Bromovirus: A genus of tripartite plant viruses in the family BROMOVIRIDAE. Transmission is by beetles. Brome mosaic virus is the type species.Alfamovirus: A genus of the family BROMOVIRIDAE with a wide host range. Transmission is by aphids and the type species is ALFALFA MOSAIC VIRUS.Chenopodium quinoa: A species of the Chenopodium genus which is the source of edible seed called quinoa. It contains makisterone A and other STEROIDS, some having ECDYSTEROID activity on insects.Plant Viral Movement Proteins: Viral proteins that facilitate the movement of viruses between plant cells by means of PLASMODESMATA, channels that traverse the plant cell walls.Fabaceae: The large family of plants characterized by pods. Some are edible and some cause LATHYRISM or FAVISM and other forms of poisoning. Other species yield useful materials like gums from ACACIA and various LECTINS like PHYTOHEMAGGLUTININS from PHASEOLUS. Many of them harbor NITROGEN FIXATION bacteria on their roots. Many but not all species of "beans" belong to this family.Plants, Medicinal: Plants whose roots, leaves, seeds, bark, or other constituent parts possess therapeutic, tonic, purgative, curative or other pharmacologic attributes, when administered to man or animals.Hordeum: A plant genus of the family POACEAE. The EDIBLE GRAIN, barley, is widely used as food.Protoplasts: The protoplasm and plasma membrane of plant, fungal, bacterial or archaeon cells without the CELL WALL.Plant Diseases: Diseases of plants.RNA, Viral: Ribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of viruses.Viral Proteins: Proteins found in any species of virus.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Particle Size: Relating to the size of solids.Genome, Viral: The complete genetic complement contained in a DNA or RNA molecule in a virus.Virion: The infective system of a virus, composed of the viral genome, a protein core, and a protein coat called a capsid, which may be naked or enclosed in a lipoprotein envelope called the peplos.Terminology as Topic: The terms, expressions, designations, or symbols used in a particular science, discipline, or specialized subject area.Indigo Carmine: Indolesulfonic acid used as a dye in renal function testing for the detection of nitrates and chlorates, and in the testing of milk.BooksClassification: The systematic arrangement of entities in any field into categories classes based on common characteristics such as properties, morphology, subject matter, etc.Red Cross: International collective of humanitarian organizations led by volunteers and guided by its Congressional Charter and the Fundamental Principles of the International Red Cross Movement, to provide relief to victims of disaster and help people prevent, prepare for, and respond to emergencies.Vanilla: A plant genus of the family ORCHIDACEAE that is the source of the familiar flavoring used in foods and medicines (FLAVORING AGENTS).Paeonia: A plant genus of the family Paeoniaceae, order Dilleniales, subclass Dilleniidae, class Magnoliopsida. These perennial herbs are up to 2 m (6') tall. Leaves are alternate and are divided into three lobes, each lobe being further divided into three smaller lobes. The large flowers are symmetrical, bisexual, have 5 sepals, 5 petals (sometimes 10), and many stamens.Encyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)GermanyBacteria: One of the three domains of life (the others being Eukarya and ARCHAEA), also called Eubacteria. They are unicellular prokaryotic microorganisms which generally possess rigid cell walls, multiply by cell division, and exhibit three principal forms: round or coccal, rodlike or bacillary, and spiral or spirochetal. Bacteria can be classified by their response to OXYGEN: aerobic, anaerobic, or facultatively anaerobic; by the mode by which they obtain their energy: chemotrophy (via chemical reaction) or PHOTOTROPHY (via light reaction); for chemotrophs by their source of chemical energy: CHEMOLITHOTROPHY (from inorganic compounds) or chemoorganotrophy (from organic compounds); and by their source for CARBON; NITROGEN; etc.; HETEROTROPHY (from organic sources) or AUTOTROPHY (from CARBON DIOXIDE). They can also be classified by whether or not they stain (based on the structure of their CELL WALLS) with CRYSTAL VIOLET dye: gram-negative or gram-positive.Editorial Policies: The guidelines and policy statements set forth by the editor(s) or editorial board of a publication.Rhizoctonia: A mitosporic Ceratobasidiaceae fungal genus that is an important plant pathogen affecting potatoes and other plants. There are numerous teleomorphs.Reduviidae: A family of winged insects of the suborder HETEROPTERA, called assassin bugs, because most prey on other insects. However one subfamily, TRIATOMINAE, attacks humans and other vertebrates and transmits Chagas disease.RNA Viruses: Viruses whose genetic material is RNA.Pest Control, Biological: Use of naturally-occuring or genetically-engineered organisms to reduce or eliminate populations of pests.Ascomycota: A phylum of fungi which have cross-walls or septa in the mycelium. The perfect state is characterized by the formation of a saclike cell (ascus) containing ascospores. Most pathogenic fungi with a known perfect state belong to this phylum.Fungi: A kingdom of eukaryotic, heterotrophic organisms that live parasitically as saprobes, including MUSHROOMS; YEASTS; smuts, molds, etc. They reproduce either sexually or asexually, and have life cycles that range from simple to complex. Filamentous fungi, commonly known as molds, refer to those that grow as multicellular colonies.Bromus: A plant genus of the family POACEAE. The name is similar to Broom or Scotch Broom (CYTISUS) or Butcher's Broom (RUSCUS) or Desert Broom (BACCHARIS) or Spanish Broom (SPARTIUM).Bromoviridae: A family of RNA plant viruses with a wide host range in crops and horticultural species. All viruses are readily transmitted by mechanical means and some by insects and pollen. The genera include: ALFAMOVIRUS; BROMOVIRUS; CUCUMOVIRUS; ILARVIRUS; and OLEAVIRUS.Mosaic Viruses: Viruses which produce a mottled appearance of the leaves of plants.Tobacco Mosaic Virus: The type species of TOBAMOVIRUS which causes mosaic disease of tobacco. Transmission occurs by mechanical inoculation.Semliki forest virus: A species of ALPHAVIRUS isolated in central, eastern, and southern Africa.ArchivesBiological Science Disciplines: All of the divisions of the natural sciences dealing with the various aspects of the phenomena of life and vital processes. The concept includes anatomy and physiology, biochemistry and biophysics, and the biology of animals, plants, and microorganisms. It should be differentiated from BIOLOGY, one of its subdivisions, concerned specifically with the origin and life processes of living organisms.Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.PubMed: A bibliographic database that includes MEDLINE as its primary subset. It is produced by the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), part of the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE. PubMed, which is searchable through NLM's Web site, also includes access to additional citations to selected life sciences journals not in MEDLINE, and links to other resources such as the full-text of articles at participating publishers' Web sites, NCBI's molecular biology databases, and PubMed Central.Directories as Topic: Lists of persons or organizations, systematically arranged, usually in alphabetic or classed order, giving address, affiliations, etc., for individuals, and giving address, officers, functions, and similar data for organizations. (ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Publishing: "The business or profession of the commercial production and issuance of literature" (Webster's 3d). It includes the publisher, publication processes, editing and editors. Production may be by conventional printing methods or by electronic publishing.Research: Critical and exhaustive investigation or experimentation, having for its aim the discovery of new facts and their correct interpretation, the revision of accepted conclusions, theories, or laws in the light of newly discovered facts, or the practical application of such new or revised conclusions, theories, or laws. (Webster, 3d ed)Environment: The external elements and conditions which surround, influence, and affect the life and development of an organism or population.Biodiversity: The variety of all native living organisms and their various forms and interrelationships.Conservation of Natural Resources: The protection, preservation, restoration, and rational use of all resources in the total environment.Egypt: A country in northern Africa, bordering the Mediterranean Sea, between Libya and the Gaza Strip, and the Red Sea north of Sudan, and includes the Asian Sinai Peninsula Its capital is Cairo.Research Personnel: Those individuals engaged in research.Research Support as Topic: Financial support of research activities.

