A malpresentation of the FETUS at near term or during OBSTETRIC LABOR with the fetal cephalic pole in the fundus of the UTERUS. There are three types of breech: the complete breech with flexed hips and knees; the incomplete breech with one or both hips partially or fully extended; the frank breech with flexed hips and extended knees.
The artificial alteration of the fetal position to facilitate birth.
Extraction of the FETUS by means of abdominal HYSTEROTOMY.
The position or orientation of the FETUS at near term or during OBSTETRIC LABOR, determined by its relation to the SPINE of the mother and the birth canal. The normal position is a vertical, cephalic presentation with the fetal vertex flexed on the NECK.
Delivery of the FETUS and PLACENTA under the care of an obstetrician or a health worker. Obstetric deliveries may involve physical, psychological, medical, or surgical interventions.
A nonreassuring fetal status (NRFS) indicating that the FETUS is compromised (American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists 1988). It can be identified by sub-optimal values in FETAL HEART RATE; oxygenation of FETAL BLOOD; and other parameters.
An infant born at or after 42 weeks of gestation.
Measurement of the dimensions and capacity of the pelvis. It includes cephalopelvimetry (measurement of fetal head size in relation to maternal pelvic capacity), a prognostic guide to the management of LABOR, OBSTETRIC associated with disproportion.
The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.
Slow or difficult OBSTETRIC LABOR or CHILDBIRTH.
Extraction of the fetus by abdominal hysterotomy anytime following a previous cesarean.
The number of offspring a female has borne. It is contrasted with GRAVIDITY, which refers to the number of pregnancies, regardless of outcome.
Results of conception and ensuing pregnancy, including LIVE BIRTH; STILLBIRTH; SPONTANEOUS ABORTION; INDUCED ABORTION. The outcome may follow natural or artificial insemination or any of the various ASSISTED REPRODUCTIVE TECHNIQUES, such as EMBRYO TRANSFER or FERTILIZATION IN VITRO.
An infant during the first month after birth.
The mass or quantity of heaviness of an individual at BIRTH. It is expressed by units of pounds or kilograms.
The age of the conceptus, beginning from the time of FERTILIZATION. In clinical obstetrics, the gestational age is often estimated as the time from the last day of the last MENSTRUATION which is about 2 weeks before OVULATION and fertilization.
The visualization of tissues during pregnancy through recording of the echoes of ultrasonic waves directed into the body. The procedure may be applied with reference to the mother or the fetus and with reference to organs or the detection of maternal or fetal disease.

Should a preterm breech go for vaginal delivery or caesarean section. (1/92)

This study correlates the mode of breech delivery to the immediate neonatal outcome in preterm breeches. We had 9816 deliveries in the period between 1st January 1994 to 31st August 1996. The incidence of breech deliveries was 3.95% and the incidence of preterm breech deliveries was 1.9%. Totally 112 (69%) patients delivered vaginally and 50 (31%) underwent caesarean section. Between 30-36.6 weeks gestation the incidence of birth asphyxia was higher in the vaginal group. In this group the take home baby rate after vaginal delivery was 81% as compared to 86% in caesarean group. Head entrapment, cord prolapse, respiratory distress syndrome and intraventricular haemorrhage were the various complications seen with vaginal breech delivery.  (+info)

Birth trauma to muscles in babies born by breech delivery and its possible fatal consequences. (2/92)

Dissection and histological examination was made of the muscles of 86 babies who died after breech delivery, and of 38 babies who died after vertex presentation. A control group of 50 surviving breech-delivered babies was examined clinically and the results compared. It was concluded that the most common type of birth trauma to a baby born by breech delivery is injury to muscles and soft tissues of the back and lower extremities, which is often extensive. In some severly injured babies histological examination of organs revels signs of crush syndrome and disseminated intravascular coagulation. It is suggested that the extensive muscle trauma forms the background of these fatal conditions.  (+info)

A decision analytical cost analysis of offering ECV in a UK district general hospital. (3/92)

OBJECTIVE: To determine the care pathways and implications of offering mothers the choice of external cephalic version (ECV) at term for singleton babies who present with an uncomplicated breech pregnancy versus assisted breech delivery or elective caesarean. DESIGN: A prospective observational audit to construct a decision analysis of uncomplicated full term breech presentations. SETTING: The North Staffordshire NHS Trust. SUBJECTS: All women (n = 176) who presented at full term with a breech baby without complications during July 1995 and June 1997. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The study determined to compare the outcome in terms of the costs and cost consequences for the care pathways that resulted from whether a women chose to accept the offer of ECV or not. All the associated events were then mapped for the two possible pathways. The costs were considered only within the hospital setting, from the perspective of the health care provider up to the point of delivery. RESULTS: The additional costs for ECV, assisted breech delivery and elective caesarean over and above a normal birth were 186.70 pounds sterling, 425.36 pounds sterling and 1,955.22 pounds sterling respectively. The total expected cost of the respective care pathways for "ECV accepted" and "ECV not accepted" (including the probability of adverse events) were 1,452 pounds sterling and 1,828 pounds sterling respectively, that is the cost of delivery through the ECV care pathways is less costly than the non ECV delivery care pathway. CONCLUSIONS: Implementing an ECV service may yield cost savings in secondary care over and above the traditional delivery methods for breech birth of assisted delivery or caesarean section. The scale of these expected cost savings are in the range of 248 pounds sterling to 376 pounds sterling per patient. This converts to a total expected cost saving of between 43,616 pounds sterling and 44,544 pounds sterling for the patient cohort considered in this study.  (+info)

Role of pelvimetry in active management of labour. (4/92)

All cases referred for pelvimetry in 1970-1 and all breech presentations referred for pelvimetry in 1972-4 were reviewed. Indications for pelvimetry fell into four main categories: high head in the antenatal clinic (47-8%); high head in labour (13-9%); breech presentation (20-9%); and previous caesarean section (14-8%). In the first two categories pelvimetry rarely if ever influenced management, and it should not be performed routinely. In breech presentation and cases of caesarean section pelvimetry seemed to be of value, but in the latter group it should be performed puerperally to avoid the known radiation hazard to the fetus. A fairly close correlation between obstetric conjugate and pelvic capacity was shown, which suggested that a 3400-g baby might pass through a pelvis of obstetric conjugate of 10 cm as a cephalic trial of labour, but would need an obstetric conjugate of 11-7 cm for safe vaginal breech delivery.  (+info)

Moxibustion in breech version--a descriptive review. (5/92)

