An eleven-amino acid neurotransmitter that appears in both the central and peripheral nervous systems. It is involved in transmission of PAIN, causes rapid contractions of the gastrointestinal smooth muscle, and modulates inflammatory and immune responses.
The physical or mechanical action of the LUNGS; DIAPHRAGM; RIBS; and CHEST WALL during respiration. It includes airflow, lung volume, neural and reflex controls, mechanoreceptors, breathing patterns, etc.
Agents that suppress cough. They act centrally on the medullary cough center. EXPECTORANTS, also used in the treatment of cough, act locally.
A histamine H1 antagonist. It has mild hypnotic properties and some local anesthetic action and is used for allergies (including skin eruptions) both parenterally and locally. It is a common ingredient of cold remedies.
Altered reactivity to an antigen, which can result in pathologic reactions upon subsequent exposure to that particular antigen.
The act of breathing with the LUNGS, consisting of INHALATION, or the taking into the lungs of the ambient air, and of EXHALATION, or the expelling of the modified air which contains more CARBON DIOXIDE than the air taken in (Blakiston's Gould Medical Dictionary, 4th ed.). This does not include tissue respiration (= OXYGEN CONSUMPTION) or cell respiration (= CELL RESPIRATION).
Washing liquid obtained from irrigation of the lung, including the BRONCHI and the PULMONARY ALVEOLI. It is generally used to assess biochemical, inflammatory, or infection status of the lung.
Spirometric technique in which the volume of air breathed in the right and left lung is recorded separately.
The act of BREATHING in.
Drugs that selectively bind to and activate beta-adrenergic receptors.
The condition of an anatomical structure's being constricted beyond normal dimensions.
The rate of airflow measured during a FORCED VITAL CAPACITY determination.
The volume of air that is exhaled by a maximal expiration following a maximal inspiration.
A histamine H1 antagonist used as an antiemetic, antitussive, for dermatoses and pruritus, for hypersensitivity reactions, as a hypnotic, an antiparkinson, and as an ingredient in common cold preparations. It has some undesired antimuscarinic and sedative effects.
The volume of air remaining in the LUNGS at the end of a normal, quiet expiration. It is the sum of the RESIDUAL VOLUME and the EXPIRATORY RESERVE VOLUME. Common abbreviation is FRC.
A state characterized by loss of feeling or sensation. This depression of nerve function is usually the result of pharmacologic action and is induced to allow performance of surgery or other painful procedures.
Compounds bind to and activate ADRENERGIC BETA-2 RECEPTORS.
A widely used non-cardioselective beta-adrenergic antagonist. Propranolol has been used for MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION; ARRHYTHMIA; ANGINA PECTORIS; HYPERTENSION; HYPERTHYROIDISM; MIGRAINE; PHEOCHROMOCYTOMA; and ANXIETY but adverse effects instigate replacement by newer drugs.
Hypertonic sodium chloride solution. A solution having an osmotic pressure greater than that of physiologic salt solution (0.9 g NaCl in 100 ml purified water).
A series of hydrocarbons containing both chlorine and fluorine. These have been used as refrigerants, blowing agents, cleaning fluids, solvents, and as fire extinguishing agents. They have been shown to cause stratospheric ozone depletion and have been banned for many uses.
Analogs or derivatives of scopolamine.
A neurotransmitter found at neuromuscular junctions, autonomic ganglia, parasympathetic effector junctions, a subset of sympathetic effector junctions, and at many sites in the central nervous system.
A form of hypersensitivity affecting the respiratory tract. It includes ASTHMA and RHINITIS, ALLERGIC, SEASONAL.
Cell-surface receptors that bind LEUKOTRIENES with high affinity and trigger intracellular changes influencing the behavior of cells. The leukotriene receptor subtypes have been tentatively named according to their affinities for the endogenous leukotrienes LTB4; LTC4; LTD4; and LTE4.
Physiologically active compounds found in many organs of the body. They are formed in vivo from the prostaglandin endoperoxides and cause platelet aggregation, contraction of arteries, and other biological effects. Thromboxanes are important mediators of the actions of polyunsaturated fatty acids transformed by cyclooxygenase.
A cycloheptathiophene blocker of histamine H1 receptors and release of inflammatory mediators. It has been proposed for the treatment of asthma, rhinitis, skin allergies, and anaphylaxis.
Agents that inhibit the actions of the parasympathetic nervous system. The major group of drugs used therapeutically for this purpose is the MUSCARINIC ANTAGONISTS.
The secretion of histamine from mast cell and basophil granules by exocytosis. This can be initiated by a number of factors, all of which involve binding of IgE, cross-linked by antigen, to the mast cell or basophil's Fc receptors. Once released, histamine binds to a number of different target cell receptors and exerts a wide variety of effects.
The extra volume of air that can be expired with maximum effort beyond the level reached at the end of a normal, quiet expiration. Common abbreviation is ERV.
A family of hexahydropyridines.
The force per unit area that the air exerts on any surface in contact with it. Primarily used for articles pertaining to air pressure within a closed environment.
Difficult or labored breathing.
A measure of the amount of WATER VAPOR in the air.
A stable prostaglandin endoperoxide analog which serves as a thromboxane mimetic. Its actions include mimicking the hydro-osmotic effect of VASOPRESSIN and activation of TYPE C PHOSPHOLIPASES. (From J Pharmacol Exp Ther 1983;224(1): 108-117; Biochem J 1984;222(1):103-110)
A sudden, audible expulsion of air from the lungs through a partially closed glottis, preceded by inhalation. It is a protective response that serves to clear the trachea, bronchi, and/or lungs of irritants and secretions, or to prevent aspiration of foreign materials into the lungs.
Injections made into a vein for therapeutic or experimental purposes.
A slowly hydrolyzed muscarinic agonist with no nicotinic effects. Pilocarpine is used as a miotic and in the treatment of glaucoma.
The act of constricting.
A process leading to shortening and/or development of tension in muscle tissue. Muscle contraction occurs by a sliding filament mechanism whereby actin filaments slide inward among the myosin filaments.
The volume of air inspired or expired during each normal, quiet respiratory cycle. Common abbreviations are TV or V with subscript T.
Derivatives of ACETIC ACID. Included under this heading are a broad variety of acid forms, salts, esters, and amides that contain the carboxymethane structure.
Substances that are recognized by the immune system and induce an immune reaction.
Drugs that bind to but do not activate MUSCARINIC RECEPTORS, thereby blocking the actions of endogenous ACETYLCHOLINE or exogenous agonists. Muscarinic antagonists have widespread effects including actions on the iris and ciliary muscle of the eye, the heart and blood vessels, secretions of the respiratory tract, GI system, and salivary glands, GI motility, urinary bladder tone, and the central nervous system.
A glucocorticoid used in the management of ASTHMA, the treatment of various skin disorders, and allergic RHINITIS.
The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)
Nerve fibers liberating acetylcholine at the synapse after an impulse.
A stable, physiologically active compound formed in vivo from the prostaglandin endoperoxides. It is important in the platelet-release reaction (release of ADP and serotonin).
Granular leukocytes with a nucleus that usually has two lobes connected by a slender thread of chromatin, and cytoplasm containing coarse, round granules that are uniform in size and stainable by eosin.
One of the two major classes of cholinergic receptors. Muscarinic receptors were originally defined by their preference for MUSCARINE over NICOTINE. There are several subtypes (usually M1, M2, M3....) that are characterized by their cellular actions, pharmacology, and molecular biology.
An involuntary movement or exercise of function in a part, excited in response to a stimulus applied to the periphery and transmitted to the brain or spinal cord.
Cell surface proteins that bind THROMBOXANES with high affinity and trigger intracellular changes influencing the behavior of cells. Some thromboxane receptors act via the inositol phosphate and diacylglycerol second messenger systems.
An ergot derivative that is a congener of LYSERGIC ACID DIETHYLAMIDE. It antagonizes the effects of serotonin in blood vessels and gastrointestinal smooth muscle, but has few of the properties of other ergot alkaloids. Methysergide is used prophylactically in migraine and other vascular headaches and to antagonize serotonin in the carcinoid syndrome.
A benzoic-sulfonamide-furan. It is a diuretic with fast onset and short duration that is used for EDEMA and chronic RENAL INSUFFICIENCY.
An adrenergic beta-2 agonist that is used as a bronchodilator and tocolytic.
The craniosacral division of the autonomic nervous system. The cell bodies of the parasympathetic preganglionic fibers are in brain stem nuclei and in the sacral spinal cord. They synapse in cranial autonomic ganglia or in terminal ganglia near target organs. The parasympathetic nervous system generally acts to conserve resources and restore homeostasis, often with effects reciprocal to the sympathetic nervous system.
Compounds that bind to and inhibit that enzymatic activity of LIPOXYGENASES. Included under this category are inhibitors that are specific for lipoxygenase subtypes and act to reduce the production of LEUKOTRIENES.
A non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agent (NSAID) that inhibits the enzyme cyclooxygenase necessary for the formation of prostaglandins and other autacoids. It also inhibits the motility of polymorphonuclear leukocytes.
A beta-2 adrenergic agonist used in the treatment of ASTHMA and BRONCHIAL SPASM.
A family of trypsin-like SERINE ENDOPEPTIDASES that are expressed in a variety of cell types including human prostate epithelial cells. They are formed from tissue prokallikrein by action with TRYPSIN. They are highly similar to PROSTATE-SPECIFIC ANTIGEN.
A class of compounds named after and generally derived from C20 fatty acids (EICOSANOIC ACIDS) that includes PROSTAGLANDINS; LEUKOTRIENES; THROMBOXANES, and HYDROXYEICOSATETRAENOIC ACIDS. They have hormone-like effects mediated by specialized receptors (RECEPTORS, EICOSANOID).
A phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitor with antidepressant properties.
Any disorder marked by obstruction of conducting airways of the lung. AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION may be acute, chronic, intermittent, or persistent.
A highly toxic, colorless, nonflammable gas. It is used as a pharmaceutical aid and antioxidant. It is also an environmental air pollutant.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
A small aerosol canister used to release a calibrated amount of medication for inhalation.
A biochemical messenger and regulator, synthesized from the essential amino acid L-TRYPTOPHAN. In humans it is found primarily in the central nervous system, gastrointestinal tract, and blood platelets. Serotonin mediates several important physiological functions including neurotransmission, gastrointestinal motility, hemostasis, and cardiovascular integrity. Multiple receptor families (RECEPTORS, SEROTONIN) explain the broad physiological actions and distribution of this biochemical mediator.
An evanescent cutaneous reaction occurring when antibody is injected into a local area on the skin and antigen is subsequently injected intravenously along with a dye. The dye makes the rapidly occurring capillary dilatation and increased vascular permeability readily visible by leakage into the reaction site. PCA is a sensitive reaction for detecting very small quantities of antibodies and is also a method for studying the mechanisms of immediate hypersensitivity.
Organic sulfonic acid esters or salts which contain an aromatic hydrocarbon radical.
Synthetic compounds that are analogs of the naturally occurring prostaglandin endoperoxides and that mimic their pharmacologic and physiologic activities. They are usually more stable than the naturally occurring compounds.
Compounds in which one or more of the three hydroxyl groups of glycerol are in ethereal linkage with a saturated or unsaturated aliphatic alcohol; one or two of the hydroxyl groups of glycerol may be esterified. These compounds have been found in various animal tissue.
Granulated cells that are found in almost all tissues, most abundantly in the skin and the gastrointestinal tract. Like the BASOPHILS, mast cells contain large amounts of HISTAMINE and HEPARIN. Unlike basophils, mast cells normally remain in the tissues and do not circulate in the blood. Mast cells, derived from the bone marrow stem cells, are regulated by the STEM CELL FACTOR.
Compounds which inhibit or antagonize the biosynthesis or actions of phosphodiesterases.
An antimuscarinic agent that inhibits gastric secretion at lower doses than are required to affect gastrointestinal motility, salivary, central nervous system, cardiovascular, ocular, and urinary function. It promotes the healing of duodenal ulcers and due to its cytoprotective action is beneficial in the prevention of duodenal ulcer recurrence. It also potentiates the effect of other antiulcer agents such as CIMETIDINE and RANITIDINE. It is generally well tolerated by patients.
An anti-inflammatory analgesic and antipyretic of the phenylalkynoic acid series. It has been shown to reduce bone resorption in periodontal disease by inhibiting CARBONIC ANHYDRASE.
A dual inhibitor of both cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase pathways. It exerts an anti-inflammatory effect by inhibiting the formation of prostaglandins and leukotrienes. The drug also enhances pulmonary hypoxic vasoconstriction and has a protective effect after myocardial ischemia.
An enzyme found predominantly in platelet microsomes. It catalyzes the conversion of PGG(2) and PGH(2) (prostaglandin endoperoxides) to thromboxane A2. EC 5.3.99.5.
Adenine nucleotide containing one phosphate group esterified to the sugar moiety in the 2'-, 3'-, or 5'-position.
A local anesthetic and cardiac depressant used as an antiarrhythmia agent. Its actions are more intense and its effects more prolonged than those of PROCAINE but its duration of action is shorter than that of BUPIVACAINE or PRILOCAINE.
Individuals who have developed skills, physical stamina and strength or participants in SPORTS or other physical activities.
The exchange of OXYGEN and CARBON DIOXIDE between alveolar air and pulmonary capillary blood that occurs across the BLOOD-AIR BARRIER.
A stable adenosine A1 and A2 receptor agonist. Experimentally, it inhibits cAMP and cGMP phosphodiesterase activity.
Inflammation of the large airways in the lung including any part of the BRONCHI, from the PRIMARY BRONCHI to the TERTIARY BRONCHI.
Progressive diminution of the susceptibility of a human or animal to the effects of a drug, resulting from its continued administration. It should be differentiated from DRUG RESISTANCE wherein an organism, disease, or tissue fails to respond to the intended effectiveness of a chemical or drug. It should also be differentiated from MAXIMUM TOLERATED DOSE and NO-OBSERVED-ADVERSE-EFFECT LEVEL.
Immunologically mediated adverse reactions to medicinal substances used legally or illegally.
Exudates are fluids, CELLS, or other cellular substances that are slowly discharged from BLOOD VESSELS usually from inflamed tissues. Transudates are fluids that pass through a membrane or squeeze through tissue or into the EXTRACELLULAR SPACE of TISSUES. Transudates are thin and watery and contain few cells or PROTEINS.
Measurement of rate of airflow over the middle half of a FORCED VITAL CAPACITY determination (from the 25 percent level to the 75 percent level). Common abbreviations are MMFR and FEF 25%-75%.
Drugs that bind to and activate muscarinic cholinergic receptors (RECEPTORS, MUSCARINIC). Muscarinic agonists are most commonly used when it is desirable to increase smooth muscle tone, especially in the GI tract, urinary bladder and the eye. They may also be used to reduce heart rate.
BENZOIC ACID amides.

Post-shift changes in pulmonary function in a cement factory in eastern Saudi Arabia. (1/896)

This cross-sectional study was conducted in 1992 in the oldest of three Portland cement producing factories in Eastern Saudi Arabia. The respirable dust level was in excess of the recommended ACGIH level in all sections. Spirometry was done for 149 cement workers and 348 controls, using a Vitalograph spirometer. FEV1, FVC, FEV1/FVC% and FEF25-75% were calculated and corrected to BTPS. A significantly higher post-shift reduction FEV1, FEV1/FVC% and FEF25-75% was observed in the exposed subjects. Multiple regression analysis showed a significant relationship between post-shift changes and exposure to cement dust but failed to support any relationship with smoking. These findings may indicate an increase in the bronchial muscle tone leading to some degree of bronchoconstriction as a result of an irritant effect induced by the acute exposure to cement dust.  (+info)

Mechanisms of capsaicin- and lactic acid-induced bronchoconstriction in the newborn dog. (2/896)

1. Capsaicin activation of the pulmonary C fibre vanilloid receptor (VR1) evokes the pulmonary chemoreflex and reflex bronchoconstriction. Among potential endogenous ligands of C fibre afferents, lactic acid has been suggested as a promising candidate. We tested the hypotheses that (a) lactic acid behaves as a stimulant of C fibre receptors in the newborn dog to cause reflex bronchoconstriction, and (b) lactic acid causes reflex bronchoconstriction via the same pulmonary C fibre receptor mechanism as capsaicin using the competitive capsaicin/VR1 receptor antagonist capsazepine. 2. Right heart injection of lactic acid caused a significant increase (47 +/- 8.0 %) in lung resistance (RL) that was atropine sensitive (reduced by 75 %; P < 0.05), consistent with reflex activation of muscarinic efferents by stimulation of C fibre afferents. 3. Infusion of the competitive capsaicin antagonist capsazepine caused an 80 % reduction (P < 0.01) in the control bronchoconstrictor response (41 +/- 8.5 % increase in RL) to right heart injections of capsaicin. The effects of capsazepine are consistent with reversible blockade of the VR1 receptor to abolish C fibre-mediated reflex bronchoconstriction. 4. Lactic acid-evoked increases in RL were unaffected by VR1 blockade with capsazepine, consistent with a separate lactic acid-induced reflex mechanism. 5. We conclude that (a) putative stimulation of C fibres with lactic acid causes reflex bronchoconstriction in the newborn dog, (b) capsazepine reversibly antagonizes reflex bronchoconstriction elicited by right heart injection of capsaicin, presumably by attenuating capsaicin-induced activation of the C fibre 'capsaicin' receptor (VR1), and (c) capsazepine resistance of lactic acid-induced bronchoconstriction indicates that lactic acid evokes reflex bronchoconstriction by a separate mechanism, possibly via the acid-sensing ionic channel.  (+info)

Nitric oxide limits the eicosanoid-dependent bronchoconstriction and hypotension induced by endothelin-1 in the guinea-pig. (3/896)

1. This study attempts to investigate if endogenous nitric oxide (NO) can modulate the eicosanoid-releasing properties of intravenously administered endothelin-1 (ET-1) in the pulmonary and circulatory systems in the guinea-pig. 2. The nitric oxide synthase blocker N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; 300 microM; 30 min infusion) potentiated, in an L-arginine sensitive fashion, the release of thromboxane A2 (TxA2) stimulated by ET-1, the selective ET(B) receptor agonist IRL 1620 (Suc-[Glu9,Ala11,15]-ET-1(8-21)) or bradykinin (BK) (5, 50 and 50 nM, respectively, 3 min infusion) in guinea-pig isolated and perfused lungs. 3. In anaesthetized and ventilated guinea-pigs intravenous injection of ET-1 (0.1-1.0 nmol kg(-1)), IRL 1620 (0.2-1.6 nmol kg(-1)), BK (1.0-10.0 nmol kg(-1)) or U 46619 (0.2-5.7 nmol kg(-1)) each induced dose-dependent increases in pulmonary insufflation pressure (PIP). Pretreatment with L-NAME (5 mg kg(-1)) did not change basal PIP, but increased, in L-arginine sensitive manner, the magnitude of the PIP increases (in both amplitude and duration) triggered by each of the peptides (at 0.25, 0.4 and 1.0 nmol kg(-1), respectively), without modifying bronchoconstriction caused by U 46619 (0.57 nmol kg(-1)). 4. The increases in PIP induced by ET-1, IRL 1620 (0.25 and 0.4 nmol kg(-1), respectively) or U 46619 (0.57 nmol kg(-1)) were accompanied by rapid and transient increases of mean arterial blood pressure (MAP). Pretreatment with L-NAME (5 mg kg(-1); i.v. raised basal MAP persistently and, under this condition, subsequent administration of ET-1 or IRL 1620, but not of U-46619, induced hypotensive responses which were prevented by pretreatment with the cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor indomethacin. 5. Thus, endogenous NO appears to modulate ET-1-induced bronchoconstriction and pressor effects in the guinea-pig by limiting the peptide's ability to induce, possibly via ET(B) receptors, the release of TxA2 in the lungs and of vasodilatory prostanoids in the systemic circulation. Furthermore, it would seem that these eicosanoid-dependent actions of ET-1 in the pulmonary system and on systemic arterial resistance in this species are physiologically dissociated.  (+info)

Anaphylactic bronchoconstriction in BP2 mice: interactions between serotonin and acetylcholine. (4/896)

1. Immunized BP2 mice developed an acute bronchoconstriction in vivo and airway muscle contraction in vitro in response to ovalbumin (OA) and these contractions were dose dependent. 2. Methysergide or atropine inhibited OA-induced bronchoconstriction in vivo and airway muscle contraction in vitro. 3. Neostigmine potentiated the OA-induced bronchoconstriction in vivo and airway muscle contraction in vitro of BP2 mice. This potentiation was markedly reduced by the administration of methysergide or atropine and when the two antagonists were administered together, the responses were completely inhibited. 4. Neostigmine also potentiated the serotonin (5-HT)- and acetylcholine (ACh)-induced bronchoconstriction and this potentiation was significantly reversed by atropine. 5. These results indicate that OA provokes a bronchoconstriction in immunized BP2 mice by stimulating the release of 5-HT, which in turn acts via the cholinergic mediator, ACh.  (+info)

Bronchoconstrictor effect of thrombin and thrombin receptor activating peptide in guinea-pigs in vivo. (5/896)

