Brassica: A plant genus of the family Cruciferae. It contains many species and cultivars used as food including cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli, Brussel sprouts, kale, collard greens, MUSTARD PLANT; (B. alba, B. junica, and B. nigra), turnips (BRASSICA NAPUS) and rapeseed (BRASSICA RAPA).Glucosinolates: Substituted thioglucosides. They are found in rapeseed (Brassica campestris) products and related cruciferae. They are metabolized to a variety of toxic products which are most likely the cause of hepatocytic necrosis in animals and humans.Isothiocyanates: Organic compounds with the general formula R-NCS.Thiocyanates: Organic derivatives of thiocyanic acid which contain the general formula R-SCN.Calcium Signaling: Signal transduction mechanisms whereby calcium mobilization (from outside the cell or from intracellular storage pools) to the cytoplasm is triggered by external stimuli. Calcium signals are often seen to propagate as waves, oscillations, spikes, sparks, or puffs. The calcium acts as an intracellular messenger by activating calcium-responsive proteins.Imidoesters: Esters of the hypothetical imidic acids. They react with amines or amino acids to form amidines and are therefore used to modify protein structures and as cross-linking agents.Calcium Channels: Voltage-dependent cell membrane glycoproteins selectively permeable to calcium ions. They are categorized as L-, T-, N-, P-, Q-, and R-types based on the activation and inactivation kinetics, ion specificity, and sensitivity to drugs and toxins. The L- and T-types are present throughout the cardiovascular and central nervous systems and the N-, P-, Q-, & R-types are located in neuronal tissue.Calcium, Dietary: Calcium compounds used as food supplements or in food to supply the body with calcium. Dietary calcium is needed during growth for bone development and for maintenance of skeletal integrity later in life to prevent osteoporosis.Anticarcinogenic Agents: Agents that reduce the frequency or rate of spontaneous or induced tumors independently of the mechanism involved.Food Storage: Keeping food for later consumption.Calcium Carbonate: Carbonic acid calcium salt (CaCO3). An odorless, tasteless powder or crystal that occurs in nature. It is used therapeutically as a phosphate buffer in hemodialysis patients and as a calcium supplement.Brassicaceae: A plant family of the order Capparales, subclass Dilleniidae, class Magnoliopsida. They are mostly herbaceous plants with peppery-flavored leaves, due to gluconapin (GLUCOSINOLATES) and its hydrolysis product butenylisotrhiocyanate. The family includes many plants of economic importance that have been extensively altered and domesticated by humans. Flowers have 4 petals. Podlike fruits contain a number of seeds. Cress is a general term used for many in the Brassicacea family. Rockcress is usually ARABIS; Bittercress is usually CARDAMINE; Yellowcress is usually RORIPPA; Pennycress is usually THLASPI; Watercress refers to NASTURTIUM; or RORIPPA or TROPAEOLUM; Gardencress refers to LEPIDIUM; Indiancress refers to TROPAEOLUM.Vegetables: A food group comprised of EDIBLE PLANTS or their parts.Calcium Phosphates: Calcium salts of phosphoric acid. These compounds are frequently used as calcium supplements.Calcium Isotopes: Stable calcium atoms that have the same atomic number as the element calcium, but differ in atomic weight. Ca-42-44, 46, and 48 are stable calcium isotopes.Calcium Chloride: A salt used to replenish calcium levels, as an acid-producing diuretic, and as an antidote for magnesium poisoning.Food, Genetically Modified: Food derived from genetically modified organisms (ORGANISMS, GENETICALLY MODIFIED).NAD(P)H Dehydrogenase (Quinone): A flavoprotein that reversibly catalyzes the oxidation of NADH or NADPH by various quinones and oxidation-reduction dyes. The enzyme is inhibited by dicoumarol, capsaicin, and caffeine.Plant Stems: Parts of plants that usually grow vertically upwards towards the light and support the leaves, buds, and reproductive structures. (From Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)Plant Extracts: Concentrated pharmaceutical preparations of plants obtained by removing active constituents with a suitable solvent, which is evaporated away, and adjusting the residue to a prescribed standard.Verticillium: A mitosporic fungal genus commonly isolated from soil. Some species are the cause of wilt diseases in many different plants.Plant Components, Aerial: The above-ground plant without the roots.Sulfides: Chemical groups containing the covalent sulfur bonds -S-. The sulfur atom can be bound to inorganic or organic moieties.Calcium Channels, L-Type: Long-lasting voltage-gated CALCIUM CHANNELS found in both excitable and nonexcitable tissue. They are responsible for normal myocardial and vascular smooth muscle contractility. Five subunits (alpha-1, alpha-2, beta, gamma, and delta) make up the L-type channel. The alpha-1 subunit is the binding site for calcium-based antagonists. Dihydropyridine-based calcium antagonists are used as markers for these binding sites.Diet: Regular course of eating and drinking adopted by a person or animal.Benzyl CompoundsCalcium Oxalate: The calcium salt of oxalic acid, occurring in the urine as crystals and in certain calculi.Tin Compounds: Inorganic compounds that contain tin as an integral part of the molecule.Calcium Gluconate: The calcium salt of gluconic acid. The compound has a variety of uses, including its use as a calcium replenisher in hypocalcemic states.Selenium: An element with the atomic symbol Se, atomic number 34, and atomic weight 78.96. It is an essential micronutrient for mammals and other animals but is toxic in large amounts. Selenium protects intracellular structures against oxidative damage. It is an essential component of GLUTATHIONE PEROXIDASE.Selenic Acid: A strong dibasic acid with the molecular formula H2SeO4. Included under this heading is the acid form, and inorganic salts of dihydrogen selenium tetraoxide.Calcium Radioisotopes: Unstable isotopes of calcium that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. Ca atoms with atomic weights 39, 41, 45, 47, 49, and 50 are radioactive calcium isotopes.Glutathione Transferase: A transferase that catalyzes the addition of aliphatic, aromatic, or heterocyclic FREE RADICALS as well as EPOXIDES and arene oxides to GLUTATHIONE. Addition takes place at the SULFUR. It also catalyzes the reduction of polyol nitrate by glutathione to polyol and nitrite.Phenol: An antiseptic and disinfectant aromatic alcohol.Selenium Compounds: Inorganic compounds that contain selenium as an integral part of the molecule.Calcium Compounds: Inorganic compounds that contain calcium as an integral part of the molecule.Calcium Channels, N-Type: CALCIUM CHANNELS that are concentrated in neural tissue. Omega toxins inhibit the actions of these channels by altering their voltage dependence.Egtazic Acid: A chelating agent relatively more specific for calcium and less toxic than EDETIC ACID.Pepsinogen C: This is one of the 2 related pepsinogen systems in humans. It is found in prostate and seminal fluid whereas PEPSINOGEN A is not.Biological Availability: The extent to which the active ingredient of a drug dosage form becomes available at the site of drug action or in a biological medium believed to reflect accessibility to a site of action.Xylem: Plant tissue that carries water up the root and stem. Xylem cell walls derive most of their strength from LIGNIN. The vessels are similar to PHLOEM sieve tubes but lack companion cells and do not have perforated sides and pores.Calcium Channel Agonists: Agents that increase calcium influx into calcium channels of excitable tissues. This causes vasoconstriction in VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE and/or CARDIAC MUSCLE cells as well as stimulation of insulin release from pancreatic islets. Therefore, tissue-selective calcium agonists have the potential to combat cardiac failure and endocrinological disorders. They have been used primarily in experimental studies in cell and tissue culture.Dietary Supplements: Products in capsule, tablet or liquid form that provide dietary ingredients, and that are intended to be taken by mouth to increase the intake of nutrients. Dietary supplements can include macronutrients, such as proteins, carbohydrates, and fats; and/or MICRONUTRIENTS, such as VITAMINS; MINERALS; and PHYTOCHEMICALS.