A brome mosaic virus intergenic RNA3 replication signal functions with viral replication protein 1a to dramatically stabilize RNA in vivo. (1/238)

Brome mosaic virus (BMV), a positive-strand RNA virus in the alphavirus-like superfamily, encodes two RNA replication proteins. The 1a protein has putative helicase and RNA-capping domains, whereas 2a contains a polymerase-like domain. Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing 1a and 2a is capable of replicating a BMV RNA3 template produced by in vivo transcription of a DNA copy of RNA3. Although insufficient for RNA3 replication, the expression of 1a protein alone results in a dramatic and specific stabilization of the RNA3 template in yeast. As one step toward understanding 1a-induced stabilization of RNA3, the interactions involved, and its possible relation to RNA replication, we have identified the cis-acting sequences required for this effect. We find that 1a-induced stabilization is mediated by a 150- to 190-base segment of the RNA3 intergenic region corresponding to a previously identified enhancer of RNA3 replication. Moreover, this segment is sufficient to confer 1a-induced stability on a heterologous beta-globin RNA. Within this intergenic segment, partial deletions that inhibited 1a-induced stabilization in yeast expressing 1a alone resulted in parallel decreases in the levels of negative- and positive-strand RNA3 replication products in yeast expressing 1a and 2a. In particular, a small deletion encompassing a motif corresponding to the box B element of RNA polymerase III promoters dramatically reduced the ability of RNAs to respond to 1a or 1a and 2a. These and other findings suggest that 1a-induced stabilization likely reflects an early template selection step in BMV RNA replication.  (+info)

The N-terminal half of the brome mosaic virus 1a protein has RNA capping-associated activities: specificity for GTP and S-adenosylmethionine. (2/238)

The N-terminal half of the brome mosaic virus (BMV) 1a replication-associated protein contains sequence motifs found in RNA methyltransferases. We demonstrate that recombinant BMV methyltransferase-like (MT) domain expressed in Escherichia coli forms an adduct with a guanine nucleotide in a reaction that requires S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) and divalent cations. Moieties in GTP and AdoMet required for adduct formation were determined using a competition assay and chemical analogues. In the guanine nucleotide the ribose 2' hydroxyl, the triphosphates, the base C6 keto group, and possibly the N1 imine are required. In AdoMet, the methyl group and the ability to transfer a methyl group to guanine nucleotide were demonstrated to be required for adduct formation. The effects of methyltransferase inhibitors on viral RNA synthesis was determined using an in vitro RNA synthesis assay. These results are consistent with the previously reported activities of alphaviral nsP1 methyltransferase protein and identify the chemical moieties required for the BMV methyltransferase activity.  (+info)

Effect of C-terminal deletions in the movement protein of cowpea chlorotic mottle virus on cell-to-cell and long-distance movement. (3/238)

In order to elucidate the function of the C-terminal region of cowpea chlorotic mottle bromovirus (CCMV) movement protein (MP) in cell-to-cell movement, a set of deletions ranging from 10 to 80 amino acids (deltaMP10, deltaMP20, deltaMP33, deltaMP43, deltaMP60 and deltaMP80) was engineered into the MP gene encoded by the biologically active clone C3/deltaCP-EGFP, a variant of CCMV RNA3 that contained wild-type (wt) MP and the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene in place of the coat protein (CP). The effect of each MP deletion on cell-to-cell movement was examined in three susceptible host plants: Chenopodium quinoa, Nicotiana benthamiana and cowpea (Vigno sinensis cv. Black Eye). The results indicate that, except for mutant deltaMP43, infections resulting from the deletion mutants remained subliminal. Interestingly, infections resulting from inoculating mutant deltaMP43, which lacked the 43 most C-terminal amino acids, spread rapidly between cells and the number of infected cells expressing EGFP approached that of control inoculations made with C3/deltaCP-EGFP. To verify whether the presence of wt CP altered the movement behaviour of these mutants, each MP deletion was also incorporated into the genetic background of wt CCMV RNA3 (pCC3) and inoculated independently to all three hosts. The results suggest that the overall movement process exhibited by each MP mutant is influenced profoundly by the presence of CP and the particular host plant tested.  (+info)

RNA recombination in brome mosaic virus, a model plus strand RNA virus. (4/238)

Studies on the molecular mechanism of genetic recombination in RNA viruses have progressed at the time when experimental systems of efficient recombination crossovers were established. The system of brome mosaic virus (BMV) represents one of the most useful and most advanced tools for investigation of the molecular aspects of the mechanism of RNA-RNA recombination events. By using engineered BMV RNA components, the occurrence of both homologous and nonhomologous crosses were demonstrated among the segments of the BMV RNA genome. Studies show that the two types of crossovers require different RNA signal sequences and that both types depend upon the participation of BMV replicase proteins. Mutations in the two BMV-encoded replicase polypeptides (proteins 1a and 2a) reveal that their different regions participate in homologous and in nonhomologous crossovers. Based on all these data, it is most likely that homologous and nonhomologous recombinant crosses do occur via two different types of template switching events (copy-choice mechanism) where viral replicase complex changes RNA templates during viral RNA replication at distinct signal sequences. In this review we discuss various aspects of the mechanism of RNA recombination in BMV and we emphasize future projections of this research.  (+info)