1. Several thrombin cellular effects are dependent upon stimulation of proteinase activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) localized over the cellular surface. Following activation by thrombin, a new N-terminus peptide is unmasked on PAR-1 receptor, which functions as a tethered ligand for the receptor itself. Synthetic peptides called thrombin receptor activating peptides (TRAPs), corresponding to the N-terminus residue unmasked, reproduce several thrombin cellular effects, but are devoid of catalytic activity. We have evaluated the bronchial response to intravenous administration of human alpha-thrombin or a thrombin receptor activating peptide (TRAP-9) in anaesthetized, artificially ventilated guinea-pigs. 2. Intravenous injection of thrombin (100 microkg(-1)) caused bronchoconstriction that was recapitulated by injection of TRAP-9 (1 mg kg(-1)). Animal pretreatment with the thrombin inhibitor Hirulog (10 mg kg(-1) i.v.) prevented thrombin-induced bronchoconstriction, but did not affect bronchoconstriction induced by TRAP-9. Both agents did not induce bronchoconstriction when injected intravenously to rats. 3. The bronchoconstrictor effect of thrombin and TRAP-9 was subjected to tolerance; however, in animals desensitized to thrombin effect, TRAP-9 was still capable of inducing bronchoconstriction, but not vice versa. 4. Depleting animals of circulating platelets prevented bronchoconstriction induced by both thrombin and TRAP-9. 5. Bronchoconstriction was paralleled by a biphasic change in arterial blood pressure, characterized by a hypotensive phase followed by a hypertensive phase. Thrombin-induced hypotension was not subject to tolerance and was inhibited by Hirulog; conversely, hypertension was subject to tolerance and was not inhibited by Hirulog. Hypotension and hypertension induced by TRAP-9 were neither subject to tolerance nor inhibited by Hirulog. 6. Our results indicate that thrombin causes bronchoconstriction in guinea-pigs through a mechanism that requires proteolytic activation of its receptor and the exposure of the tethered ligand peptide. Platelet activation might be triggered by the thrombin effect.  (+info)

Mechanisms of bronchoprotection by anesthetic induction agents: propofol versus ketamine. (6/896)

BACKGROUND: Propofol and ketamine have been purported to decrease bronchoconstriction during induction of anesthesia and intubation. Whether they act on airway smooth muscle or through neural reflexes has not been determined. We compared propofol and ketamine to attenuate the direct activation of airway smooth muscle by methacholine and limit neurally mediated bronchoconstriction (vagal nerve stimulation). METHODS: After approval from the institutional review board, eight sheep were anesthetized with pentobarbital, paralyzed, and ventilated. After left thoracotomy, the bronchial artery was cannulated and perfused. In random order, 5 mg/ml concentrations of propofol, ketamine, and thiopental were infused into the bronchial artery at rates of 0.06, 0.20, and 0.60 ml/min. After 10 min, airway resistance was measured before and after vagal nerve stimulation and methacholine given via the bronchial artery. Data were expressed as a percent of baseline response before infusion of drug and analyzed by analysis of variance with significance set at P< or =0.05. RESULTS: Systemic blood pressure was not affected by any of the drugs (P>0.46). Baseline airway resistance was not different among the three agents (P = 0.56) or by dose (P = 0.96). Infusion of propofol and ketamine into the bronchial artery caused a dose-dependent attenuation of the vagal nerve stimulation-induced bronchoconstriction to 26+/-11% and 8+/-2% of maximum, respectively (P<0.0001). In addition, propofol caused a significant decrease in the methacholine-induced bronchoconstriction to 43+/-27% of maximum at the highest concentration (P = 0.05) CONCLUSIONS: The local bronchoprotective effects of ketamine and propofol on airways is through neurally mediated mechanisms. Although the direct effects on airway smooth muscle occur at high concentrations, these are unlikely to be of primary clinical relevance.  (+info)

Deficiency of nitric oxide in polycation-induced airway hyperreactivity. (7/896)

Using a perfused guinea-pig tracheal tube preparation, we investigated the role of endogenous nitric oxide (NO) in polycation-induced airway hyperreactivity (AHR) to methacholine. Intraluminal (IL) administration of the NO synthase inhibitor Nomega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; 100 microM) caused a 1.8 fold increase in the maximal contractile response (Emax) to IL methacholine compared to control, without an effect on the pEC50 (-log10 EC50). The polycation poly-L-arginine (100 microg ml(-1), IL) similarly enhanced the Emax for methacholine; however, the pEC50 value was also increased, by one log10 unit. L-NAME had no effect on the enhanced methacholine response of poly-L-arginine-treated airways, while the enhanced agonist response was completely normalized by the polyanion heparin (25 u ml(-1), IL). In addition, the effect of L-NAME was fully restored in the poly-L-arginine plus heparin treated airways. The results indicate that, in addition to enhanced epithelial permeability, a deficiency of endogenous NO contributes to polycation-induced AHR. The latter finding may represent a novel mechanism of AHR induced by eosinophil-derived cationic proteins in allergic asthma.  (+info)

Roles of oxygen radicals and elastase in citric acid-induced airway constriction of guinea-pigs. (8/896)

Antioxidants attenuate noncholinergic airway constriction. To further investigate the relationship between tachykinin-mediated airway constriction and oxygen radicals, we explored citric acid-induced bronchial constriction in 48 young Hartley strain guinea-pigs, divided into six groups: control; citric acid; hexa(sulphobutyl)fullerenes + citric acid; hexa(sulphobutyl)fullerenes + phosphoramidon + citric acid; dimethylthiourea (DMTU) + citric acid; and DMTU + phosphoramidon + citric acid. Hexa(sulphobutyl)fullerenes and DMTU are scavengers of oxygen radicals while phosphoramidon is an inhibitor of the major degradation enzyme for tachykinins. Animals were anaesthetized, paralyzed, and artificially ventilated. Each animal was given 50 breaths of 4 ml saline or citric acid aerosol. We measured dynamic respiratory compliance (Crs), forced expiratory volume in 0.1 (FEV0.1), and maximal expiratory flow at 30% total lung capacity (Vmax30) to evaluate the degree of airway constriction. Citric acid, but not saline, aerosol inhalation caused marked decreases in Crs, FEV0.1 and Vmax30, indicating marked airway constriction. This constriction was significantly attenuated by either hexa(sulphobutyl)fullerenes or by DMTU. In addition, phosphoramidon significantly reversed the attenuating action of hexa(sulphobutyl)fullerenes, but not that of DMTU. Citric acid aerosol inhalation caused increases in both lucigenin- and t-butyl hydroperoxide-initiated chemiluminescence counts, indicating citric acid-induced increase in oxygen radicals and decrease in antioxidants in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. These alterations were significantly suppressed by either hexa(sulphobutyl)fullerenes or DMTU. An elastase inhibitor eglin-c also significantly attenuated citric acid-induced airway constriction, indicating the contributing role of elastase in this type of constriction. We conclude that both oxygen radicals and elastase play an important role in tachykinin-mediated, citric acid-induced airway constriction.  (+info)

Bronchoconstriction is a medical term that refers to the narrowing of the airways in the lungs (the bronchi and bronchioles) due to the contraction of the smooth muscles surrounding them. This constriction can cause difficulty breathing, wheezing, coughing, and shortness of breath, which are common symptoms of asthma and other respiratory conditions.

Bronchoconstriction can be triggered by a variety of factors, including allergens, irritants, cold air, exercise, and emotional stress. In some cases, it may also be caused by certain medications, such as beta-blockers or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Treatment for bronchoconstriction typically involves the use of bronchodilators, which are medications that help to relax the smooth muscles around the airways and widen them, making it easier to breathe.

Exercise-induced asthma (EIA) is a type of asthma that is triggered by physical activity or exercise. Officially known as exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB), this condition causes the airways in the lungs to narrow and become inflamed, leading to symptoms such as wheezing, coughing, shortness of breath, and chest tightness. These symptoms typically occur during or after exercise and can last for several minutes to a few hours.

EIA is caused by the loss of heat and moisture from the airways during exercise, which leads to the release of inflammatory mediators that cause the airways to constrict. People with EIA may have underlying asthma or may only experience symptoms during exercise. Proper diagnosis and management of EIA can help individuals maintain an active lifestyle and participate in physical activities without experiencing symptoms.

Bronchial spasm refers to a sudden constriction or tightening of the muscles in the bronchial tubes, which are the airways that lead to the lungs. This constriction can cause symptoms such as coughing, wheezing, and difficulty breathing. Bronchial spasm is often associated with respiratory conditions such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and bronchitis. In these conditions, the airways are sensitive to various triggers such as allergens, irritants, or infections, which can cause the muscles in the airways to contract and narrow. This can make it difficult for air to flow in and out of the lungs, leading to symptoms such as shortness of breath, wheezing, and coughing. Bronchial spasm can be treated with medications that help to relax the muscles in the airways and open up the airways, such as bronchodilators and anti-inflammatory drugs.

Bronchoconstrictor agents are substances that cause narrowing or constriction of the bronchioles, the small airways in the lungs. This can lead to symptoms such as wheezing, coughing, and shortness of breath. Bronchoconstrictor agents include certain medications (such as some beta-blockers and prostaglandin F2alpha), environmental pollutants (such as tobacco smoke and air pollution particles), and allergens (such as dust mites and pollen).

In contrast to bronchodilator agents, which are medications that widen the airways and improve breathing, bronchoconstrictor agents can make it more difficult for a person to breathe. People with respiratory conditions such as asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) may be particularly sensitive to bronchoconstrictor agents and may experience severe symptoms when exposed to them.

Airway resistance is a measure of the opposition to airflow during breathing, which is caused by the friction between the air and the walls of the respiratory tract. It is an important parameter in respiratory physiology because it can affect the work of breathing and gas exchange.

Airway resistance is usually expressed in units of cm H2O/L/s or Pa·s/m, and it can be measured during spontaneous breathing or during forced expiratory maneuvers, such as those used in pulmonary function testing. Increased airway resistance can result from a variety of conditions, including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), bronchitis, and bronchiectasis. Decreased airway resistance can be seen in conditions such as emphysema or after a successful bronchodilator treatment.

Methacholine chloride is a medication that is used as a diagnostic tool to help identify and assess the severity of asthma or other respiratory conditions that cause airway hyperresponsiveness. It is a synthetic derivative of acetylcholine, which is a neurotransmitter that causes smooth muscle contraction in the body.

When methacholine chloride is inhaled, it stimulates the muscarinic receptors in the airways, causing them to constrict or narrow. This response is measured and used to determine the degree of airway hyperresponsiveness, which can help diagnose asthma and assess its severity.

The methacholine challenge test involves inhaling progressively higher doses of methacholine chloride until a significant decrease in lung function is observed or until a maximum dose is reached. The test results are then used to guide treatment decisions and monitor the effectiveness of therapy. It's important to note that this test should be conducted under the supervision of a healthcare professional, as it carries some risks, including bronchoconstriction and respiratory distress.

Bronchial provocation tests are a group of medical tests used to assess the airway responsiveness of the lungs by challenging them with increasing doses of a specific stimulus, such as methacholine or histamine, which can cause bronchoconstriction (narrowing of the airways) in susceptible individuals. These tests are often performed to diagnose and monitor asthma and other respiratory conditions that may be associated with heightened airway responsiveness.

The most common type of bronchial provocation test is the methacholine challenge test, which involves inhaling increasing concentrations of methacholine aerosol via a nebulizer. The dose response is measured by monitoring lung function (usually through spirometry) before and after each exposure. A positive test is indicated when there is a significant decrease in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) or other measures of airflow, which suggests bronchial hyperresponsiveness.

Other types of bronchial provocation tests include histamine challenges, exercise challenges, and mannitol challenges. These tests have specific indications, contraindications, and protocols that should be followed to ensure accurate results and patient safety. Bronchial provocation tests are typically conducted in a controlled clinical setting under the supervision of trained healthcare professionals.

"Bronchi" are a pair of airways in the respiratory system that branch off from the trachea (windpipe) and lead to the lungs. They are responsible for delivering oxygen-rich air to the lungs and removing carbon dioxide during exhalation. The right bronchus is slightly larger and more vertical than the left, and they further divide into smaller branches called bronchioles within the lungs. Any abnormalities or diseases affecting the bronchi can impact lung function and overall respiratory health.

Asthma is a chronic respiratory disease characterized by inflammation and narrowing of the airways, leading to symptoms such as wheezing, coughing, shortness of breath, and chest tightness. The airway obstruction in asthma is usually reversible, either spontaneously or with treatment.

The underlying cause of asthma involves a combination of genetic and environmental factors that result in hypersensitivity of the airways to certain triggers, such as allergens, irritants, viruses, exercise, and emotional stress. When these triggers are encountered, the airways constrict due to smooth muscle spasm, swell due to inflammation, and produce excess mucus, leading to the characteristic symptoms of asthma.

Asthma is typically managed with a combination of medications that include bronchodilators to relax the airway muscles, corticosteroids to reduce inflammation, and leukotriene modifiers or mast cell stabilizers to prevent allergic reactions. Avoiding triggers and monitoring symptoms are also important components of asthma management.

There are several types of asthma, including allergic asthma, non-allergic asthma, exercise-induced asthma, occupational asthma, and nocturnal asthma, each with its own set of triggers and treatment approaches. Proper diagnosis and management of asthma can help prevent exacerbations, improve quality of life, and reduce the risk of long-term complications.

Histamine is defined as a biogenic amine that is widely distributed throughout the body and is involved in various physiological functions. It is derived primarily from the amino acid histidine by the action of histidine decarboxylase. Histamine is stored in granules (along with heparin and proteases) within mast cells and basophils, and is released upon stimulation or degranulation of these cells.

Once released into the tissues and circulation, histamine exerts a wide range of pharmacological actions through its interaction with four types of G protein-coupled receptors (H1, H2, H3, and H4 receptors). Histamine's effects are diverse and include modulation of immune responses, contraction and relaxation of smooth muscle, increased vascular permeability, stimulation of gastric acid secretion, and regulation of neurotransmission.

Histamine is also a potent mediator of allergic reactions and inflammation, causing symptoms such as itching, sneezing, runny nose, and wheezing. Antihistamines are commonly used to block the actions of histamine at H1 receptors, providing relief from these symptoms.

Cromolyn sodium is a medication that belongs to a class of drugs known as mast cell stabilizers. It works by preventing the release of certain chemicals from mast cells, which are immune system cells found in various tissues throughout the body, including the skin, lungs, and gastrointestinal tract.

Mast cells play an important role in the body's allergic response. When a person is exposed to an allergen, such as pollen or pet dander, mast cells release chemicals like histamine, which can cause symptoms of an allergic reaction, such as itching, swelling, and inflammation.

Cromolyn sodium is used to prevent asthma attacks, hay fever, and other allergic reactions. It is often prescribed for people who have difficulty controlling their symptoms with other medications, such as inhaled corticosteroids or antihistamines.

The medication is available in various forms, including inhalers, nasal sprays, and eye drops. When used as an inhaler, cromolyn sodium is typically administered four times a day to prevent asthma symptoms. As a nasal spray or eye drop, it is usually used several times a day to prevent allergic rhinitis or conjunctivitis.

While cromolyn sodium can be effective in preventing allergic reactions, it does not provide immediate relief of symptoms. It may take several days or even weeks of regular use before the full benefits of the medication are felt.

Forced Expiratory Volume (FEV) is a medical term used to describe the volume of air that can be forcefully exhaled from the lungs in one second. It is often measured during pulmonary function testing to assess lung function and diagnose conditions such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or asthma.

FEV is typically expressed as a percentage of the Forced Vital Capacity (FVC), which is the total volume of air that can be exhaled from the lungs after taking a deep breath in. The ratio of FEV to FVC is used to determine whether there is obstruction in the airways, with a lower ratio indicating more severe obstruction.

There are different types of FEV measurements, including FEV1 (the volume of air exhaled in one second), FEV25-75 (the average volume of air exhaled during the middle 50% of the FVC maneuver), and FEV0.5 (the volume of air exhaled in half a second). These measurements can provide additional information about lung function and help guide treatment decisions.

"Inhalation administration" is a medical term that refers to the method of delivering medications or therapeutic agents directly into the lungs by inhaling them through the airways. This route of administration is commonly used for treating respiratory conditions such as asthma, COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), and cystic fibrosis.

Inhalation administration can be achieved using various devices, including metered-dose inhalers (MDIs), dry powder inhalers (DPIs), nebulizers, and soft-mist inhalers. Each device has its unique mechanism of delivering the medication into the lungs, but they all aim to provide a high concentration of the drug directly to the site of action while minimizing systemic exposure and side effects.

The advantages of inhalation administration include rapid onset of action, increased local drug concentration, reduced systemic side effects, and improved patient compliance due to the ease of use and non-invasive nature of the delivery method. However, proper technique and device usage are crucial for effective therapy, as incorrect usage may result in suboptimal drug deposition and therapeutic outcomes.

Bronchodilators are medications that relax and widen the airways (bronchioles) in the lungs, making it easier to breathe. They work by relaxing the smooth muscle around the airways, which allows them to dilate or open up. This results in improved airflow and reduced symptoms of bronchoconstriction, such as wheezing, coughing, and shortness of breath.

Bronchodilators can be classified into two main types: short-acting and long-acting. Short-acting bronchodilators are used for quick relief of symptoms and last for 4 to 6 hours, while long-acting bronchodilators are used for maintenance therapy and provide symptom relief for 12 hours or more.

Examples of bronchodilator agents include:

* Short-acting beta-agonists (SABAs) such as albuterol, levalbuterol, and pirbuterol
* Long-acting beta-agonists (LABAs) such as salmeterol, formoterol, and indacaterol
* Anticholinergics such as ipratropium, tiotropium, and aclidinium
* Combination bronchodilators that contain both a LABA and an anticholinergic, such as umeclidinium/vilanterol and glycopyrrolate/formoterol.

I must clarify that the term "Guinea Pigs" is not typically used in medical definitions. However, in colloquial or informal language, it may refer to people who are used as the first to try out a new medical treatment or drug. This is known as being a "test subject" or "in a clinical trial."

In the field of scientific research, particularly in studies involving animals, guinea pigs are small rodents that are often used as experimental subjects due to their size, cost-effectiveness, and ease of handling. They are not actually pigs from Guinea, despite their name's origins being unclear. However, they do not exactly fit the description of being used in human medical experiments.

Aerosols are defined in the medical field as suspensions of fine solid or liquid particles in a gas. In the context of public health and medicine, aerosols often refer to particles that can remain suspended in air for long periods of time and can be inhaled. They can contain various substances, such as viruses, bacteria, fungi, or chemicals, and can play a role in the transmission of respiratory infections or other health effects.

For example, when an infected person coughs or sneezes, they may produce respiratory droplets that can contain viruses like influenza or SARS-CoV-2 (the virus that causes COVID-19). Some of these droplets can evaporate quickly and leave behind smaller particles called aerosols, which can remain suspended in the air for hours and potentially be inhaled by others. This is one way that respiratory viruses can spread between people in close proximity to each other.

Aerosols can also be generated through medical procedures such as bronchoscopy, suctioning, or nebulizer treatments, which can produce aerosols containing bacteria, viruses, or other particles that may pose an infection risk to healthcare workers or other patients. Therefore, appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) and airborne precautions are often necessary to reduce the risk of transmission in these settings.

Bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) or bronchial hyperreactivity (BH) is a medical term that refers to the increased sensitivity and exaggerated response of the airways to various stimuli. In people with BHR, the airways narrow (constrict) more than usual in response to certain triggers such as allergens, cold air, exercise, or irritants like smoke or fumes. This narrowing can cause symptoms such as wheezing, coughing, chest tightness, and shortness of breath.

BHR is often associated with asthma and other respiratory conditions, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and bronchiectasis. It is typically diagnosed through a series of tests that measure the degree of airway narrowing in response to various stimuli. These tests may include spirometry, methacholine challenge test, or histamine challenge test.

BHR can be managed with medications such as bronchodilators and anti-inflammatory drugs, which help to relax the muscles around the airways and reduce inflammation. It is also important to avoid triggers that can exacerbate symptoms and make BHR worse.

Methacholine compounds are medications that are used as a diagnostic tool to help identify and confirm the presence of airway hyperresponsiveness in patients with respiratory symptoms such as cough, wheeze, or shortness of breath. These compounds act as bronchoconstrictors, causing narrowing of the airways in individuals who have heightened sensitivity and reactivity of their airways, such as those with asthma.

Methacholine is a synthetic derivative of acetylcholine, a neurotransmitter that mediates nerve impulse transmission in the body. When inhaled, methacholine binds to muscarinic receptors on the smooth muscle surrounding the airways, leading to their contraction and narrowing. The degree of bronchoconstriction is then measured to assess the patient's airway responsiveness.

It is important to note that methacholine compounds are not used as therapeutic agents but rather as diagnostic tools in a controlled medical setting under the supervision of healthcare professionals.

Lung compliance is a measure of the ease with which the lungs expand and is defined as the change in lung volume for a given change in transpulmonary pressure. It is often expressed in units of liters per centimeter of water (L/cm H2O). A higher compliance indicates that the lungs are more easily distensible, while a lower compliance suggests that the lungs are stiffer and require more force to expand. Lung compliance can be affected by various conditions such as pulmonary fibrosis, pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

Albuterol is a medication that is used to treat bronchospasm, or narrowing of the airways in the lungs, in conditions such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). It is a short-acting beta-2 agonist, which means it works by relaxing the muscles around the airways, making it easier to breathe. Albuterol is available in several forms, including an inhaler, nebulizer solution, and syrup, and it is typically used as needed to relieve symptoms of bronchospasm. It may also be used before exercise to prevent bronchospasm caused by physical activity.

The medical definition of Albuterol is: "A short-acting beta-2 adrenergic agonist used to treat bronchospasm in conditions such as asthma and COPD. It works by relaxing the muscles around the airways, making it easier to breathe."