The management of breech presentation at term remains controversial. It appears logical that maternal and perinatal outcomes would be improved if breech presentation could be avoided. External cephalic version is considered a safe procedure if cases are selected appropriately and anaesthesia avoided. Moxibustion is a traditional Chinese method of treatment, which utilizes the heat generated by burning herbal preparations containing the plant Artemisia vulgaris to stimulate the acupuncture points. It is used for breech version with a reported success rate of 84.6% after 34 weeks gestation. Moxibustion technique is cheap, safe, simple, self-administered, non-invasive, painless and generally well tolerated. Although many studies give encouraging results regarding the use of moxibustion in inducing cephalic version of breech presentation, a definitive conclusion cannot be made as most involve small sample sizes and are not randomised. Moxibustion could be an extra option offered to women with breech presentation along with vaginal delivery, caesarean section and external cephalic version. This article discusses the possible role of moxibustion in correction of breech presentation in the hope that, some interest will be stimulated in what is a very interesting area for future research.  (+info)

Obstetric outcome among women with unexplained infertility after IVF: a matched case-control study. (6/92)

BACKGROUND: Infertility itself and also assisted reproductive treatment increase the incidence of some obstetric complications. Women with unexplained infertility are reported to be at an increased risk of intrauterine growth restriction during pregnancy, but not for other perinatal complications. METHODS: A matched case-control study was performed on care during pregnancy and delivery, obstetric complications and infant perinatal outcomes of 107 women with unexplained infertility, with 118 clinical pregnancies after IVF or ICSI treatment. These resulted in 90 deliveries; of these, 69 were singleton, 20 twin and one triplet. Two control groups were chosen from the Finnish Medical Birth Register, one group for spontaneous pregnancies (including 445 women and 545 children), matched according to maternal age, parity, year of birth, mother's residence and number of children at birth, and the other group for all pregnancies after IVF, ICSI or frozen embryo transfer treatment (FET) during the study period (including 2377 women and 2853 children). RESULTS: Among singletons, no difference was found in the mean birthweight, and the incidence of low birthweight (<2500 g) was comparable with that of the control groups. No differences were found in gestational duration, major congenital malformations or perinatal mortality among the groups studied. Among singletons in the study group, there were more term breech presentations (10.1%) compared with both spontaneously conceiving women and all IVF women (P < 0.01). The rate of pregnancy-induced hypertension was significantly lower among singletons in the study group (P < 0.05) compared with other IVF singletons. The multiple pregnancy rate was 23.3% in the study group. The obstetric outcome of the IVF twins was similar to both control groups. CONCLUSIONS: The overall obstetric outcome among couples with unexplained infertility treated with IVF was good, with similar outcome compared with spontaneous pregnancies and IVF pregnancies generally.  (+info)

Erich Bracht (1882-1969) of Berlin and his "breech" manoeuvre. (7/92)

Erich Bracht, a German gynaecologist, described in 1935 the manoeuvre named after him for delivering the frank breech with minimal interference. In spite of the reported success of his method, it received little attention in the United Kingdom or North America.  (+info)

Introducing routine external cephalic version for the management of the malpresenting fetus near term. (8/92)

BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of external cephalic version (ECV) when its use was introduced in the routine management of breech presentation and transverse lie after 36 weeks by obstetricians with limited prior experience with the procedure. The influence of various factors on the outcome of ECV was also studied. METHODS: Retrospective study of 44 consecutive cases of ECV which were analysed with respect to outcome, parity, type of breech, placental site and birth weight. RESULTS: ECV was successful in 45% of women, 80% of women with successful ECV delivered vaginally while 10% underwent spontaneous reversion to a non-cephalic presentation. In contrast, only 15% of women with failed ECV delivered vaginally. Parity, type of breech presentation and placental location did not significantly affect the outcome of ECV although there was a trend towards better success rate of ECV with multiparity, flexed breech presentation, transverse lie and posteriorly-located placentae. The mean birth weight of fetuses of women with successful ECV was significantly heavier than those of women who failed ECV (p < 0.001). No significant fetal or maternal morbidity occurred as a result of ECV in this study. CONCLUSION: ECV is a safe and effective procedure that is useful in the management of breech presentation and transverse lie near term. The lack of prior experience with the procedure does not appear to influence the success rate or morbidity.  (+info)

Breech presentation is a term used in obstetrics to describe a situation where the fetus's buttocks or feet are positioned to come out first during childbirth, instead of the head. There are several types of breech presentations, including:

1. Frank breech: The fetus's hips are flexed and its knees are extended, so that the buttocks are the leading part of the body.
2. Complete breech: The fetus's hips and knees are flexed, and both thighs and legs are close to its chest, so that the buttocks are the leading part of the body.
3. Footling breech: One or both feet are presenting first, with the heels down.

Breech presentation occurs in about 3-4% of all pregnancies at term. While some breech babies can be safely delivered vaginally, most obstetricians recommend a cesarean delivery for breech presentation due to the increased risk of complications such as cord prolapse, head entrapment, and fetal distress. However, there are some techniques that may be used to attempt a vaginal breech delivery in certain situations, such as external cephalic version (ECV), which is a procedure where a healthcare provider manually turns the fetus from a breech position to a head-down position while it is still in the uterus.

Fetal version is a medical term used to describe the position or presentation of the fetus in the uterus during pregnancy. It refers to the way the fetus is facing or lying in relation to the mother's pelvis.

There are several different types of fetal versions, including:

* Cephalic version: This is the most common and preferred position for birth. The fetus's head is downward, facing the mother's cervix.
* Breech version: In this position, the fetus's buttocks or feet are pointed downward toward the mother's cervix. There are several different types of breech versions, including frank breech (where the baby's legs are straight up in front of its body), complete breech (where the baby's legs are folded at the knees), and footling breech (where one or both of the baby's feet are coming out below the buttocks).
* Transverse version: This is a less common position where the fetus is lying sideways across the mother's uterus.

Fetal version can be assessed through physical examination, ultrasound, or both. In some cases, healthcare providers may attempt to manually turn the fetus into a different position using a procedure called external cephalic version (ECV). This is typically done in the third trimester of pregnancy and is used to reduce the risk of breech delivery and improve outcomes for both the mother and baby.

A Cesarean section, often referred to as a C-section, is a surgical procedure used to deliver a baby. It involves making an incision through the mother's abdomen and uterus to remove the baby. This procedure may be necessary when a vaginal delivery would put the mother or the baby at risk.

There are several reasons why a C-section might be recommended, including:

* The baby is in a breech position (feet first) or a transverse position (sideways) and cannot be turned to a normal head-down position.
* The baby is too large to safely pass through the mother's birth canal.
* The mother has a medical condition, such as heart disease or high blood pressure, that could make vaginal delivery risky.
* The mother has an infection, such as HIV or herpes, that could be passed to the baby during a vaginal delivery.
* The labor is not progressing and there are concerns about the health of the mother or the baby.