Initiation of genomic plus-strand RNA synthesis from DNA and RNA templates by a viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. (5/238)

In contrast to the synthesis of minus-strand genomic and plus-strand subgenomic RNAs, the requirements for brome mosaic virus (BMV) genomic plus-strand RNA synthesis in vitro have not been previously reported. Therefore, little is known about the biochemical requirements for directing genomic plus-strand synthesis. Using DNA templates to characterize the requirements for RNA-dependent RNA polymerase template recognition, we found that initiation from the 3' end of a template requires one nucleotide 3' of the initiation nucleotide. The addition of a nontemplated nucleotide at the 3' end of minus-strand BMV RNAs led to initiation of genomic plus-strand RNA in vitro. Genomic plus-strand initiation was specific since cucumber mosaic virus minus-strand RNA templates were unable to direct efficient synthesis under the same conditions. In addition, mutational analysis of the minus-strand template revealed that the -1 nontemplated nucleotide, along with the +1 cytidylate and +2 adenylate, is important for RNA-dependent RNA polymerase interaction. Furthermore, genomic plus-strand RNA synthesis is affected by sequences 5' of the initiation site.  (+info)

Use of DNA, RNA, and chimeric templates by a viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase: evolutionary implications for the transition from the RNA to the DNA world. (6/238)

All polynucleotide polymerases have a similar structure and mechanism of catalysis, consistent with their evolution from one progenitor polymerase. Viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRp) are expected to have properties comparable to those from this progenitor and therefore may offer insight into the commonalities of all classes of polymerases. We examined RNA synthesis by the brome mosaic virus RdRp on DNA, RNA, and hybrid templates and found that precise initiation of RNA synthesis can take place from all of these templates. Furthermore, initiation can take place from either internal or penultimate initiation sites. Using a template competition assay, we found that the BMV RdRp interacts with DNA only three- to fourfold less well than it interacts with RNA. Moreover, a DNA molecule with a ribonucleotide at position -11 relative to the initiation nucleotide was able to interact with RdRp at levels comparable to that observed with RNA. These results suggest that relatively few conditions were needed for an ancestral RdRp to replicate DNA genomes.  (+info)

Mapping the molecular determinant of pathogenicity in a hammerhead viroid: a tetraloop within the in vivo branched RNA conformation. (7/238)

Chrysanthemum chlorotic mottle viroid (CChMVd) is an RNA of 398-399 nt that can adopt hammerhead structures in both polarity strands. We have identified by Northern-blot hybridization a nonsymptomatic strain (CChMVd-NS) that protects against challenge inoculation with the symptomatic strain (CChMVd-S). Analysis of CChMVd-NS cDNA clones has revealed a size and sequence very similar to those of the CChMVd-S strain. Some of the mutations observed in CChMVd-NS molecular variants were previously identified in CChMVd-S RNA, but others were never found in this RNA. When bioassayed in chrysanthemum, cDNA clones containing the CChMVd-NS specific mutations were infectious but nonsymptomatic. Site-directed mutagenesis showed that one of the CChMVd-NS-specific mutations, a UUUC --> GAAA substitution, was sufficient to change the symptomatic phenotype into the nonsymptomatic one without altering the final accumulation level of the viroid RNA. The pathogenicity determinant-to our knowledge, a determinant of this class has not been described previously in hammerhead viroids-is located in a tetraloop of the computer-predicted branched conformation for CChMVd RNA. Analysis of the sequence heterogeneity found in CChMVd-S and -NS variants strongly supports the existence of such a conformation in vivo, showing that the rod-like or quasi-rod-like secondary structure is not a universal paradigm for viroids.  (+info)

Brome mosaic virus defective RNAs generated during infection of barley plants. (8/238)

Brome mosaic virus (BMV) purified from systemically infected barley leaves 8 weeks post-inoculation (p.i.) contained defective RNAs (D-RNAs). The D-RNAs were detected in total and virion RNAs extracted from infected plants at 8 weeks p.i. or later, but not before, when barley plants had been inoculated with virions either containing or lacking D-RNA. The D-RNAs were derived from genomic RNA3 by double or mainly single deletions in the 3a protein ORF, and formed a heterogeneous population. By using in vitro transcripts of D-RNA synthesized from full-length cDNA clones, the D-RNAs were shown to replicate in a helper virus-dependent manner and to be packaged into virions in barley protoplasts. Subgenomic RNA4 was produced from the D-RNA and the coat protein was also expressed. Existence of the D-RNAs together with BMV genomic RNAs in inoculated protoplasts decreased the accumulation of 3a protein but it had no apparent effect on the accumulation of BMV genomic RNA3 or the coat protein. This is the first report of naturally occurring D-RNAs generated during prolonged infection with BMV.  (+info)

*Bromovirus

... is a genus of viruses, in the family Bromoviridae. Plants serve as natural hosts. There are currently six species in ... Group: ssRNA(+) Order: Unassigned Family: Bromoviridae Genus: Bromovirus Broad bean mottle virus Brome mosaic virus Cassia ... Viruses in Bromovirus are non-enveloped, with icosahedral geometries, and T=3 symmetry. The diameter is around 26 nm. Genomes ...

*Brome mosaic virus

Ahlquist, P. (1992). "Bromovirus RNA replication and transcription". Current Opinion in Genetics & Development. 2 (1): 71-76. ... icosahedral RNA plant virus belonging to the genus Bromovirus, family Bromoviridae, in the alphavirus-like superfamily. BMV ...

*Cassia (genus)

The plant pathogenic viruses cassia yellow blotch bromovirus and cassia yellow spot potyvirus were first described from Cassia ...

*Paul Ahlquist

Diaz, A., Gallei, A., and Ahlquist, P. Bromovirus RNA Replication Compartment Formation Requires Concerted Action of 1a's Self- ... Essential Host Genes Affecting Bromovirus RNA Replication. PLoS One, 6(8):e23988, 2011. Scholthof, K.-B. G., Adkins, S., ...

*Taxonomic list of viruses

Bromovirus Broad bean mottle virus Brome mosaic virus Cassia yellow blotch virus Cowpea chlorotic mottle virus Melandrium ...