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Plant Proteins: Proteins found in plants (flowers, herbs, shrubs, trees, etc.). The concept does not include proteins found in vegetables for which VEGETABLE PROTEINS is available.Gene Expression Regulation, Plant: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in plants.Calcimycin: An ionophorous, polyether antibiotic from Streptomyces chartreusensis. It binds and transports CALCIUM and other divalent cations across membranes and uncouples oxidative phosphorylation while inhibiting ATPase of rat liver mitochondria. The substance is used mostly as a biochemical tool to study the role of divalent cations in various biological systems.Cooking: The art or practice of preparing food. It includes the preparation of special foods for diets in various diseases.Carotenoids: The general name for a group of fat-soluble pigments found in green, yellow, and leafy vegetables, and yellow fruits. They are aliphatic hydrocarbons consisting of a polyisoprene backbone.Flowers: The reproductive organs of plants.Calcium Hydroxide: A white powder prepared from lime that has many medical and industrial uses. It is in many dental formulations, especially for root canal filling.Phosphorus: A non-metal element that has the atomic symbol P, atomic number 15, and atomic weight 31. It is an essential element that takes part in a broad variety of biochemical reactions.Dose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.Pepsinogen A: This is one of 2 related pepsinogen systems in humans and is also known as pepsinogen. (The other is PEPSINOGEN C.) This includes isozymogens Pg1-Pg5 (pepsinogens 1-5, group I or products of PGA1-PGA5 genes). This is the main pepsinogen found in urine.Nifedipine: A potent vasodilator agent with calcium antagonistic action. It is a useful anti-anginal agent that also lowers blood pressure.Calcium Sulfate: A calcium salt that is used for a variety of purposes including: building materials, as a desiccant, in dentistry as an impression material, cast, or die, and in medicine for immobilizing casts and as a tablet excipient. It exists in various forms and states of hydration. Plaster of Paris is a mixture of powdered and heat-treated gypsum.Alkyl and Aryl Transferases: A somewhat heterogeneous class of enzymes that catalyze the transfer of alkyl or related groups (excluding methyl groups). EC 2.5.Plant Shoots: New immature growth of a plant including stem, leaves, tips of branches, and SEEDLINGS.Cross-Over Studies: Studies comparing two or more treatments or interventions in which the subjects or patients, upon completion of the course of one treatment, are switched to another. In the case of two treatments, A and B, half the subjects are randomly allocated to receive these in the order A, B and half to receive them in the order B, A. A criticism of this design is that effects of the first treatment may carry over into the period when the second is given. (Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Parathyroid Hormone: A polypeptide hormone (84 amino acid residues) secreted by the PARATHYROID GLANDS which performs the essential role of maintaining intracellular CALCIUM levels in the body. Parathyroid hormone increases intracellular calcium by promoting the release of CALCIUM from BONE, increases the intestinal absorption of calcium, increases the renal tubular reabsorption of calcium, and increases the renal excretion of phosphates.Fruit: The fleshy or dry ripened ovary of a plant, enclosing the seed or seeds.Membrane Potentials: The voltage differences across a membrane. For cellular membranes they are computed by subtracting the voltage measured outside the membrane from the voltage measured inside the membrane. They result from differences of inside versus outside concentration of potassium, sodium, chloride, and other ions across cells' or ORGANELLES membranes. For excitable cells, the resting membrane potentials range between -30 and -100 millivolts. Physical, chemical, or electrical stimuli can make a membrane potential more negative (hyperpolarization), or less negative (depolarization).Indoles: Benzopyrroles with the nitrogen at the number one carbon adjacent to the benzyl portion, in contrast to ISOINDOLES which have the nitrogen away from the six-membered ring.Magnesium: A metallic element that has the atomic symbol Mg, atomic number 12, and atomic weight 24.31. It is important for the activity of many enzymes, especially those involved in OXIDATIVE PHOSPHORYLATION.Pyroglyphidae: Family of house dust mites, in the superfamily Analgoidea, order Astigmata. They include the genera Dermatophagoides and Euroglyphus.Beverages: Liquids that are suitable for drinking. (From Merriam Webster Collegiate Dictionary, 10th ed)Chelating Agents: Chemicals that bind to and remove ions from solutions. Many chelating agents function through the formation of COORDINATION COMPLEXES with METALS.Fura-2: A fluorescent calcium chelating agent which is used to study intracellular calcium in tissues.Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Calcium Citrate: A colorless crystalline or white powdery organic, tricarboxylic acid occurring in plants, especially citrus fruits, and used as a flavoring agent, as an antioxidant in foods, and as a sequestrating agent. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Kinetics: The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.Plant Leaves: Expanded structures, usually green, of vascular plants, characteristically consisting of a bladelike expansion attached to a stem, and functioning as the principal organ of photosynthesis and transpiration. (American Heritage Dictionary, 2d ed)Selenocysteine: A naturally occurring amino acid in both eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms. It is found in tRNAs and in the catalytic site of some enzymes. The genes for glutathione peroxidase and formate dehydrogenase contain the TGA codon, which codes for this amino acid.Signal Transduction: The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.Thapsigargin: A sesquiterpene lactone found in roots of THAPSIA. It inhibits CA(2+)-TRANSPORTING ATPASE mediated uptake of CALCIUM into SARCOPLASMIC RETICULUM.Plants, Genetically Modified: PLANTS, or their progeny, whose GENOME has been altered by GENETIC ENGINEERING.S100 Calcium Binding Protein G: A calbindin protein found in many mammalian tissues, including the UTERUS, PLACENTA, BONE, PITUITARY GLAND, and KIDNEYS. In intestinal ENTEROCYTES it mediates intracellular calcium transport from apical to basolateral membranes via calcium binding at two EF-HAND MOTIFS. Expression is regulated in some tissues by VITAMIN D.Ryanodine Receptor Calcium Release Channel: A tetrameric calcium release channel in the SARCOPLASMIC RETICULUM membrane of SMOOTH MUSCLE CELLS, acting oppositely to SARCOPLASMIC RETICULUM CALCIUM-TRANSPORTING ATPASES. It is important in skeletal and cardiac excitation-contraction coupling and studied by using RYANODINE. Abnormalities are implicated in CARDIAC ARRHYTHMIAS and MUSCULAR DISEASES.Metabolome: The dynamic collection of metabolites which represent a cell's or organism's net metabolic response to current conditions.Calcium Pyrophosphate: An inorganic pyrophosphate which affects calcium metabolism in mammals. Abnormalities in its metabolism occur in some human diseases, notably HYPOPHOSPHATASIA and pseudogout (CHONDROCALCINOSIS).Calcium Metabolism Disorders: Disorders in the processing of calcium in the body: its absorption, transport, storage, and utilization.Lignin: The most abundant natural aromatic organic polymer found in all vascular plants. Lignin together with cellulose and hemicellulose are the major cell wall components of the fibers of all wood and grass species. Lignin is composed of coniferyl, p-coumaryl, and sinapyl alcohols in varying ratios in different plant species. (From Merck Index, 11th ed)Verapamil: A calcium channel blocker that is a class IV anti-arrhythmia agent.Antioxidants: Naturally occurring or synthetic substances that inhibit or retard the oxidation of a substance to which it is added. They counteract the harmful and damaging effects of oxidation in animal tissues.Calcium-Binding Proteins: Proteins to which calcium ions are bound. They can act as transport proteins, regulator proteins, or activator proteins. They typically contain EF HAND MOTIFS.NF-E2-Related Factor 2: A basic-leucine zipper transcription factor that was originally described as a transcriptional regulator controlling expression of the BETA-GLOBIN gene. It may regulate the expression of a wide variety of genes that play a role in protecting cells from oxidative damage.Dihydropyridines: Pyridine moieties which are partially saturated by the addition of two hydrogen atoms in any position.