Ipratropium is an anticholinergic bronchodilator medication that is often used to treat respiratory conditions such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma. It works by blocking the action of acetylcholine, a chemical messenger in the body that causes muscles around the airways to tighten and narrow. By preventing this effect, ipratropium helps to relax the muscles around the airways, making it easier to breathe.

Ipratropium is available in several forms, including an aerosol spray, nebulizer solution, and dry powder inhaler. It is typically used in combination with other respiratory medications, such as beta-agonists or corticosteroids, to provide more effective relief of symptoms. Common side effects of ipratropium include dry mouth, throat irritation, and headache.

Nedocromil is not a medication that has direct therapeutic use, but it is the active ingredient in a prescription eye drop and inhaler medication called "nedocromil sodium." Therefore, I will provide you with the definition of nedocromil sodium.

Nedocromil sodium is a medication used to prevent asthma symptoms and allergic rhinitis (hay fever) symptoms. It belongs to a class of medications called mast cell stabilizers, which work by preventing the release of chemicals from certain cells in the body that cause inflammation and allergic reactions.

Nedocromil sodium is available as an eye drop solution for the prevention of itching associated with allergic conjunctivitis and as a metered-dose inhaler for the prevention of asthma symptoms. It is typically used on a regular basis to help prevent symptoms from occurring, rather than to treat acute symptoms.

It's important to note that nedocromil sodium is not a bronchodilator or a steroid medication and should not be used as a replacement for these types of medications if they have been prescribed by your healthcare provider.

Neurokinin-2 (NK-2) receptors are a type of G protein-coupled receptor that binds to and is activated by the neuropeptide substance P, which is a member of the tachykinin family. These receptors are widely distributed in the central and peripheral nervous systems and play important roles in various physiological functions, including pain transmission, smooth muscle contraction, and neuroinflammation.

NK-2 receptors are involved in the development of hyperalgesia (an increased sensitivity to pain) and allodynia (pain caused by a stimulus that does not normally provoke pain). They have also been implicated in several pathological conditions, such as inflammatory bowel disease, asthma, and neurodegenerative disorders.

NK-2 receptor antagonists have been developed and investigated for their potential therapeutic use in the treatment of various pain disorders, gastrointestinal diseases, and other medical conditions.

Neurokinin A (NKA) is a neuropeptide belonging to the tachykinin family, which also includes substance P and neurokinin B. It is widely distributed in the central and peripheral nervous systems and plays a role in various physiological functions such as pain transmission, smooth muscle contraction, and immune response regulation. NKA exerts its effects by binding to neurokinin 1 (NK-1) receptors, although it has lower affinity for these receptors compared to substance P. It is involved in several pathological conditions, including inflammation, neurogenic pain, and neurodegenerative disorders.

"SRS-A" is an older abbreviation for "Slow-Reacting Substance of Anaphylaxis," which refers to a group of molecules called "leukotrienes." Leukotrienes are mediators of inflammation and play a key role in the pathogenesis of asthma and other allergic diseases. They are produced by mast cells and basophils upon activation, and cause bronchoconstriction, increased vascular permeability, and mucus production.

The term "SRS-A" is not commonly used in modern medical literature, as it has been largely replaced by the more specific names of its individual components: LTC4, LTD4, and LTE4. These leukotrienes are now collectively referred to as the "cysteinyl leukotrienes."

A lung is a pair of spongy, elastic organs in the chest that work together to enable breathing. They are responsible for taking in oxygen and expelling carbon dioxide through the process of respiration. The left lung has two lobes, while the right lung has three lobes. The lungs are protected by the ribcage and are covered by a double-layered membrane called the pleura. The trachea divides into two bronchi, which further divide into smaller bronchioles, leading to millions of tiny air sacs called alveoli, where the exchange of gases occurs.

The trachea, also known as the windpipe, is a tube-like structure in the respiratory system that connects the larynx (voice box) to the bronchi (the two branches leading to each lung). It is composed of several incomplete rings of cartilage and smooth muscle, which provide support and flexibility. The trachea plays a crucial role in directing incoming air to the lungs during inspiration and outgoing air to the larynx during expiration.

Histamine antagonists, also known as histamine blockers or H1-blockers, are a class of medications that work by blocking the action of histamine, a substance in the body that is released during an allergic reaction. Histamine causes many of the symptoms of an allergic response, such as itching, sneezing, runny nose, and hives. By blocking the effects of histamine, these medications can help to relieve or prevent allergy symptoms.

Histamine antagonists are often used to treat conditions such as hay fever, hives, and other allergic reactions. They may also be used to treat stomach ulcers caused by excessive production of stomach acid. Some examples of histamine antagonists include diphenhydramine (Benadryl), loratadine (Claritin), and famotidine (Pepcid).

It's important to note that while histamine antagonists can be effective at relieving allergy symptoms, they do not cure allergies or prevent the release of histamine. They simply block its effects. It's also worth noting that these medications can have side effects, such as drowsiness, dry mouth, and dizziness, so it's important to follow your healthcare provider's instructions carefully when taking them.

Anaphylaxis is a severe, life-threatening systemic allergic reaction that occurs suddenly after exposure to an allergen (a substance that triggers an allergic reaction) to which the person has previously been sensitized. The symptoms of anaphylaxis include rapid onset of symptoms such as itching, hives, swelling of the throat and tongue, difficulty breathing, wheezing, cough, chest tightness, rapid heartbeat, hypotension (low blood pressure), shock, and in severe cases, loss of consciousness and death. Anaphylaxis is a medical emergency that requires immediate treatment with epinephrine (adrenaline) and other supportive measures to stabilize the patient's condition.

The vagus nerve, also known as the 10th cranial nerve (CN X), is the longest of the cranial nerves and extends from the brainstem to the abdomen. It has both sensory and motor functions and plays a crucial role in regulating various bodily functions such as heart rate, digestion, respiratory rate, speech, and sweating, among others.

The vagus nerve is responsible for carrying sensory information from the internal organs to the brain, and it also sends motor signals from the brain to the muscles of the throat and voice box, as well as to the heart, lungs, and digestive tract. The vagus nerve helps regulate the body's involuntary responses, such as controlling heart rate and blood pressure, promoting relaxation, and reducing inflammation.

Dysfunction in the vagus nerve can lead to various medical conditions, including gastroparesis, chronic pain, and autonomic nervous system disorders. Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is a therapeutic intervention that involves delivering electrical impulses to the vagus nerve to treat conditions such as epilepsy, depression, and migraine headaches.

Hyperventilation is a medical condition characterized by an increased respiratory rate and depth, resulting in excessive elimination of carbon dioxide (CO2) from the body. This leads to hypocapnia (low CO2 levels in the blood), which can cause symptoms such as lightheadedness, dizziness, confusion, tingling sensations in the extremities, and muscle spasms. Hyperventilation may occur due to various underlying causes, including anxiety disorders, lung diseases, neurological conditions, or certain medications. It is essential to identify and address the underlying cause of hyperventilation for proper treatment.

Leukotriene E4 (LTE4) is a biological mediator derived from the arachidonic acid pathway, which plays a significant role in the inflammatory response. It is a type of leukotriene that is synthesized from leukotriene C4 (LTC4) and leukotriene D4 (LTD4) via the action of enzymes such as gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase and dipeptidases.

LTE4 is a potent bronchoconstrictor, meaning it can cause narrowing of the airways in the lungs, and it also has chemotactic properties that attract inflammatory cells such as eosinophils to sites of inflammation. It is involved in the pathogenesis of asthma and other allergic diseases, where it contributes to bronchoconstriction, increased vascular permeability, and mucus production.

LTE4 can be measured in urine as a biomarker of airway inflammation, particularly in patients with asthma. Increased levels of LTE4 in the urine have been associated with more severe asthma symptoms, poorer lung function, and increased risk of exacerbations.

Whole-body plethysmography is a non-invasive medical technique used to measure changes in the volume of air in the lungs and chest during breathing. It is often utilized in the diagnosis and assessment of various respiratory disorders such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, and restrictive lung diseases.

During whole-body plethysmography, the patient enters a sealed, clear chamber, usually in a standing or sitting position. The patient is instructed to breathe normally while the machine measures changes in pressure within the chamber as the chest and abdomen move during respiration. These measurements are then used to calculate lung volume, airflow, and other respiratory parameters.

This technique provides valuable information about the functional status of the lungs and can help healthcare providers make informed decisions regarding diagnosis, treatment planning, and disease monitoring.

Bronchial diseases refer to medical conditions that affect the bronchi, which are the large airways that lead into the lungs. These diseases can cause inflammation, narrowing, or obstruction of the bronchi, leading to symptoms such as coughing, wheezing, chest tightness, and difficulty breathing.

Some common bronchial diseases include:

1. Asthma: A chronic inflammatory disease of the airways that causes recurring episodes of wheezing, breathlessness, chest tightness, and coughing.
2. Chronic Bronchitis: A long-term inflammation of the bronchi that leads to a persistent cough and excessive mucus production.
3. Bronchiectasis: A condition in which the bronchi become damaged and widened, leading to chronic infection and inflammation.
4. Bronchitis: An inflammation of the bronchi that can cause coughing, wheezing, and chest tightness.
5. Emphysema: A lung condition that causes shortness of breath due to damage to the air sacs in the lungs. While not strictly a bronchial disease, it is often associated with chronic bronchitis and COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease).

Treatment for bronchial diseases may include medications such as bronchodilators, corticosteroids, or antibiotics, as well as lifestyle changes such as quitting smoking and avoiding irritants. In severe cases, oxygen therapy or surgery may be necessary.

'Ascaris' is a genus of parasitic roundworms that are known to infect the human gastrointestinal tract. The two species that commonly infect humans are Ascaris lumbricoides (also known as the "large roundworm") and Ascaris suum (the "pig roundworm").

Human infection with Ascaris lumbricoides typically occurs through the ingestion of contaminated food or water containing the worm's eggs. Once inside the human body, these eggs hatch into larvae, which migrate through various tissues before reaching the small intestine, where they mature into adult worms. Adult female worms can grow up to 20-35 cm in length and produce thousands of eggs per day, which are then excreted in feces and can contaminate the environment, perpetuating the transmission cycle.

Symptoms of ascariasis (the infection caused by Ascaris) can range from mild to severe, depending on the number of worms present and the individual's overall health status. Light infections may not cause any symptoms, while heavy infections can lead to abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and intestinal obstruction. In some cases, Ascaris worms may migrate to unusual locations such as the lungs or bile ducts, causing additional complications.

Preventive measures include improving sanitation and hygiene practices, such as handwashing with soap and water, proper disposal of human feces, and cooking food thoroughly before consumption. Treatment typically involves administration of anthelmintic medications that kill the worms, followed by appropriate follow-up care to ensure complete eradication of the infection.

Gallamine triethiodide is not typically considered a medical term, but it is a pharmacological substance with historical use in anesthesia. It is a quaternary ammonium compound with muscarinic anticholinergic and skeletal muscle relaxant properties. The chemical formula for gallamine triethiodide is C17H24I3N2O2.

In a medical or clinical context, gallamine triethiodide has been used as an adjunct to general anesthesia to provide muscle relaxation during surgical procedures. However, due to its significant side effects and the availability of safer alternatives, it is no longer commonly used in modern anesthetic practice.

Chlorpheniramine is an antihistamine medication that is used to relieve allergic symptoms caused by hay fever, hives, and other allergies. It works by blocking the action of histamine, a substance in the body that causes allergic symptoms. Chlorpheniramine is available in various forms, including tablets, capsules, syrup, and injection.

Common side effects of chlorpheniramine include drowsiness, dry mouth, blurred vision, and dizziness. It may also cause more serious side effects such as rapid heartbeat, difficulty breathing, and confusion, especially in elderly people or those with underlying medical conditions. Chlorpheniramine should be used with caution and under the supervision of a healthcare provider, particularly in children, pregnant women, and people with medical conditions such as glaucoma, enlarged prostate, and respiratory disorders.

It is important to follow the dosage instructions carefully when taking chlorpheniramine, as taking too much can lead to overdose and serious complications. If you experience any unusual symptoms or have concerns about your medication, it is best to consult with a healthcare provider.

Leukotriene antagonists are a class of medications that work by blocking the action of leukotrienes, which are chemicals released by the immune system in response to an allergen or irritant. Leukotrienes cause airway muscles to tighten and inflammation in the airways, leading to symptoms such as wheezing, shortness of breath, and coughing. By blocking the action of leukotrienes, leukotriene antagonists can help relieve these symptoms and improve lung function. These medications are often used to treat asthma and allergic rhinitis (hay fever). Examples of leukotriene antagonists include montelukast, zafirlukast, and pranlukast.

Leukotriene D4 (LTD4) is a biological mediator derived from arachidonic acid, which is released from membrane phospholipids by the action of phospholipase A2. It is one of the cysteinyl leukotrienes (cys-LTs), along with LTC4 and LTE4, that are produced in the body through the 5-lipoxygenase pathway.

LTD4 plays a significant role in the inflammatory response, particularly in the airways. It is a potent constrictor of bronchial smooth muscle, increases vascular permeability, and recruits eosinophils and other inflammatory cells to the site of inflammation. These actions contribute to the pathogenesis of asthma and allergic rhinitis.

LTD4 exerts its effects by binding to cys-LT receptors (CysLT1 and CysLT2) found on various cell types, including smooth muscle cells, endothelial cells, and inflammatory cells. The activation of these receptors leads to a cascade of intracellular signaling events that result in the observed biological responses.

Inhibitors of 5-lipoxygenase or cys-LT receptor antagonists are used as therapeutic agents for the treatment of asthma and allergic rhinitis, targeting the actions of LTD4 and other cys-LTs to reduce inflammation and bronchoconstriction.

Atropine is an anticholinergic drug that blocks the action of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine in the central and peripheral nervous system. It is derived from the belladonna alkaloids, which are found in plants such as deadly nightshade (Atropa belladonna), Jimson weed (Datura stramonium), and Duboisia spp.

In clinical medicine, atropine is used to reduce secretions, increase heart rate, and dilate the pupils. It is often used before surgery to dry up secretions in the mouth, throat, and lungs, and to reduce salivation during the procedure. Atropine is also used to treat certain types of nerve agent and pesticide poisoning, as well as to manage bradycardia (slow heart rate) and hypotension (low blood pressure) caused by beta-blockers or calcium channel blockers.

Atropine can have several side effects, including dry mouth, blurred vision, dizziness, confusion, and difficulty urinating. In high doses, it can cause delirium, hallucinations, and seizures. Atropine should be used with caution in patients with glaucoma, prostatic hypertrophy, or other conditions that may be exacerbated by its anticholinergic effects.

A muscarinic M2 receptor is a type of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that binds to the neurotransmitter acetylcholine. It is one of five subtypes of muscarinic receptors (M1-M5) and is widely distributed throughout the body, particularly in the heart, smooth muscle, and exocrine glands.

The M2 receptor is coupled to the G protein inhibitory Gαi/o, which inhibits adenylyl cyclase activity and reduces intracellular cAMP levels. This leads to a variety of physiological responses, including negative chronotropy (slowing of heart rate) and negative inotropy (decreased contractility) in the heart, relaxation of smooth muscle in the bronchioles and gastrointestinal tract, and inhibition of exocrine gland secretion.

The M2 receptor is an important target for drugs used to treat a variety of conditions, including cardiovascular diseases, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and gastrointestinal disorders. Anticholinergic drugs such as atropine and ipratropium bind to the M2 receptor and block its activity, while muscarinic agonists such as bethanechol activate the receptor.

The double-blind method is a study design commonly used in research, including clinical trials, to minimize bias and ensure the objectivity of results. In this approach, both the participants and the researchers are unaware of which group the participants are assigned to, whether it be the experimental group or the control group. This means that neither the participants nor the researchers know who is receiving a particular treatment or placebo, thus reducing the potential for bias in the evaluation of outcomes. The assignment of participants to groups is typically done by a third party not involved in the study, and the codes are only revealed after all data have been collected and analyzed.

Clemastine is an antihistamine medication that is used to relieve symptoms of allergies, such as runny nose, sneezing, and itchy or watery eyes. It works by blocking the action of histamine, a substance in the body that causes allergic symptoms. Clemastine is available in oral tablet and liquid forms, and is typically taken twice daily with a full glass of water.

Common side effects of clemastine include drowsiness, dry mouth, headache, and upset stomach. It is important to avoid activities that require mental alertness, such as driving or operating heavy machinery, until you know how the medication affects you. Clemastine may also cause dizziness, so it is best to avoid getting up too quickly from a sitting or lying position.

Like all medications, clemastine should be taken only as directed by your healthcare provider. It is important to inform them of any other medications you are taking, as well as any medical conditions you may have, as clemastine can interact with certain drugs and may not be suitable for everyone.

Terbutaline is a medication that belongs to a class of drugs called beta-2 adrenergic agonists. It works by relaxing muscles in the airways and increasing the flow of air into the lungs, making it easier to breathe. Terbutaline is used to treat bronchospasm (wheezing, shortness of breath) associated with asthma, chronic bronchitis, emphysema, and other lung diseases. It may also be used to prevent or treat bronchospasm caused by exercise or to prevent premature labor in pregnant women.

The medical definition of Terbutaline is: "A synthetic sympathomimetic amine used as a bronchodilator for the treatment of asthma, bronchitis, and emphysema. It acts as a nonselective beta-2 adrenergic agonist, relaxing smooth muscle in the airways and increasing airflow to the lungs."

Respiratory Function Tests (RFTs) are a group of medical tests that measure how well your lungs take in and exhale air, and how well they transfer oxygen and carbon dioxide into and out of your blood. They can help diagnose certain lung disorders, measure the severity of lung disease, and monitor response to treatment.

RFTs include several types of tests, such as:

1. Spirometry: This test measures how much air you can exhale and how quickly you can do it. It's often used to diagnose and monitor conditions like asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and other lung diseases.
2. Lung volume testing: This test measures the total amount of air in your lungs. It can help diagnose restrictive lung diseases, such as pulmonary fibrosis or sarcoidosis.
3. Diffusion capacity testing: This test measures how well oxygen moves from your lungs into your bloodstream. It's often used to diagnose and monitor conditions like pulmonary fibrosis, interstitial lung disease, and other lung diseases that affect the ability of the lungs to transfer oxygen to the blood.
4. Bronchoprovocation testing: This test involves inhaling a substance that can cause your airways to narrow, such as methacholine or histamine. It's often used to diagnose and monitor asthma.
5. Exercise stress testing: This test measures how well your lungs and heart work together during exercise. It's often used to diagnose lung or heart disease.

Overall, Respiratory Function Tests are an important tool for diagnosing and managing a wide range of lung conditions.

Capsaicin is defined in medical terms as the active component of chili peppers (genus Capsicum) that produces a burning sensation when it comes into contact with mucous membranes or skin. It is a potent irritant and is used topically as a counterirritant in some creams and patches to relieve pain. Capsaicin works by depleting substance P, a neurotransmitter that relays pain signals to the brain, from nerve endings.

Here is the medical definition of capsaicin from the Merriam-Webster's Medical Dictionary:

caпсаісіn : an alkaloid (C18H27NO3) that is the active principle of red peppers and is used in topical preparations as a counterirritant and analgesic.

Ovalbumin is the major protein found in egg white, making up about 54-60% of its total protein content. It is a glycoprotein with a molecular weight of around 45 kDa and has both hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions. Ovalbumin is a single polypeptide chain consisting of 385 amino acids, including four disulfide bridges that contribute to its structure.

Ovalbumin is often used in research as a model antigen for studying immune responses and allergies. In its native form, ovalbumin is not allergenic; however, when it is denatured or degraded into smaller peptides through cooking or digestion, it can become an allergen for some individuals.

In addition to being a food allergen, ovalbumin has been used in various medical and research applications, such as vaccine development, immunological studies, and protein structure-function analysis.

Pulmonary ventilation, also known as pulmonary respiration or simply ventilation, is the process of moving air into and out of the lungs to facilitate gas exchange. It involves two main phases: inhalation (or inspiration) and exhalation (or expiration). During inhalation, the diaphragm and external intercostal muscles contract, causing the chest volume to increase and the pressure inside the chest to decrease, which then draws air into the lungs. Conversely, during exhalation, these muscles relax, causing the chest volume to decrease and the pressure inside the chest to increase, which pushes air out of the lungs. This process ensures that oxygen-rich air from the atmosphere enters the alveoli (air sacs in the lungs), where it can diffuse into the bloodstream, while carbon dioxide-rich air from the bloodstream in the capillaries surrounding the alveoli is expelled out of the body.

Smooth muscle, also known as involuntary muscle, is a type of muscle that is controlled by the autonomic nervous system and functions without conscious effort. These muscles are found in the walls of hollow organs such as the stomach, intestines, bladder, and blood vessels, as well as in the eyes, skin, and other areas of the body.

Smooth muscle fibers are shorter and narrower than skeletal muscle fibers and do not have striations or sarcomeres, which give skeletal muscle its striped appearance. Smooth muscle is controlled by the autonomic nervous system through the release of neurotransmitters such as acetylcholine and norepinephrine, which bind to receptors on the smooth muscle cells and cause them to contract or relax.

Smooth muscle plays an important role in many physiological processes, including digestion, circulation, respiration, and elimination. It can also contribute to various medical conditions, such as hypertension, gastrointestinal disorders, and genitourinary dysfunction, when it becomes overactive or underactive.