*List of MeSH codes (B04)

... bromovirus MeSH B04.715.081.180 --- cucumovirus MeSH B04.715.081.400 --- ilarvirus MeSH B04.715.081.700 --- oleavirus MeSH ... bromovirus MeSH B04.715.464.100 --- caulimovirus MeSH B04.715.464.150 --- comovirus MeSH B04.715.464.180 --- cucumovirus MeSH ... bromovirus MeSH B04.820.081.180 --- cucumovirus MeSH B04.820.081.400 --- ilarvirus MeSH B04.820.081.700 --- oleavirus MeSH ... bromovirus MeSH B04.820.464.150 --- comovirus MeSH B04.820.464.180 --- cucumovirus MeSH B04.820.464.600 --- potyvirus MeSH ...

*List of genera of viruses

Blosnavirus Bocaparvovirus Bornavirus Botrexvirus Bppunalikevirus Bracovirus Brambyvirus Brevidensovirus Bromovirus ...

*Bromoviridae

Bromovirus Broad bean mottle virus Brome mosaic virus Cassia yellow blotch virus Cowpea chlorotic mottle virus Melandrium ...
TY - THES. T1 - Chemical virology. T2 - decorating the interior of the cowpea chlorotic mottle virus. AU - Minten, Inge Jeannette. PY - 2011/4/4. Y1 - 2011/4/4. KW - METIS-283479. M3 - PhD Thesis - Research external, graduation external. SN - 978-90--9025926-0. PB - Radboud University Nijmegen. CY - Nijmegen. ER - ...
Positive-strand RNA viruses are the largest virus class and include many pathogens such as hepatitis C virus and the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS). Brome mosaic virus (BMV) is a representative positive-strand RNA virus whose RNA replication, gene expression, and encapsidation have been reproduced in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. By using traditional yeast genetics, host genes have been identified that function in controlling BMV translation, selecting BMV RNAs as replication templates, activating the replication complex, maintaining a lipid composition required for membrane-associated RNA replication, and other steps. To more globally and systematically identify such host factors, we used engineered BMV derivatives to assay viral RNA replication in each strain of an ordered, genome-wide set of yeast single-gene deletion mutants. Each deletion strain was transformed to express BMV replicase proteins and a BMV RNA replication template with the capsid gene replaced by a ...
Shop RNA replication protein ELISA Kit, Recombinant Protein and RNA replication protein Antibody at MyBioSource. Custom ELISA Kit, Recombinant Protein and Antibody are available.
Read "Remarkable variability of apple mosaic virus capsid protein gene after nucleotide position 141, Archives of Virology" on DeepDyve, the largest online rental service for scholarly research with thousands of academic publications available at your fingertips.
Under conditions of low ionic strength and a pH ranging between about 3.7 and 5.0,solutions of purified coat proteins of cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV) form sphericalmultishell structures in the absence of viral RNA. The outer surfaces of the shells in thesestructures are negatively charged, whereas the inner surfaces are positively charged due to a disordered cationic N-terminal domain of the capsid protein, the arginine-rich RNA-binding motif that protrudes into the interior. We show that the main forces stabilizing these .... ...
The genome is segmented and tripartite. The segments are distributive among 3 particle types of different sizes. The genome consists of three segments to four segments of linear, positive-sense, single-stranded RNA. The virion may contain minor species of non-genomic nucleic acid. Although the encapsidated nucleic acid is mainly of genomic origin, the virions may also contain subgenomic RNA. Subgenomic RNA is the mRNA (RNA-4, a subgenomic fragment of RNA-3) derived from genomic RNA-3. The complete genome is fully sequenced and is 8620-8800 nucleotides long. RNA-1 has been fully sequenced and 3158-3372-3900 nucleotides long; RNA-2 has been fully sequenced and 2799-3032-3400 nucleotides long; RNA-3 is sequenced but only an estimate is given and the sequence is 2117-2296-2600 nucleotides long; RNA-4 has been fully sequenced and is 800 nucleotides long. The genome has a base ratio of 24.4-25.95-28 % guanine; 24.9-26.05-27 % adenine; 19-20.62-22.2 % cytosine; 24-27.42-29 % uracil. The genome has a ...
The genome is segmented and tripartite. The segments are distributive among 3 particle types of different sizes. The genome consists of three to four segments of linear, positive-sense, single-stranded RNA. The virion may contain minor species of non-genomic nucleic acid. Although the encapsidated nucleic acid is mainly of genomic origin, the virions may also contain subgenomic RNA. Subgenomic RNA is the mRNA (RNA-4, a subgenomic fragment of RNA-3) derived from genomic RNA-3. The complete genome is fully sequenced and is 8620-8800 nucleotides long. RNA-1 has been fully sequenced and 3158-3372-3900 nucleotides long; RNA-2 has been fully sequenced and 2799-3032-3400 nucleotides long; RNA-3 is sequenced but only an estimate is given and the sequence is 2117-2296-2600 nucleotides long; RNA-4 has been fully sequenced and is 800 nucleotides long. The genome has a base ratio of 24.4-25.95-28 % guanine; 24.9-26.05-27 % adenine; 19-20.62-22.2 % cytosine; 24-27.42-29 % uracil. The genome has a ...
Principal Investigator:NOMURA Yasuyuki, Project Period (FY):1990 - 1991, Research Category:Grant-in-Aid for General Scientific Research (B), Research Field:Biological pharmacy
Brome mosaic virus (BMV) is a small (28 nm, 86S), positive-stranded, icosahedral RNA plant virus belonging to the genus Bromovirus, family Bromoviridae, in the alphavirus-like superfamily. BMV commonly infects Bromus inermis (see Bromus) and other grasses, can be found almost anywhere wheat is grown, and thrives in areas with heavy foot or machinery traffic. It is also one of the few grass viruses that infects dicotyledonous plants; however, it primarily infects monocotyledonous plants, such as barley and others in the family Gramineae. BMV was first isolated in 1942 from bromegrass (Bromus inermis), had its genomic organization determined by the 1970s, and was completely sequenced with commercially available clones by the 1980s. The alphavirus-like superfamily includes more than 250 plant and animal viruses including Tobacco mosaic virus, Semliki forest virus, Hepatitis E virus, Sindbis virus, and arboviruses (which cause certain types of encephalitis). Many of the positive-strand RNA viruses ...
Daniel, Marie-Christine and Tsvetkova, Irina B. and Quinkert, Zachary T. and Murali, Ayaluru and De, Mrinmoy and Rotello, Vincent M. and Kao, C. Cheng and Dragnea, Bogdan. (2010) Role of Surface Charge Density in Nanoparticle-Templated Assembly of Bromovirus Protein Cages. ACS Nano, 4 (7). p. 3853. ISSN 1936-0851 Aniagyei, Stella E. and Kennedy, Chelsea J. and Stein, Barry and Willits, Deborah A. and Douglas, Trevor and Young, Mark J. and De, Mrinmoy and Rotello, Vincent M. and Srisathiyanarayanan, D. and Kao, C. Cheng and Dragnea, Bogdan. (2009) Synergistic Effects of Mutations and Nanoparticle Templating in the Self-Assembly of Cowpea Chlorotic Mottle Virus Capsids. Nano Letters, 9 (1). pp. 393-398. ISSN 1530-6984 De, Mrinmoy and Rana, Subinoy and Akpinar, Handan and Miranda, Oscar R. and Arvizo, Rochelle R. and Bunz, Uwe H. F. and Rotello, Vincent M.. (2009) Sensing of proteins in human serum using conjugates of nanoparticles and green fluorescent protein. Nature Chemistry, 1 (6). p. 461. ...