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Cytosol: Intracellular fluid from the cytoplasm after removal of ORGANELLES and other insoluble cytoplasmic components.Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism Analysis: The detection of RESTRICTION FRAGMENT LENGTH POLYMORPHISMS by selective PCR amplification of restriction fragments derived from genomic DNA followed by electrophoretic analysis of the amplified restriction fragments.Enzyme Induction: An increase in the rate of synthesis of an enzyme due to the presence of an inducer which acts to derepress the gene responsible for enzyme synthesis.Ascorbic Acid: A six carbon compound related to glucose. It is found naturally in citrus fruits and many vegetables. Ascorbic acid is an essential nutrient in human diets, and necessary to maintain connective tissue and bone. Its biologically active form, vitamin C, functions as a reducing agent and coenzyme in several metabolic pathways. Vitamin C is considered an antioxidant.Selenoproteins: Selenoproteins are proteins that specifically incorporate SELENOCYSTEINE into their amino acid chain. Most selenoproteins are enzymes with the selenocysteine residues being responsible for their catalytic functions.Lanthanum: Lanthanum. The prototypical element in the rare earth family of metals. It has the atomic symbol La, atomic number 57, and atomic weight 138.91. Lanthanide ion is used in experimental biology as a calcium antagonist; lanthanum oxide improves the optical properties of glass.Patch-Clamp Techniques: An electrophysiologic technique for studying cells, cell membranes, and occasionally isolated organelles. All patch-clamp methods rely on a very high-resistance seal between a micropipette and a membrane; the seal is usually attained by gentle suction. The four most common variants include on-cell patch, inside-out patch, outside-out patch, and whole-cell clamp. Patch-clamp methods are commonly used to voltage clamp, that is control the voltage across the membrane and measure current flow, but current-clamp methods, in which the current is controlled and the voltage is measured, are also used.Calcium Channels, P-Type: CALCIUM CHANNELS located within the PURKINJE CELLS of the cerebellum. They are involved in stimulation-secretion coupling of neurons.Chlorophyll: Porphyrin derivatives containing magnesium that act to convert light energy in photosynthetic organisms.Cytokinins: Plant hormones that promote the separation of daughter cells after mitotic division of a parent cell. Frequently they are purine derivatives.Diltiazem: A benzothiazepine derivative with vasodilating action due to its antagonism of the actions of CALCIUM ion on membrane functions.Potassium: An element in the alkali group of metals with an atomic symbol K, atomic number 19, and atomic weight 39.10. It is the chief cation in the intracellular fluid of muscle and other cells. Potassium ion is a strong electrolyte that plays a significant role in the regulation of fluid volume and maintenance of the WATER-ELECTROLYTE BALANCE.Plant Roots: The usually underground portions of a plant that serve as support, store food, and through which water and mineral nutrients enter the plant. (From American Heritage Dictionary, 1982; Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)Kidney Calculi: Stones in the KIDNEY, usually formed in the urine-collecting area of the kidney (KIDNEY PELVIS). Their sizes vary and most contains CALCIUM OXALATE.Hypocalcemia: Reduction of the blood calcium below normal. Manifestations include hyperactive deep tendon reflexes, Chvostek's sign, muscle and abdominal cramps, and carpopedal spasm. (Dorland, 27th ed)Neurons: The basic cellular units of nervous tissue. Each neuron consists of a body, an axon, and dendrites. Their purpose is to receive, conduct, and transmit impulses in the NERVOUS SYSTEM.Aequorin: A photoprotein isolated from the bioluminescent jellyfish Aequorea. It emits visible light by an intramolecular reaction when a trace amount of calcium ion is added. The light-emitting moiety in the bioluminescence reaction is believed to be 2-amino-3-benzyl-5-(p-hydroxyphenyl)pyrazine (AF-350).Intracellular Fluid: The fluid inside CELLS.Calmodulin: A heat-stable, low-molecular-weight activator protein found mainly in the brain and heart. The binding of calcium ions to this protein allows this protein to bind to cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases and to adenyl cyclase with subsequent activation. Thereby this protein modulates cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP levels.Receptors, Calcium-Sensing: A class of G-protein-coupled receptors that react to varying extracellular CALCIUM levels. Calcium-sensing receptors in the PARATHYROID GLANDS play an important role in the maintenance of calcium HOMEOSTASIS by regulating the release of PARATHYROID HORMONE. They differ from INTRACELLULAR CALCIUM-SENSING PROTEINS which sense intracellular calcium levels.Calcium Channels, Q-Type: CALCIUM CHANNELS located in the neurons of the brain.Strontium: An element of the alkaline earth family of metals. It has the atomic symbol Sr, atomic number 38, and atomic weight 87.62.Seeds: The encapsulated embryos of flowering plants. They are used as is or for animal feed because of the high content of concentrated nutrients like starches, proteins, and fats. Rapeseed, cottonseed, and sunflower seed are also produced for the oils (fats) they yield.Inositol 1,4,5-Trisphosphate Receptors: Intracellular receptors that bind to INOSITOL 1,4,5-TRISPHOSPHATE and play an important role in its intracellular signaling. Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors are calcium channels that release CALCIUM in response to increased levels of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate in the CYTOPLASM.Hypercalcemia: Abnormally high level of calcium in the blood.Ionophores: Chemical agents that increase the permeability of biological or artificial lipid membranes to specific ions. Most ionophores are relatively small organic molecules that act as mobile carriers within membranes or coalesce to form ion permeable channels across membranes. Many are antibiotics, and many act as uncoupling agents by short-circuiting the proton gradient across mitochondrial membranes.Vitamin D: A vitamin that includes both CHOLECALCIFEROLS and ERGOCALCIFEROLS, which have the common effect of preventing or curing RICKETS in animals. It can also be viewed as a hormone since it can be formed in SKIN by action of ULTRAVIOLET RAYS upon the precursors, 7-dehydrocholesterol and ERGOSTEROL, and acts on VITAMIN D RECEPTORS to regulate CALCIUM in opposition to PARATHYROID HORMONE.Neoplasms: New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.Fluorescent Dyes: Agents that emit light after excitation by light. The wave length of the emitted light is usually longer than that of the incident light. Fluorochromes are substances that cause fluorescence in other substances, i.e., dyes used to mark or label other compounds with fluorescent tags.Ionomycin: A divalent calcium ionophore that is widely used as a tool to investigate the role of intracellular calcium in cellular processes.Electrophysiology: The study of the generation and behavior of electrical charges in living organisms particularly the nervous system and the effects of electricity on living organisms.Rabbits: The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.Calcium Channels, R-Type: CALCIUM CHANNELS located in the neurons of the brain. They are inhibited by the marine snail toxin, omega conotoxin MVIIC.Food Hypersensitivity: Gastrointestinal disturbances, skin eruptions, or shock due to allergic reactions to allergens in food.Genes, Plant: The functional hereditary units of PLANTS.Inositol 1,4,5-Trisphosphate: Intracellular messenger formed by the action of phospholipase C on phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate, which is one of the phospholipids that make up the cell membrane. Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate is released into the cytoplasm where it releases calcium ions from internal stores within the cell's endoplasmic reticulum. These calcium ions stimulate the activity of B kinase or calmodulin.Genetic Heterogeneity: The presence of apparently similar characters for which the genetic evidence indicates that different genes or different genetic mechanisms are involved in different pedigrees. In clinical settings genetic heterogeneity refers to the presence of a variety of genetic defects which cause the same disease, often due to mutations at different loci on the same gene, a finding common to many human diseases including ALZHEIMER DISEASE; CYSTIC FIBROSIS; LIPOPROTEIN LIPASE DEFICIENCY, FAMILIAL; and POLYCYSTIC KIDNEY DISEASES. (Rieger, et al., Glossary of Genetics: Classical and Molecular, 5th ed; Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)Sodium: A member of the alkali group of metals. It has the atomic symbol Na, atomic number 11, and atomic weight 23.Rats, Sprague-Dawley: A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.Bone and Bones: A specialized CONNECTIVE TISSUE that is the main constituent of the SKELETON. The principle cellular component of bone is comprised of OSTEOBLASTS; OSTEOCYTES; and OSTEOCLASTS, while FIBRILLAR COLLAGENS and hydroxyapatite crystals form the BONE MATRIX.Intestinal Absorption: Uptake of substances through the lining of the INTESTINES.Apoptosis: One of the mechanisms by which CELL DEATH occurs (compare with NECROSIS and AUTOPHAGOCYTOSIS). Apoptosis is the mechanism responsible for the physiological deletion of cells and appears to be intrinsically programmed. It is characterized by distinctive morphologic changes in the nucleus and cytoplasm, chromatin cleavage at regularly spaced sites, and the endonucleolytic cleavage of genomic DNA; (DNA FRAGMENTATION); at internucleosomal sites. This mode of cell death serves as a balance to mitosis in regulating the size of animal tissues and in mediating pathologic processes associated with tumor growth.Caffeine: A methylxanthine naturally occurring in some beverages and also used as a pharmacological agent. Caffeine's most notable pharmacological effect is as a central nervous system stimulant, increasing alertness and producing agitation. It also relaxes SMOOTH MUSCLE, stimulates CARDIAC MUSCLE, stimulates DIURESIS, and appears to be useful in the treatment of some types of headache. Several cellular actions of caffeine have been observed, but it is not entirely clear how each contributes to its pharmacological profile. Among the most important are inhibition of cyclic nucleotide PHOSPHODIESTERASES, antagonism of ADENOSINE RECEPTORS, and modulation of intracellular calcium handling.Xenobiotics: Chemical substances that are foreign to the biological system. They include naturally occurring compounds, drugs, environmental agents, carcinogens, insecticides, etc.Adenosine Triphosphate: An adenine nucleotide containing three phosphate groups esterified to the sugar moiety. In addition to its crucial roles in metabolism adenosine triphosphate is a neurotransmitter.Cell Line, Tumor: A cell line derived from cultured tumor cells.Homeostasis: The processes whereby the internal environment of an organism tends to remain balanced and stable.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.omega-Conotoxin GVIA: A neurotoxic peptide, which is a cleavage product (VIa) of the omega-Conotoxin precursor protein contained in venom from the marine snail, CONUS geographus. It is an antagonist of CALCIUM CHANNELS, N-TYPE.Myocardium: The muscle tissue of the HEART. It is composed of striated, involuntary muscle cells (MYOCYTES, CARDIAC) connected to form the contractile pump to generate blood flow.Calcinosis: Pathologic deposition of calcium salts in tissues.Nitrendipine: A calcium channel blocker with marked vasodilator action. It is an effective antihypertensive agent and differs from other calcium channel blockers in that it does not reduce glomerular filtration rate and is mildly natriuretic, rather than sodium retentive.Hydrogen-Ion Concentration: The normality of a solution with respect to HYDROGEN ions; H+. It is related to acidity measurements in most cases by pH = log 1/2[1/(H+)], where (H+) is the hydrogen ion concentration in gram equivalents per liter of solution. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)DNA Adducts: The products of chemical reactions that result in the addition of extraneous chemical groups to DNA.Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic: Agents obtained from higher plants that have demonstrable cytostatic or antineoplastic activity.Cell Line: Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.Calcitriol: The physiologically active form of vitamin D. It is formed primarily in the kidney by enzymatic hydroxylation of 25-hydroxycholecalciferol (CALCIFEDIOL). Its production is stimulated by low blood calcium levels and parathyroid hormone. Calcitriol increases intestinal absorption of calcium and phosphorus, and in concert with parathyroid hormone increases bone resorption.Ion Channels: Gated, ion-selective glycoproteins that traverse membranes. The stimulus for ION CHANNEL GATING can be due to a variety of stimuli such as LIGANDS, a TRANSMEMBRANE POTENTIAL DIFFERENCE, mechanical deformation or through INTRACELLULAR SIGNALING PEPTIDES AND PROTEINS.Ryanodine: A methylpyrrole-carboxylate from RYANIA that disrupts the RYANODINE RECEPTOR CALCIUM RELEASE CHANNEL to modify CALCIUM release from SARCOPLASMIC RETICULUM resulting in alteration of MUSCLE CONTRACTION. It was previously used in INSECTICIDES. It is used experimentally in conjunction with THAPSIGARGIN and other inhibitors of CALCIUM ATPASE uptake of calcium into SARCOPLASMIC RETICULUM.Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid: Liquid chromatographic techniques which feature high inlet pressures, high sensitivity, and high speed.Nimodipine: A calcium channel blockader with preferential cerebrovascular activity. It has marked cerebrovascular dilating effects and lowers blood pressure.Ion Transport: The movement of ions across energy-transducing cell membranes. Transport can be active, passive or facilitated. Ions may travel by themselves (uniport), or as a group of two or more ions in the same (symport) or opposite (antiport) directions.DNA, Complementary: Single-stranded complementary DNA synthesized from an RNA template by the action of RNA-dependent DNA polymerase. cDNA (i.e., complementary DNA, not circular DNA, not C-DNA) is used in a variety of molecular cloning experiments as well as serving as a specific hybridization probe.Nucleotidyltransferases: A class of enzymes that transfers nucleotidyl residues. EC 2.7.7.Prostatic Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the PROSTATE.Ion Channel Gating: The opening and closing of ion channels due to a stimulus. The stimulus can be a change in membrane potential (voltage-gated), drugs or chemical transmitters (ligand-gated), or a mechanical deformation. Gating is thought to involve conformational changes of the ion channel which alters selective permeability.Parathyroid Glands: Two pairs of small oval-shaped glands located in the front and the base of the NECK and adjacent to the two lobes of THYROID GLAND. They secrete PARATHYROID HORMONE that regulates the balance of CALCIUM; PHOSPHORUS; and MAGNESIUM in the body.Breeding: The production of offspring by selective mating or HYBRIDIZATION, GENETIC in animals or plants.omega-Conotoxins: A family of structurally related neurotoxic peptides from mollusk venom that inhibit voltage-activated entry of calcium into the presynaptic membrane. They selectively inhibit N-, P-, and Q-type calcium channels.Oxalates: Derivatives of OXALIC ACID. Included under this heading are a broad variety of acid forms, salts, esters, and amides that are derived from the ethanedioic acid structure.Rats, Wistar: A strain of albino rat developed at the Wistar Institute that has spread widely at other institutions. This has markedly diluted the original strain.Isradipine: A potent antagonist of CALCIUM CHANNELS that is highly selective for VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE. It is effective in the treatment of chronic stable angina pectoris, hypertension, and congestive cardiac failure.Tissue Distribution: Accumulation of a drug or chemical substance in various organs (including those not relevant to its pharmacologic or therapeutic action). This distribution depends on the blood flow or perfusion rate of the organ, the ability of the drug to penetrate organ membranes, tissue specificity, protein binding. The distribution is usually expressed as tissue to plasma ratios.Minerals: Native, inorganic or fossilized organic substances having a definite chemical composition and formed by inorganic reactions. They may occur as individual crystals or may be disseminated in some other mineral or rock. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed; McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Sarcoplasmic Reticulum Calcium-Transporting ATPases: Calcium-transporting ATPases that catalyze the active transport of CALCIUM into the SARCOPLASMIC RETICULUM vesicles from the CYTOPLASM. They are primarily found in MUSCLE CELLS and play a role in the relaxation of MUSCLES.Muscle Contraction: A process leading to shortening and/or development of tension in muscle tissue. Muscle contraction occurs by a sliding filament mechanism whereby actin filaments slide inward among the myosin filaments.Calbindins: Calcium-binding proteins that are found in DISTAL KIDNEY TUBULES, INTESTINES, BRAIN, and other tissues where they bind, buffer and transport cytoplasmic calcium. Calbindins possess a variable number of EF-HAND MOTIFS which contain calcium-binding sites. Some isoforms are regulated by VITAMIN D.Cholecalciferol: Derivative of 7-dehydroxycholesterol formed by ULTRAVIOLET RAYS breaking of the C9-C10 bond. It differs from ERGOCALCIFEROL in having a single bond between C22 and C23 and lacking a methyl group at C24.Biological Transport, Active: The movement of materials across cell membranes and epithelial layers against an electrochemical gradient, requiring the expenditure of metabolic energy.Electric Stimulation: Use of electric potential or currents to elicit biological responses.Xanthenes: Compounds with three aromatic rings in linear arrangement with an OXYGEN in the center ring.Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.Genotype: The genetic constitution of the individual, comprising the ALLELES present at each GENETIC LOCUS.Nicardipine: A potent calcium channel blockader with marked vasodilator action. It has antihypertensive properties and is effective in the treatment of angina and coronary spasms without showing cardiodepressant effects. It has also been used in the treatment of asthma and enhances the action of specific antineoplastic agents.Extracellular Space: Interstitial space between cells, occupied by INTERSTITIAL FLUID as well as amorphous and fibrous substances. For organisms with a CELL WALL, the extracellular space includes everything outside of the CELL MEMBRANE including the PERIPLASM and the cell wall.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Muscles: Contractile tissue that produces movement in animals.Aniline CompoundsGastric Mucosa: Lining of the STOMACH, consisting of an inner EPITHELIUM, a middle LAMINA PROPRIA, and an outer MUSCULARIS MUCOSAE. The surface cells produce MUCUS that protects the stomach from attack by digestive acid and enzymes. When the epithelium invaginates into the LAMINA PROPRIA at various region of the stomach (CARDIA; GASTRIC FUNDUS; and PYLORUS), different tubular gastric glands are formed. These glands consist of cells that secrete mucus, enzymes, HYDROCHLORIC ACID, or hormones.Cell Cycle: The complex series of phenomena, occurring between the end of one CELL DIVISION and the end of the next, by which cellular material is duplicated and then divided between two daughter cells. The cell cycle includes INTERPHASE, which includes G0 PHASE; G1 PHASE; S PHASE; and G2 PHASE, and CELL DIVISION PHASE.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Potassium Chloride: A white crystal or crystalline powder used in BUFFERS; FERTILIZERS; and EXPLOSIVES. It can be used to replenish ELECTROLYTES and restore WATER-ELECTROLYTE BALANCE in treating HYPOKALEMIA.Myocardial Contraction: Contractile activity of the MYOCARDIUM.Crosses, Genetic: Deliberate breeding of two different individuals that results in offspring that carry part of the genetic material of each parent. The parent organisms must be genetically compatible and may be from different varieties or closely related species.Urinary Bladder Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the URINARY BLADDER.Endoplasmic Reticulum: A system of cisternae in the CYTOPLASM of many cells. In places the endoplasmic reticulum is continuous with the plasma membrane (CELL MEMBRANE) or outer membrane of the nuclear envelope. If the outer surfaces of the endoplasmic reticulum membranes are coated with ribosomes, the endoplasmic reticulum is said to be rough-surfaced (ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM, ROUGH); otherwise it is said to be smooth-surfaced (ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM, SMOOTH). (King & Stansfield, A Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)Rats, Inbred Strains: Genetically identical individuals developed from brother and sister matings which have been carried out for twenty or more generations or by parent x offspring matings carried out with certain restrictions. This also includes animals with a long history of closed colony breeding.Calcium Dobesilate: A drug used to reduce hemorrhage in diabetic retinopathy.Mibefradil: A benzimidazoyl-substituted tetraline that selectively binds and inhibits CALCIUM CHANNELS, T-TYPE.Biological Transport: The movement of materials (including biochemical substances and drugs) through a biological system at the cellular level. The transport can be across cell membranes and epithelial layers. It also can occur within intracellular compartments and extracellular compartments.Cell Membrane Permeability: A quality of cell membranes which permits the passage of solvents and solutes into and out of cells.Bone Density: The amount of mineral per square centimeter of BONE. This is the definition used in clinical practice. Actual bone density would be expressed in grams per milliliter. It is most frequently measured by X-RAY ABSORPTIOMETRY or TOMOGRAPHY, X RAY COMPUTED. Bone density is an important predictor for OSTEOPOROSIS.Plasma Membrane Calcium-Transporting ATPases: Calcium-transporting ATPases found on the PLASMA MEMBRANE that catalyze the active transport of CALCIUM from the CYTOPLASM into the extracellular space. They play a role in maintaining a CALCIUM gradient across plasma membrane.Cloning, Molecular: The insertion of recombinant DNA molecules from prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic sources into a replicating vehicle, such as a plasmid or virus vector, and the introduction of the resultant hybrid molecules into recipient cells without altering the viability of those cells.Colonic Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the COLON.Electron Probe Microanalysis: Identification and measurement of ELEMENTS and their location based on the fact that X-RAYS emitted by an element excited by an electron beam have a wavelength characteristic of that element and an intensity related to its concentration. It is performed with an electron microscope fitted with an x-ray spectrometer, in scanning or transmission mode.Liver: A large lobed glandular organ in the abdomen of vertebrates that is responsible for detoxification, metabolism, synthesis and storage of various substances.Cyclic AMP: An adenine nucleotide containing one phosphate group which is esterified to both the 3'- and 5'-positions of the sugar moiety. It is a second messenger and a key intracellular regulator, functioning as a mediator of activity for a number of hormones, including epinephrine, glucagon, and ACTH.Buffers: A chemical system that functions to control the levels of specific ions in solution. When the level of hydrogen ion in solution is controlled the system is called a pH buffer.Electric Conductivity: The ability of a substrate to allow the passage of ELECTRONS.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Absorption: The physical or physiological processes by which substances, tissue, cells, etc. take up or take in other substances or energy.Arsenazo III: Metallochrome indicator that changes color when complexed to the calcium ion under physiological conditions. It is used to measure local calcium ion concentrations in vivo.