C-sections are generally safe for both the mother and the baby, but like any surgery, they do carry some risks. These can include infection, bleeding, blood clots, and injury to nearby organs. In addition, women who have a C-section are more likely to experience complications in future pregnancies, such as placenta previa or uterine rupture.

If you have questions about whether a C-section is necessary for your delivery, it's important to discuss your options with your healthcare provider.

'Labor presentation' is a term used in obstetrics to describe the part of the fetus that enters the mother's pelvis first during labor. This positioning determines the route the baby will take through the birth canal. The most common and uncomplicated presentation is vertex or cephalic presentation, where the baby's head is the presenting part. Other possible presentations include breech (buttocks or feet first), face, brow, and shoulder presentations, which can potentially lead to complications during delivery if not managed appropriately.

"Delivery, Obstetric" is a medical term that refers to the process of giving birth to a baby. It involves the passage of the fetus through the mother's vagina or via Caesarean section (C-section), which is a surgical procedure.

The obstetric delivery process typically includes three stages:

1. The first stage begins with the onset of labor and ends when the cervix is fully dilated.
2. The second stage starts with full dilation of the cervix and ends with the birth of the baby.
3. The third stage involves the delivery of the placenta, which is the organ that provides oxygen and nutrients to the developing fetus during pregnancy.

Obstetric delivery requires careful monitoring and management by healthcare professionals to ensure the safety and well-being of both the mother and the baby. Various interventions and techniques may be used during the delivery process to facilitate a safe and successful outcome, including the use of medications, assisted delivery with forceps or vacuum extraction, and C-section.

Fetal distress is a term used to describe situations where a fetus is experiencing problems during labor or delivery that are causing significant physiological changes. These changes may include an abnormal heart rate, decreased oxygen levels, or the presence of meconium (the baby's first stool) in the amniotic fluid. Fetal distress can be caused by a variety of factors, such as problems with the umbilical cord, placental abruption, maternal high blood pressure, or prolonged labor. It is important to monitor fetal well-being during labor and delivery to detect and address any signs of fetal distress promptly. Treatment may include changing the mother's position, administering oxygen, giving intravenous fluids, or performing an emergency cesarean section.

A postmature infant is a newborn who is delivered at or after 42 weeks (294 days) of gestation. These infants are also known as "post-term" or "post-dates." At this stage, the placenta may not function optimally, leading to potential issues such as decreased fetal movement, meconium staining of amniotic fluid, and low birth weight. Postmature infants may require close monitoring and evaluation after delivery to ensure their well-being.

Pelvimetry is a medical measurement and evaluation of the size and shape of the pelvis, which can be performed in several ways:

1. Clinical pelvimetry: This involves physical examination to assess the dimensions of the pelvis by palpation and measurement of the distance between bony landmarks.
2. Radiological pelvimetry: This uses X-ray or CT imaging to obtain more accurate measurements of the pelvic diameters, including the anteroposterior, transverse, and oblique dimensions.
3. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) pelvimetry: This method is considered the most accurate for assessing the size and shape of the pelvis, as it provides detailed images without radiation exposure.

Pelvimetry is often used in obstetrics to evaluate whether a woman's pelvis can accommodate a fetus during childbirth (known as "obstetric pelvimetry"). It helps healthcare providers determine if a vaginal delivery is possible or if a cesarean section may be necessary. However, the use of pelvimetry in modern obstetrics has become less common due to its limited predictive value and the increasing focus on individualized birth management.

Pregnancy is a physiological state or condition where a fertilized egg (zygote) successfully implants and grows in the uterus of a woman, leading to the development of an embryo and finally a fetus. This process typically spans approximately 40 weeks, divided into three trimesters, and culminates in childbirth. Throughout this period, numerous hormonal and physical changes occur to support the growing offspring, including uterine enlargement, breast development, and various maternal adaptations to ensure the fetus's optimal growth and well-being.

Dystocia is a medical term used to describe difficult or abnormal labor or delivery in animals, including humans. It refers to a situation where the natural process of childbirth is hindered or obstructed, making it difficult for the fetus to pass through the birth canal. This condition can be caused by various factors such as the size and position of the fetus, maternal pelvic size or shape, hormonal imbalances, or other medical conditions that affect the mother's ability to give birth.

Dystocia can lead to serious complications for both the mother and the fetus if not treated promptly and appropriately. Prolonged labor can result in fetal distress, hypoxia (lack of oxygen), or even death. In addition, maternal injuries such as uterine rupture, cervical trauma, or infection can occur during a difficult delivery.

The treatment for dystocia depends on the underlying cause and severity of the condition. In some cases, manual assistance or manipulation of the fetus may be sufficient to facilitate delivery. However, in more severe cases, medical intervention such as cesarean section (C-section) may be necessary to ensure the safety of both the mother and the fetus.

It is important for pregnant individuals to receive regular prenatal care from a qualified healthcare provider to monitor their pregnancy and identify any potential risk factors for dystocia or other complications. Prompt medical attention should be sought if any signs of difficult labor or delivery are observed.

A "repeat cesarean section" is a medical term that refers to the delivery of a fetus through surgical incision in the abdominal and uterine walls, which has been performed previously. It is also known as a "classical repeat cesarean delivery." This procedure may be recommended when vaginal birth poses potential risks to the mother or the baby, such as in cases of placenta previa, previous classical uterine incision, or multiple pregnancies. The decision for a repeat cesarean section is typically made after considering various factors, including the patient's medical history, current pregnancy status, and personal preferences.

In medical terms, parity refers to the number of times a woman has given birth to a viable fetus, usually defined as a pregnancy that reaches at least 20 weeks' gestation. It is often used in obstetrics and gynecology to describe a woman's childbearing history and to assess potential risks associated with childbirth.

Parity is typically categorized as follows:

* Nulliparous: A woman who has never given birth to a viable fetus.
* Primiparous: A woman who has given birth to one viable fetus.
* Multiparous: A woman who has given birth to more than one viable fetus.

In some cases, parity may also consider the number of pregnancies that resulted in stillbirths or miscarriages, although this is not always the case. It's important to note that parity does not necessarily reflect the total number of pregnancies a woman has had, only those that resulted in viable births.