Page contains details about doxorubicin-conjugated tobacco mosaic virus capsid protein mutant assemblies . It has composition images, properties, Characterization methods, synthesis, applications and reference articles : nano.nature.com
In the summer of 2005, Giau was a REU intern in Dr. C. Kaos lab at Texas A&M University. Her project was titled, "Visualization of Fluorescent Brome Mosaic Virus RNA3 in an In-vivo Environment.". During my stay at Texas, I worked with a plant virus called Brome Mosaic Virus. In recent years, this virus has become a model system for positive strand RNA viruses.. The internship was a rewarding experience because it was my first time being exposed to scientific research on a larger scale. Within one lab there were at least 4-5 large scale projects going on. It was definately an "action-packed" environment for science majors.. Secondly, I was very amazed to see how these scientists were so dedicated to their work. The Post-doc that I worked under spent at least 12 hours a day in the lab during weekdays, and he was always in the lab on the weekends as well. Through this internship I found out that the lab is where I want to be in the future.. Giau graduated magna cum laude with a double major in ...
1I4B: Structural and thermodynamic studies on mutant RNA motifs that impair the specificity between a viral replicase and its promoter
By using the ability of the positive-strand RNA ((+)RNA) virus BMV to replicate in yeast it was previously shown that subunits of the LSm1-7 ring, as well as Pat1 and Dhh1 play an essential role in the transit of the BMV ...
POSTDOCTORAL POSITIONS IN VIRAL RNA REPLICATION, GENE EXPRESSION AND VIRUS-HOST INTERACTIONS Creative, highly motivated researchers are sought for postdoctoral positions studying the functions and interactions of viral and host factors in RNA replication, gene expression, and related events in positive-strand RNA viruses. Unique opportunities to identify and study relevant host factors are available through our demonstration that bromovirus and nodavirus RNA replicons can replicate and express foreign genes in yeast, allowing the use of powerful yeast genetics to identify pertinent host genes and to greatly facilitate other experiments (Janda and Ahlquist [1993] Cell 72:961-970; Quadt et al. [1995] PNAS 92:4892-4896; Price et al. (1996) PNAS 93:9465-9470). Bromoviruses and nodaviruses are well-studied viruses with excellent genetic and biochemical resources for in vivo and in vitro studies of fundamental replication mechanisms. Significant opportunities are available in several areas of ...
in fact, both the 1a and 2a genes of brome mosaic virus were expressed as , transgenes, and an RNA3 derivitave as a replication substrate. I was just , trying to make two points to the curious layperson: first, that it is possible , for a virus to cross kingdoms (beyond the bunyaviridae) and second, that it is , difficult, and is unlikely to occur without a good deal of human or evolutionary effort, , Cheers! Good answer...but as Terry Hanzlik pointed out, flock house nodavirus infects plants (done in your institution) AND insects, and can multiply in cells of a number of animal cell lines...so maybe some of the effort isnt needed! And its not only Bunyaviridae; also Reoviridae and Rhabdoviridae, and some other as yet unclassified animal-type viruses which multiply in pants [Freudian, that - mean PLANTS, of course!] and insects. And there is evidence accumulating to suggest certain Potyviridae multiply in plants and fungi, and someone in our institute is convinced a certain relatively obscure ...
Machlomovirus is a genus of plant viruses, in the family Tombusviridae. Plants serve as natural hosts. There is currently only one species in this genus: the type species Maize chlorotic mottle virus (MCMV), which causes significant losses in maize production worldwide. MCMV was first identified in the U.S. state of Kansas causing corn lethal necrosis, a severe disease that negatively affects all stages of development for maize plants. Group: ssRNA(+) Order: Unassigned Family: Tombusviridae Genus: Machlomovirus Maize chlorotic mottle virus Viruses in Machlomovirus are non-enveloped, with icosahedral and spherical geometries, and T=3 symmetry. The diameter is around 28-34 nm. Genomes are linear, around 4-5.4kb in length. Viral replication is cytoplasmic. Entry into the host cell is achieved by penetration into the host cell. Replication follows the positive stranded RNA virus replication model. Positive stranded RNA virus transcription, using the premature termination model of subgenomic RNA ...
Cowpea mottle virus ATCC ® PVAS-518™ Designation: Mokwa [Cowpea Mottle Carmovirus Antiserum] Application: Test animal used: rabbit Plant research
83062-04-8 - RNA (velvet tobacco mottle virus 2) - Searchable synonyms, formulas, resource links, and other chemical information.
Custom Spherical Mirrors - BMV Optical Technologies Inc. - Routinely manufactures both concave and convex spherical mirrors in virtually any material
Prune dwarf virus (PDV) is one of the members of Bromoviridae family, genus Ilarvirus. Host components that participate in the regulation of viral replication or cell-to-cell movement via plasmodesmata are still unknown. In contrast, viral infections caused by some other Bromoviridae members are well characterized. Bromoviridae can be distinguished based on localization of their replication process in infected cells, cell-to-cell movement mechanisms, and plant-specific response reactions. Depending upon the genus,
Pest/Path: Corn Lethal Necrosis (CLN) (Maize Chlorotic Mottle Virus (MCMV) and Wheat Streak Mosaic Virus or Maize Dwarf Mosaic Virus (MDMV ...
Pest/Path: Corn Lethal Necrosis (CLN) (Maize Chlorotic Mottle Virus (MCMV) and Wheat Streak Mosaic Virus or Maize Dwarf Mosaic Virus (MDMV ...
Maize Chlorotic Mottle Virus (MCMV) is a deleterious pathogen which causes Maize Lethal Necrosis Disease that result in substantial yield loss of Maize crop worldwide. The positive-sense RNA genome of MCMV (4.4 kb) encodes six proteins: P32 (32kDa protein), RNA dependent RNA polymerases (P50 and P111), P31 (31kDa protein), P7 (7kDa protein), coat protein (25 kDa). P31, P7 and coat protein are encoded from sgRNA1, located at the 3′end of the genome and sgRNA2, located at the extremity of the 3′genome end. The objective of this study is to locate the possible attachment sites of Zea mays derived miRNAs in the genome of MCMV, using four diverse efficient miRNA target prediction algorithms. In total, 321 mature miRNAs were retrieved from miRBase (miRNA database) and were tested for hybridization of MCMV. These algorithms considered the parameters of seed pairing, minimum free energy, target site accessibility, multiple target sites, pattern recognition and folding energy for attachment. Out of 321 only
watermelon silver mottle virus ATCC ® PVMC-55™ Designation: WS-Y NP Application: contains sequence nucleocapsid protein C polypeptide Plant research