A cross-over study is a type of experimental design in which participants receive two or more interventions in a specific order. After a washout period, each participant receives the opposite intervention(s). The primary advantage of this design is that it controls for individual variability by allowing each participant to act as their own control.

In medical research, cross-over studies are often used to compare the efficacy or safety of two treatments. For example, a researcher might conduct a cross-over study to compare the effectiveness of two different medications for treating high blood pressure. Half of the participants would be randomly assigned to receive one medication first and then switch to the other medication after a washout period. The other half of the participants would receive the opposite order of treatments.

Cross-over studies can provide valuable insights into the relative merits of different interventions, but they also have some limitations. For example, they may not be suitable for studying conditions that are chronic or irreversible, as it may not be possible to completely reverse the effects of the first intervention before administering the second one. Additionally, carryover effects from the first intervention can confound the results if they persist into the second treatment period.

Overall, cross-over studies are a useful tool in medical research when used appropriately and with careful consideration of their limitations.

Anti-asthmatic agents are a class of medications used to prevent or alleviate the symptoms of asthma, such as wheezing, shortness of breath, and coughing. These medications work by reducing inflammation, relaxing muscles in the airways, and preventing allergic reactions that can trigger an asthma attack.

There are several types of anti-asthmatic agents, including:

1. Bronchodilators: These medications relax the muscles around the airways, making it easier to breathe. They can be short-acting or long-acting, depending on how long they work.
2. Inhaled corticosteroids: These medications reduce inflammation in the airways and help prevent asthma symptoms from occurring.
3. Leukotriene modifiers: These medications block the action of leukotrienes, chemicals that contribute to inflammation and narrowing of the airways.
4. Combination therapies: Some anti-asthmatic agents combine different types of medications, such as a bronchodilator and an inhaled corticosteroid, into one inhaler.
5. Biologics: These are newer types of anti-asthmatic agents that target specific molecules involved in the inflammatory response in asthma. They are usually given by injection.

It's important to note that different people with asthma may require different medications or combinations of medications to manage their symptoms effectively. Therefore, it is essential to work closely with a healthcare provider to determine the best treatment plan for each individual.

Tachykinins are a group of neuropeptides that share a common carboxy-terminal sequence and bind to G protein-coupled receptors, called tachykinin receptors. They are widely distributed in the nervous system and play important roles as neurotransmitters or neuromodulators in various physiological functions, such as pain transmission, smooth muscle contraction, and inflammation. The most well-known tachykinins include substance P, neurokinin A, and neuropeptide K. They are involved in many pathological conditions, including chronic pain, neuroinflammation, and neurodegenerative diseases.

Histamine H1 antagonists, also known as H1 blockers or antihistamines, are a class of medications that work by blocking the action of histamine at the H1 receptor. Histamine is a chemical mediator released by mast cells and basophils in response to an allergic reaction or injury. It causes various symptoms such as itching, sneezing, runny nose, and wheal and flare reactions (hives).

H1 antagonists prevent the binding of histamine to its receptor, thereby alleviating these symptoms. They are commonly used to treat allergic conditions such as hay fever, hives, and eczema, as well as motion sickness and insomnia. Examples of H1 antagonists include diphenhydramine (Benadryl), loratadine (Claritin), cetirizine (Zyrtec), and doxylamine (Unisom).

Sulfites are a group of chemical compounds that contain the sulfite ion (SO3−2), which consists of one sulfur atom and three oxygen atoms. In medical terms, sulfites are often used as food additives or preservatives, serving to prevent bacterial growth and preserve the color of certain foods and drinks.

Sulfites can be found naturally in some foods, such as wine, dried fruits, and vegetables, but they are also added to a variety of processed products like potato chips, beer, and soft drinks. While sulfites are generally considered safe for most people, they can cause adverse reactions in some individuals, particularly those with asthma or a sensitivity to sulfites.

In the medical field, sulfites may also be used as medications to treat certain conditions. For example, they may be used as a vasodilator to widen blood vessels and improve blood flow during heart surgery or as an antimicrobial agent in some eye drops. However, their use as a medication is relatively limited due to the potential for adverse reactions.

Quinolines are a class of organic compounds that consist of a bicyclic structure made up of a benzene ring fused to a piperidine ring. They have a wide range of applications, but they are perhaps best known for their use in the synthesis of various medications, including antibiotics and antimalarial drugs.

Quinolone antibiotics, such as ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin, work by inhibiting the bacterial enzymes involved in DNA replication and repair. They are commonly used to treat a variety of bacterial infections, including urinary tract infections, pneumonia, and skin infections.

Quinoline-based antimalarial drugs, such as chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine, work by inhibiting the parasite's ability to digest hemoglobin in the red blood cells. They are commonly used to prevent and treat malaria.

It is important to note that quinolines have been associated with serious side effects, including tendinitis and tendon rupture, nerve damage, and abnormal heart rhythms. As with any medication, it is important to use quinolines only under the supervision of a healthcare provider, and to follow their instructions carefully.

Leukotrienes are a type of lipid mediator derived from arachidonic acid, which is a fatty acid found in the cell membranes of various cells in the body. They are produced by the 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) pathway and play an essential role in the inflammatory response. Leukotrienes are involved in several physiological and pathophysiological processes, including bronchoconstriction, increased vascular permeability, and recruitment of immune cells to sites of injury or infection.

There are four main types of leukotrienes: LTB4, LTC4, LTD4, and LTE4. These molecules differ from each other based on the presence or absence of specific chemical groups attached to their core structure. Leukotrienes exert their effects by binding to specific G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) found on the surface of various cells.

LTB4 is primarily involved in neutrophil chemotaxis and activation, while LTC4, LTD4, and LTE4 are collectively known as cysteinyl leukotrienes (CysLTs). CysLTs cause bronchoconstriction, increased mucus production, and vascular permeability in the airways, contributing to the pathogenesis of asthma and other respiratory diseases.

In summary, leukotrienes are potent lipid mediators that play a crucial role in inflammation and immune responses. Their dysregulation has been implicated in several disease states, making them an important target for therapeutic intervention.

Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a potent phospholipid mediator that plays a significant role in various inflammatory and immune responses. It is a powerful lipid signaling molecule released mainly by activated platelets, neutrophils, monocytes, endothelial cells, and other cell types during inflammation or injury.

PAF has a molecular structure consisting of an alkyl chain linked to a glycerol moiety, a phosphate group, and an sn-2 acetyl group. This unique structure allows PAF to bind to its specific G protein-coupled receptor (PAF-R) on the surface of target cells, triggering various intracellular signaling cascades that result in cell activation, degranulation, and aggregation.

The primary functions of PAF include:

1. Platelet activation and aggregation: PAF stimulates platelets to aggregate, release their granules, and activate the coagulation cascade, which can lead to thrombus formation.
2. Neutrophil and monocyte activation: PAF activates these immune cells, leading to increased adhesion, degranulation, and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and pro-inflammatory cytokines.
3. Vasodilation and increased vascular permeability: PAF can cause vasodilation by acting on endothelial cells, leading to an increase in blood flow and facilitating the extravasation of immune cells into inflamed tissues.
4. Bronchoconstriction: In the respiratory system, PAF can induce bronchoconstriction and recruitment of inflammatory cells, contributing to asthma symptoms.
5. Neurotransmission modulation: PAF has been implicated in neuroinflammation and may play a role in neuronal excitability, synaptic plasticity, and cognitive functions.

Dysregulated PAF signaling has been associated with several pathological conditions, including atherosclerosis, sepsis, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), ischemia-reperfusion injury, and neuroinflammatory disorders. Therefore, targeting the PAF pathway may provide therapeutic benefits in these diseases.

Peak Expiratory Flow Rate (PEFR) is a measurement of how quickly a person can exhale air from their lungs. It is often used as a quick test to assess breathing difficulties in people with respiratory conditions such as asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). PEFR is measured in liters per minute (L/min) and the highest value obtained during a forceful exhalation is recorded as the peak expiratory flow rate. Regular monitoring of PEFR can help to assess the severity of an asthma attack or the effectiveness of treatment.

Tachykinin receptors are a type of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that bind and respond to tachykinins, which are neuropeptides involved in various physiological functions such as neurotransmission, smooth muscle contraction, vasodilation, and pain perception. There are three main subtypes of tachykinin receptors: NK1, NK2, and NK3.

NK1 receptors primarily bind substance P, a neuropeptide that plays a role in neurotransmission, inflammation, and pain signaling. NK2 receptors mainly bind neurokinin A (NKA) and are involved in smooth muscle contraction, particularly in the respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts. NK3 receptors primarily bind neurokinin B (NKB) and are found in the central nervous system, where they play a role in regulating body temperature, feeding behavior, and sexual function.

Tachykinin receptors have been implicated in various pathological conditions such as chronic pain, inflammation, asthma, and neurodegenerative disorders. As a result, tachykinin receptor antagonists are being developed as potential therapeutic agents for these conditions.

A vagotomy is a surgical procedure that involves cutting or blocking the vagus nerve, which is a parasympathetic nerve that runs from the brainstem to the abdomen and helps regulate many bodily functions such as heart rate, gastrointestinal motility, and digestion. In particular, vagotomy is often performed as a treatment for peptic ulcers, as it can help reduce gastric acid secretion.

There are several types of vagotomy procedures, including:

1. Truncal vagotomy: This involves cutting the main trunks of the vagus nerve as they enter the abdomen. It is a more extensive procedure that reduces gastric acid secretion significantly but can also lead to side effects such as delayed gastric emptying and diarrhea.
2. Selective vagotomy: This involves cutting only the branches of the vagus nerve that supply the stomach, leaving the rest of the nerve intact. It is a less extensive procedure that reduces gastric acid secretion while minimizing side effects.
3. Highly selective vagotomy (HSV): Also known as parietal cell vagotomy, this involves cutting only the branches of the vagus nerve that supply the acid-secreting cells in the stomach. It is a highly targeted procedure that reduces gastric acid secretion while minimizing side effects such as delayed gastric emptying and diarrhea.

Vagotomy is typically performed using laparoscopic or open surgical techniques, depending on the patient's individual needs and the surgeon's preference. While vagotomy can be effective in treating peptic ulcers, it is not commonly performed today due to the development of less invasive treatments such as proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) that reduce gastric acid secretion without surgery.

The Respiratory System is a complex network of organs and tissues that work together to facilitate the process of breathing, which involves the intake of oxygen and the elimination of carbon dioxide. This system primarily includes the nose, throat (pharynx), voice box (larynx), windpipe (trachea), bronchi, bronchioles, lungs, and diaphragm.

The nostrils or mouth take in air that travels through the pharynx, larynx, and trachea into the lungs. Within the lungs, the trachea divides into two bronchi, one for each lung, which further divide into smaller tubes called bronchioles. At the end of these bronchioles are tiny air sacs known as alveoli where the exchange of gases occurs. Oxygen from the inhaled air diffuses through the walls of the alveoli into the bloodstream, while carbon dioxide, a waste product, moves from the blood to the alveoli and is exhaled out of the body.

The diaphragm, a large muscle that separates the chest from the abdomen, plays a crucial role in breathing by contracting and relaxing to change the volume of the chest cavity, thereby allowing air to flow in and out of the lungs. Overall, the Respiratory System is essential for maintaining life by providing the body's cells with the oxygen needed for metabolism and removing waste products like carbon dioxide.

Spirometry is a common type of pulmonary function test (PFT) that measures how well your lungs work. This is done by measuring how much air you can exhale from your lungs after taking a deep breath, and how quickly you can exhale it. The results are compared to normal values for your age, height, sex, and ethnicity.

Spirometry is used to diagnose and monitor certain lung conditions, such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and other respiratory diseases that cause narrowing of the airways. It can also be used to assess the effectiveness of treatment for these conditions. The test is non-invasive, safe, and easy to perform.

Atropine derivatives are a class of drugs that are chemically related to atropine, an alkaloid found in the nightshade family of plants. These drugs have anticholinergic properties, which means they block the action of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine in the body.

Atropine derivatives can be used for a variety of medical purposes, including:

1. Treating motion sickness and vertigo
2. Dilating the pupils during eye examinations
3. Reducing saliva production during surgical procedures
4. Treating certain types of poisoning, such as organophosphate or nerve gas poisoning
5. Managing symptoms of some neurological disorders, such as Parkinson's disease and myasthenia gravis

Some examples of atropine derivatives include hyoscyamine, scopolamine, and ipratropium. These drugs can have side effects, including dry mouth, blurred vision, constipation, difficulty urinating, and rapid heartbeat. They should be used with caution and under the supervision of a healthcare provider.

Airway obstruction is a medical condition that occurs when the normal flow of air into and out of the lungs is partially or completely blocked. This blockage can be caused by a variety of factors, including swelling of the tissues in the airway, the presence of foreign objects or substances, or abnormal growths such as tumors.

When the airway becomes obstructed, it can make it difficult for a person to breathe normally. They may experience symptoms such as shortness of breath, wheezing, coughing, and chest tightness. In severe cases, airway obstruction can lead to respiratory failure and other life-threatening complications.

There are several types of airway obstruction, including:

1. Upper airway obstruction: This occurs when the blockage is located in the upper part of the airway, such as the nose, throat, or voice box.
2. Lower airway obstruction: This occurs when the blockage is located in the lower part of the airway, such as the trachea or bronchi.
3. Partial airway obstruction: This occurs when the airway is partially blocked, allowing some air to flow in and out of the lungs.
4. Complete airway obstruction: This occurs when the airway is completely blocked, preventing any air from flowing into or out of the lungs.

Treatment for airway obstruction depends on the underlying cause of the condition. In some cases, removing the obstruction may be as simple as clearing the airway of foreign objects or mucus. In other cases, more invasive treatments such as surgery may be necessary.

Terfenadine is an antihistamine medication that has been used to treat symptoms of allergies such as hay fever, hives, and other allergic reactions. It works by blocking the action of histamine, a substance in the body that causes allergic symptoms. Terfenadine was first approved for use in the United States in 1985, but it is no longer available in many countries due to concerns about rare but serious side effects related to heart rhythm disturbances. It has been replaced by other antihistamines that are considered safer and more effective.

Nebulizer: A nebulizer is a medical device that delivers medication in the form of a mist to the respiratory system. It is often used for people who have difficulty inhaling medication through traditional inhalers, such as young children or individuals with severe respiratory conditions. The medication is placed in the nebulizer cup and then converted into a fine mist by the machine. This allows the user to breathe in the medication directly through a mouthpiece or mask.

Vaporizer: A vaporizer, on the other hand, is a device that heats up a liquid, often water or essential oils, to produce steam or vapor. While some people use vaporizers for therapeutic purposes, such as to help relieve congestion or cough, it is important to note that vaporizers are not considered medical devices and their effectiveness for these purposes is not well-established.

It's worth noting that nebulizers and vaporizers are different from each other in terms of their purpose and usage. Nebulizers are used specifically for delivering medication, while vaporizers are used to produce steam or vapor, often for non-medical purposes.

A dose-response relationship in the context of drugs refers to the changes in the effects or symptoms that occur as the dose of a drug is increased or decreased. Generally, as the dose of a drug is increased, the severity or intensity of its effects also increases. Conversely, as the dose is decreased, the effects of the drug become less severe or may disappear altogether.

The dose-response relationship is an important concept in pharmacology and toxicology because it helps to establish the safe and effective dosage range for a drug. By understanding how changes in the dose of a drug affect its therapeutic and adverse effects, healthcare providers can optimize treatment plans for their patients while minimizing the risk of harm.

The dose-response relationship is typically depicted as a curve that shows the relationship between the dose of a drug and its effect. The shape of the curve may vary depending on the drug and the specific effect being measured. Some drugs may have a steep dose-response curve, meaning that small changes in the dose can result in large differences in the effect. Other drugs may have a more gradual dose-response curve, where larger changes in the dose are needed to produce significant effects.

In addition to helping establish safe and effective dosages, the dose-response relationship is also used to evaluate the potential therapeutic benefits and risks of new drugs during clinical trials. By systematically testing different doses of a drug in controlled studies, researchers can identify the optimal dosage range for the drug and assess its safety and efficacy.

Ethanolamines are a class of organic compounds that contain an amino group (-NH2) and a hydroxyl group (-OH) attached to a carbon atom. They are derivatives of ammonia (NH3) in which one or two hydrogen atoms have been replaced by a ethanol group (-CH2CH2OH).

The most common ethanolamines are:

* Monethanolamine (MEA), also called 2-aminoethanol, with the formula HOCH2CH2NH2.
* Diethanolamine (DEA), also called 2,2'-iminobisethanol, with the formula HOCH2CH2NHCH2CH2OH.
* Triethanolamine (TEA), also called 2,2',2''-nitrilotrisethanol, with the formula N(CH2CH2OH)3.

Ethanolamines are used in a wide range of industrial and consumer products, including as solvents, emulsifiers, detergents, pharmaceuticals, and personal care products. They also have applications as intermediates in the synthesis of other chemicals. In the body, ethanolamines play important roles in various biological processes, such as neurotransmission and cell signaling.

Benzalkonium compounds are a group of related chemicals that have antimicrobial properties. They are commonly used as disinfectants and preservatives in various products such as eye drops, nasal sprays, skin creams, and household cleaners. Benzalkonium compounds work by disrupting the cell membranes of bacteria, fungi, and viruses, leading to their death. They are often used in low concentrations and are generally considered safe for topical use, but they can cause irritation and allergic reactions in some people. Prolonged or frequent use of products containing benzalkonium compounds may also lead to the development of bacterial resistance.

An allergen is a substance that can cause an allergic reaction in some people. These substances are typically harmless to most people, but for those with allergies, the immune system mistakenly identifies them as threats and overreacts, leading to the release of histamines and other chemicals that cause symptoms such as itching, sneezing, runny nose, rashes, hives, and difficulty breathing. Common allergens include pollen, dust mites, mold spores, pet dander, insect venom, and certain foods or medications. When a person comes into contact with an allergen, they may experience symptoms that range from mild to severe, depending on the individual's sensitivity to the substance and the amount of exposure.

Lung volume measurements are clinical tests that determine the amount of air inhaled, exhaled, and present in the lungs at different times during the breathing cycle. These measurements include:

1. Tidal Volume (TV): The amount of air inhaled or exhaled during normal breathing, usually around 500 mL in resting adults.
2. Inspiratory Reserve Volume (IRV): The additional air that can be inhaled after a normal inspiration, approximately 3,000 mL in adults.
3. Expiratory Reserve Volume (ERV): The extra air that can be exhaled after a normal expiration, about 1,000-1,200 mL in adults.
4. Residual Volume (RV): The air remaining in the lungs after a maximal exhalation, approximately 1,100-1,500 mL in adults.
5. Total Lung Capacity (TLC): The total amount of air the lungs can hold at full inflation, calculated as TV + IRV + ERV + RV, around 6,000 mL in adults.
6. Functional Residual Capacity (FRC): The volume of air remaining in the lungs after a normal expiration, equal to ERV + RV, about 2,100-2,700 mL in adults.
7. Inspiratory Capacity (IC): The maximum amount of air that can be inhaled after a normal expiration, equal to TV + IRV, around 3,500 mL in adults.
8. Vital Capacity (VC): The total volume of air that can be exhaled after a maximal inspiration, calculated as IC + ERV, approximately 4,200-5,600 mL in adults.

These measurements help assess lung function and identify various respiratory disorders such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, and restrictive lung diseases.

Cholinergic antagonists, also known as anticholinergics or parasympatholytics, are a class of drugs that block the action of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine in the nervous system. They achieve this by binding to and blocking the activation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, which are found in various organs throughout the body, including the eyes, lungs, heart, gastrointestinal tract, and urinary bladder.

The blockade of these receptors results in a range of effects depending on the specific organ system involved. For example, cholinergic antagonists can cause mydriasis (dilation of the pupils), cycloplegia (paralysis of the ciliary muscle of the eye), tachycardia (rapid heart rate), reduced gastrointestinal motility and secretion, urinary retention, and respiratory tract smooth muscle relaxation.

Cholinergic antagonists are used in a variety of clinical settings, including the treatment of conditions such as Parkinson's disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, gastrointestinal disorders, and urinary incontinence. Some common examples of cholinergic antagonists include atropine, scopolamine, ipratropium, and oxybutynin.

It's important to note that cholinergic antagonists can have significant side effects, particularly when used in high doses or in combination with other medications that affect the nervous system. These side effects can include confusion, memory impairment, hallucinations, delirium, and blurred vision. Therefore, it's essential to use these drugs under the close supervision of a healthcare provider and to follow their instructions carefully.

A muscarinic M3 receptor is a type of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that binds to the neurotransmitter acetylcholine. It is a subtype of muscarinic receptors, which are named after the muscarine mushroom alkaloid that can activate them.

The M3 receptor is widely expressed in various tissues and organs, including the smooth muscle of the gastrointestinal tract, urinary bladder, respiratory system, and vasculature. When activated by acetylcholine or muscarinic agonists, it triggers a range of intracellular signaling pathways that lead to various physiological responses, such as smooth muscle contraction, glandular secretion, and modulation of neurotransmitter release.

The M3 receptor is known to couple primarily to the Gq/11 family of G proteins, which activate phospholipase C (PLC) and increase intracellular calcium levels. This leads to smooth muscle contraction and other downstream effects. The M3 receptor also interacts with other signaling pathways, such as those involving adenylyl cyclase, mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), and ion channels.