"Tenderstem broccoli" is a cross between broccoli and Chinese broccoli. Beneforté is a variety of broccoli containing 2-3 times ... Sprouting broccoli has a larger number of heads with many thin stalks. Purple cauliflower is a type of broccoli grown in Europe ... Broccoli is classified in the Italica cultivar group of the species Brassica oleracea. Broccoli has large flower heads, usually ... Broccoli has low content of carbohydrates, protein, fat, and dietary fiber. Boiling broccoli reduces the levels of sulforaphane ...
Oxalates bind to calcium and prevent its absorption in the human body. Glucosinolates prevent the uptake of iodine, affecting ... They are found in broccoli, brussel sprouts, cabbage and cauliflower. Excessive intake of required nutrients can also result in ... Because calcium, iron, zinc and magnesium share the same transporter within the intestine, excessive consumption of one of ... Phytic acid has a strong binding affinity to minerals such as calcium, magnesium, iron, copper, and zinc. This results in ...
Omega-3s are found in dark leafy green vegetables, flax seed, walnuts, kidney and pinto beans, broccoli and squash. Calcium is ... Pregnant woman should get enough omega-3s, vitamin B12, and calcium. All these elements could be found in vegetarian meals and ...
Green-leaved vegetables such as kale, collard greens, and turnip greens, as well as broccoli, carrot, and cauliflower are ... Eggs, scrambled or boiled (along with the shell) are an excellent source of protein and calcium. Hemp, roasted soybeans, ...
The purpose of vitamin D3 is to digest calcium. Without being able to digest calcium, the iguana develops Metabolic Bone ... Foods high in oxalate should not be given for an everyday diet are: Broccoli, Carrots, Snap peas, Okra, Sweet Potato, and ... Also of concern is the oxalate to calcium ratio, and avoiding those that provide too much oxalate which is harmful. ... 2 to 1 calcium to phosphorus) in their diet. The best food source for the Iguana is dark green leafy greens such as collard ...
Calcium oxalate is the most common component of kidney stones. Early investigators isolated oxalic acid from wood-sorrel ( ... Oxalis). Members of the spinach family and the brassicas (cabbage, broccoli, brussels sprouts) are high in oxalates, as are ... The toxicity of oxalic acid is due to kidney failure caused by precipitation of solid calcium oxalate, the main component of ... Rhubarb leaves contain about 0.5% oxalic acid, and jack-in-the-pulpit (Arisaema triphyllum) contains calcium oxalate crystals. ...
Fresh greens such as endive or commercial dandelion are very important in providing calcium and other nutrients. As with all ... Eclectus in captivity require vegetables high in beta-carotene, such as lightly cooked sweet potato, fresh broccoli clumps, and ... Debra McDonald, avian nutrition researcher, has discussed the effect of manmade vitamin A on the uptake of calcium.] Fortified ... which inhibits the uptake of calcium, which often occurs subsequent to feeding commercially produced food treats or a high ...
Legume hays are higher in protein, calories, and calcium, which in excess can cause kidney stones and loose stool. This type of ... It is recommended that cauliflower, broccoli and cabbage be avoided, as they cause gas and can lead to gastrointestinal stasis ... but should be fed sparingly due to the high calcium content. New vegetables should be introduced slowly due to the delicate ...
... the human body can absorb about half of the calcium present in broccoli, yet only around 5% of the calcium in spinach. A ... The calcium in spinach is among the least bioavailable of food calcium sources. By way of comparison, ... Heaney, Robert Proulx (2006). Calcium in human health. p. 135. ISBN 978-1-59259-961-5. Retrieved 2009-04-15. Whitney E, Rady ... Spinach also has a moderate calcium content which can be affected by oxalates, decreasing its absorption. ...
... and vegetables like broccoli and related plants contain iron and calcium. Vegetables are very low in fats and calories, but ... Milk and its derivative products are a rich source of dietary calcium and also provide protein, phosphorus, vitamin A, and ... The Harvard School of Public Health proposes a healthy eating pyramid, which includes calcium and multi-vitamin supplements as ... Feskanich, D; Willett, W. C.; Colditz, G. A. (2003). "Calcium, vitamin D, milk consumption, and hip fractures: A prospective ...
They had a greater intake of calcium, from drinking more milk, and of iron, as they ate more red meat than poultry and iron ... containing dark green vegetables such as broccoli and kale. In the early 1950s, no children would have eaten pasta, but 50% of ...
Pairs may only destroy and eat their eggs in cases of calcium deficiency. Females are responsible for the entire incubation ... broccoli, carrots, alfalfa, peas, endive, and sweet potatoes), dandelions, chickweed, soaked corn, germinated sunflower seeds ... They require more protein intake during breeding season, more carbohydrates when rearing young, and more calcium during egg ...
However, vitamin C does not leach in all vegetables at the same rate; research shows broccoli seems to retain more than any ... However, taking vitamin C in the form of sodium ascorbate and calcium ascorbate may minimize this effect. Other symptoms ... Ascorbate salts such as sodium ascorbate and calcium ascorbate are used in some dietary supplements. These release ascorbate ... The most commonly used supplement compounds are ascorbic acid, sodium ascorbate and calcium ascorbate. Vitamin C molecules can ...
... (commonly marketed in the United States as broccoli raab or broccoli rabe /rɑːb/) is a green cruciferous vegetable. The ... Rapini is a source of vitamins A, C, and K, as well as potassium, calcium, and iron. The cultivated vegetable probably descends ... It is also known as i broccoli friarelli and sometimes broccoli di rape, rapi, or rapini. In Portugal and Spain they are called ... In Italy, broccoli rabe is known by different names: in Naples it is known as friarielli; in Rome broccoletti; in Puglia, cime ...
E302 calcium ascorbate (approved for use as a food additive in the EU,[88] U.S.[89] and Australia and New Zealand)[90] ... However, vitamin C does not leach in all vegetables at the same rate; research shows broccoli seems to retain more than any ... However, taking vitamin C in the form of sodium ascorbate and calcium ascorbate may minimize this effect.[29] Other symptoms ... The most commonly used supplement compounds are ascorbic acid, sodium ascorbate and calcium ascorbate.[2] Vitamin C molecules ...
... issued suggested protocols recommending commercially grown sprout seeds be soaked and sterilized with 20,000 PPM calcium ... to four-day-old broccoli sprouts, at least 20 times the concentration of full grown broccoli. Broccoli sprouts are rich in ... Broccoli sprouts are three- to four-day-old broccoli plants that look like alfalfa sprouts, but taste like radishes. While ... Broccoli seeds are available for home growing. One can sprout broccoli seeds using a jar or a commercial sprouting kit. ...
In the United Kingdom and Ireland it is referred to as "tenderstem broccoli". In Brazil, the common form of the word broccoli ... Broccolini is high in vitamin C (containing 100% of daily intake) and also contains vitamin A, calcium, vitamin E, folate, iron ... "Broccoli, Broccolini & Broccoli Rabe". RV Goddess. Retrieved 22 September 2016. "Sakata Home Grown Presents: Broccolini® Ideas ... "brócolis") refers to broccolini: the more traditional broccoli is called "brócolis americano" (American broccoli). "朝日新聞グローブ ( ...
All of these feature high oxalic acid content which induces production of calcium oxalates (crystals/stones) by binding calcium ... Greens and weeds: mainly; bok-choi, broccoli or cauliflower leaves, cabbage leaves, collard greens, dandelion leaves, kelp, ... Vegetables (except uncooked potatoes, uncooked onions and all mushrooms): beet, broccoli, cauliflower, carrots, cucumber, all ... and other trace minerals present in foods and goods with which they're ingested - possibly leading to calcium deficiencies and/ ...