Pregnancy outcome refers to the final result or status of a pregnancy, including both the health of the mother and the newborn baby. It can be categorized into various types such as:

1. Live birth: The delivery of one or more babies who show signs of life after separation from their mother.
2. Stillbirth: The delivery of a baby who has died in the womb after 20 weeks of pregnancy.
3. Miscarriage: The spontaneous loss of a pregnancy before the 20th week.
4. Abortion: The intentional termination of a pregnancy before the fetus can survive outside the uterus.
5. Ectopic pregnancy: A pregnancy that develops outside the uterus, usually in the fallopian tube, which is not viable and requires medical attention.
6. Preterm birth: The delivery of a baby before 37 weeks of gestation, which can lead to various health issues for the newborn.
7. Full-term birth: The delivery of a baby between 37 and 42 weeks of gestation.
8. Post-term pregnancy: The delivery of a baby after 42 weeks of gestation, which may increase the risk of complications for both mother and baby.

The pregnancy outcome is influenced by various factors such as maternal age, health status, lifestyle habits, genetic factors, and access to quality prenatal care.

A newborn infant is a baby who is within the first 28 days of life. This period is also referred to as the neonatal period. Newborns require specialized care and attention due to their immature bodily systems and increased vulnerability to various health issues. They are closely monitored for signs of well-being, growth, and development during this critical time.

Birth weight refers to the first weight of a newborn infant, usually taken immediately after birth. It is a critical vital sign that indicates the baby's health status and is used as a predictor for various short-term and long-term health outcomes.

Typically, a full-term newborn's weight ranges from 5.5 to 8.8 pounds (2.5 to 4 kg), although normal birth weights can vary significantly based on factors such as gestational age, genetics, maternal health, and nutrition. Low birth weight is defined as less than 5.5 pounds (2.5 kg), while high birth weight is greater than 8.8 pounds (4 kg).

Low birth weight babies are at a higher risk for various medical complications, including respiratory distress syndrome, jaundice, infections, and developmental delays. High birth weight babies may face challenges with delivery, increased risk of obesity, and potential metabolic issues later in life. Regular prenatal care is essential to monitor fetal growth and ensure a healthy pregnancy and optimal birth weight for the baby.

Gestational age is the length of time that has passed since the first day of the last menstrual period (LMP) in pregnant women. It is the standard unit used to estimate the age of a pregnancy and is typically expressed in weeks. This measure is used because the exact date of conception is often not known, but the start of the last menstrual period is usually easier to recall.

It's important to note that since ovulation typically occurs around two weeks after the start of the LMP, gestational age is approximately two weeks longer than fetal age, which is the actual time elapsed since conception. Medical professionals use both gestational and fetal age to track the development and growth of the fetus during pregnancy.

Prenatal ultrasonography, also known as obstetric ultrasound, is a medical diagnostic procedure that uses high-frequency sound waves to create images of the developing fetus, placenta, and amniotic fluid inside the uterus. It is a non-invasive and painless test that is widely used during pregnancy to monitor the growth and development of the fetus, detect any potential abnormalities or complications, and determine the due date.

During the procedure, a transducer (a small handheld device) is placed on the mother's abdomen and moved around to capture images from different angles. The sound waves travel through the mother's body and bounce back off the fetus, producing echoes that are then converted into electrical signals and displayed as images on a screen.

Prenatal ultrasonography can be performed at various stages of pregnancy, including early pregnancy to confirm the pregnancy and detect the number of fetuses, mid-pregnancy to assess the growth and development of the fetus, and late pregnancy to evaluate the position of the fetus and determine if it is head down or breech. It can also be used to guide invasive procedures such as amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling.

Overall, prenatal ultrasonography is a valuable tool in modern obstetrics that helps ensure the health and well-being of both the mother and the developing fetus.