Dysregulation of muscarinic M3 receptors has been implicated in various diseases, including gastrointestinal disorders, overactive bladder syndrome, asthma, and cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, selective modulation of this receptor subtype is a potential therapeutic strategy for these conditions.

Neurokinin-1 (NK-1) receptor antagonists are a class of drugs that block the action of substance P, a neuropeptide involved in pain transmission and inflammation. These drugs work by binding to NK-1 receptors found on nerve cells, preventing substance P from activating them and transmitting pain signals. NK-1 receptor antagonists have been studied for their potential use in treating various conditions associated with pain and inflammation, such as migraine headaches, depression, and irritable bowel syndrome. Some examples of NK-1 receptor antagonists include aprepitant, fosaprepitant, and rolapitant.

Bradykinin is a naturally occurring peptide in the human body, consisting of nine amino acids. It is a potent vasodilator and increases the permeability of blood vessels, causing a local inflammatory response. Bradykinin is formed from the breakdown of certain proteins, such as kininogen, by enzymes called kininases or proteases, including kallikrein. It plays a role in several physiological processes, including pain transmission, blood pressure regulation, and the immune response. In some pathological conditions, such as hereditary angioedema, bradykinin levels can increase excessively, leading to symptoms like swelling, redness, and pain.

Thromboxane A2 (TXA2) is a potent prostanoid, a type of lipid compound derived from arachidonic acid. It is primarily produced and released by platelets upon activation during the process of hemostasis (the body's response to stop bleeding). TXA2 acts as a powerful vasoconstrictor, causing blood vessels to narrow, which helps limit blood loss at the site of injury. Additionally, it promotes platelet aggregation, contributing to the formation of a stable clot and preventing further bleeding. However, uncontrolled or excessive production of TXA2 can lead to thrombotic events such as heart attacks and strokes. Its effects are balanced by prostacyclin (PGI2), which is produced by endothelial cells and has opposing actions, acting as a vasodilator and inhibiting platelet aggregation. The balance between TXA2 and PGI2 helps maintain vascular homeostasis.

Substance P is an undecapeptide neurotransmitter and neuromodulator, belonging to the tachykinin family of peptides. It is widely distributed in the central and peripheral nervous systems and is primarily found in sensory neurons. Substance P plays a crucial role in pain transmission, inflammation, and various autonomic functions. It exerts its effects by binding to neurokinin 1 (NK-1) receptors, which are expressed on the surface of target cells. Apart from nociception and inflammation, Substance P is also involved in regulating emotional behaviors, smooth muscle contraction, and fluid balance.

Respiratory mechanics refers to the biomechanical properties and processes that involve the movement of air through the respiratory system during breathing. It encompasses the mechanical behavior of the lungs, chest wall, and the muscles of respiration, including the diaphragm and intercostal muscles.

Respiratory mechanics includes several key components:

1. **Compliance**: The ability of the lungs and chest wall to expand and recoil during breathing. High compliance means that the structures can easily expand and recoil, while low compliance indicates greater resistance to expansion and recoil.
2. **Resistance**: The opposition to airflow within the respiratory system, primarily due to the friction between the air and the airway walls. Airway resistance is influenced by factors such as airway diameter, length, and the viscosity of the air.
3. **Lung volumes and capacities**: These are the amounts of air present in the lungs during different phases of the breathing cycle. They include tidal volume (the amount of air inspired or expired during normal breathing), inspiratory reserve volume (additional air that can be inspired beyond the tidal volume), expiratory reserve volume (additional air that can be exhaled beyond the tidal volume), and residual volume (the air remaining in the lungs after a forced maximum exhalation).
4. **Work of breathing**: The energy required to overcome the resistance and elastic forces during breathing. This work is primarily performed by the respiratory muscles, which contract to generate negative intrathoracic pressure and expand the chest wall, allowing air to flow into the lungs.
5. **Pressure-volume relationships**: These describe how changes in lung volume are associated with changes in pressure within the respiratory system. Important pressure components include alveolar pressure (the pressure inside the alveoli), pleural pressure (the pressure between the lungs and the chest wall), and transpulmonary pressure (the difference between alveolar and pleural pressures).

Understanding respiratory mechanics is crucial for diagnosing and managing various respiratory disorders, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, and restrictive lung diseases.

Antitussive agents are medications that are used to suppress cough. They work by numbing the throat and interrupting the cough reflex. Some common antitussives include dextromethorphan, codeine, and hydrocodone. These medications can be found in various over-the-counter and prescription cough and cold products. It is important to use antitussives only as directed, as they can have side effects such as drowsiness, constipation, and slowed breathing. Additionally, it's important to note that long term use of opioid antitussive like codeine and hydrocodone are not recommended due to the risk of addiction and other serious side effects.

Pyrilamine is an antihistamine drug that is primarily used to relieve allergic symptoms such as sneezing, itching, watery eyes, and runny nose. It works by blocking the action of histamine, a substance naturally produced by the body during an allergic reaction. Pyrilamine may also be used to treat motion sickness and to help with tension headaches or migraines.

Pyrilamine is available in various forms, including tablets, capsules, and syrup, and it can be taken with or without food. Common side effects of pyrilamine include dizziness, dry mouth, and drowsiness. It is important to avoid activities that require mental alertness, such as driving or operating heavy machinery, until you know how pyrilamine affects you.

Like all medications, pyrilamine should be taken under the supervision of a healthcare provider, who can determine the appropriate dosage and monitor for any potential side effects or interactions with other drugs. It is essential to follow the instructions provided by your healthcare provider carefully and not exceed the recommended dose.

Hypersensitivity is an exaggerated or inappropriate immune response to a substance that is generally harmless to most people. It's also known as an allergic reaction. This abnormal response can be caused by various types of immunological mechanisms, including antibody-mediated reactions (types I, II, and III) and cell-mediated reactions (type IV). The severity of the hypersensitivity reaction can range from mild discomfort to life-threatening conditions. Common examples of hypersensitivity reactions include allergic rhinitis, asthma, atopic dermatitis, food allergies, and anaphylaxis.

Medical Definition of Respiration:

Respiration, in physiology, is the process by which an organism takes in oxygen and gives out carbon dioxide. It's also known as breathing. This process is essential for most forms of life because it provides the necessary oxygen for cellular respiration, where the cells convert biochemical energy from nutrients into adenosine triphosphate (ATP), and releases waste products, primarily carbon dioxide.

In humans and other mammals, respiration is a two-stage process:

1. Breathing (or external respiration): This involves the exchange of gases with the environment. Air enters the lungs through the mouth or nose, then passes through the pharynx, larynx, trachea, and bronchi, finally reaching the alveoli where the actual gas exchange occurs. Oxygen from the inhaled air diffuses into the blood, while carbon dioxide, a waste product of metabolism, diffuses from the blood into the alveoli to be exhaled.

2. Cellular respiration (or internal respiration): This is the process by which cells convert glucose and other nutrients into ATP, water, and carbon dioxide in the presence of oxygen. The carbon dioxide produced during this process then diffuses out of the cells and into the bloodstream to be exhaled during breathing.

In summary, respiration is a vital physiological function that enables organisms to obtain the necessary oxygen for cellular metabolism while eliminating waste products like carbon dioxide.

Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid is a type of clinical specimen obtained through a procedure called bronchoalveolar lavage. This procedure involves inserting a bronchoscope into the lungs and instilling a small amount of saline solution into a specific area of the lung, then gently aspirating the fluid back out. The fluid that is recovered is called bronchoalveolar lavage fluid.

BAL fluid contains cells and other substances that are present in the lower respiratory tract, including the alveoli (the tiny air sacs where gas exchange occurs). By analyzing BAL fluid, doctors can diagnose various lung conditions, such as pneumonia, interstitial lung disease, and lung cancer. They can also monitor the effectiveness of treatments for these conditions by comparing the composition of BAL fluid before and after treatment.

BAL fluid is typically analyzed for its cellular content, including the number and type of white blood cells present, as well as for the presence of bacteria, viruses, or other microorganisms. The fluid may also be tested for various proteins, enzymes, and other biomarkers that can provide additional information about lung health and disease.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Bronchospirometry" is not a widely recognized or established medical term or procedure in the field of pulmonology (lung medicine) or respiratory function testing. It seems that this term may be a combination of 'broncho-,' referring to the bronchi or airways within the lungs, and '-spirometry,' which relates to measuring lung volumes and flows.

However, I cannot find any specific medical definition, research studies, or literature that directly use or describe "Bronchospirometry." It is essential to rely on established and well-defined medical terminology to ensure accurate communication between healthcare professionals and researchers.

If you have more context or information about where you encountered this term, I would be happy to help further clarify the situation.

Inhalation is the act or process of breathing in where air or other gases are drawn into the lungs. It's also known as inspiration. This process involves several muscles, including the diaphragm and intercostal muscles between the ribs, working together to expand the chest cavity and decrease the pressure within the thorax, which then causes air to flow into the lungs.

In a medical context, inhalation can also refer to the administration of medications or therapeutic gases through the respiratory tract, typically using an inhaler or nebulizer. This route of administration allows for direct delivery of the medication to the lungs, where it can be quickly absorbed into the bloodstream and exert its effects.

Adrenergic beta-agonists are a class of medications that bind to and activate beta-adrenergic receptors, which are found in various tissues throughout the body. These receptors are part of the sympathetic nervous system and mediate the effects of the neurotransmitter norepinephrine (also called noradrenaline) and the hormone epinephrine (also called adrenaline).

When beta-agonists bind to these receptors, they stimulate a range of physiological responses, including relaxation of smooth muscle in the airways, increased heart rate and contractility, and increased metabolic rate. As a result, adrenergic beta-agonists are often used to treat conditions such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and bronchitis, as they can help to dilate the airways and improve breathing.

There are several different types of beta-agonists, including short-acting and long-acting formulations. Short-acting beta-agonists (SABAs) are typically used for quick relief of symptoms, while long-acting beta-agonists (LABAs) are used for more sustained symptom control. Examples of adrenergic beta-agonists include albuterol (also known as salbutamol), terbutaline, formoterol, and salmeterol.

It's worth noting that while adrenergic beta-agonists can be very effective in treating respiratory conditions, they can also have side effects, particularly if used in high doses or for prolonged periods of time. These may include tremors, anxiety, palpitations, and increased blood pressure. As with any medication, it's important to use adrenergic beta-agonists only as directed by a healthcare professional.

Pathological constriction refers to an abnormal narrowing or tightening of a body passage or organ, which can interfere with the normal flow of blood, air, or other substances through the area. This constriction can occur due to various reasons such as inflammation, scarring, or abnormal growths, and can affect different parts of the body, including blood vessels, airways, intestines, and ureters. Pathological constriction can lead to a range of symptoms and complications depending on its location and severity, and may require medical intervention to correct.

Forced expiratory flow rates (FEFR) are measures of how quickly and efficiently air can be exhaled from the lungs during a forced breath maneuver. These measurements are often used in pulmonary function testing to help diagnose and monitor obstructive lung diseases such as asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

FEFR is typically measured during a forced expiratory maneuver, where the person takes a deep breath in and then exhales as forcefully and quickly as possible into a mouthpiece connected to a spirometer. The spirometer measures the volume and flow rate of the exhaled air over time.

There are several different FEFR measurements that can be reported, including:

* Forced Expiratory Flow (FEF) 25-75%: This is the average flow rate during the middle half of the forced expiratory maneuver.
* Peak Expiratory Flow Rate (PEFR): This is the maximum flow rate achieved during the first second of the forced expiratory maneuver.
* Forced Expiratory Volume in 1 Second (FEV1): This is the volume of air exhaled in the first second of the forced expiratory maneuver.

Abnormal FEFR values can indicate obstruction in the small airways of the lungs, which can make it difficult to breathe out fully and quickly. The specific pattern of abnormalities in FEFR measurements can help doctors differentiate between different types of obstructive lung diseases.

Vital capacity (VC) is a term used in pulmonary function tests to describe the maximum volume of air that can be exhaled after taking a deep breath. It is the sum of inspiratory reserve volume, tidal volume, and expiratory reserve volume. In other words, it's the total amount of air you can forcibly exhale after inhaling as deeply as possible. Vital capacity is an important measurement in assessing lung function and can be reduced in conditions such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, and other respiratory disorders.

Diphenhydramine is an antihistamine medication used to relieve symptoms of allergies, such as sneezing, runny nose, and itchy or watery eyes. It works by blocking the action of histamine, a substance in the body that causes allergic reactions. Diphenhydramine can also be used to treat motion sickness, insomnia, and symptoms of the common cold.

In addition to its antihistamine effects, diphenhydramine also has anticholinergic properties, which means it can help to reduce secretions in the nose and throat, and may have a drying effect on the mouth and eyes. It is available over-the-counter in various forms, including tablets, capsules, liquid, and topical creams or ointments.

It's important to note that diphenhydramine can cause drowsiness, so it should be used with caution when operating heavy machinery or driving a vehicle. It may also interact with other medications, so it's important to speak with a healthcare provider before taking this medication.

Functional Residual Capacity (FRC) is the volume of air that remains in the lungs after normal expiration during quiet breathing. It represents the sum of the residual volume (RV) and the expiratory reserve volume (ERV). The FRC is approximately 2.5-3.5 liters in a healthy adult. This volume of air serves to keep the alveoli open and maintain oxygenation during periods of quiet breathing, as well as providing a reservoir for additional ventilation during increased activity or exercise.

Anesthesia is a medical term that refers to the loss of sensation or awareness, usually induced by the administration of various drugs. It is commonly used during surgical procedures to prevent pain and discomfort. There are several types of anesthesia, including:

1. General anesthesia: This type of anesthesia causes a complete loss of consciousness and is typically used for major surgeries.
2. Regional anesthesia: This type of anesthesia numbs a specific area of the body, such as an arm or leg, while the patient remains conscious.
3. Local anesthesia: This type of anesthesia numbs a small area of the body, such as a cut or wound, and is typically used for minor procedures.

Anesthesia can be administered through various routes, including injection, inhalation, or topical application. The choice of anesthesia depends on several factors, including the type and duration of the procedure, the patient's medical history, and their overall health. Anesthesiologists are medical professionals who specialize in administering anesthesia and monitoring patients during surgical procedures to ensure their safety and comfort.

Adrenergic beta-2 receptor agonists are a class of medications that bind to and stimulate beta-2 adrenergic receptors, which are found in various tissues throughout the body, including the lungs, blood vessels, and skeletal muscles. These receptors are part of the sympathetic nervous system and play a role in regulating various physiological processes such as heart rate, blood pressure, and airway diameter.

When beta-2 receptor agonists bind to these receptors, they cause bronchodilation (opening of the airways), relaxation of smooth muscle, and increased heart rate and force of contraction. These effects make them useful in the treatment of conditions such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and premature labor.

Examples of adrenergic beta-2 receptor agonists include albuterol, terbutaline, salmeterol, and formoterol. These medications can be administered by inhalation, oral administration, or injection, depending on the specific drug and the condition being treated.

It's important to note that while adrenergic beta-2 receptor agonists are generally safe and effective when used as directed, they can have side effects such as tremors, anxiety, palpitations, and headaches. In addition, long-term use of some beta-2 agonists has been associated with increased risk of severe asthma exacerbations and even death in some cases. Therefore, it's important to use these medications only as directed by a healthcare provider and to report any concerning symptoms promptly.

Propranolol is a medication that belongs to a class of drugs called beta blockers. Medically, it is defined as a non-selective beta blocker, which means it blocks the effects of both epinephrine (adrenaline) and norepinephrine (noradrenaline) on the heart and other organs. These effects include reducing heart rate, contractility, and conduction velocity, leading to decreased oxygen demand by the myocardium. Propranolol is used in the management of various conditions such as hypertension, angina pectoris, arrhythmias, essential tremor, anxiety disorders, and infants with congenital heart defects. It may also be used to prevent migraines and reduce the risk of future heart attacks. As with any medication, it should be taken under the supervision of a healthcare provider due to potential side effects and contraindications.

A hypertonic saline solution is a type of medical fluid that contains a higher concentration of salt (sodium chloride) than is found in the average person's blood. This solution is used to treat various medical conditions, such as dehydration, brain swelling, and increased intracranial pressure.

The osmolarity of a hypertonic saline solution typically ranges from 1500 to 23,400 mOsm/L, with the most commonly used solutions having an osmolarity of around 3000 mOsm/L. The high sodium concentration in these solutions creates an osmotic gradient that draws water out of cells and into the bloodstream, helping to reduce swelling and increase fluid volume in the body.

It is important to note that hypertonic saline solutions should be administered with caution, as they can cause serious side effects such as electrolyte imbalances, heart rhythm abnormalities, and kidney damage if not used properly. Healthcare professionals must carefully monitor patients receiving these solutions to ensure safe and effective treatment.

Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) are synthetic, volatile organic compounds that consist of carbon atoms, chlorine atoms, and fluorine atoms. They were widely used in various applications such as refrigerants, aerosol propellants, solvents, and fire extinguishing agents due to their non-toxicity, non-flammability, and chemical stability.

However, CFCs have been found to contribute significantly to the depletion of the Earth's ozone layer when released into the atmosphere. This is because they are stable enough to reach the upper atmosphere, where they react with ultraviolet radiation to release chlorine atoms that can destroy ozone molecules. As a result, the production and use of CFCs have been phased out under the Montreal Protocol, an international treaty aimed at protecting the ozone layer.

Scopolamine derivatives are a class of compounds that are chemically related to scopolamine, a natural alkaloid found in certain plants such as nightshade. These derivatives share similar structural and pharmacological properties with scopolamine, which is a muscarinic antagonist. They block the action of acetylcholine, a neurotransmitter, at muscarinic receptors in the nervous system.

Scopolamine derivatives are commonly used in medical settings as anticholinergics, which have various therapeutic applications. They can be used to treat conditions such as motion sickness, nausea and vomiting, Parkinson's disease, and certain types of nerve agent poisoning. Some examples of scopolamine derivatives include hyoscine, pirenzepine, and telenzepine.

It is important to note that scopolamine derivatives can have significant side effects, including dry mouth, blurred vision, dizziness, and cognitive impairment. Therefore, they should be used with caution and under the close supervision of a healthcare provider.

Acetylcholine is a neurotransmitter, a type of chemical messenger that transmits signals across a chemical synapse from one neuron (nerve cell) to another "target" neuron, muscle cell, or gland cell. It is involved in both peripheral and central nervous system functions.

In the peripheral nervous system, acetylcholine acts as a neurotransmitter at the neuromuscular junction, where it transmits signals from motor neurons to activate muscles. Acetylcholine also acts as a neurotransmitter in the autonomic nervous system, where it is involved in both the sympathetic and parasympathetic systems.

In the central nervous system, acetylcholine plays a role in learning, memory, attention, and arousal. Disruptions in cholinergic neurotransmission have been implicated in several neurological disorders, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and myasthenia gravis.

Acetylcholine is synthesized from choline and acetyl-CoA by the enzyme choline acetyltransferase and is stored in vesicles at the presynaptic terminal of the neuron. When a nerve impulse arrives, the vesicles fuse with the presynaptic membrane, releasing acetylcholine into the synapse. The acetylcholine then binds to receptors on the postsynaptic membrane, triggering a response in the target cell. Acetylcholine is subsequently degraded by the enzyme acetylcholinesterase, which terminates its action and allows for signal transduction to be repeated.

Respiratory hypersensitivity, also known as respiratory allergies or hypersensitive pneumonitis, refers to an exaggerated immune response in the lungs to inhaled substances or allergens. This condition occurs when the body's immune system overreacts to harmless particles, leading to inflammation and damage in the airways and alveoli (air sacs) of the lungs.

There are two types of respiratory hypersensitivity: immediate and delayed. Immediate hypersensitivity, also known as type I hypersensitivity, is mediated by immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies and results in symptoms such as sneezing, runny nose, and asthma-like symptoms within minutes to hours of exposure to the allergen. Delayed hypersensitivity, also known as type III or type IV hypersensitivity, is mediated by other immune mechanisms and can take several hours to days to develop after exposure to the allergen.

Common causes of respiratory hypersensitivity include mold spores, animal dander, dust mites, pollen, and chemicals found in certain occupations. Symptoms may include coughing, wheezing, shortness of breath, chest tightness, and fatigue. Treatment typically involves avoiding the allergen, if possible, and using medications such as corticosteroids, bronchodilators, or antihistamines to manage symptoms. In severe cases, immunotherapy (allergy shots) may be recommended to help desensitize the immune system to the allergen.

Leukotriene receptors are a type of cell surface receptor that bind to and are activated by leukotrienes, which are lipid mediators derived from arachidonic acid. These receptors play an important role in the inflammatory response and are involved in various physiological and pathophysiological processes, including bronchoconstriction, increased vascular permeability, and recruitment of inflammatory cells.

There are two main types of leukotriene receptors: CysLT1 and CysLT2. The CysLT1 receptor has a high affinity for the cysteinyl leukotrienes LTC4, LTD4, and LTE4, while the CysLT2 receptor has a lower affinity for these ligands. Activation of the CysLT1 receptor leads to smooth muscle contraction, increased vascular permeability, and recruitment of inflammatory cells, while activation of the CysLT2 receptor is associated with vasoconstriction and bronchodilation.

Leukotriene receptors are found on various cell types, including immune cells (e.g., eosinophils, mast cells), airway smooth muscle cells, endothelial cells, and epithelial cells. They play a key role in the pathogenesis of asthma and other allergic diseases, as well as in the development of inflammation in response to infection or tissue injury.

