Mammaplasty: Surgical reconstruction of the breast including both augmentation and reduction.Breast: In humans, one of the paired regions in the anterior portion of the THORAX. The breasts consist of the MAMMARY GLANDS, the SKIN, the MUSCLES, the ADIPOSE TISSUE, and the CONNECTIVE TISSUES.Mastectomy: Surgical procedure to remove one or both breasts.Seroma: Tumor-like sterile accumulation of serum in a tissue, organ, or cavity. It results from a tissue insult and is the product of tissue inflammation. It most commonly occurs following MASTECTOMY.Video-Assisted Surgery: Endoscopic surgical procedures performed with visualization via video transmission. When real-time video is combined interactively with prior CT scans or MRI images, this is called image-guided surgery (see SURGERY, COMPUTER-ASSISTED).Breast Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the human BREAST.Mastectomy, Segmental: Removal of only enough breast tissue to ensure that the margins of the resected surgical specimen are free of tumor.Tretoquinol: An adrenergic beta-agonist used as a bronchodilator agent in asthma therapy.Surgery, Plastic: The branch of surgery concerned with restoration, reconstruction, or improvement of defective, damaged, or missing structures.Axilla: Area of the human body underneath the SHOULDER JOINT, also known as the armpit or underarm.Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting: Emesis and queasiness occurring after anesthesia.Acellular Dermis: Remaining tissue from normal DERMIS tissue after the cells are removed.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Lymph Node Excision: Surgical excision of one or more lymph nodes. Its most common use is in cancer surgery. (From Dorland, 28th ed, p966)Surgical Wound Infection: Infection occurring at the site of a surgical incision.Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast: An invasive (infiltrating) CARCINOMA of the mammary ductal system (MAMMARY GLANDS) in the human BREAST.Carcinoma, Intraductal, Noninfiltrating: A noninvasive (noninfiltrating) carcinoma of the breast characterized by a proliferation of malignant epithelial cells confined to the mammary ducts or lobules, without light-microscopy evidence of invasion through the basement membrane into the surrounding stroma.Breast Diseases: Pathological processes of the BREAST.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Surgical Mesh: Any woven or knit material of open texture used in surgery for the repair, reconstruction, or substitution of tissue. The mesh is usually a synthetic fabric made of various polymers. It is occasionally made of metal.Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy: A diagnostic procedure used to determine whether LYMPHATIC METASTASIS has occurred. The sentinel lymph node is the first lymph node to receive drainage from a neoplasm.Mastectomy, Modified Radical: Total mastectomy with axillary node dissection, but with preservation of the pectoral muscles.Methylprednisolone Hemisuccinate: A water-soluble ester of METHYLPREDNISOLONE used for cardiac, allergic, and hypoxic emergencies.Lymphatic Metastasis: Transfer of a neoplasm from its primary site to lymph nodes or to distant parts of the body by way of the lymphatic system.Chemotherapy, Adjuvant: Drug therapy given to augment or stimulate some other form of treatment such as surgery or radiation therapy. Adjuvant chemotherapy is commonly used in the therapy of cancer and can be administered before or after the primary treatment.Surgical Flaps: Tongues of skin and subcutaneous tissue, sometimes including muscle, cut away from the underlying parts but often still attached at one end. They retain their own microvasculature which is also transferred to the new site. They are often used in plastic surgery for filling a defect in a neighboring region.Hernia, Ventral: A hernia caused by weakness of the anterior ABDOMINAL WALL due to midline defects, previous incisions, or increased intra-abdominal pressure. Ventral hernias include UMBILICAL HERNIA, incisional, epigastric, and spigelian hernias.Surgical Wound Dehiscence: Pathologic process consisting of a partial or complete disruption of the layers of a surgical wound.