387440791 - EP 0832191 A4 2000-11-15 - RECOMBINANT VIRAL NUCLEIC ACIDS - [origin: WO9640867A1] The present invention relates to a recombinant viral nucleic acid selected from a (+) sense, single stranded RNA virus possessing a native subgenomic promoter encoding for a first viral subgenomic promoter, a nucleic acid sequence that codes for a viral coat protein whose transcription is regulated by the first viral subgenomic promoter, a second viral subgenomic promoter and a second nucleic acid sequence whose transcription is regulated by the second viral subgenomic promoter. The first and second viral subgenomic promoters of the recombinant viral nucleic acid do not have homologous sequences relative to each other. The recombinant viral nucleic acid provides the particular advantage that it systematically transcribes the second nucleic acid in the host. Host organisms encompassed by the present invention include procaryotes and eucaryotes, particularly animals and plants. The present invention also relates
Optimization of an Elastic Network Augmented Coarse Grained Model to Study CCMV Capsid Deformation. . Biblioteca virtual para leer y descargar libros, documentos, trabajos y tesis universitarias en PDF. Material universiario, documentación y tareas realizadas por universitarios en nuestra biblioteca. Para descargar gratis y para leer online.
Cerebral Autosomal Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is the most common hereditary vascular dementia. CADASIL is a systemic disease of small and medium-sized arteries although the symptoms are almost exclusively neurological, including migraineous headache, recurrent ischemic episodes, cognitive impairment and, finally, subcortical dementia. CADASIL is caused by over 170 different mutations in the NOTCH3 gene, which encodes a receptor expressed in adults predominantly in the vascular smooth muscle cells. The function of NOTCH3 is not crucial for embryonic development but is needed after birth. NOTCH3 directs postnatal arterial maturation and helps to maintain arterial integrity. It is involved in regulation of vascular tone and in the wound healing of a vascular injury. In addition, NOTCH3 promotes cell survival by inducing expression of anti-apoptotic proteins. NOTCH3 is a membrane-spanning protein with a large extracellular domain (N3ECD) ...
Summary:Delayed planting has been suggested to reduce density of the bean leaf beetle Cerotoma trifurcata (Förster), the principal vector of Bean pod mottle virus. Therefore, planting date was explored to determine if it might impact damage caused by the virus. Four planting dates, ranging from mid-March to mid-June, and two soybean Glycine max (L.) cultivars were examined for their effect on the relative damage caused by the virus in central Iowa for the years 2000-2002. Damage was assessed in terms of ...
Read "Cactus mild mottle virus is a new cactus-infecting tobamovirus, Archives of Virology" on DeepDyve, the largest online rental service for scholarly research with thousands of academic publications available at your fingertips.
Eduardo C. Alfonso, MD, Professor and Chair of Ophthalmology serves as the Medical Director of the Ocular Microbiology Core. Darlene Miller, Research Associate Director is the Scientific Director and imitates and collaborates on research projects and studies. Jorge Maestre-Mesa, MD, PhD is our molecular biology expert and is instrumental in molecular studies on ocular microbiomes and individual microbes. Medical Technologists, Edith Perez, BS, MT (ASCP) and Martha Diaz, BS MT (ASCP-retiring), assist in maintaining the ocular microbiology databank.. ...
... is a Yale University research laboratory that studies the replication of hepatitis C virus (HCV) and related positive-strand RNA viruses, led by Brett Lindenbach.
Codoñer, F.M., Cuevas, J.M., Sánchez-Navarro, J.A., Pallás, V. and Elena, S.F.(2005) Molecular Evolution of the Plant Virus Family Bromoviridae Based on RNA 3 Encoded Proteins. Journal of Molecular Evolution 61: 697-705. ...
Abstract: Clinical, cytogenetic and molecular observations on a sterile stallion 2n=65, XXY and a sterile mare 2n=64, XY are reported. The XXY stallion was a pure case since all cells showed the same chromosome constitution. In the cells of mare XY, no SRY gene was found by both FISH- and molecular analyses. Both carriers show normal body conformation but were sterile because the stallion had no spermatozoa in the ejaculate, as revealed by microscope observation, and the mare showed the typical gonadal dysgenesis since both the uterus and ovaries were hypoplasic, as revealed by both rectal palpation and ultrasonic analysis. Although a mutation and/or deletion of SRY gene seems to be involved in the sex reversal, this syndrome is not yet fully understood. The possibility of other genes playing an important role in this syndrome and changes in the protein encoded by SRY are discussed.. ...
ID JQ809577; SV 1; linear; genomic RNA; STD; VRL; 335 BP. XX AC JQ809577; XX DT 18-JUN-2012 (Rel. 113, Created) DT 18-JUN-2012 (Rel. 113, Last updated, Version 1) XX DE Apple stem grooving virus isolate BJ-ml movement protein gene, partial cds. XX KW . XX OS Apple stem grooving virus OC Viruses; ssRNA viruses; ssRNA positive-strand viruses, no DNA stage; OC Tymovirales; Betaflexiviridae; Trivirinae; Capillovirus. XX RN [1] RP 1-335 RA Hu G.J., Hong N., Wang G.P.; RT "Apple stem grooving virus isolates from Chinese pears"; RL Unpublished. XX RN [2] RP 1-335 RA Hu G.J., Hong N., Wang G.P.; RT ; RL Submitted (21-MAR-2012) to the INSDC. RL College of Plant Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, RL Shizishan No. 1, Wuhan, Hubei 430070, China XX DR MD5; cec29cc7e6c2cbde6eb9d8f732fc9c7b. XX FH Key Location/Qualifiers FH FT source 1..335 FT /organism="Apple stem grooving virus" FT /host="pear" FT /isolate="BJ-ml" FT /mol_type="genomic RNA" FT /country="China" FT ...
Bean pod mottle virus (BPMV) is a virus disease spread primarily by the bean leaf beetle, Cerotoma trifurcata. Seed transmission is al
GNH is a holistic and sustainable approach to development, which balances material and non-material values with the conviction that humans want to search for happiness
Over the longer term this particular set of economic variables may actually pull the country out of its decadeslong deflationary quagmire. Japan as a nation needs to spend again, build again and buy again. Up until now, there hasnt been the will or a really compelling reason to do so. Now, whether you call it divine intervention or simply the flip side of a bad set of circumstances, Japan has its mojo back. It may take a few years before all of the above unfolds, but I think we are on the cusp of dramatic change within this country. Remember, you heard it here first, folks. Bill Schmick is an independent investor with Berkshire Money Management. (See About for more information.) None of the information presented in any of these articles is intended to be and should not be construed as an endorsement of BMM or a solicitation to become a client of BMM. The reader should not assume that any strategies, or specific investments discussed are employed, bought, sold or held by BMM. Direct your ...