... incidence of breech presentation at preterm corresponds to the incidence of breech presentation when birth occurs. A breech ... The fetuses in breech presentation during this period have the same probability for breech and cephalic presentation at ... The highest possible probability of breech presentation of 50% indicates that breech presentation is a consequence of random ... the incidence of cephalic and breech presentations remain stable, i.e. breech presentation around 3-4% and cephalic ...
Breech presentation 3. Multiple gestation 4. Cesarean delivery 5. Low birth weight 6. Antepartum hemorrhage and 7.Cord prolapse ...
Løvset, Jørgen (1937). "Shoulder delivery by breech presentation". The Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology of the British ... His name is known worldwide for a new way to release the child's shoulders at the breech birth (Løvset's manoeuvre), which he ... especially for fetuses that were born in the breech. He was involved in the changes in obstetrics where it went from being ... method is described in all textbooks and remains the standard method in Norway at the vaginal birth of children in the breech. ...
breech presentation, ruptured membranes, twin pregnancy). The cephalic index is used in the categorisation of animals, ...
Coyle, M E; Smith, C; Peat, B (9 May 2023). "Cephalic version by moxibustion for breech presentation". Cochrane Database of ... In addition, the need or role of turning the baby by performing an external cephalic version to prevent a breech birth along ... when included along with other procedures that are usual to care for a person who is at risk of a breech birth, may decrease ... and help turn breech babies. Practitioners claim moxibustion to be especially effective in the treatment of chronic problems, " ...
Coyle, Meaghan E.; Smith, Caroline; Peat, Brian (9 May 2023). "Cephalic version by moxibustion for breech presentation". The ... Cochrane Review found moderate certainty evidence for the use of moxibustion plus usual care in correcting breech presentation ...
Coyle, Meaghan E.; Smith, Caroline; Peat, Brian (2023-05-09). "Cephalic version by moxibustion for breech presentation". The ... found moderate certainty evidence for the use of moxibustion plus usual care for reducing the chance of breech presentation of ...
Coyle, Meaghan E; Smith, Caroline A; Peat, Brian (16 May 2012). "Cephalic version by moxibustion for breech presentation". ... is a belief that moxibustion of mugwort is effective at increasing the cephalic positioning of fetuses who were in a breech ...
A very high incidence of breech presentation has been noted among infants with FD. A lower birth weight as compared to siblings ... Mostello, D.; Chang, J. J.; Bai, F.; Wang, J.; Guild, C.; Stamps, K.; Leet, T. L. (January 2014). "Breech presentation at ... Axelrod, Felicia B.; Leistner, Hedi L.; Porges, Robert F. (1974-01-01). "Breech presentation among infants with familial ...
... as a mode to avoid the risks associated with a vaginal breech or cesarean delivery for singleton breech presentation. ECV can ... ECV performed before term may decrease the rate of breech presentation compared to ECV at term, but may increase the risk of ... It is a manual procedure that is recommended by national guidelines for breech presentation of a pregnancy with a single baby, ... Evidence of complications of ECV from clinical trials is limited, but ECV does reduce the chance of breech presentation at ...
... which is referred to as breech presentation. Risk for breech presentation may increase with multiple pregnancies (more than one ... There are many variations of breech presentations and multiple ways the baby can get stuck during delivery. If a breech ... Babies in breech presentation can be delivered vaginally depending on the experience of the provider and if the fetus meets ... The cord may also be wrapped around a limb in breech presentation, and should similarly be reduced in these cases. If the baby ...
Biswas, A; Su, LL; Mattar, C (Apr 2013). "Caesarean section for preterm birth and, breech presentation and twin pregnancies". ...
A breech birth is the birth of a baby from a breech presentation, in which the baby exits the pelvis with the buttocks or feet ... In a 'breech presentation', the unborn baby is bottom-down instead of head-down. Babies born bottom-first are more likely to be ... In breech presentation, fetal heart sounds are heard just above the umbilicus. Babies are usually born head first. If the baby ... Biswas A, Su LL, Mattar C (April 2013). "Caesarean section for preterm birth and, breech presentation and twin pregnancies". ...
These complications may include a contracted pelvis, breech presentation, or occipito-posterior position. PROM: premature ...
Non-cephalic presentations are the breech presentation (3.5%) and the shoulder presentation (0.5%). The vertex is the area of ... A cephalic presentation or head presentation or head-first presentation is a situation at childbirth where the fetus is in a ... In the brow presentation the head is slightly extended, but less than in the face presentation. The chin presentation is a ... Face presentations account for less than 1% of presentations at term. In the sinicipital presentation the large fontanelle is ...
Breech birth presentations occur when the fetus' buttocks or lower extremities are poised to deliver before the fetus' upper ... The three types of breech positions are footling breech, frank breech, and complete breech. These births occur in 3% to 4% of ... Controversy and debate surround the topic due to different views on the preferred route of delivery when breech presentation ... Gray, Caron; Shanahan, Meaghan (2022). Breech Presentation. StatPearls Publishing. PMID 28846227. Archived from the original on ...
Specific situations that can contribute to birth injury include breech presentation and shoulder dystocia. Most fetal birth ... this can occur both presented head first or where one comes head first and the other is breech and/or helped by a forceps/ ... an abnormal uterine position such as breech or shoulder dystocia, and cephalopelvic disproportion (a small pelvis or large ...
... face chin breech presentation (buttocks or feet first): complete breech footling breech frank breech shoulder presentation: arm ... This presentation is not compatible with vaginal delivery.[why?] Breech presentation with longitudinal lie: Left sacrum ... or shoulder presentation. A malpresentation is any presentation other than a vertex presentation (with the top of the head ... hence known as breech presentation), which lie anteriorly and toward the left. Right sacrum anterior (RSA)-the buttocks face ...
Specific situations that can contribute to birth injury include breech presentation, conduplicato corpore and shoulder dystocia ... an abnormal uterine position such as breech or shoulder dystocia, and cephalopelvic disproportion (a small pelvis or large ...
Complications including breech presentation, shoulder dystocia, maternal bleeding or umbilical cord prolapse can also be ...
Wastlund D, Moraitis AA, Dacey A, Sovio U, Wilson EC, Smith GC (April 2019). "Screening for breech presentation using universal ... reduce emergency cesarean section and fetal mortality in breech presentation; moreover, it would be cost effective if fetal ... late-pregnancy ultrasound in nulliparous women could identify around 14,826 otherwise undiagnosed breech presentations across ... presentation could be assessed for less than £19.80 per woman. The human placenta does not have a microbiome and placental ...
Breech presentation occurred in 43% of women and cesarean section was performed in 82% of the cases. The uterus is formed ...
Due to breech presentation and hypoxia, she was born with cerebral palsy, making speaking and mobilizing difficult. When Yu ...
Fitzpatrick Lectures) Spencer, HR (1901). "The Dangers and Diagnosis of Breech Presentation, and its Treatment by External ... In 1901, he published an article on the complications of breech birth, where he advocated routine examination of the pregnant ... In 1901, he published an article on breech birth, where he discussed its dangers and encouraged antenatal screening by ...
His ancestral name was Ji (姬), given name Wusheng (寤生), which means "difficult birth" with breech presentation. In 743 BC, he ...
Pups are born breech by presentation, and the mother consumes the placenta Females typically give birth to two offspring, with ...
Doctors who examined the child shortly after her birth noted that a breech presentation "would have proved fatal to the infant ...
... such as breech presentation. LGA or macrosomic births can lead to complications for both the mother and the infant. Common ...