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Drainage: The removal of fluids or discharges from the body, such as from a wound, sore, or cavity.Breast Feeding: The nursing of an infant at the breast.Fibrin Tissue Adhesive: An autologous or commercial tissue adhesive containing FIBRINOGEN and THROMBIN. The commercial product is a two component system from human plasma that contains more than fibrinogen and thrombin. The first component contains highly concentrated fibrinogen, FACTOR VIII, fibronectin, and traces of other plasma proteins. The second component contains thrombin, calcium chloride, and antifibrinolytic agents such as APROTININ. Mixing of the two components promotes BLOOD CLOTTING and the formation and cross-linking of fibrin. The tissue adhesive is used for tissue sealing, HEMOSTASIS, and WOUND HEALING.Exudates and Transudates: Exudates are fluids, CELLS, or other cellular substances that are slowly discharged from BLOOD VESSELS usually from inflamed tissues. Transudates are fluids that pass through a membrane or squeeze through tissue or into the EXTRACELLULAR SPACE of TISSUES. Transudates are thin and watery and contain few cells or PROTEINS.Abdominal Wall: The outer margins of the ABDOMEN, extending from the osteocartilaginous thoracic cage to the PELVIS. Though its major part is muscular, the abdominal wall consists of at least seven layers: the SKIN, subcutaneous fat, deep FASCIA; ABDOMINAL MUSCLES, transversalis fascia, extraperitoneal fat, and the parietal PERITONEUM.Polytetrafluoroethylene: Homopolymer of tetrafluoroethylene. Nonflammable, tough, inert plastic tubing or sheeting; used to line vessels, insulate, protect or lubricate apparatus; also as filter, coating for surgical implants or as prosthetic material. Synonyms: Fluoroflex; Fluoroplast; Ftoroplast; Halon; Polyfene; PTFE; Tetron.Mastectomy, Radical: Removal of the breast, pectoral muscles, axillary lymph nodes, and associated skin and subcutaneous tissue.Combined Modality Therapy: The treatment of a disease or condition by several different means simultaneously or sequentially. Chemoimmunotherapy, RADIOIMMUNOTHERAPY, chemoradiotherapy, cryochemotherapy, and SALVAGE THERAPY are seen most frequently, but their combinations with each other and surgery are also used.Inguinal Canal: The tunnel in the lower anterior ABDOMINAL WALL through which the SPERMATIC CORD, in the male; ROUND LIGAMENT, in the female; nerves; and vessels pass. Its internal end is at the deep inguinal ring and its external end is at the superficial inguinal ring.Thoracic Cavity: The region of the thorax that includes the PLEURAL CAVITY and MEDIASTINUM.Breast Neoplasms, Male: Any neoplasms of the male breast. These occur infrequently in males in developed countries, the incidence being about 1% of that in females.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Suture Techniques: Techniques for securing together the edges of a wound, with loops of thread or similar materials (SUTURES).Receptors, Estrogen: Cytoplasmic proteins that bind estrogens and migrate to the nucleus where they regulate DNA transcription. Evaluation of the state of estrogen receptors in breast cancer patients has become clinically important.Laparoscopy: A procedure in which a laparoscope (LAPAROSCOPES) is inserted through a small incision near the navel to examine the abdominal and pelvic organs in the PERITONEAL CAVITY. If appropriate, biopsy or surgery can be performed during laparoscopy.Bariatric Surgery: Surgical procedures aimed at affecting metabolism and producing major WEIGHT REDUCTION in patients with MORBID OBESITY.Hernia, Inguinal: An abdominal hernia with an external bulge in the GROIN region. It can be classified by the location of herniation. Indirect inguinal hernias occur through the internal inguinal ring. Direct inguinal hernias occur through defects in the ABDOMINAL WALL (transversalis fascia) in Hesselbach's triangle. The former type is commonly seen in children and young adults; the latter in adults.Tissue Adhesives: Substances used to cause adherence of tissue to tissue or tissue to non-tissue surfaces, as for prostheses.Mammography: Radiographic examination of the breast.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Groin: The external junctural region between the lower part of the abdomen and the thigh.Fibrocystic Breast Disease: A common and benign breast disease characterized by varying degree of fibrocystic changes in the breast tissue. There are three major patterns of morphological changes, including FIBROSIS, formation of CYSTS, and proliferation of glandular tissue (adenosis). The fibrocystic breast has a dense irregular, lumpy, bumpy consistency.General Surgery: A specialty in which manual or operative procedures are used in the treatment of disease, injuries, or deformities.Breast Implants: Implants used to reconstruct and/or cosmetically enhance the female breast. They have an outer shell or envelope of silicone elastomer and are filled with either saline or silicone gel. The outer shell may be either smooth or textured.Cell Line, Tumor: A cell line derived from cultured tumor cells.Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Receptor, erbB-2: A cell surface protein-tyrosine kinase receptor that is overexpressed in a variety of ADENOCARCINOMAS. It has extensive homology to and heterodimerizes with the EGF RECEPTOR, the ERBB-3 RECEPTOR, and the ERBB-4 RECEPTOR. Activation of the erbB-2 receptor occurs through heterodimer formation with a ligand-bound erbB receptor family member.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Receptors, Progesterone: Specific proteins found in or on cells of progesterone target tissues that specifically combine with progesterone. The cytosol progesterone-receptor complex then associates with the nucleic acids to initiate protein synthesis. There are two kinds of progesterone receptors, A and B. Both are induced by estrogen and have short half-lives.Breast Self-Examination: The inspection of one's breasts, usually for signs of disease, especially neoplastic disease.Thoracic Surgery: A surgical specialty concerned with diagnosis and treatment of disorders of the heart, lungs, and esophagus. Two major types of thoracic surgery are classified as pulmonary and cardiovascular.Tamoxifen: One of the SELECTIVE ESTROGEN RECEPTOR MODULATORS with tissue-specific activities. Tamoxifen acts as an anti-estrogen (inhibiting agent) in the mammary tissue, but as an estrogen (stimulating agent) in cholesterol metabolism, bone density, and cell proliferation in the ENDOMETRIUM.Reconstructive Surgical Procedures: Procedures used to reconstruct, restore, or improve defective, damaged, or missing structures.Cardiac Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the heart.Neoplasm Staging: Methods which attempt to express in replicable terms the extent of the neoplasm in the patient.Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in neoplastic tissue.Tumor Markers, Biological: Molecular products metabolized and secreted by neoplastic tissue and characterized biochemically in cells or body fluids. They are indicators of tumor stage and grade as well as useful for monitoring responses to treatment and predicting recurrence. Many chemical groups are represented including hormones, antigens, amino and nucleic acids, enzymes, polyamines, and specific cell membrane proteins and lipids.Neoplasm Invasiveness: Ability of neoplasms to infiltrate and actively destroy surrounding tissue.Postoperative Period: The period following a surgical operation.Carcinoma, Lobular: A infiltrating (invasive) breast cancer, relatively uncommon, accounting for only 5%-10% of breast tumors in most series. It is often an area of ill-defined thickening in the breast, in contrast to the dominant lump characteristic of ductal carcinoma. It is typically composed of small cells in a linear arrangement with a tendency to grow around ducts and lobules. There is likelihood of axillary nodal involvement with metastasis to meningeal and serosal surfaces. (DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p1205)Neoplasm Metastasis: The transfer of a neoplasm from one organ or part of the body to another remote from the primary site.Ultrasonography, Mammary: Use of ultrasound for imaging the breast. The most frequent application is the diagnosis of neoplasms of the female breast.Preoperative Care: Care given during the period prior to undergoing surgery when psychological and physical preparations are made according to the special needs of the individual patient. This period spans the time between admission to the hospital to the time the surgery begins. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal: Antineoplastic agents that are used to treat hormone-sensitive tumors. Hormone-sensitive tumors may be hormone-dependent, hormone-responsive, or both. A hormone-dependent tumor regresses on removal of the hormonal stimulus, by surgery or pharmacological block. Hormone-responsive tumors may regress when pharmacologic amounts of hormones are administered regardless of whether previous signs of hormone sensitivity were observed. The major hormone-responsive cancers include carcinomas of the breast, prostate, and endometrium; lymphomas; and certain leukemias. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual 1994, p2079)Genes, BRCA1: A tumor suppressor gene (GENES, TUMOR SUPPRESSOR) located on human CHROMOSOME 17 at locus 17q21. Mutations of this gene are associated with the formation of HEREDITARY BREAST AND OVARIAN CANCER SYNDROME. It encodes a large nuclear protein that is a component of DNA repair pathways.Immunohistochemistry: Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.Neoplasm Recurrence, Local: The local recurrence of a neoplasm following treatment. It arises from microscopic cells of the original neoplasm that have escaped therapeutic intervention and later become clinically visible at the original site.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Postoperative Care: The period of care beginning when the patient is removed from surgery and aimed at meeting the patient's psychological and physical needs directly after surgery. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Surgery, Computer-Assisted: Surgical procedures conducted with the aid of computers. This is most frequently used in orthopedic and laparoscopic surgery for implant placement and instrument guidance. Image-guided surgery interactively combines prior CT scans or MRI images with real-time video.Thoracic Surgery, Video-Assisted: Endoscopic surgery of the pleural cavity performed with visualization via video transmission.Survival Analysis: A class of statistical procedures for estimating the survival function (function of time, starting with a population 100% well at a given time and providing the percentage of the population still well at later times). The survival analysis is then used for making inferences about the effects of treatments, prognostic factors, exposures, and other covariates on the function.Carcinoma: A malignant neoplasm made up of epithelial cells tending to infiltrate the surrounding tissues and give rise to metastases. It is a histological type of neoplasm but is often wrongly used as a synonym for "cancer." (From Dorland, 27th ed)Cataract Extraction: The removal of a cataractous CRYSTALLINE LENS from the eye.Surgical Procedures, Operative: Operations carried out for the correction of deformities and defects, repair of injuries, and diagnosis and cure of certain diseases. (Taber, 18th ed.)Postmenopause: The physiological period following the MENOPAUSE, the permanent cessation of the menstrual life.Antineoplastic Agents: Substances that inhibit or prevent the proliferation of NEOPLASMS.Survival Rate: The proportion of survivors in a group, e.g., of patients, studied and followed over a period, or the proportion of persons in a specified group alive at the beginning of a time interval who survive to the end of the interval. It is often studied using life table methods.Coronary Artery Bypass: Surgical therapy of ischemic coronary artery disease achieved by grafting a section of saphenous vein, internal mammary artery, or other substitute between the aorta and the obstructed coronary artery distal to the obstructive lesion.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Tumor Cells, Cultured: Cells grown in vitro from neoplastic tissue. If they can be established as a TUMOR CELL LINE, they can be propagated in cell culture indefinitely.Disease-Free Survival: Period after successful treatment in which there is no appearance of the symptoms or effects of the disease.Surgery, Oral: A dental specialty concerned with the diagnosis and surgical treatment of disease, injuries, and defects of the human oral and maxillofacial region.Milk, HumanAge Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Breast Cyst: A fluid-filled closed cavity or sac that is lined by an EPITHELIUM and found in the BREAST. It may appear as a single large cyst in one breast, multifocal, or bilateral in FIBROCYSTIC BREAST DISEASE.Nipples: The conic organs which usually give outlet to milk from the mammary glands.Neoplasm Proteins: Proteins whose abnormal expression (gain or loss) are associated with the development, growth, or progression of NEOPLASMS. Some neoplasm proteins are tumor antigens (ANTIGENS, NEOPLASM), i.e. they induce an immune reaction to their tumor. Many neoplasm proteins have been characterized and are used as tumor markers (BIOMARKERS, TUMOR) when they are detectable in cells and body fluids as monitors for the presence or growth of tumors. Abnormal expression of ONCOGENE PROTEINS is involved in neoplastic transformation, whereas the loss of expression of TUMOR SUPPRESSOR PROTEINS is involved with the loss of growth control and progression of the neoplasm.Fibroadenoma: An adenoma containing fibrous tissue. It should be differentiated from ADENOFIBROMA which is a tumor composed of connective tissue (fibroma) containing glandular (adeno-) structures. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Premenopause: The period before MENOPAUSE. In premenopausal women, the climacteric transition from full sexual maturity to cessation of ovarian cycle takes place between the age of late thirty and early fifty.Mammary Glands, Human: Glandular tissue in the BREAST of human that is under the influence of hormones such as ESTROGENS; PROGESTINS; and PROLACTIN. In WOMEN, after PARTURITION, the mammary glands secrete milk (MILK, HUMAN) for the nourishment of the young.Estrogens: Compounds that interact with ESTROGEN RECEPTORS in target tissues to bring about the effects similar to those of ESTRADIOL. Estrogens stimulate the female reproductive organs, and the development of secondary female SEX CHARACTERISTICS. Estrogenic chemicals include natural, synthetic, steroidal, or non-steroidal compounds.Estrogen Receptor alpha: One of the ESTROGEN RECEPTORS that has marked affinity for ESTRADIOL. Its expression and function differs from, and in some ways opposes, ESTROGEN RECEPTOR BETA.MCF-7 Cells: An estrogen responsive cell line derived from a patient with metastatic human breast ADENOCARCINOMA (at the Michigan Cancer Foundation.)Intraoperative Care: Patient care procedures performed during the operation that are ancillary to the actual surgery. It includes monitoring, fluid therapy, medication, transfusion, anesthesia, radiography, and laboratory tests.Reoperation: A repeat operation for the same condition in the same patient due to disease progression or recurrence, or as followup to failed previous surgery.Mammary Neoplasms, Experimental: Experimentally induced mammary neoplasms in animals to provide a model for studying human BREAST NEOPLASMS.Surgical Procedures, Elective: Surgery which could be postponed or not done at all without danger to the patient. Elective surgery includes procedures to correct non-life-threatening medical problems as well as to alleviate conditions causing psychological stress or other potential risk to patients, e.g., cosmetic or contraceptive surgery.Breast Implantation: Surgical insertion of an inert sac filled with silicone or other material to augment the female form cosmetically.Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols: The use of two or more chemicals simultaneously or sequentially in the drug therapy of neoplasms. The drugs need not be in the same dosage form.Cardiopulmonary Bypass: Diversion of the flow of blood from the entrance of the right atrium directly to the aorta (or femoral artery) via an oxygenator thus bypassing both the heart and lungs.Colorectal Surgery: A surgical specialty concerned with the diagnosis and treatment of disorders and abnormalities of the COLON; RECTUM; and ANAL CANAL.Ambulatory Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on an outpatient basis. It may be hospital-based or performed in an office or surgicenter.Intraoperative Complications: Complications that affect patients during surgery. They may or may not be associated with the disease for which the surgery is done, or within the same surgical procedure.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Menopause: The last menstrual period. Permanent cessation of menses (MENSTRUATION) is usually defined after 6 to 12 months of AMENORRHEA in a woman over 45 years of age. In the United States, menopause generally occurs in women between 48 and 55 years of age.Neoadjuvant Therapy: Preliminary cancer therapy (chemotherapy, radiation therapy, hormone/endocrine therapy, immunotherapy, hyperthermia, etc.) that precedes a necessary second modality of treatment.Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.BRCA2 Protein: A large, nuclear protein, encoded by the BRCA2 gene (GENE, BRCA2). Mutations in this gene predispose humans to breast and ovarian cancer. The BRCA2 protein is an essential component of DNA repair pathways, suppressing the formation of gross chromosomal rearrangements. (from Genes Dev. 2000;14(11):1400-6)Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Genes, BRCA2: A tumor suppressor gene (GENES, TUMOR SUPPRESSOR) located on human chromosome 13 at locus 13q12.3. Mutations in this gene predispose humans to breast and ovarian cancer. It encodes a large, nuclear protein that is an essential component of DNA repair pathways, suppressing the formation of gross chromosomal rearrangements. (from Genes Dev 2000;14(11):1400-6)BRCA1 