Viruses  | Free Full-Text | Viruses Infecting the Plant Pathogenic Fungus Rhizoctonia solani | HTMLViruses | Free Full-Text | Viruses Infecting the Plant Pathogenic Fungus Rhizoctonia solani | HTML

There are currently six genera in the family, including Alfamovirus, Anulavirus, Bromovirus, Cucumovirus, Ilarvirus, and ... and Bromovirus, or bacilliform for the members of the genera Ilarvirus, Alfamovirus, and Oleavirus [76]. ... bromovirus CMV; CMV-RNA 1 encodes 1a (replicase component; Pfam12467, E-value 1e-73), CMV-RNA 2 encodes 2a (replicase component ... bromovirus CMV; CMV-RNA 1 encodes 1a (replicase component; Pfam12467, E-value 1e-73), CMV-RNA 2 encodes 2a (replicase component ...
more infohttps://www.mdpi.com/1999-4915/11/12/1113/htm

Difference between revisions of Bromovirus - microbewikiDifference between revisions of "Bromovirus" - microbewiki

Virion Structure of a Bromovirus. The virions of a bromovirus consist of a capsid that is not enveloped and round with ... Viruses; ssRNA positive-strand viruses, no DNA stage; Bromoviridae; Bromovirus Species. Broad bean mottle virus, Brome mosaic ... The genus Bromovirus is one of five genera in the Bromoviridae family. It has a tripartite genome and an encapsidated ... Reproduction Cycle of a Bromovirus in a Host Cell. Viral Ecology & Pathology. References. Plant Viruses Online ...
more infohttps://microbewiki.kenyon.edu/index.php?title=Bromovirus&diff=54595&oldid=3758

Difference between revisions of Bromovirus - microbewikiDifference between revisions of "Bromovirus" - microbewiki

Virion Structure of a Bromovirus. The virions of a bromovirus consist of a capsid that is not enveloped and round with ... Viruses; ssRNA positive-strand viruses, no DNA stage; Bromoviridae; Bromovirus Species. Broad bean mottle virus, Brome mosaic ... The genus Bromovirus is one of five genera in the Bromoviridae family. It has a tripartite genome and an encapsidated ... Reproduction Cycle of a Bromovirus in a Host Cell. Viral Ecology & Pathology. References. Plant Viruses Online ...
more infohttps://microbewiki.kenyon.edu/index.php?title=Bromovirus&diff=prev&oldid=4723

Bromovirus - WikipediaBromovirus - Wikipedia

Bromovirus is a genus of viruses, in the family Bromoviridae. Plants serve as natural hosts. There are currently six species in ... Group: ssRNA(+) Order: Unassigned Family: Bromoviridae Genus: Bromovirus Broad bean mottle virus Brome mosaic virus Cassia ... Viruses in Bromovirus are non-enveloped, with icosahedral geometries, and T=3 symmetry. The diameter is around 26 nm. Genomes ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bromovirus

Expression and characterization of the 3a movement protein of cowpea chlorotic mottle bromovirus, Archives of Virology | 10...Expression and characterization of the 3a movement protein of cowpea chlorotic mottle bromovirus, Archives of Virology | 10...

"Expression and characterization of the 3a movement protein of cowpea chlorotic mottle bromovirus, Archives of Virology" on ... Expression and characterization of the 3a movement protein of cowpea chlorotic mottle bromovirus. Fujita, M.; Mise, K.; ... Expression and characterization of the 3a movement protein of cowpea chlorotic mottle bromovirus Fujita, M.; Mise, K.; Furusawa ... Expression and characterization of the 3a movement protein of cowpea chlorotic mottle bromovirus. ...
more infohttps://www.deepdyve.com/lp/springer_journal/expression-and-characterization-of-the-3a-movement-protein-of-cowpea-y0cRtXRpmu

Barley yellow dwarf luteoviruses and other virus diseases - M. Henry, R.T. PlumbBarley yellow dwarf luteoviruses and other virus diseases - M. Henry, R.T. Plumb

BROME MOSAIC BROMOVIRUS. Brome mosaic bromovirus (BMV) was first reported to cause economic damage in wheat in South Africa and ...
more infohttp://www.fao.org/docrep/006/y4011e/y4011e0o.htm

The Big Picture Book of Viruses - Baltimore ListingThe Big Picture Book of Viruses - Baltimore Listing

Bromovirus. brome mosaic virus. Plants. Cucumovirus. cucumber mosaic virus. Plants. Caliciviridae:. Calicivirus. vesicular ...
more infohttp://www.virology.net/Big_Virology/BVFamilyGroup.html

Virus-Taxonomie - WikipediaVirus-Taxonomie - Wikipedia

Genus Bromovirus (früher Tricornavirus). *Genus Cucumovirus, mit Species Peanut stunt virus, sowie Gurkenmosaikvirus - en. ...
more infohttps://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Virus-Taxonomie

Brome mosaic virus - WikipediaBrome mosaic virus - Wikipedia

Ahlquist, P. (1992). "Bromovirus RNA replication and transcription". Current Opinion in Genetics & Development. 2 (1): 71-76. ... icosahedral RNA plant virus belonging to the genus Bromovirus, family Bromoviridae, in the alphavirus-like superfamily. BMV ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brome_mosaic_virus

Diseases of SoybeanDiseases of Soybean

Genus Bromovirus; Cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV), bean yellow stipple strain, soybean strain (CCMV-S). Cowpea mild mottle ...
more infohttps://www.apsnet.org/edcenter/resources/commonnames/Pages/Soybean.aspx