Risk factors for hip dysplasia include female sex, family history, certain swaddling practices, and breech presentation whether ... In the breech position the femoral head tends to get pushed out of the socket and the breech position is probably the most ...
If the fetal presentation is not breech, forceps or manual manipulation can be used to turn it to a breech presentation while ... During the surgery, the fetus is removed from the uterus in the breech position. ... "in the case of head-first presentation, the entire fetal head is outside the body of the mother" at the time the life is ...
Breech presentation is defined as a fetus in a longitudinal lie with the buttocks or feet closest to the cervix. This occurs in ... A frank breech presentation is preferred when vaginal delivery is attempted. Complete breeches and footling breeches are still ... encoded search term (Breech Presentation) and Breech Presentation What to Read Next on Medscape ... 8] In this group of women, 47 had complete breech presentations, 16 had incomplete breech presentations (hips flexed, 1 knee ...
A kind of breech presentation in which the hips are flexed and the knees are extended. ... Rat Community Forum Directory of Rat Laboratories Video Tutorials News RGD Publications RGD Presentations Archive Nomenclature ...
Breech Presentation A child born by a breech presentation (whanau waewae) was regarded as likely to be smart physically and ...
Term children with breech presentation at one or more check-ups after 30.0 weeks gestation had a twofold higher risk of ... Term children with breech presentation at one or more check-ups after 30.0 weeks gestation had a twofold higher risk of ... Term children with breech presentation at one or more check-ups after 30.0 weeks gestation had a twofold higher risk of ... Term children with breech presentation at one or more check-ups after 30.0 weeks gestation had a twofold higher risk of ...
... incidence of breech presentation at preterm corresponds to the incidence of breech presentation when birth occurs. A breech ... The fetuses in breech presentation during this period have the same probability for breech and cephalic presentation at ... The highest possible probability of breech presentation of 50% indicates that breech presentation is a consequence of random ... the incidence of cephalic and breech presentations remain stable, i.e. breech presentation around 3-4% and cephalic ...
Moxibustion effective for correcting breech presentation Categories: Acupuncture research Moxibustion has positive effects on ...
Including Breech Presentation) - Etiology, pathophysiology, symptoms, signs, diagnosis & prognosis from the MSD Manuals - ... Fetal Presentation, Position, and Lie (Including Breech Presentation) By Julie S. Moldenhauer , MD, Childrens Hospital of ... If breech presentation is detected, external cephalic version can sometimes move the fetus to vertex presentation before labor ... In breech presentation, the presenting part is a poor dilating wedge, which can cause the head to be trapped during delivery, ...
... breech presentation]); three spontaneous abortions (at 9, 51, and 99 days postvaccination); three induced abortions; and one ... The clinical presentation of pertussis can be similar to that for respiratory illness caused by B. parapertussis, B. ...
In a breech presentation, a large, nodular body is felt.. * The second maneuver involves palpation in the paraumbilical regions ... 41, 42, 20] Vaginal breech and mid- or high-forceps deliveries are now rarely performed. [43, 44, 45] Therefore, subsequent ... In a cephalic presentation, the fetus head is considered engaged if the examiners hands diverge as they trace the fetus head ... The mechanisms of labor, also known as the cardinal movements, are described in relation to a vertex presentation, as is the ...
Her fetus was noted to be in the breech presentation. Her prior obstetric history was notable for a spontaneous abortion at 8 ... Given the fetal hydrocephalus (biparietal diameter 11.6 cm) and breech presentation, she underwent a classical cesarean ...
presentation, the entire fetal head is outside the body of 17. the mother, or, in the case of breech presentation, any ...
There was another doctor who does go around the country, teaching breech, who did a presentation, showing a whole bunch of ... Elliot Berlin: Sure, so I was a breech baby in the 1970s and I dont think they really realized that I was breech till towards ... And then of course if the baby stays breech and you need to have breech delivery options, which options are available to you, ... One is a doctor, who has always done vaginal breech birth, hes always supported vaginal breech, he has some criteria that are ...
... a breech face/brow presentation or transverse lie, and cephalopelvic disproportion.[x] ... Appropriate presentation and attitude. It may be safer not to use the cup in brow or face presentations. ...
breech presentation (buttocks) (complete) (frank) 652.2. *. with successful version 652.1. *. cardiovascular disease ( ...
Breech/Malpresentation--At birth, the presentation of the fetal buttocks rather than the head, or other malpresentation. ... Cephalopelvic disproportion--The relationship of the size, presentation and position of the fetal head to the maternal pelvis ... Breech/malpresentation, Cephalopelvic disproportion, Cord prolapse, Anesthetic complications, Fetal distress, Other ... 20 hours) ................. NTPRLONG 1106 Dysfunctional labor ......................... NTDYSFUN 1107 Breech/malpresentation ...
... breech presentation*. Ear, Nose and Throat eg. sinusitis, allergic rhinitis* including hayfever*, sore throat, mouth ulcers, ...
Obstetric care for breech presentations at Oslo University Hospital, Ullevål in the period 2000-2012. From 2000 to 2006, the ...
there are problems with the position of the baby (e.g. breech presentation) ... and interactive presentations) for use during legal proceedings, including research, demand letters, client conferences, ...
... vaginal breech birth injury case arising from the defendant hospitals failure to deliver the known breech presentation baby ...
What is the evidence on term singleton breech? ... Breech nomenclature & outcomes of various breech presentations ... Evidence on term breech since the Term Breech Trial If you would like to understand the risks and benefits of vaginal breech ... Outcomes of community breech birth. This 1-hour lecture covers the evidence on outcomes of community breech birth (home or ... The Term Breech Trial found a NNT of 104, meaning that one baby was saved for every 104 c-sections. However, that number was ...
2000) Planned caesarean section versus planned vaginal birth for breech presentation at term: a randomised multicentre trial. ... obstetricians are telling women that it is safer having a caesarean operation for a breech presentation. What they do not tell ... rather than a physiological midwifery assisted breech birth,) ... women is that the way obstetricians perform a vaginal breech ...
Breech presentation: Frank breech (bottom presenting) increases the risk by about 20%, while complete or footling breech only ... "recommends and ultrasound study at six weeks of age for almost all baby girls who were in the breech, or bottom-first position ...
... and neonates with breech presentation. It also helps control blood pressure in women with preeclampsia by alleviating labor ... and an association of higher frequency of persistent occipitoposterior presentation. [3] The rate of cesarean delivery remains ...
Preventing Breech Presentation. Typically, while a baby is in the womb, it is in a breech presentation. Physicians arent ... that the Webster technique could be used as soon as the eighth month of pregnancy if a womans baby is in a breech presentation ... and Physiological Therapeutics published a study that found that the Webster technique helped to correct breech presentation in ... Approximately four percent of deliveries present in a breech position, which is dangerous and potentially life-threatening.. ...
... with the exception of screening for presentation near term, where a clinical and economic case can be made for its ... Breech Presentation. , False Positive Reactions. , Female. , Fetal Development. , Fetal Growth Retardation. , Fetal Macrosomia ... Fetal presentation. , Large for gestational age. , Screening. , Small for gestational age. , Stillbirth. , Ultrasound. , ... with the exception of screening for presentation near term, where a clinical and economic case can be made for its ...