Bones are mainly composed of calcium phosphate. The phosphate reacts with the acid, and the calcium is excreted by the kidneys. ... For example, cooked broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, and green beans are all equivalent. Fresh, canned, or frozen foods ... and calcium-rich foods. In particular, the B vitamins, calcium, and vitamin D must be artificially supplemented. This is ... The urine has a low pH, which stops uric acid from dissolving, leading to crystals that act as a nidus for calcium stone ...
Data on broccoli and spinach from USDA database.[8] Data on Wheatgrass juice from indoor grown wheatgrass.[4] ... Calcium 7.2 mg 13 mg 28 mg Iron 0.66 mg 0.21 mg 0.77 mg ...
All of these feature high oxalic acid contents that induces production of calcium oxalates (crystals/stones) by binding calcium ... i.e. beet, broccoli, cauliflower, carrots, cucumber, all cabbage varieties, fresh beans, fresh peas, parsnip, all pepper ... Possibly leading to calcium deficiencies &/or hypocalcemia in minor cases. Liver and/or other internal organs' damage or ... Cuttlebones help provide beak-trimming and a source of calcium and other necessary minerals. Natural perches and special rough ...
Calcium supports child growth in many varying ways. Common sources of calcium are found in dates, grapefruit,oranges, celery, ... broccoli, spinach, carrot) 1/2 cup cooked, canned or dried beans, peas or lentils 1 cup of leafy or raw green salad vegetables ... A diet rich with Calcium, Vitamin C, B Vitamins, Iodine and Zinc ensures a growing child receives the most benefits from the ... Foundation for strong healthy bones and teeth - majority of the calcium consumed as a child is deposited onto collagen bone ...
Jamieson, Sophie (30 October 2015). "Kale, broccoli and cabbage replace traditional flowers as brides opt for vegetable wedding ... calcium, potassium, and phosphorus (see table "Kale, raw"). Boiling raw kale diminishes most of these nutrients except for ... As with broccoli and other cruciferous vegetables, kale contains glucosinolate compounds such as glucoraphanin, which ...
Legume hays are higher in protein, calories, and calcium, which in excess can cause kidney stones and loose stool. This type of ... It is recommended that cauliflower, broccoli, lettuce and cabbage be avoided, as they cause gas and can lead to ...
"Calcium fractional absorption and metabolism assessed using stable isotopes differ between postpartum and never pregnant women ... "The bioavailability to humans of ascorbic acid from oranges, orange juice and cooked broccoli is similar to that of synthetic ...
Kim, Sang-Hoon (2004). "Fractal dimensions of a green broccoli and a white cauliflower". arXiv:cond-mat/0411597 .. ... Brassica oleracea also includes broccoli, brussels sprouts, cabbage, collard greens, and kale, collectively called "cole" crops ... It is available in the normal curd (head) shape and with a fractal spiral curd called Romanesco broccoli. Both have been ... In Great Britain and southern Italy, a broccoli with tiny flower buds is sold as a vegetable under the name "purple cauliflower ...
How much broccoli or turnip greens would I have to eat to meet the equivalent calcium intake of two servings of dairy products ... You would have to eat 2.5 cups of broccoli or 1 cup of turnip greens. ...
... is a cross between broccoli and Chinese broccoli. Varieties[edit]. There are three commonly grown types of broccoli. The most ... Sprouting broccoli has a larger number of heads with many thin stalks. Purple cauliflower is a type of broccoli grown in Europe ... Broccoli is classified in the Italica cultivar group of the species Brassica oleracea. Broccoli has large flower heads, usually ... The majority of broccoli cultivars are cool-weather crops that do poorly in hot summer weather. Broccoli grows best when ...
"Tenderstem broccoli" is a cross between broccoli and Chinese broccoli. Beneforté is a variety of broccoli containing 2-3 times ... Sprouting broccoli has a larger number of heads with many thin stalks. Purple cauliflower is a type of broccoli grown in Europe ... Broccoli is classified in the Italica cultivar group of the species Brassica oleracea. Broccoli has large flower heads, usually ... Broccoli has low content of carbohydrates, protein, fat, and dietary fiber. Boiling broccoli reduces the levels of sulforaphane ...
It is rich in vitamins and minerals such as vitamin A as beta carotene, vitamin C, phosphorus, magnesium, calcium, folic acid ... Medicinal uses of broccoli Health benefits of broccoli BROCCOLI is a vegetable of the Cruciferae family, related to cauliflower ... Broccoli is rich in calcium. Broccoli contains plenty of calcium, whose role in bone formation is so important to prevent the ... Medicinal uses of broccoli. Health benefits of broccoli. BROCCOLI is a vegetable of the Cruciferae family, related to ...
Check out the food score for Amys Broccoli & Cheese in a Pocket Sandwich from EWGs Food Scores! EWGs Food Scores rates more ... Calcium Phosphate (Mono, Di and Tri Basic). This additive is of moderate concern in food. Learn why. ... Label for Amys Broccoli & Cheese in a Pocket Sandwich captured by LabelINSIGHT on May 18, 2017 Tell us if the product name is ... Amys Broccoli & Cheese in a Pocket Sandwich. EWG assumes no responsibility for the accuracy of images presented. ...
Colorful bits of broccoli and red bell peppers, sauteed in olive oil and garlic, are tossed with fresh linguine and dusted with ... Back to Linguini with Broccoli and Red Peppers All Reviews for Linguini with Broccoli and Red Peppers ... Drain broccoli and add to skillet. Sprinkle lightly with garlic salt and saute broccoli and peppers until soft. ... It wasn't that it tasted bad but basically this meal was just butter oil noodles and broccoli. I think it put my tatse ...
Broccoli florets and bacon add great flavor, color, and texture to baked macaroni and cheese--and its on the table in less ... Back to Skillet Bacon and Broccoli Macaroni and Cheese All Reviews for Skillet Bacon and Broccoli Macaroni and Cheese ... Broccoli florets and bacon add great flavor, color, and texture to baked macaroni and cheese--and its on the table in less ... Reviews for: Photos of Skillet Bacon and Broccoli Macaroni and Cheese. Reviews: Most Helpful ...
42mg calcium. Serves: 6. Serving size: 3/4 cup. Note: Nutritional analysis may vary depending on ingredient brands used. ... In a large bowl, mix broccoli, raisins, red onions, walnuts, and bacon. ...
Give sautéed broccoli a boost of flavor with sesame and soy sauce in this quick, easy side dish. ... Calcium 4% Iron 4% * The % Daily Value (DV) tells you how much a nutrient in a serving of food contributes to a daily diet. ... Add the sauce mixture to the broccoli in the skillet. Stir and cook until broccoli is tender and the sauce has thickened, about ... In a medium skillet, sauté broccoli in oil over medium heat for 2 to 3 minutes. ...
Broccoli, frozen, chopped, cooked, boiled, drained, without salt - nutrtion information: calories, carbohydrates, protein, fat ... Calcium, Ca. 33.0 mg. 60.7 mg. Iron, Fe. 0.6 mg. 1.1 mg. ... Broccoli, frozen, chopped, cooked, boiled, drained, without ... Previous: Broccoli, frozen, chopped, unprepared nutrition information. Next: Broccoli, frozen, spears, unprepared nutrition ...