Drugs that target leukotriene receptors, such as montelukast (a CysLT1 receptor antagonist), are used in the treatment of asthma and allergic rhinitis. These drugs work by blocking the activation of leukotriene receptors, thereby reducing inflammation and bronchoconstriction.

Thromboxanes are a type of lipid compound that is derived from arachidonic acid, a type of fatty acid found in the cell membranes of many organisms. They are synthesized in the body through the action of an enzyme called cyclooxygenase (COX).

Thromboxanes are primarily produced by platelets, a type of blood cell that plays a key role in clotting. Once formed, thromboxanes act as powerful vasoconstrictors, causing blood vessels to narrow and blood flow to decrease. They also promote the aggregation of platelets, which can lead to the formation of blood clots.

Thromboxanes are involved in many physiological processes, including hemostasis (the process by which bleeding is stopped) and inflammation. However, excessive production of thromboxanes has been implicated in a number of pathological conditions, such as heart attacks, strokes, and pulmonary hypertension.

There are several different types of thromboxanes, including thromboxane A2 (TXA2) and thromboxane B2 (TXB2). TXA2 is the most biologically active form and has a very short half-life, while TXB2 is a more stable metabolite that can be measured in the blood to assess thromboxane production.

Ketotifen is an antihistamine and mast cell stabilizer used in the prevention and treatment of allergic reactions. It works by blocking the release of histamine, a substance that causes allergic symptoms, and preventing the activation of mast cells, which play a key role in allergic responses. Ketotifen is available as an oral medication and is often used to treat chronic urticaria (hives) and other allergic conditions. It may also have some benefits in the treatment of asthma.

It's important to note that ketotifen should be taken under the supervision of a healthcare professional, as it can cause side effects such as drowsiness, dry mouth, and increased appetite. Additionally, it may interact with other medications, so it is important to inform your doctor of all medications you are taking before starting ketotifen.

Parasympatholytics are a type of medication that blocks the action of the parasympathetic nervous system. The parasympathetic nervous system is responsible for the body's rest and digest response, which includes slowing the heart rate, increasing intestinal and glandular activity, and promoting urination and defecation.

Parasympatholytics work by selectively binding to muscarinic receptors, which are found in various organs throughout the body, including the heart, lungs, and digestive system. By blocking these receptors, parasympatholytics can cause a range of effects, such as an increased heart rate, decreased glandular secretions, and reduced intestinal motility.

Some common examples of parasympatholytics include atropine, scopolamine, and ipratropium. These medications are often used to treat conditions such as bradycardia (slow heart rate), excessive salivation, and gastrointestinal cramping or diarrhea. However, because they can have significant side effects, parasympatholytics are typically used only when necessary and under the close supervision of a healthcare provider.

Histamine release is the process by which mast cells and basophils (types of white blood cells) release histamine, a type of chemical messenger or mediator, into the surrounding tissue fluid in response to an antigen-antibody reaction. This process is a key part of the body's immune response to foreign substances, such as allergens, and helps to initiate local inflammation, increase blood flow, and recruit other immune cells to the site of the reaction.

Histamine release can also occur in response to certain medications, physical trauma, or other stimuli. When histamine is released in large amounts, it can cause symptoms such as itching, sneezing, runny nose, watery eyes, and hives. In severe cases, it can lead to anaphylaxis, a life-threatening allergic reaction that requires immediate medical attention.

Expiratory Reserve Volume (ERV) is the maximum amount of air that can be exhaled forcefully after a normal tidal exhalation. It is the difference between the functional residual capacity (FRC) and the residual volume (RV). In other words, ERV is the extra volume of air that can be exhaled from the lungs after a normal breath out, when one tries to empty the lungs as much as possible. This volume is an important parameter in pulmonary function tests and helps assess lung health and disease. A decreased ERV may indicate restrictive lung diseases such as pulmonary fibrosis or neuromuscular disorders affecting respiratory muscles.

Piperidines are not a medical term per se, but they are a class of organic compounds that have important applications in the pharmaceutical industry. Medically relevant piperidines include various drugs such as some antihistamines, antidepressants, and muscle relaxants.

A piperidine is a heterocyclic amine with a six-membered ring containing five carbon atoms and one nitrogen atom. The structure can be described as a cyclic secondary amine. Piperidines are found in some natural alkaloids, such as those derived from the pepper plant (Piper nigrum), which gives piperidines their name.

In a medical context, it is more common to encounter specific drugs that belong to the class of piperidines rather than the term itself.

Air pressure, also known as atmospheric pressure, is the force exerted by the weight of air in the atmosphere on a surface. It is measured in units such as pounds per square inch (psi), hectopascals (hPa), or inches of mercury (inHg). The standard atmospheric pressure at sea level is defined as 101,325 Pa (14.7 psi/1013 hPa/29.92 inHg). Changes in air pressure can be used to predict weather patterns and are an important factor in the study of aerodynamics and respiratory physiology.

Dyspnea is defined as difficulty or discomfort in breathing, often described as shortness of breath. It can range from mild to severe, and may occur during rest, exercise, or at any time. Dyspnea can be caused by various medical conditions, including heart and lung diseases, anemia, and neuromuscular disorders. It is important to seek medical attention if experiencing dyspnea, as it can be a sign of a serious underlying condition.

Humidity, in a medical context, is not typically defined on its own but is related to environmental conditions that can affect health. Humidity refers to the amount of water vapor present in the air. It is often discussed in terms of absolute humidity (the mass of water per unit volume of air) or relative humidity (the ratio of the current absolute humidity to the maximum possible absolute humidity, expressed as a percentage). High humidity can contribute to feelings of discomfort, difficulty sleeping, and exacerbation of respiratory conditions such as asthma.

A cough is a reflex action that helps to clear the airways of irritants, foreign particles, or excess mucus or phlegm. It is characterized by a sudden, forceful expulsion of air from the lungs through the mouth and nose. A cough can be acute (short-term) or chronic (long-term), and it can be accompanied by other symptoms such as chest pain, shortness of breath, or fever. Coughing can be caused by various factors, including respiratory infections, allergies, asthma, environmental pollutants, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), and chronic lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and bronchitis. In some cases, a cough may be a symptom of a more serious underlying condition, such as heart failure or lung cancer.

Intravenous injections are a type of medical procedure where medication or fluids are administered directly into a vein using a needle and syringe. This route of administration is also known as an IV injection. The solution injected enters the patient's bloodstream immediately, allowing for rapid absorption and onset of action. Intravenous injections are commonly used to provide quick relief from symptoms, deliver medications that are not easily absorbed by other routes, or administer fluids and electrolytes in cases of dehydration or severe illness. It is important that intravenous injections are performed using aseptic technique to minimize the risk of infection.

Pilocarpine is a cholinergic agonist, which means it stimulates the parasympathetic nervous system by binding to muscarinic receptors. It is primarily used in the treatment of dry mouth (xerostomia) caused by radiation therapy or Sjögren's syndrome, as well as in the management of glaucoma due to its ability to construct the pupils and reduce intraocular pressure. Pilocarpine can also be used to treat certain cardiovascular conditions and chronic bronchitis. It is available in various forms, including tablets, ophthalmic solutions, and topical gels.

In medical terms, constriction refers to the narrowing or tightening of a body part or passageway. This can occur due to various reasons such as spasms of muscles, inflammation, or abnormal growths. It can lead to symptoms like difficulty in breathing, swallowing, or blood flow, depending on where it occurs. For example, constriction of the airways in asthma, constriction of blood vessels in hypertension, or constriction of the esophagus in certain digestive disorders.

Muscle contraction is the physiological process in which muscle fibers shorten and generate force, leading to movement or stability of a body part. This process involves the sliding filament theory where thick and thin filaments within the sarcomeres (the functional units of muscles) slide past each other, facilitated by the interaction between myosin heads and actin filaments. The energy required for this action is provided by the hydrolysis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Muscle contractions can be voluntary or involuntary, and they play a crucial role in various bodily functions such as locomotion, circulation, respiration, and posture maintenance.

Tidal volume (Vt) is the amount of air that moves into or out of the lungs during normal, resting breathing. It is the difference between the volume of air in the lungs at the end of a normal expiration and the volume at the end of a normal inspiration. In other words, it's the volume of each breath you take when you are not making any effort to breathe more deeply.

The average tidal volume for an adult human is around 500 milliliters (ml) per breath, but this can vary depending on factors such as age, sex, size, and fitness level. During exercise or other activities that require increased oxygen intake, tidal volume may increase to meet the body's demands for more oxygen.

Tidal volume is an important concept in respiratory physiology and clinical medicine, as it can be used to assess lung function and diagnose respiratory disorders such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or asthma.

Acetates, in a medical context, most commonly refer to compounds that contain the acetate group, which is an functional group consisting of a carbon atom bonded to two hydrogen atoms and an oxygen atom (-COO-). An example of an acetate is sodium acetate (CH3COONa), which is a salt formed from acetic acid (CH3COOH) and is often used as a buffering agent in medical solutions.

Acetates can also refer to a group of medications that contain acetate as an active ingredient, such as magnesium acetate, which is used as a laxative, or calcium acetate, which is used to treat high levels of phosphate in the blood.

In addition, acetates can also refer to a process called acetylation, which is the addition of an acetyl group (-COCH3) to a molecule. This process can be important in the metabolism and regulation of various substances within the body.

An antigen is a substance (usually a protein) that is recognized as foreign by the immune system and stimulates an immune response, leading to the production of antibodies or activation of T-cells. Antigens can be derived from various sources, including bacteria, viruses, fungi, parasites, and tumor cells. They can also come from non-living substances such as pollen, dust mites, or chemicals.

Antigens contain epitopes, which are specific regions on the antigen molecule that are recognized by the immune system. The immune system's response to an antigen depends on several factors, including the type of antigen, its size, and its location in the body.

In general, antigens can be classified into two main categories:

1. T-dependent antigens: These require the help of T-cells to stimulate an immune response. They are typically larger, more complex molecules that contain multiple epitopes capable of binding to both MHC class II molecules on antigen-presenting cells and T-cell receptors on CD4+ T-cells.
2. T-independent antigens: These do not require the help of T-cells to stimulate an immune response. They are usually smaller, simpler molecules that contain repetitive epitopes capable of cross-linking B-cell receptors and activating them directly.

Understanding antigens and their properties is crucial for developing vaccines, diagnostic tests, and immunotherapies.

Muscarinic antagonists, also known as muscarinic receptor antagonists or parasympatholytics, are a class of drugs that block the action of acetylcholine at muscarinic receptors. Acetylcholine is a neurotransmitter that plays an important role in the parasympathetic nervous system, which helps to regulate various bodily functions such as heart rate, digestion, and respiration.

Muscarinic antagonists work by binding to muscarinic receptors, which are found in various organs throughout the body, including the eyes, lungs, heart, and gastrointestinal tract. By blocking the action of acetylcholine at these receptors, muscarinic antagonists can produce a range of effects depending on the specific receptor subtype that is affected.

For example, muscarinic antagonists may be used to treat conditions such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma by relaxing the smooth muscle in the airways and reducing bronchoconstriction. They may also be used to treat conditions such as urinary incontinence or overactive bladder by reducing bladder contractions.

Some common muscarinic antagonists include atropine, scopolamine, ipratropium, and tiotropium. It's important to note that these drugs can have significant side effects, including dry mouth, blurred vision, constipation, and confusion, especially when used in high doses or for prolonged periods of time.

Budesonide is a corticosteroid medication that is used to reduce inflammation in the body. It works by mimicking the effects of hormones produced naturally by the adrenal glands, which help regulate the immune system and suppress inflammatory responses. Budesonide is available as an inhaler, nasal spray, or oral tablet, and is used to treat a variety of conditions, including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), rhinitis, and Crohn's disease.

When budesonide is inhaled or taken orally, it is absorbed into the bloodstream and travels throughout the body, where it can reduce inflammation in various tissues and organs. In the lungs, for example, budesonide can help prevent asthma attacks by reducing inflammation in the airways, making it easier to breathe.

Like other corticosteroid medications, budesonide can have side effects, particularly if used at high doses or for long periods of time. These may include thrush (a fungal infection in the mouth), hoarseness, sore throat, cough, headache, and easy bruising or skin thinning. Long-term use of corticosteroids can also lead to more serious side effects, such as adrenal suppression, osteoporosis, and increased risk of infections.

It is important to follow the dosage instructions provided by your healthcare provider when taking budesonide or any other medication, and to report any unusual symptoms or side effects promptly.

I believe there might be a misunderstanding in your question. "Dogs" is not a medical term or condition. It is the common name for a domesticated carnivore of the family Canidae, specifically the genus Canis, which includes wolves, foxes, and other extant and extinct species of mammals. Dogs are often kept as pets and companions, and they have been bred in a wide variety of forms and sizes for different purposes, such as hunting, herding, guarding, assisting police and military forces, and providing companionship and emotional support.

If you meant to ask about a specific medical condition or term related to dogs, please provide more context so I can give you an accurate answer.

Cholinergic fibers are nerve cell extensions (neurons) that release the neurotransmitter acetylcholine at their synapses, which are the junctions where they transmit signals to other neurons or effector cells such as muscles and glands. These fibers are a part of the cholinergic system, which plays crucial roles in various physiological processes including learning and memory, attention, arousal, sleep, and muscle contraction.

Cholinergic fibers can be found in both the central nervous system (CNS) and the peripheral nervous system (PNS). In the CNS, cholinergic neurons are primarily located in the basal forebrain and brainstem, and their projections innervate various regions of the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, thalamus, and other brain areas. In the PNS, cholinergic fibers are responsible for activating skeletal muscles through neuromuscular junctions, as well as regulating functions in smooth muscles, cardiac muscles, and glands via the autonomic nervous system.

Dysfunction of the cholinergic system has been implicated in several neurological disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and myasthenia gravis.

Thromboxane B2 (TXB2) is a stable metabolite of thromboxane A2 (TXA2), which is a potent vasoconstrictor and platelet aggregator synthesized by activated platelets. TXA2 has a very short half-life, quickly undergoing spontaneous conversion to the more stable TXB2.

TXB2 itself does not have significant biological activity but serves as a marker for TXA2 production in various physiological and pathophysiological conditions, such as thrombosis, inflammation, and atherosclerosis. It can be measured in blood or other bodily fluids to assess platelet activation and the status of hemostatic and inflammatory processes.

Eosinophils are a type of white blood cell that play an important role in the body's immune response. They are produced in the bone marrow and released into the bloodstream, where they can travel to different tissues and organs throughout the body. Eosinophils are characterized by their granules, which contain various proteins and enzymes that are toxic to parasites and can contribute to inflammation.

Eosinophils are typically associated with allergic reactions, asthma, and other inflammatory conditions. They can also be involved in the body's response to certain infections, particularly those caused by parasites such as worms. In some cases, elevated levels of eosinophils in the blood or tissues (a condition called eosinophilia) can indicate an underlying medical condition, such as a parasitic infection, autoimmune disorder, or cancer.

Eosinophils are named for their staining properties - they readily take up eosin dye, which is why they appear pink or red under the microscope. They make up only about 1-6% of circulating white blood cells in healthy individuals, but their numbers can increase significantly in response to certain triggers.

Muscarinic receptors are a type of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that bind to the neurotransmitter acetylcholine. They are found in various organ systems, including the nervous system, cardiovascular system, and respiratory system. Muscarinic receptors are activated by muscarine, a type of alkaloid found in certain mushrooms, and are classified into five subtypes (M1-M5) based on their pharmacological properties and signaling pathways.

Muscarinic receptors play an essential role in regulating various physiological functions, such as heart rate, smooth muscle contraction, glandular secretion, and cognitive processes. Activation of M1, M3, and M5 muscarinic receptors leads to the activation of phospholipase C (PLC) and the production of inositol trisphosphate (IP3) and diacylglycerol (DAG), which increase intracellular calcium levels and activate protein kinase C (PKC). Activation of M2 and M4 muscarinic receptors inhibits adenylyl cyclase, reducing the production of cAMP and modulating ion channel activity.

In summary, muscarinic receptors are a type of GPCR that binds to acetylcholine and regulates various physiological functions in different organ systems. They are classified into five subtypes based on their pharmacological properties and signaling pathways.

A reflex is an automatic, involuntary and rapid response to a stimulus that occurs without conscious intention. In the context of physiology and neurology, it's a basic mechanism that involves the transmission of nerve impulses between neurons, resulting in a muscle contraction or glandular secretion.

Reflexes are important for maintaining homeostasis, protecting the body from harm, and coordinating movements. They can be tested clinically to assess the integrity of the nervous system, such as the knee-j jerk reflex, which tests the function of the L3-L4 spinal nerve roots and the sensitivity of the stretch reflex arc.

Thromboxane receptors are a type of G protein-coupled receptor that binds thromboxane A2 (TXA2), a powerful inflammatory mediator and vasoconstrictor synthesized in the body from arachidonic acid. These receptors play a crucial role in various physiological processes, including platelet aggregation, smooth muscle contraction, and modulation of immune responses.

There are two main types of thromboxane receptors: TPα and TPβ. The TPα receptor is primarily found on platelets and vascular smooth muscle cells, while the TPβ receptor is expressed in various tissues such as the kidney, lung, and brain. Activation of these receptors by thromboxane A2 leads to a variety of cellular responses, including platelet activation and aggregation, vasoconstriction, and inflammation.

Abnormalities in thromboxane receptor function have been implicated in several pathological conditions, such as cardiovascular diseases, asthma, and cancer. Therefore, thromboxane receptors are an important target for the development of therapeutic agents to treat these disorders.

Methysergide is a medication that belongs to a class of drugs called ergot alkaloids. It is primarily used for the prophylaxis (prevention) of migraine headaches. Methysergide works by narrowing blood vessels around the brain, which is thought to help prevent migraines.

The medical definition of Methysergide is:
A semisynthetic ergot alkaloid derivative used in the prophylaxis of migraine and cluster headaches. It has both agonist and antagonist properties at serotonin receptors, and its therapeutic effects are thought to be related to its ability to block the binding of serotonin to its receptors. However, methysergide can have serious side effects, including fibrotic reactions in various organs, such as the heart, lungs, and kidneys, so it is usually used only for short periods of time and under close medical supervision.

Furosemide is a loop diuretic medication that is primarily used to treat edema (fluid retention) associated with various medical conditions such as heart failure, liver cirrhosis, and kidney disease. It works by inhibiting the sodium-potassium-chloride cotransporter in the ascending loop of Henle in the kidneys, thereby promoting the excretion of water, sodium, and chloride ions. This increased urine output helps reduce fluid accumulation in the body and lower blood pressure.

Furosemide is also known by its brand names Lasix and Frusid. It can be administered orally or intravenously, depending on the patient's condition and the desired rate of diuresis. Common side effects include dehydration, electrolyte imbalances, hearing loss (in high doses), and increased blood sugar levels.

It is essential to monitor kidney function, electrolyte levels, and fluid balance while using furosemide to minimize potential adverse effects and ensure appropriate treatment.

Fenoterol is a short-acting β2-adrenergic receptor agonist, which is a type of medication used to treat respiratory conditions such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). It works by relaxing the muscles in the airways and increasing the flow of air into the lungs, making it easier to breathe.

Fenoterol is available in various forms, including inhalation solution, nebulizer solution, and dry powder inhaler. It is usually used as a rescue medication to relieve sudden symptoms or during an asthma attack. Like other short-acting β2-agonists, fenoterol has a rapid onset of action but its effects may wear off quickly, typically within 4-6 hours.

It is important to note that the use of fenoterol has been associated with an increased risk of severe asthma exacerbations and cardiovascular events, such as irregular heartbeat and high blood pressure. Therefore, it should be used with caution and only under the supervision of a healthcare professional.

The Parasympathetic Nervous System (PNS) is the part of the autonomic nervous system that primarily controls vegetative functions during rest, relaxation, and digestion. It is responsible for the body's "rest and digest" activities including decreasing heart rate, lowering blood pressure, increasing digestive activity, and stimulating sexual arousal. The PNS utilizes acetylcholine as its primary neurotransmitter and acts in opposition to the Sympathetic Nervous System (SNS), which is responsible for the "fight or flight" response.

Lipoxygenase inhibitors are a class of compounds that block the activity of lipoxygenase enzymes. These enzymes are involved in the metabolism of arachidonic acid and other polyunsaturated fatty acids, leading to the production of leukotrienes and other inflammatory mediators. By inhibiting lipoxygenase, these compounds can help reduce inflammation and may have potential therapeutic applications in the treatment of various diseases, including asthma, atherosclerosis, and cancer. Some examples of lipoxygenase inhibitors include nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), zileuton, and baicalein.

Indomethacin is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) that is commonly used to reduce pain, inflammation, and fever. It works by inhibiting the activity of certain enzymes in the body, including cyclooxygenase (COX), which plays a role in producing prostaglandins, chemicals involved in the inflammatory response.

Indomethacin is available in various forms, such as capsules, suppositories, and injectable solutions, and is used to treat a wide range of conditions, including rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, gout, and bursitis. It may also be used to relieve pain and reduce fever in other conditions, such as dental procedures or after surgery.

Like all NSAIDs, indomethacin can have side effects, including stomach ulcers, bleeding, and kidney damage, especially when taken at high doses or for long periods of time. It may also increase the risk of heart attack and stroke. Therefore, it is important to use indomethacin only as directed by a healthcare provider and to report any unusual symptoms or side effects promptly.