... for breech presentation has increased markedly in most well resourced countries since the publication of the term breech trial ... is effective in reducing non cephalic presentation at births as well as reducing the need for CS for breech presentation. ... Caesarean Section versus Planned Vaginal Birth for Breech Presentation at Term: A Randomised Multicentre Trial. Term Breech ... If women with breech presentation have a primary caesarean section in the first pregnancy a large number will have an elective ...
Breech Presentation: CNGOF Guidelines for Clinical Practice - Short Text]. / Présentation du siège. Recommandations pour la ... Breech Presentation: CNGOF Guidelines for Clinical Practice - Information and Management]. / Présentation du siège. ...
Other breech presentations are only bum down, which is considered frank breech, or with a foot down, which is considered ... There are a few different types of breech presentations. The first is the feet and/or bum down, as I previously mentioned. ... Pregnant people whose baby has a breech presentation typically means baby is in utero with their feet or bottom down towards ... There are several reasons why you may have a breech presentation. Those may include: physiological, structural and even ...
  • Assisted breech delivery: This is the most common type of vaginal breech delivery. (medscape.com)
  • What they do not tell women is that the way obstetricians perform a vaginal breech delivery (the woman on her back, feet in stirrups and manipulating the baby as it is being born, sometimes with the use of forceps) can result in more damage than a caesarean operation. (aims.org.uk)
  • A frank breech (otherwise known as an extended breech) is where the baby's legs are up next to its abdomen, with its knees straight and its feet next to its ears. (wikipedia.org)
  • Among frank breech babies the incidence is 0.5 percent, among complete breeches 5 percent, and among footling breeches 15 percent. (wikipedia.org)
  • Other breech presentations are only bum down, which is considered frank breech, or with a foot down, which is considered footling breech. (hamiltonchiros.com)
  • Transverse lie is often accompanied by shoulder presentation, which requires cesarean delivery. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Listen to our fascinating discussion on vaginal breech birth, cesarean, and things to find out about your baby's positioning as you enter the late stages of pregnancy. (evidencebasedbirth.com)
  • If you would like to understand the risks and benefits of vaginal breech birth vs. cesarean section, we suggest that you watch this presentation. (breechwithoutborders.org)
  • In other words, routine cesarean section for term breech had no long-term advantages. (breechwithoutborders.org)
  • A Dutch registry study by Vlemmix et al (2014) calculated what would happen if all of the Dutch women who still choose vaginal breech birth were to have planned cesarean sections. (breechwithoutborders.org)
  • Fetal abnormalities are observed in 17% of preterm breech deliveries and in 9% of term breech deliveries. (medscape.com)
  • In the general population, incidence of breech presentation at preterm corresponds to the incidence of breech presentation when birth occurs. (wikipedia.org)
  • Besides providing analgesia in labor, regional analgesia may facilitate atraumatic vaginal delivery of twins, preterm neonates, and neonates with breech presentation. (medscape.com)
  • The fetuses in breech presentation during this period have the same probability for breech and cephalic presentation at delivery. (wikipedia.org)
  • During the second period, lasting from the 25th to the 35th gestational week, the incidence of cephalic presentation increases, with a proportional decrease of breech presentation. (wikipedia.org)
  • A breech presentation at delivery occurs when the fetus does not turn to a cephalic presentation. (wikipedia.org)
  • The highest possible probability of breech presentation of 50% indicates that breech presentation is a consequence of random filling of the intrauterine space, with the same probability of breech and cephalic presentation in a longitudinally elongated uterus. (wikipedia.org)
  • External cephalic version (ECV) is effective in reducing non cephalic presentation at births and caesarean section (CS) for breech presentation. (scirp.org)
  • It has clearly been shown [4] that external cephalic version (ECV) is effective in reducing non cephalic presentation at births as well as reducing the need for CS for breech presentation. (scirp.org)
  • During the first period, which lasts until the 24th gestational week, the incidence of a longitudinal lie increases, with equal proportions of breech or cephalic presentations from this lie. (wikipedia.org)
  • ECV- This procedure may be recommended by your birth provider to manually turn your baby from breech to head down while still in the uterus. (hamiltonchiros.com)
  • Normal fetal lie is longitudinal, normal presentation is vertex, and occiput anterior is the most common position. (msdmanuals.com)
  • A kind of breech presentation in which the hips are flexed and the knees are extended. (mcw.edu)
  • A complete breech (or flexed breech) is when the baby appears as though it is sitting crossed-legged with its legs bent at the hips and knees. (wikipedia.org)
  • Breech presentation is defined as a fetus in a longitudinal lie with the buttocks or feet closest to the cervix. (medscape.com)
  • As long as the fetal heart rate is stable in this situation, it is permissible to manage expectantly to allow the cervix to completely dilate around the breech (see the image below). (medscape.com)
  • Pregnant people whose baby has a breech presentation typically means baby is in utero with their feet or bottom down towards the cervix. (hamiltonchiros.com)
  • Vaginal breech deliveries were previously the norm until 1959 when it was proposed that all breech presentations should be delivered abdominally to reduce perinatal morbidity and mortality. (medscape.com)
  • And some studies, such as PREMODA (Goffinet 2006), have found no differences in perinatal mortality or morbidity between vaginal breech birth and planned CS. (breechwithoutborders.org)
  • Most babies in the breech position are delivered via caesarean section because it is seen as safer than being born vaginally. (wikipedia.org)
  • Also, delivering all breech babies by caesarean section in developing countries is difficult to implement as there are not always resources available to provide this service. (wikipedia.org)
  • He attends labor at hospitals, homes, and birth centers, and he works with several hundred breech babies each year. (evidencebasedbirth.com)
  • Rebecca Dekker: Dr. Berlin also works with several hundred breech babies each year, most of whom, turn into the ideal pre-birth position once normal function is restored to the mother's lower back and pelvis. (evidencebasedbirth.com)
  • This graphic shows how planned CS for breech has affected women and their babies in the Netherlands. (breechwithoutborders.org)
  • The percentage of breech deliveries decreases with advancing gestational age from 22-25% of births prior to 28 weeks' gestation to 7-15% of births at 32 weeks' gestation to 3-4% of births at term. (medscape.com)
  • An anesthesiologist and a pediatrician should be immediately available for all vaginal breech deliveries. (medscape.com)
  • Also, women with previous Caesarean deliveries have a risk of breech presentation at term twice that of women with previous vaginal deliveries. (wikipedia.org)
  • Approximately four percent of deliveries present in a breech position, which is dangerous and potentially life-threatening. (sportsandfamilychiropractic.com)
  • The value set contains the list of the different presentations (orientations within the mother's womb) that a fetus may be in prior to delivery. (cdc.gov)
  • Due to their higher than average rate of possible complications for the baby, breech births are generally considered higher risk. (wikipedia.org)
  • Breech births also occur in many other mammals such as dogs and horses, see veterinary obstetrics. (wikipedia.org)
  • In addition to the above, breech births in which the sacrum is the fetal denominator can be classified by the position of a fetus. (wikipedia.org)
  • Total breech extraction: The fetal feet are grasped, and the entire fetus is extracted. (medscape.com)
  • If breech presentation is detected, external cephalic version can sometimes move the fetus to vertex presentation before labor, usually at 37 or 38 weeks. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Ultrasound scan was used to assess fetus and to confirm presentation. (scirp.org)