Diseases of BeanDiseases of Bean

Genus Bromovirus; Cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV) Clover yellow vein Genus Potyvirus; Clover yellow vein virus (CYVV) ...
more infohttps://www.apsnet.org/edcenter/resources/commonnames/Pages/Bean.aspx

Search: All Pfam signatures | InterPro | EMBL-EBISearch: All Pfam signatures | InterPro | EMBL-EBI

Bromovirus coat protein (IPR002009) Pfam signature: PF01318 Colicin immunity protein/pyocin immunity protein (IPR000290) Pfam ... Bromovirus movement protein (IPR002538) Pfam signature: PF01573 MaoC-like dehydratase domain (IPR002539) Pfam signature: ...
more infohttp://www.ebi.ac.uk/interpro/member-database/Pfam

Diseases of Corn (syn. Maize)Diseases of Corn (syn. Maize)

Genus Bromovirus, Brome mosaic virus (BMV). Cereal chlorotic mottle. Genus Nucleorhabdovirus, Cereal chlorotic mottle virus ( ...
more infohttp://apsnet.org/publications/commonnames/Pages/Corn.aspx

Non-canonical Translation in Plant RNA VirusesNon-canonical Translation in Plant RNA Viruses

... genus Bromovirus, family Bromoviridae). Because of their multiple functions, it has been difficult to tease out the mechanisms ...
more infohttp://pubmedcentralcanada.ca/pmcc/articles/PMC5382211/

Viruses  | Free Full-Text | Deletions within the 3 Non-Translated Region of Alfalfa mosaic virus RNA4 Do Not Affect...Viruses | Free Full-Text | Deletions within the 3' Non-Translated Region of Alfalfa mosaic virus RNA4 Do Not Affect...

Choi, Y.G.; Rao, A.L. Molecular studies on bromovirus capsid protein. VII. Selective packaging on BMV RNA4 by specific N- ...
more infohttp://mdpi.com/1999-4915/5/7/1802/htm

Plus itPlus it

2015) Host ESCRT proteins are required for Bromovirus RNA replication compartment assembly and function. PLoS Pathog 11: ...
more infohttp://www.plantphysiol.org/content/179/2/507

Marilyn J. Roossinck - Research Output
     - Penn StateMarilyn J. Roossinck - Research Output - Penn State

Simmonds, P., Adams, M. J., Benk, M., Breitbart, M., Brister, J. R., Carstens, E. B., Davison, A. J., Delwart, E., Gorbalenya, A. E., Harrach, B., Hull, R., King, A. M. Q., Koonin, E. V., Krupovic, M., Kuhn, J. H., Lefkowitz, E. J., Nibert, M. L., Orton, R., Roossinck, M. J., Sabanadzovic, S. & 6 others, Sullivan, M. B., Suttle, C. A., Tesh, R. B., Van Der Vlugt, R. A., Varsani, A. & Zerbini, F. M., Feb 13 2017, In : Nature Reviews Microbiology. 15, 3, p. 161-168 8 p.. Research output: Contribution to journal › Article ...
more infohttps://pennstate.pure.elsevier.com/en/persons/marilyn-j-roossinck/publications/?type=%2Fdk%2Fatira%2Fpure%2Fresearchoutput%2Fresearchoutputtypes%2Fcontributiontojournal%2Farticle

Frontiers | Viral and Cellular Factors Involved in Phloem Transport of Plant Viruses | Plant ScienceFrontiers | Viral and Cellular Factors Involved in Phloem Transport of Plant Viruses | Plant Science

This concerns members in the Potexvirus, Cucumovirus, Bromovirus, Tospovirus, Closterovirus, Curtovirus, Polerovirus, and ... The carboxy-terminal two-thirds of the cowpea chlorotic mottle bromovirus capsid protein is incapable of virion formation yet ...
more infohttps://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fpls.2013.00154/full

Code System ConceptCode System Concept

Genus Bromovirus (organism). Code System Preferred Concept Name. Genus Bromovirus (organism). Concept Status. Published. ...
more infohttps://phinvads.cdc.gov/vads/ViewCodeSystemConcept.action?oid=2.16.840.1.113883.6.96&code=417404009

The Impact of Host Diet on  Titer in | proLékaře.czThe Impact of Host Diet on Titer in | proLékaře.cz

Článek Host ESCRT Proteins Are Required for Bromovirus RNA Replication Compartment Assembly and Function ... Host ESCRT Proteins Are Required for Bromovirus RNA Replication Compartment Assembly and Function ...
more infohttps://www.prolekare.cz/casopisy/plos-pathogens/2015-3/the-impact-of-host-diet-on-titer-in-53879

Catch Me If You Can: The Link between Autophagy and Viruses | proLékaře.czCatch Me If You Can: The Link between Autophagy and Viruses | proLékaře.cz

Článek Host ESCRT Proteins Are Required for Bromovirus RNA Replication Compartment Assembly and Function ... Host ESCRT Proteins Are Required for Bromovirus RNA Replication Compartment Assembly and Function ...
more infohttps://www.prolekare.cz/casopisy/plos-pathogens/2015-3/catch-me-if-you-can-the-link-between-autophagy-and-viruses-53383

KAKEN - Research Projects | Environmental response control systems inspired by insects and plants (KAKENHI-PLANNED-24120006)KAKEN - Research Projects | Environmental response control systems inspired by insects and plants (KAKENHI-PLANNED-24120006)

Presentation] A double-strand structure in the 5′ untranslated region of Melandrium yellow fleck bromovirus RNA3 is involved in ... untranslated region is required for the efficient amplification of negative-strand RNA3 in the bromovirus Melandrium yellow ...
more infohttps://kaken.nii.ac.jp/en/grant/KAKENHI-PLANNED-24120006/

Mark A. Young - Plant Sciences and Plant Pathology | Montana State UniversityMark A. Young - Plant Sciences and Plant Pathology | Montana State University

Mutational analysis of the Cowpea chlorotic mottle bromovirus b-hexamer structure on virion assembly and stability. Virology ( ... Effects of the Cowpea chlorotic mottle bromovirus ß-hexamer structure on virion assembly. Virology, 306:280-288, 2003. ...
more infohttp://plantsciences.montana.edu/facultyorstaff/faculty/young/
  • Heterologous expression of the modified coat protein of Cowpea chlorotic mottle bromovirus results in the assembly of protein cages with altered architectures and functions. (openwetware.org)