Metaproterenol is a short-acting, selective beta-2 adrenergic receptor agonist. It is primarily used as a bronchodilator to treat and prevent bronchospasms associated with reversible obstructive airway diseases such as asthma, chronic bronchitis, and emphysema. Metaproterenol works by relaxing the smooth muscles in the airways, thereby opening up the air passages and making it easier to breathe. It is available in oral (tablet or liquid) and inhalation (aerosol or solution for nebulization) forms. Common side effects include tremors, nervousness, headache, tachycardia, and palpitations.

Tissue kallikreins are a group of serine proteases that are involved in various physiological and pathophysiological processes, including blood pressure regulation, inflammation, and tissue remodeling. They are produced by various tissues throughout the body and are secreted as inactive precursors called kallikrein precursor proteins or zymogens.

Once activated, tissue kallikreins cleave several substrates, including kininogens, to generate bioactive peptides that mediate a variety of cellular responses. For example, the activation of the kinin-kallikrein system leads to the production of bradykinin, which is a potent vasodilator and inflammatory mediator.

Tissue kallikreins have been implicated in several diseases, including cancer, cardiovascular disease, and neurodegenerative disorders. They are also potential targets for therapeutic intervention, as inhibiting their activity has shown promise in preclinical studies for the treatment of various diseases.

Eicosanoids are a group of signaling molecules made by the enzymatic or non-enzymatic oxidation of arachidonic acid and other polyunsaturated fatty acids with 20 carbon atoms. They include prostaglandins, thromboxanes, leukotrienes, and lipoxins, which are involved in a wide range of physiological and pathophysiological processes, such as inflammation, immune response, blood clotting, and smooth muscle contraction. Eicosanoids act as local hormones or autacoids, affecting the function of cells near where they are produced. They are synthesized by various cell types, including immune cells, endothelial cells, and neurons, in response to different stimuli, such as injury, infection, or stress. The balance between different eicosanoids can have significant effects on health and disease.

Rolipram is not a medical term per se, but it is the name of a pharmaceutical compound. Rolipram is a selective inhibitor of phosphodiesterase-4 (PDE4), an enzyme that plays a role in regulating the body's inflammatory response and is involved in various cellular signaling pathways.

Rolipram has been investigated as a potential therapeutic agent for several medical conditions, including depression, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and Alzheimer's disease. However, its development as a drug has been hindered by issues related to its pharmacokinetics, such as poor bioavailability and a short half-life, as well as side effects like nausea and emesis.

Therefore, while Rolipram is an important compound in the field of pharmacology and has contributed significantly to our understanding of PDE4's role in various physiological processes, it is not typically used as a medical term to describe a specific disease or condition.

Obstructive lung disease is a category of respiratory diseases characterized by airflow limitation that causes difficulty in completely emptying the alveoli (tiny air sacs) of the lungs during exhaling. This results in the trapping of stale air and prevents fresh air from entering the alveoli, leading to various symptoms such as coughing, wheezing, shortness of breath, and decreased exercise tolerance.

The most common obstructive lung diseases include:

1. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): A progressive disease that includes chronic bronchitis and emphysema, often caused by smoking or exposure to harmful pollutants.
2. Asthma: A chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways characterized by variable airflow obstruction, bronchial hyperresponsiveness, and an underlying inflammation. Symptoms can be triggered by various factors such as allergens, irritants, or physical activity.
3. Bronchiectasis: A condition in which the airways become abnormally widened, scarred, and thickened due to chronic inflammation or infection, leading to mucus buildup and impaired clearance.
4. Cystic Fibrosis: An inherited genetic disorder that affects the exocrine glands, resulting in thick and sticky mucus production in various organs, including the lungs. This can lead to chronic lung infections, inflammation, and airway obstruction.
5. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency: A genetic condition characterized by low levels of alpha-1 antitrypsin protein, which leads to uncontrolled protease enzyme activity that damages the lung tissue, causing emphysema-like symptoms.

Treatment for obstructive lung diseases typically involves bronchodilators (to relax and widen the airways), corticosteroids (to reduce inflammation), and lifestyle modifications such as smoking cessation and pulmonary rehabilitation programs. In severe cases, oxygen therapy or even lung transplantation may be considered.

Sulfur dioxide (SO2) is not a medical term per se, but it's an important chemical compound with implications in human health and medicine. Here's a brief definition:

Sulfur dioxide (SO2) is a colorless gas with a sharp, pungent odor. It is primarily released into the atmosphere as a result of human activities such as the burning of fossil fuels (like coal and oil) and the smelting of metals. SO2 is also produced naturally during volcanic eruptions and some biological processes.

In medical terms, exposure to high levels of sulfur dioxide can have adverse health effects, particularly for people with respiratory conditions like asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). SO2 can irritate the eyes, nose, throat, and lungs, causing coughing, wheezing, shortness of breath, and a tight feeling in the chest. Prolonged exposure to elevated levels of SO2 may exacerbate existing respiratory issues and lead to decreased lung function.

Regulations are in place to limit sulfur dioxide emissions from industrial sources to protect public health and reduce air pollution.

In the field of medicine, "time factors" refer to the duration of symptoms or time elapsed since the onset of a medical condition, which can have significant implications for diagnosis and treatment. Understanding time factors is crucial in determining the progression of a disease, evaluating the effectiveness of treatments, and making critical decisions regarding patient care.

For example, in stroke management, "time is brain," meaning that rapid intervention within a specific time frame (usually within 4.5 hours) is essential to administering tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a clot-busting drug that can minimize brain damage and improve patient outcomes. Similarly, in trauma care, the "golden hour" concept emphasizes the importance of providing definitive care within the first 60 minutes after injury to increase survival rates and reduce morbidity.

Time factors also play a role in monitoring the progression of chronic conditions like diabetes or heart disease, where regular follow-ups and assessments help determine appropriate treatment adjustments and prevent complications. In infectious diseases, time factors are crucial for initiating antibiotic therapy and identifying potential outbreaks to control their spread.

Overall, "time factors" encompass the significance of recognizing and acting promptly in various medical scenarios to optimize patient outcomes and provide effective care.

A Metered Dose Inhaler (MDI) is a medical device used to administer a specific amount or "metered dose" of medication, usually in the form of an aerosol, directly into the lungs of a patient. The MDI consists of a pressurized canister that contains the medication mixed with a propellant, a metering valve that releases a precise quantity of the medication, and a mouthpiece or mask for the patient to inhale the medication.

MDIs are commonly used to treat respiratory conditions such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and bronchitis. They are also used to deliver other medications such as corticosteroids, anticholinergics, and beta-agonists. Proper use of an MDI requires coordination between the pressing of the canister and inhalation of the medication, which may be challenging for some patients. Therefore, it is essential to receive proper training on how to use an MDI effectively.

Serotonin, also known as 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), is a monoamine neurotransmitter that is found primarily in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, blood platelets, and the central nervous system (CNS) of humans and other animals. It is produced by the conversion of the amino acid tryptophan to 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP), and then to serotonin.

In the CNS, serotonin plays a role in regulating mood, appetite, sleep, memory, learning, and behavior, among other functions. It also acts as a vasoconstrictor, helping to regulate blood flow and blood pressure. In the GI tract, it is involved in peristalsis, the contraction and relaxation of muscles that moves food through the digestive system.

Serotonin is synthesized and stored in serotonergic neurons, which are nerve cells that use serotonin as their primary neurotransmitter. These neurons are found throughout the brain and spinal cord, and they communicate with other neurons by releasing serotonin into the synapse, the small gap between two neurons.

Abnormal levels of serotonin have been linked to a variety of disorders, including depression, anxiety, schizophrenia, and migraines. Medications that affect serotonin levels, such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), are commonly used to treat these conditions.

Passive Cutaneous Anaphylaxis (PCA) is a type of localized or cutaneous hypersensitivity reaction that occurs when an individual who has been sensitized to a particular antigen is injected with the antigen along with a dye (usually Evans blue) and subsequently intravenously administered with a foreign protein, such as horse serum, that contains antibodies (IgG) against the antigen. The IgG antibodies passively transfer to the sensitized individual and bind to the antigen at the site of injection, forming immune complexes. These immune complexes then activate the complement system, leading to the release of mediators such as histamine, which causes localized vasodilation, increased vascular permeability, and extravasation of the dye into the surrounding tissues. As a result, a blue-colored wheal or skin blanching appears at the injection site, indicating a positive PCA reaction. This test is used to detect the presence of IgG antibodies in an individual's serum and to study the mechanisms of immune complex-mediated hypersensitivity reactions.

Arylsulfonates are organic compounds that contain a sulfonate group (-SO3H) attached to an aromatic ring. The term "aryl" refers to the aromatic ring, which can be phenyl (a benzene ring) or any other aromatic structure. Sulfonation is the process of introducing a sulfonate group into an organic compound. Arylsulfonates are often used as detergents, dyes, and pharmaceuticals. They also serve as important intermediates in chemical synthesis.

Prostaglandin endoperoxides are naturally occurring lipid compounds that play important roles as mediators in the body's inflammatory and physiological responses. They are intermediate products in the conversion of arachidonic acid to prostaglandins and thromboxanes, which are synthesized by the action of enzymes called cyclooxygenases (COX-1 and COX-2).

Synthetic prostaglandin endoperoxides, on the other hand, are chemically synthesized versions of these compounds. They are used in medical research and therapeutic applications to mimic or inhibit the effects of naturally occurring prostaglandin endoperoxides. These synthetic compounds can be used to study the mechanisms of prostaglandin action, develop new drugs, or as stand-in agents for the natural compounds in experimental settings.

It's important to note that while synthetic prostaglandin endoperoxides can serve as useful tools in research and medicine, they also carry potential risks and side effects, much like their naturally occurring counterparts. Therefore, their use should be carefully monitored and regulated to ensure safety and efficacy.

Glyceryl ethers, also known as glycerol ethers or alkyl glycosides, are a class of compounds formed by the reaction between glycerol and alcohols. In the context of medical definitions, glyceryl ethers may refer to a group of naturally occurring compounds found in some organisms, including humans.

These compounds are characterized by an ether linkage between the glycerol molecule and one or more alkyl chains, which can vary in length. Glyceryl ethers have been identified as components of various biological tissues, such as lipid fractions of human blood and lung surfactant.

In some cases, glyceryl ethers may also be used as pharmaceutical excipients or drug delivery systems due to their unique physicochemical properties. For example, they can enhance the solubility and bioavailability of certain drugs, making them useful in formulation development. However, it is important to note that specific medical applications and uses of glyceryl ethers may vary depending on the particular compound and its properties.

Mast cells are a type of white blood cell that are found in connective tissues throughout the body, including the skin, respiratory tract, and gastrointestinal tract. They play an important role in the immune system and help to defend the body against pathogens by releasing chemicals such as histamine, heparin, and leukotrienes, which help to attract other immune cells to the site of infection or injury. Mast cells also play a role in allergic reactions, as they release histamine and other chemicals in response to exposure to an allergen, leading to symptoms such as itching, swelling, and redness. They are derived from hematopoietic stem cells in the bone marrow and mature in the tissues where they reside.

Phosphodiesterase inhibitors (PDE inhibitors) are a class of drugs that work by blocking the action of phosphodiesterase enzymes, which are responsible for breaking down cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), two crucial intracellular signaling molecules.

By inhibiting these enzymes, PDE inhibitors increase the concentration of cAMP and cGMP in the cells, leading to a variety of effects depending on the specific type of PDE enzyme that is inhibited. These drugs have been used in the treatment of various medical conditions such as erectile dysfunction, pulmonary arterial hypertension, and heart failure.

Examples of PDE inhibitors include sildenafil (Viagra), tadalafil (Cialis), vardenafil (Levitra) for erectile dysfunction, and iloprost, treprostinil, and sildenafil for pulmonary arterial hypertension. It's important to note that different PDE inhibitors have varying levels of selectivity for specific PDE isoforms, which can result in different therapeutic effects and side effect profiles.

Pirenzepine is a medication that belongs to a class of drugs called anticholinergics or parasympatholytics. It works by blocking the action of acetylcholine, a neurotransmitter in the body, on certain types of muscarinic receptors.

Pirenzepine is primarily used to treat peptic ulcers and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) by reducing the production of stomach acid. It may also be used to manage symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome, such as abdominal pain and diarrhea.

The medication is available in the form of tablets or gel for topical application. Side effects of pirenzepine may include dry mouth, blurred vision, constipation, dizziness, and difficulty urinating. It should be used with caution in people with glaucoma, benign prostatic hyperplasia, or other conditions that may be exacerbated by anticholinergic drugs.

It is important to note that this definition is for informational purposes only and should not be taken as medical advice. Always consult with a healthcare professional before starting any new medication.

Flurbiprofen is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) that is commonly used to treat pain, inflammation, and fever. It works by inhibiting the activity of cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes, which are involved in the production of prostaglandins, chemicals that contribute to inflammation and pain.

Flurbiprofen is available in various forms, including tablets, capsules, and topical creams or gels. It is used to treat a variety of conditions, such as arthritis, menstrual cramps, dental pain, and migraines.

Like other NSAIDs, flurbiprofen can cause side effects, such as stomach ulcers, bleeding, and kidney problems, especially when taken in high doses or for long periods of time. It is important to follow the recommended dosage and consult with a healthcare provider before taking this medication.

Thromboxane-A Synthase (TXA2S) is a medical term referring to an enzyme that plays a crucial role in the blood coagulation process. It is found in platelets, and its primary function is to convert arachidonic acid into thromboxane A2 (TXA2), a potent vasoconstrictor and platelet aggregator.

Thromboxane A2 causes platelets to clump together, which is essential for the formation of blood clots that can help prevent excessive bleeding after an injury. However, an overproduction of thromboxane A2 can lead to the development of blood clots in blood vessels, increasing the risk of heart attack and stroke.

Therefore, Thromboxane-A Synthase is a vital enzyme in hemostasis (the process that stops bleeding), but its dysregulation can contribute to various cardiovascular diseases.

Adenosine monophosphate (AMP) is a nucleotide that is the monophosphate ester of adenosine, consisting of the nitrogenous base adenine attached to the 1' carbon atom of ribose via a β-N9-glycosidic bond, which in turn is esterified to a phosphate group. It is an important molecule in biological systems as it plays a key role in cellular energy transfer and storage, serving as a precursor to other nucleotides such as ADP and ATP. AMP is also involved in various signaling pathways and can act as a neurotransmitter in the central nervous system.

Lidocaine is a type of local anesthetic that numbs painful areas and is used to prevent pain during certain medical procedures. It works by blocking the nerves that transmit pain signals to the brain. In addition to its use as an anesthetic, lidocaine can also be used to treat irregular heart rates and relieve itching caused by allergic reactions or skin conditions such as eczema.

Lidocaine is available in various forms, including creams, gels, ointments, sprays, solutions, and injectable preparations. It can be applied directly to the skin or mucous membranes, or it can be administered by injection into a muscle or vein. The specific dosage and method of administration will depend on the reason for its use and the individual patient's medical history and current health status.

Like all medications, lidocaine can have side effects, including allergic reactions, numbness that lasts too long, and in rare cases, heart problems or seizures. It is important to follow the instructions of a healthcare provider carefully when using lidocaine to minimize the risk of adverse effects.

An "athlete" is defined in the medical field as an individual who actively participates in sports, physical training, or other forms of exercise that require a significant amount of physical exertion and stamina. Athletes are often divided into different categories based on the specific type of sport or activity they engage in, such as:

1. Professional athletes: These are individuals who compete in organized sports at the highest level and earn a living from their athletic pursuits. Examples include professional football players, basketball players, golfers, tennis players, and soccer players.
2. Collegiate athletes: These are students who participate in intercollegiate sports at the university or college level. They may receive scholarships or other forms of financial aid to support their athletic and academic pursuits.
3. Amateur athletes: These are individuals who engage in sports or physical activity for recreation, fitness, or personal enjoyment rather than as a profession. Examples include weekend warriors, joggers, swimmers, and hikers.
4. Elite athletes: These are individuals who have achieved a high level of skill and performance in their chosen sport or activity. They may compete at the national or international level and represent their country in competitions.
5. Para-athletes: These are athletes with disabilities who compete in sports specifically adapted for their abilities. Examples include wheelchair basketball, blind soccer, and deaf swimming.

Regardless of the category, athletes are prone to various medical conditions related to their physical exertion, including musculoskeletal injuries, cardiovascular issues, respiratory problems, and nutritional deficiencies. Therefore, it is essential for athletes to receive regular medical check-ups, maintain a healthy lifestyle, and follow proper training and nutrition guidelines to prevent injuries and optimize their performance.

Pulmonary gas exchange is the process by which oxygen (O2) from inhaled air is transferred to the blood, and carbon dioxide (CO2), a waste product of metabolism, is removed from the blood and exhaled. This process occurs in the lungs, primarily in the alveoli, where the thin walls of the alveoli and capillaries allow for the rapid diffusion of gases between them. The partial pressure gradient between the alveolar air and the blood in the pulmonary capillaries drives this diffusion process. Oxygen-rich blood is then transported to the body's tissues, while CO2-rich blood returns to the lungs to be exhaled.

Bronchitis is a medical condition characterized by inflammation of the bronchi, which are the large airways that lead to the lungs. This inflammation can cause a variety of symptoms, including coughing, wheezing, chest tightness, and shortness of breath. Bronchitis can be either acute or chronic.

Acute bronchitis is usually caused by a viral infection, such as a cold or the flu, and typically lasts for a few days to a week. Symptoms may include a productive cough (coughing up mucus or phlegm), chest discomfort, and fatigue. Acute bronchitis often resolves on its own without specific medical treatment, although rest, hydration, and over-the-counter medications to manage symptoms may be helpful.

Chronic bronchitis, on the other hand, is a long-term condition that is characterized by a persistent cough with mucus production that lasts for at least three months out of the year for two consecutive years. Chronic bronchitis is typically caused by exposure to irritants such as cigarette smoke, air pollution, or occupational dusts and chemicals. It is often associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), which includes both chronic bronchitis and emphysema.

Treatment for chronic bronchitis may include medications to help open the airways, such as bronchodilators and corticosteroids, as well as lifestyle changes such as smoking cessation and avoiding irritants. In severe cases, oxygen therapy or lung transplantation may be necessary.

Drug tolerance is a medical concept that refers to the decreased response to a drug following its repeated use, requiring higher doses to achieve the same effect. This occurs because the body adapts to the presence of the drug, leading to changes in the function or expression of targets that the drug acts upon, such as receptors or enzymes. Tolerance can develop to various types of drugs, including opioids, benzodiazepines, and alcohol, and it is often associated with physical dependence and addiction. It's important to note that tolerance is different from resistance, which refers to the ability of a pathogen to survive or grow in the presence of a drug, such as antibiotics.

Drug hypersensitivity is an abnormal immune response to a medication or its metabolites. It is a type of adverse drug reaction that occurs in susceptible individuals, characterized by the activation of the immune system leading to inflammation and tissue damage. This reaction can range from mild symptoms such as skin rashes, hives, and itching to more severe reactions like anaphylaxis, which can be life-threatening.

Drug hypersensitivity reactions can be classified into two main types: immediate (or IgE-mediated) and delayed (or non-IgE-mediated). Immediate reactions occur within minutes to a few hours after taking the medication and are mediated by the release of histamine and other inflammatory mediators from mast cells and basophils. Delayed reactions, on the other hand, can take several days to develop and are caused by T-cell activation and subsequent cytokine release.

Common drugs that can cause hypersensitivity reactions include antibiotics (such as penicillins and sulfonamides), nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), monoclonal antibodies, and chemotherapeutic agents. It is important to note that previous exposure to a medication does not always guarantee the development of hypersensitivity reactions, as they can also occur after the first administration in some cases.

The diagnosis of drug hypersensitivity involves a thorough medical history, physical examination, and sometimes skin or laboratory tests. Treatment typically includes avoiding the offending medication and managing symptoms with antihistamines, corticosteroids, or other medications as needed. In severe cases, emergency medical care may be required to treat anaphylaxis or other life-threatening reactions.

Exudates and transudates are two types of bodily fluids that can accumulate in various body cavities or tissues as a result of injury, inflammation, or other medical conditions. Here are the medical definitions:

1. Exudates: These are fluids that accumulate due to an active inflammatory process. Exudates contain high levels of protein, white blood cells (such as neutrophils and macrophages), and sometimes other cells like red blood cells or cellular debris. They can be yellow, green, or brown in color and may have a foul odor due to the presence of dead cells and bacteria. Exudates are often seen in conditions such as abscesses, pneumonia, pleurisy, or wound infections.

Examples of exudative fluids include pus, purulent discharge, or inflammatory effusions.

2. Transudates: These are fluids that accumulate due to increased hydrostatic pressure or decreased oncotic pressure within the blood vessels. Transudates contain low levels of protein and cells compared to exudates. They are typically clear and pale yellow in color, with no odor. Transudates can be found in conditions such as congestive heart failure, liver cirrhosis, or nephrotic syndrome.

Examples of transudative fluids include ascites, pleural effusions, or pericardial effusions.

It is essential to differentiate between exudates and transudates because their underlying causes and treatment approaches may differ significantly. Medical professionals often use various tests, such as fluid analysis, to determine whether a fluid sample is an exudate or transudate.

The Maximal Mid-Expiratory Flow Rate (MMEFR), also known as Maximum Expiratory Flow at 50% of the FVC (FEF50%), is a measure of pulmonary function that reflects the rate of airflow during the middle portion of a forced expiratory maneuver. It is calculated as the maximum flow rate achieved during the expiration of air from the lungs, starting at 50% of the Forced Vital Capacity (FVC) and ending at the residual volume.