  • For example, as a result of the flawed Hannah trial 1 (which compared caesarean section with a managed obstetric delivery, rather than a physiological midwifery assisted breech birth,) obstetricians are telling women that it is safer having a caesarean operation for a breech presentation. (aims.org.uk)
  • Thick meconium passage is common as the breech is squeezed through the birth canal. (medscape.com)
  • Children who had presented in breech at least once in gestational period 37.0-birth had a 3.24 (95% CI [1.86, 5.65]) times higher risk of DDH, whereas the risk for children with breech presentation in gestational period 30.0-36.6 only was not increased. (utwente.nl)
  • A breech birth is when a baby is born bottom first instead of head first, as is normal. (wikipedia.org)
  • Doctors and midwives in the developing world often lack many of the skills required to safely assist women giving birth to a breech baby vaginally. (wikipedia.org)
  • He is the co-founder of Berlin Wellness Group in Los Angeles, California, hosts The Informed Pregnancy podcast, and served as executive producer of two documentaries about birth - Head's Up: The Disappearing Art of Breech Delivery, and Trial of Labor. (evidencebasedbirth.com)
  • Evidence Based Birth® Signature Article, The Evidence on: Breech Version . (evidencebasedbirth.com)
  • All about chiropractic care during pregnancy and breech birth. (evidencebasedbirth.com)
  • This 1-hour lecture covers the evidence on outcomes of community breech birth (home or birth center). (breechwithoutborders.org)
  • Some national registry studies have found no significant differences between planned CS and planned vaginal breech birth. (breechwithoutborders.org)
  • Making a decision about how to birth a breech baby involves a complex risk calculus. (breechwithoutborders.org)
  • A suggestion multicentre collaborative group on manage- that the rate of CS can act as a proxy indica- ment of breech birth was identified [ 16 ]. (who.int)
  • Delivery presentation describes the way the baby is positioned to come down the birth canal for delivery. (medlineplus.gov)
  • In some of these presentations, a vaginal birth is possible, but labor will generally take longer. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Perinatal mortality is increased 2- to 4-fold with breech presentation, regardless of the mode of delivery. (medscape.com)
  • The Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics published a study that found that the Webster technique helped to correct breech presentation in 82% of cases. (sportsandfamilychiropractic.com)
  • If your baby is breech, it is not safe to deliver vaginally. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Abnormal fetal lie or presentation may occur due to fetal size, fetal anomalies, uterine structural abnormalities, multiple gestation, or other factors. (msdmanuals.com)
  • It may be safer not to use the cup in brow or face presentations. (jgllaw.com)
  • An ultrasound may be able to confirm a brow presentation. (medlineplus.gov)
  • The incidence of breech presentation is affected by both maternal and fetal diseases and medical conditions. (wikipedia.org)
  • Incidence of caesarean section for breech presentation has increased markedly. (scirp.org)
  • With regard to the fetal presentation during pregnancy, three periods have been distinguished. (wikipedia.org)
  • The second period is characterized by a higher than random probability that the fetal presentation during this period will also be present at the time of delivery. (wikipedia.org)
  • This case-control study investigated the association between timing and duration of breech presentation in pregnancy and developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH). (utwente.nl)
  • The report also found that the Webster technique could be used as soon as the eighth month of pregnancy if a woman's baby is in a breech presentation. (sportsandfamilychiropractic.com)
  • Types of breech depend on how the baby's legs are lying. (wikipedia.org)
  • A footling breech is when one or both of the baby's feet are born first instead of the pelvis. (wikipedia.org)
  • In breech position, the baby's bottom is facing down instead of the head. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Several common types of abnormal lie or presentation are discussed here. (msdmanuals.com)
  • It is best to detect abnormal fetal lie or presentation before delivery. (msdmanuals.com)
  • 3 The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) "recommends and ultrasound study at six weeks of age for almost all baby girls who were in the breech, or bottom-first position. (limbsandthings.com)
  • During routine prenatal care, clinicians assess fetal lie and presentation with physical examination in the late third trimester. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Around 3-5% of pregnant women at term (37-40 weeks pregnant) have a breech baby. (wikipedia.org)
  • Practice was probably influenced by the Term Breech Trial. (sykepleien.no)
  • Praksisen ble antakelig påvirket av The Term Breech Trial. (sykepleien.no)
  • How does the Term Breech Trial compare to recent data? (breechwithoutborders.org)
  • Recent studies do not support the findings of the 2000 Term Breech Trial, a randomized controlled trial that enrolled 2,088 women. (breechwithoutborders.org)
  • A meta-analysis and other registry studies have found some short-term advantage to planned CS, but the advantage is significantly less pronounced than in the Term Breech Trial. (breechwithoutborders.org)
  • A study by Verhoeven et al (2005) discusses the effects of the increase in planned CS since the Term Breech Trial. (breechwithoutborders.org)
  • The Term Breech Trial found a NNT of 104, meaning that one baby was saved for every 104 c-sections. (breechwithoutborders.org)
  • More recent studies have found much higher NNTs than the Term Breech Trial, ranging from 175 to 666. (breechwithoutborders.org)
  • However, data on the diagnostic effectiveness of universal ultrasound suggest that better methods are required to result in net benefit, with the exception of screening for presentation near term, where a clinical and economic case can be made for its implementation. (cam.ac.uk)
  • Current guidelines [5] -[7] therefore recommend that ECV should be offered to all women with breech presentation at term. (scirp.org)
  • Spontaneous breech delivery: No traction or manipulation of the infant is used. (medscape.com)
  • Some clinicians perform an episiotomy when the breech delivery is imminent, even in multiparas, as it may help prevent soft tissue dystocia for the aftercoming head (see the images below). (medscape.com)
  • Breech presentation makes delivery difficult ,primarily because the presenting part is a poor dilating wedge. (msdmanuals.com)
  • This 71-minute lecture gives a detailed look at the risks and outcomes of different types of breeches (frank, complete, footling, etc. (breechwithoutborders.org)
  • A kneeling breech is when the baby is born knees first. (wikipedia.org)
  • With breech, the most pertinent question is: how many cesareans are needed to prevent one baby from dying? (breechwithoutborders.org)
  • My Baby Is Breech! (hamiltonchiros.com)
  • Have been told your baby is breech and now you are wondering what that means or if there is anything you can do to help? (hamiltonchiros.com)
  • These are described in relation to a vertex presentation. (medscape.com)
  • Relative contraindications for vacuum extraction include prematurity, suspected macrosomia, suspected fetal coagulation defect, fetal scalp blood sampling, and a non-vertex presentation. (jgllaw.com)
  • Avant de prendre une décision en matière de césarienne, il convient de dé nir les avantages et les risques de l'intervention sous l'angle de l'ensemble de la période de procréation de la femme et du niveau de soins existant, en évitant des césariennes inutiles et coûteuses a n de réduire les complications iatrogènes et de préserver les ressources. (who.int)
  • En dépit des progrès médicaux, les complications obstétricales occasionnent de nombreuses admissions en réanimation et sont des sources de létalité importante. (bvsalud.org)
  • Breech Presentation: CNGOF Guidelines for Clinical Practice - Information and Management]. (bvsalud.org)
  • Breech Presentation: CNGOF Guidelines for Clinical Practice - Short Text]. (bvsalud.org)
  • Thus sacro-anterior, sacro-transverse and sacro-posterior positions all exist but left sacro-anterior is the most common presentation. (wikipedia.org)
  • The increase of this probability is gradual and identical for breech and cephalic presentations during this period. (wikipedia.org)
  • Fetal distress decreased as an indication for CS, while previ- ous CS and breech presentations contributed to the increase. (who.int)