This easy Sesame Noodles with Broccoli and Chicken recipe is quicker than takeout and healthier too! Give it a try! ... Calcium 28mg 2% Iron 3mg 15% Potassium 311mg 6% * The % Daily Value (DV) tells you how much a nutrient in a serving of food ... No broccoli? Use peas, green beans, or mixed veggies.. *Flavor boosters: red chili flakes, sliced green onions, and/or a ... Heat oil in large skillet over medium heat (300 °F in an electric skillet). Add garlic and broccoli, and cook on medium until ...
... - BellaOnline Nutrition Database - BellaOnline is committed to helping our visitors become healthy and ... Calcium: 71 out of 1000 mg. Iron: 0 out of 18 mg. Potassium: 477 out of 3,500 mg. Fiber: 3 out of 25 g. Important Note: Many ... Broccoli, raw. Food Group: Vegetables and Vegetable Products. Long Description: Broccoli, raw. Short Description: BROCCOLI,RAW ... Broccoli, raw Nutrition. This page is all about the nutrition of Broccoli, raw. Learn about the carbs, calories, fat, sodium, ...
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... - BellaOnline Nutrition Database - BellaOnline is committed to helping our visitors become ... Calcium: 118 out of 1000 mg. Iron: 1 out of 18 mg. Potassium: 343 out of 3,500 mg. Fiber: 2 out of 25 g. Important Note: Many ... Long Description: Broccoli raab, cooked. Short Description: BROCCOLI RAAB,CKD. Common Name: Broccoli rabe, Rapini. Manufacturer ... Broccoli raab, cooked Nutrition. This page is all about the nutrition of Broccoli raab, cooked. Learn about the carbs, calories ...
... is also a good source of vitamin B1, magnesium, omega-3 fatty acids, protein, zinc, calcium, iron, niacin and selenium ... Also widely enjoyed worldwide is "non-heading" broccoli, often called sprouting broccoli, broccoli raab, broccoli rabe, or ... broccoli raab, broccoli rabe, and sprouting broccoli. All varieties of broccoli belong to the Brassica genus of plants. Heading ... Another form of broccoli you may also want to try in you enjoy raw broccoli is broccoli sprouts. Some of the nutrients found in ...
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Calcium {{nutrifact.calciumAmount}}mg {{nutrifact.calciumPercent}}% Iron {{nutrifact.ironAmount}}mg {{nutrifact.ironPercent}}% ... Broccoli tossed in a zesty dressing with bacon, onion, currants and sunflower seeds. ...
... or who do not consume dairy products for other reasons wonder how to add more calcium to their diets. In this article, we ... Calcium provides many health benefits. Some people who are vegan, lactose intolerant, ... Broccoli. One cup of frozen broccoli has 87 mg of calcium.. A diet rich in broccoli and other members of the cruciferous family ... 8. Broccoli rabe. Broccolis bitter cousin, broccoli rabe, contains 100 mg of calcium per cup. ...
... flavorful vegetables and crunchy topping make this corn and broccoli casserole a delicious way to cozy up to the table. ... Calcium. 30 %DV Iron. 6 %DV * Nutrition information is estimated based on the ingredients and cooking instructions as described ... I would, however, use fresh broccoli the next time and cook it before using it in this casserole. The frozen broccoli was just ... My first attempt with this recipe I used frozen Broccoli and Cauliflower instead of just Broccoli. Both vegetable choices are ...
Its no wonder this marvelously melty broccoli cheese bake has almost 200 reviews and a 4.5 heart rating. Who can resist that ... Calcium. 8 %DV Iron. 8 %DV * Nutrition information is estimated based on the ingredients and cooking instructions as described ... I also only had a single bag of the frozen broccoli so I used some fresh that I had in the fridge. This was very tasty and even ... Rated 3 out of 5 by JamieGoss from I used fresh broccoli, cooked cubed chicken breasts, all of the cream cheese, added cooked ...
Cut florets from broccoli; reserve for another use. Peel tough outer later of broccoli with a vegetable peeler; discard peels. ... Broccoli, Celery and Radish Salad content. Hy-Vee Recipes and Ideas. Header and Navigation. menu. *Hy-Vee ... Cut ribbons of broccoli from tender interior of stalks; transfer to a large bowl. ... Turn radish and celery leaves and broccoli peels into a tasty salad. Let nothing go to waste! ...
Find nutrition facts for T Bones Chicken Broccoli And Cheese and over 2,000,000 other foods in MyFitnessPal.coms food database ... Calories in T Bones Chicken Broccoli And Cheese. ... Calcium. 0%. Vitamin C. 0%. Iron. 0%. *Percent Daily Values are ... Calories in T-Bones Chicken Broccoli and Cheese. Nutrition Facts. T-Bones - Chicken Broccoli and Cheese. ...
Progresso Traditional Potato Broccoli & Cheese Chowder Soup found at Hannaford Supermarket. Add to online shopping list or ... Calcium. 0.00mg. 4%. Iron. 0.00mg. 2%. Potassium. 0.00mg. 0%. Vitamin A. 0.00mcg. 4%. ... Ingredients: CHICKEN BROTH, DRIED POTATOES, BROCCOLI, SOYBEAN OIL, MODIFIED FOOD STARCH, CREAM CHEESE (MILK, CREAM, SALT, CAROB ...
Calcium. 25%. 25%. Iron. 20%. 20%. Exchanges:. 2 1/2 Starch; 0 Fruit; 0 Other Carbohydrate; 0 Skim Milk; 0 Low-Fat Milk; 0 Milk ... While precut bagged broccoli florets make an easy shortcut, you can also cut your own. One large head of broccoli will provide ... 5-Ingredient Instant Pot™ Cheesy Chicken, Broccoli and Rice. 5-ingredient instant pot™ cheesy chicken, broccoli and rice Entree ... Stir in chicken and broccoli. Secure lid; set pressure valve to SEALING. Select MANUAL; cook on high pressure 10 minutes. ...
Caribbean Jerk Pork Tenderloin with Baked Potato and Steamed Broccoli. Recipe. Main Dish. Caribbean Jerk Pork Tenderloin with ... Caribbean Jerk Pork Tenderloin with Baked Potato and Steamed Broccoli content. Hy-Vee Recipes and Ideas. Header and Navigation ... Just before serving, place broccoli in a microwave-safe bowl with 2 tablespoons water. Microwave, covered, on HIGH for 5 to 8 ...
  • Rapini , sometimes called "broccoli raab" among other names, forms similar but smaller heads, and is actually a type of turnip ( Brassica rapa ). (wikipedia.org)
  • Many nutrients in broccoli are clearly sensitive to total steaming time, and as a general rule, all studies suggest that total steaming time be kept relatively short. (whfoods.com)
  • Overcooked broccoli becomes soft and mushy, and along with this loss in texture comes a loss in flavor and nutrients. (whfoods.com)
  • This chart graphically details the %DV that a serving of Broccoli provides for each of the nutrients of which it is a good, very good, or excellent source according to our Food Rating System. (whfoods.com)
  • Additional information about the amount of these nutrients provided by Broccoli can be found in the Food Rating System Chart . (whfoods.com)
  • A link that takes you to the In-Depth Nutritional Profile for Broccoli, featuring information over 80 nutrients, can be found under the Food Rating System Chart. (whfoods.com)
  • Broccoli is fairly bursting with nutrients and is a very versatile food. (healthline.com)
  • Broccoli is loaded with nutrients, but you can do more with it than boil. (healthline.com)
  • When you eat broccoli, you're getting dozens, maybe even hundreds, of super-nutrients that support optimal, body-wide health. (mercola.com)
  • When the broccoli bouquets are cooked al dente take them off the boliling water, drain and immediately immerse them in very cold water, best if with ice cubes. (iofbonehealth.org)