MMEFR is expressed in liters per second (L/s) or seconds (s). A decreased MMEFR may indicate obstruction in the smaller airways, such as bronchitis or asthma, while a normal value suggests that the small airways are functioning properly. However, it's important to note that MMEFR is just one of several measures used to assess pulmonary function and should be interpreted in conjunction with other test results and clinical findings.

Muscarinic agonists are a type of medication that binds to and activates muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, which are found in various organ systems throughout the body. These receptors are activated naturally by the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, and when muscarinic agonists bind to them, they mimic the effects of acetylcholine.

Muscarinic agonists can have a range of effects on different organ systems, depending on which receptors they activate. For example, they may cause bronchodilation (opening up of the airways) in the respiratory system, decreased heart rate and blood pressure in the cardiovascular system, increased glandular secretions in the gastrointestinal and salivary systems, and relaxation of smooth muscle in the urinary and reproductive systems.

Some examples of muscarinic agonists include pilocarpine, which is used to treat dry mouth and glaucoma, and bethanechol, which is used to treat urinary retention. It's important to note that muscarinic agonists can also have side effects, such as sweating, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea, due to their activation of receptors in various organ systems.

Benzamides are a class of organic compounds that consist of a benzene ring (a aromatic hydrocarbon) attached to an amide functional group. The amide group can be bound to various substituents, leading to a variety of benzamide derivatives with different biological activities.

In a medical context, some benzamides have been developed as drugs for the treatment of various conditions. For example, danzol (a benzamide derivative) is used as a hormonal therapy for endometriosis and breast cancer. Additionally, other benzamides such as sulpiride and amisulpride are used as antipsychotic medications for the treatment of schizophrenia and related disorders.

It's important to note that while some benzamides have therapeutic uses, others may be toxic or have adverse effects, so they should only be used under the supervision of a medical professional.

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... can be difficult to diagnose clinically given the lack of specific symptoms and frequent ... There is, of course, no reason why asthma and exercise-induced bronchoconstriction should not co-exist but the distinction is ... The preferred term for this condition is exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB). While exercise does not cause asthma, it ... In true exercise-induced bronchoconstriction, the results should be within normal limits. Should resting values be abnormal, ...
"Medical Definition of Bronchoconstriction". www.merriam-webster.com. Merriam-Webster, Incorporated. Retrieved 29 November 2017 ... Through their action on CysLT1 these leukotrienes can trigger bronchoconstriction, a state in which the bronchial passages of ...
Weiss P, Rundell KW (November 2009). "Imitators of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction". Allergy, Asthma, and Clinical ...
In both cases, bronchoconstriction is prominent. During an asthma episode, inflamed airways react to environmental triggers ... and episodes of bronchoconstriction. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimate that 1 in 11 children and 1 in 12 ... where this initial insult is followed 3-12 hours later with further bronchoconstriction and inflammation. The normal caliber of ... in bronchial smooth muscle cells which leads to muscle shortening and this initiates bronchoconstriction. The mechanisms behind ...
It is the opposite of bronchoconstriction. Bronchodilators induce bronchodilatation, while there are many drugs that may induce ... bronchoconstriction. Tobacco can cure one typology of asthma. It's known empirically about some doctors believed that asthma ...
Exercise can trigger bronchoconstriction both in people with or without asthma. It occurs in most people with asthma and up to ... Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction is common in professional athletes. The highest rates are among cyclists (up to 45%), ... Wilkinson M, Hart A, Milan SJ, Sugumar K (June 2014). "Vitamins C and E for asthma and exercise-induced bronchoconstriction". ... Milan SJ, Hart A, Wilkinson M (October 2013). "Vitamin C for asthma and exercise-induced bronchoconstriction". The Cochrane ...
This was likely caused by bronchoconstriction. Bronchoconstriction occurred due to a constriction of smooth muscle and airway ... sarafotoxins cause bronchoconstriction, increasing airway resistance. The bronchoconstriction is also caused by left ... Acute hypoxemia was due to bronchoconstriction and pulmonary edema. Hypoxemia was associated with metabolic acidosis and the ...
It is an important mediator of bronchoconstriction. It causes platelets to aggregate and blood vessels to dilate. Thus, it is ...
Bronchoconstriction Bronchodilation Wheezing Haggerty, Catherine L.; Ness, Roberta B.; Kelsey, Sheryl; Waterer, Grant W. (2003 ...
10 May 2010 Balmes, J.R.; Fine, J.M.; Sheppard, D. (1987). "Symptomatic bronchoconstriction after short-term inhalation of ...
February 2004). "Exaggerated bronchoconstriction due to inhalation challenges with occupational agents". Eur Respir J. 23 (2): ...
These effects include: salivation, lacrimation, diarrhea, bradycardia, and bronchoconstriction. Gastrointestinal symptoms occur ...
When asthmatics are exposed to these conditions it can trigger bronchoconstriction. Similarly, fine particulate matter (PM2.5) ... Balmes, John R.; Fine, Jonathan M.; Sheppard, Dean (November 1987). "Symptomatic Bronchoconstriction after Short-Term ... Asthmagen Atherosclerosis Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction Pneumoconiosis Pulmonary ...
"Bronchoconstriction damages airway epithelia by excess crowding-induced extrusion". BioRixv. (Articles with short description, ...
Bronchoconstriction can result in clinical symptoms such as wheezing, chest tightness, and dyspnea, which are common features ... A decrease in diameter is called bronchoconstriction, which is the tightening of the smooth muscle surrounding the bronchi and ... Bacsi A, Pan L, Ba X, Boldogh I (February 2016). "Pathophysiology of bronchoconstriction: role of oxidatively damaged DNA ...
These functions include, among others, bronchoconstriction and gland secretion.[verification needed] Cell bodies of pre- ...
Both drugs provoke bronchoconstriction, or narrowing of the airways. Whereas histamine causes nasal and bronchial mucus ... secretion and bronchoconstriction via the H1 receptor, methacholine utilizes the M3 receptor for bronchoconstriction. The ...
Burke, TV; Küng, M; Burki, NK (1989). "Pulmonary gas exchange during histamine-induced bronchoconstriction in asthmatic ... changes little with bronchoconstriction or when breathing hard during exercise. As birds have a longer and wider trachea than ...
... airway bronchoconstriction and hyper-responsiveness to bronchoconstriction agents such as histamine; increased vascular ... see Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction); and childhood sleep apnea due to adenotonsillar hypertrophy (see Acquired non- ...
... also results in bronchoconstriction in order to decrease ventilation. This mechanism is meant to counteract ... Chemoreceptors are responsible for signaling vasoconstriction, vasodilation, bronchoconstriction, and bronchodilation.[citation ...
Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) indicates acute narrowing of the airways as a result of vigorous exercise. EIB seems ... Hemilä, Harri (2014). "The effect of vitamin C on bronchoconstriction and respiratory symptoms caused by exercise: A review and ... Hemilä, Harri (2013). "Vitamin C may alleviate exercise-induced bronchoconstriction: A meta-analysis". BMJ Open. 3 (6): e002416 ... all of which cause bronchoconstriction. Vitamin C participates in the metabolism of these mediators and might thereby influence ...
Burke, TV; Küng, M; Burki, NK (1989). "Pulmonary gas exchange during histamine-induced bronchoconstriction in asthmatic ...
... see Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction); and childhood sleep apnea due to adenotonsillar hypertrophy (see {{slink,Acquired ...
He died in 1888 following a massive goiter disease with bronchoconstriction. Among Maier's written works were biographical ...
These derivatives may have pharmaceutical utility against bronchoconstriction and heart failure. A total chemical synthesis has ... prevents thiamylal-fentanyl-induced bronchoconstriction in humans". Critical Care Medicine. 30 (4): 820-6. doi:10.1097/00003246 ...
... effects of bronchoconstriction". Journal of Applied Physiology. American Physiological Society. 82 (5): 1531-1541. doi:10.1152/ ...
... induced bronchoconstriction and laryngeal obstruction in adolescent athletes". Pediatric Pulmonology. 55 (12): 3509-3516. doi: ... "Prevalence of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction and exercise-induced laryngeal obstruction in a general adolescent ... difficulties in young athletic individuals but is often misdiagnosed as asthma or exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. EILO ...
Short-acting medications provide quick or "rescue" relief from acute bronchoconstriction. Long-acting bronchodilators help to ... Short-acting bronchodilators are used for relief of bronchoconstriction, while long-acting bronchodilators are predominantly ... These are long-term medications taken routinely in order to control and prevent bronchoconstriction. They are not intended for ...
Magnesium exerts a bronchodilatatory effect, probably by antagonizing calcium-mediated bronchoconstriction. reducing electrical ...
Bronchoconstriction is defined as the narrowing of the airways in the lungs (bronchi and bronchioles). Air flow in air passages ... Bronchoconstriction is the constriction of the airways in the lungs due to the tightening of surrounding smooth muscle, with ... Prevention of bronchoconstriction by this pathway is vital for people with emphysema and there are several anticholinergic ... Pharmacotherapy of bronchoconstriction in patients with asthma by antiepileptic drugs Why Do So Many Winter Olympians Have ...
Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction (EIB). Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction, also known as exercise-induced asthma, occurs ... By gaining a deeper understanding of asthma and exercise-induced bronchoconstriction, you are one step closer to managing and, ... Asthma and Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction. Definition and Symptoms of Asthma. Asthma is a chronic respiratory condition ... Causes of Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction. Factors Contributing to EIB. Various factors contribute to the occurrence of ...
Hsu, C.-C., Lin, R.-L., Lin, Y.-S., & Lee, L.-Y. (2013). Bronchoconstriction induced by increasing airway temperature in ... Hsu, C-C, Lin, R-L, Lin, Y-S & Lee, L-Y 2013, Bronchoconstriction induced by increasing airway temperature in ovalbumin- ... Bronchoconstriction induced by increasing airway temperature in ovalbumin-sensitized rats: Role of tachykinins. Journal of ... Bronchoconstriction induced by increasing airway temperature in ovalbumin-sensitized rats: Role of tachykinins. / Hsu, Chun- ...
Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction. *Asthma Control Test. *Tobacco Use/Vaping and Asthma. *Get Valid Spirometry Results Every ...
4. Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction (EIB). Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction, also known as exercise-induced asthma, is ... Whether its asthma, bronchitis, COPD, or exercise-induced bronchoconstriction, Ventolin inhalers offer relief and improved ... This highlights the effectiveness of Ventolin inhalers in managing exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. ...
This is called exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB). In the past this was a called exercise-induced asthma. Exercise does ... This is called exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB). In the past this was a called exercise-induced asthma. Exercise does ... Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. In: Miller MD, Thompson SR, eds. DeLee, Drez, & Millers Orthopaedic Sports Medicine. 5th ... Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction update - 2016. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2016;138(5):1292-1295.e36. PMID: 27665489 pubmed. ...
Cholinergic stimulation of the nicotinic receptors in the sympathetic autonomic ganglia may cause adrenal medullary catecholamine release leading to increased heart rate, and blood pressure, and (in about 13% of the time) mydriasis (pupillary dilation).
Also called: EIA, Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction. What Is Exercise-Induced Asthma?. Many kids and teens with asthma have ... The asthma symptoms happen because the airways tighten up (called bronchoconstriction) during exercise. This blocks the flow of ...
This is known as exercise-induced bronchoconstriction, which can affect people with or without chronic asthma. ... Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB). (n.d.). http://acaai.org/asthma/exercise-induced-asthma-eib. ...
... bronchorrhea and bronchoconstriction. ...
Cough, respiratory distress, bronchoconstriction. *Cyanosis. *Excessive diaphoresis. *Hypotension, respiratory failure and ...
Key words: asthma and exercise; exercise-induced bronchoconstriction; dehydration; heat exposure; respiratory health. ...
As a result, reflex bronchoconstriction increases airway resistance.. Acute Exposure. Sulfur dioxide dissolves in the moisture ...
... bronchoconstriction; bronchial reactivity; enkephalinase; guinea pig; hypohalous acids; metalloendopeptidase; muscarinic ...
... including exercise-induced bronchoconstriction,[6, 18] allergen-induced bronchoconstriction[19-21] and aspirin-induced asthma.[ ... The effect of regular inhaled albuterol on exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. Am J Respir Crit Care Med 1996;153:65-9. ... The role of LTRAs in the treatment of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction in children has been investigated in 2 studies.[41, ... Inhibition of exercise induced bronchoconstriction by MK-571, a potent leukotriene D4-receptor antagonist. N Engl J Med 1990; ...
Airway hyperresponsiveness to hypertonic saline as a predictive index of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. Choi IS, Chung ...
4. Studies of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction to define protective mechanisms in asthma. Author : Johan Bood; Karolinska ... Abstract : Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) occurs in the majority of asthmatics following vigorous exercise. EIB is ...
The beneficial effect of nasal breathing on exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. Am Rev Respir Dis. 1978;118(1):65-73. ...
Airways in the lungs constrict - which doctors call bronchoconstriction, obstructing the airflow and making breathing more ...
Cough, respiratory distress, bronchoconstriction. *Cyanosis. *Excessive diaphoresis. *Hypotension, respiratory failure and ...
ARTRI can induce bronchoconstriction and cause acute, temporary respiratory discomfort in healthy people. People with asthma ...
This can lead to serious health effects, including shortness of breath, asthma exacerbation, bronchoconstriction, bronchitis, ...
Aerosol pentamidine-induced bronchoconstriction--predictive factors and preventive therapy. Chest 1991;100:624-7. * Smith RM, ...
Bronchoconstriction * Vasodilation and vasoconstriction (depending on the receptors) * Regulation of uterine contractility ...
Anticholinergic and muscarinic receptor antagonists are applied to relieve bronchoconstriction in asthma (Bosmans et al., 2017 ... promoting bronchoconstriction, mucus secretion and vasodilation, and participating in the cough reflex, which is closely ...
Bronchodilator therapy is not of proven effectiveness but may reverse irritative bronchoconstriction and strengthen respiratory ... Bronchodilator therapy, although it may reverse irritative bronchoconstriction and strengthen respiratory muscle effort in ...
Antihistamic Activity in Induced Bronchoconstriction / Flower: Study of aqueous and essential oil extracts of Benincasa hispida ... flower showed antihistaminic activity in histamine aerosol induced bronchoconstriction in guinea pig model. (53). • Extraction ... OF ANTIHISTAMINIC ACTIVITY OF BENINCASA HISPIDA FLOWER AQUEOUS EXTRACT FOR HISTAMINE AEROSOL INDUCES BRONCHOCONSTRICTION IN ...
Return to play following exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. Clinical journal of sport medicine, 2005, 15(6):421-5. ...
  • Bronchoconstriction is common in people with respiratory problems, such as asthma, COPD, and cystic fibrosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bronchodilator therapy, although it may reverse irritative bronchoconstriction and strengthen respiratory muscle effort in dyspneic animals. (petplace.com)
  • They can cause bronchoconstriction, mucous hypersecretion and increased airway vascular permeability resulting in airway wall edema. (cmaj.ca)
  • Airway hyperresponsiveness to hypertonic saline as a predictive index of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. (nih.gov)
  • In this article, we will delve into the world of these conditions, exploring the definition, symptoms, causes, and possible triggers of asthma and exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. (fitfreshlife.com)
  • Living with exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) requires careful management to control symptoms and maintain an active lifestyle. (fitfreshlife.com)
  • The asthma symptoms happen because the airways tighten up (called bronchoconstriction ) during exercise. (kidshealth.org)
  • Stress can also induce bronchoconstriction, worsen asthma symptoms, and exacerbate conditions like chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) by causing inflammation in the airways, leading to breathing difficulties. (psychcentral.com)
  • Current guidelines also recommend the use of short-acting bronchodilators as rescue therapy for asthma symptoms, even though there is both bronchoconstriction and inflammation present in the airways of asthmatics. (medscape.com)
  • Bronchoconstriction is the constriction of the airways in the lungs due to the tightening of surrounding smooth muscle, with consequent coughing, wheezing, and shortness of breath. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bronchoconstriction is defined as the narrowing of the airways in the lungs (bronchi and bronchioles). (wikipedia.org)
  • Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction, also known as exercise-induced asthma, occurs when physical activity triggers the tightening and constriction of the airways. (fitfreshlife.com)
  • 3. Irritation from Triggers: Environmental factors such as cold weather, pollution, and allergens can provoke an inflammatory response in the airways, inducing bronchoconstriction. (fitfreshlife.com)
  • 4. Breathing in Triggers: In some cases, exercise-induced bronchoconstriction can be triggered by inhaling substances like pollen or dust, which irritate the airways. (fitfreshlife.com)
  • Airways in the lungs constrict - which doctors call bronchoconstriction, obstructing the airflow and making breathing more difficult. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Medical management of transient bronchoconstriction or chronic bronchitis depends on the severity and etiology of the underlying disease and can be treated with combinations of the following medications: B-receptor agonists: Medications that stimulate the β2 receptor subtype on pulmonary smooth muscle will result in smooth muscle relaxation, bronchodilation, and increased airflow into the lungs during inhalation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Prevention of bronchoconstriction by this pathway is vital for people with emphysema and there are several anticholinergic medications that in combination with mucous thinning agents such as Guaifenesin cause significant improvement in breathing. (wikipedia.org)
  • Title: Understanding Asthma and Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction: Taking Control of Your BreathingImagine feeling a tightness in your chest, struggling to breathe, after engaging in physical activity. (fitfreshlife.com)
  • This is known as exercise-induced bronchoconstriction , which can affect people with or without chronic asthma. (healthline.com)
  • In asthmatic patients, the mechanism of breath sound changes during bronchoconstriction did not cause changes in transmission, but lead to migration of the sound production site to the periphery during expiration. (ersjournals.com)
  • With emphysema the shortness of breath due to effective bronchoconstriction from excessive very thick mucus blockage (it is so thick that great difficulty is encountered in expelling it resulting in near exhaustion at times) can bring on panic attacks unless the individual expects this and has effectively learned pursed lip breathing to more quickly transfer oxygen to the blood via the damaged alveoli resulting from the disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) occurs in the majority of asthmatics following vigorous exercise. (dissertations.se)
  • More generally termed exercise-induced asthma, the preferred and more accurate term exercise-induced bronchoconstriction better reflects underlying pathophysiology. (wikipedia.org)
  • In most people with EIB, this is followed by a refractory period, of generally less than four hours, during which if exercise is repeated, the bronchoconstriction is less emphasised. (wikipedia.org)
  • The underlying cause of this type of bronchoconstriction appear to be the large volume of cool, dry air inhaled during strenuous exercise. (wikipedia.org)
  • For those with asthma or exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB), this is a familiar and distressing experience. (fitfreshlife.com)
  • While the aforementioned factors contribute to exercise-induced bronchoconstriction, there are cases where the underlying cause remains unknown. (fitfreshlife.com)
  • By gaining a deeper understanding of asthma and exercise-induced bronchoconstriction, you are one step closer to managing and, in many cases, controlling these conditions. (fitfreshlife.com)
  • This is called exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB). (medlineplus.gov)
  • Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction update - 2016. (medlineplus.gov)
  • 15 - 17 ] These compounds have been extremely important in establishing the central role of the cysteinyl leukotrienes in the pathogenesis of various manifestations of asthma, including exercise-induced bronchoconstriction,[ 6 , 18 ] allergen-induced bronchoconstriction[ 19 - 21 ] and aspirin-induced asthma. (cmaj.ca)
  • The American Thoracic Society has developed new evidence-based practice guidelines for individuals with exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. (medscape.com)
  • Ovalbumin sensitization decreased the threshold dose for parathion-induced airway hyperreactivity and exacerbated parathion effects on vagally induced bronchoconstriction. (nih.gov)
  • The hyperreactivity to bronchoconstriction observed in the Aqp5(-/-) mice was not due to differences in tracheal smooth muscle contractility in isolated preparations or to altered levels of surfactant protein B. These data suggest a novel pathway by which AQP5 influences bronchoconstriction. (nih.gov)
  • Efficient Use of Simple Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction Challenge Testing in Pediatric Exercise-Induced Dyspnea. (cpxinternational.com)
  • A simple exercise test to evaluate for exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) is routinely ordered in pediatric patients with exercise-induced dyspnea. (cpxinternational.com)
  • Airway reactivity was assessed by monitoring increases in enhanced pause (PENH), a unitless variable that measures bronchoconstriction as derived from dose-response curves. (avma.org)
  • In-patients with mild asthma we found that hypoxia (FiO215%) potentiated and hyperoxia (FiO2100%) had no effect on methacholine induced bronchoconstriction. (gla.ac.uk)
  • The finding that hypoxia potentiates both salbutamol induced relaxation in-vitro in man and methacholine induced bronchoconstriction in patients with asthma may have relevance to the management of patients with acute exacerbations asthma who as part of their routine treatment receive high inspired oxygen tensions and both nebulised and intravenous bronchodilators. (gla.ac.uk)
  • Asthma is a disease of diffuse airway inflammation caused by a variety of triggering stimuli resulting in partially or completely reversible bronchoconstriction. (msdmanuals.com)
  • This unique combination makes Symbicort an efficient and comprehensive solution for managing both the inflammation and bronchoconstriction associated with asthma and COPD. (hmongamer.org)
  • The doses of 200, 400 and 800 mg/kg of the extracts were subjected to in vivo evaluation in guinea pigs (Cavia porcellus) with 1% histamine-induced bronchoconstriction, determining the latency period and the intensity of the effect. (edu.pe)