Protein: The phosphoprotein encoded by the BRCA1 gene (GENE, BRCA1). In normal cells the BRCA1 protein is localized in the nucleus, whereas in the majority of breast cancer cell lines and in malignant pleural effusions from breast cancer patients, it is localized mainly in the cytoplasm. (Science 1995;270(5237):713,789-91)Intraoperative Period: The period during a surgical operation.Cell Proliferation: All of the processes involved in increasing CELL NUMBER including CELL DIVISION.Pain, Postoperative: Pain during the period after surgery.Perioperative Care: Interventions to provide care prior to, during, and immediately after surgery.Radiotherapy, Adjuvant: Radiotherapy given to augment some other form of treatment such as surgery or chemotherapy. Adjuvant radiotherapy is commonly used in the therapy of cancer and can be administered before or after the primary treatment.Surgery Department, Hospital: Hospital department which administers all departmental functions and the provision of surgical diagnostic and therapeutic services.Orthopedic Procedures: Procedures used to treat and correct deformities, diseases, and injuries to the MUSCULOSKELETAL SYSTEM, its articulations, and associated structures.Neoplasms, Hormone-Dependent: Certain tumors that 1, arise in organs that are normally dependent on specific hormones and 2, are stimulated or caused to regress by manipulation of the endocrine environment.Risk: The probability that an event will occur. It encompasses a variety of measures of the probability of a generally unfavorable outcome.Carcinoma, Ductal: Malignant neoplasms involving the ductal systems of any of a number of organs, such as the MAMMARY GLANDS, the PANCREAS, the PROSTATE, or the LACRIMAL GLAND.Biopsy, Needle: Removal and examination of tissue obtained through a transdermal needle inserted into the specific region, organ, or tissue being analyzed.Carcinoma in Situ: A lesion with cytological characteristics associated with invasive carcinoma but the tumor cells are confined to the epithelium of origin, without invasion of the basement membrane.Thoracic Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the thoracic organs, most commonly the lungs and the heart.Inflammatory Breast Neoplasms: Metastatic breast cancer characterized by EDEMA and ERYTHEMA of the affected breast due to LYMPHATIC METASTASIS and eventual obstruction of LYMPHATIC VESSELS by the cancer cells.Surgical Procedures, Minimally Invasive: Procedures that avoid use of open, invasive surgery in favor of closed or local surgery. These generally involve use of laparoscopic devices and remote-control manipulation of instruments with indirect observation of the surgical field through an endoscope or similar device.Neurosurgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the nervous system or its parts.Genes, erbB-2: The erbB-2 gene is a proto-oncogene that codes for the erbB-2 receptor (RECEPTOR, ERBB-2), a protein with structural features similar to the epidermal growth factor receptor. Its name originates from the viral oncogene homolog (v-erbB) which is a truncated form of the chicken erbB gene found in the avian erythroblastosis virus. Overexpression and amplification of the gene is associated with a significant number of adenocarcinomas. The human c-erbB-2 gene is located at 17q21.2.Triple Negative Breast Neoplasms: Breast neoplasms that do not express ESTROGEN RECEPTORS; PROGESTERONE RECEPTORS; and do not overexpress the NEU RECEPTOR/HER-2 PROTO-ONCOGENE PROTEIN.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Estrogen Antagonists: Compounds which inhibit or antagonize the action or biosynthesis of estrogenic compounds.Genetic Predisposition to Disease: A latent susceptibility to disease at the genetic level, which may be activated under certain conditions.Aromatase Inhibitors: Compounds that inhibit AROMATASE in order to reduce production of estrogenic steroid hormones.Odds Ratio: The ratio of two odds. The exposure-odds ratio for case control data is the ratio of the odds in favor of exposure among cases to the odds in favor of exposure among noncases. The disease-odds ratio for a cohort or cross section is the ratio of the odds in favor of disease among the exposed to the odds in favor of disease among the unexposed. The prevalence-odds ratio refers to an odds ratio derived cross-sectionally from studies of prevalent cases.Vascular Surgical Procedures: Operative procedures for the treatment of vascular disorders.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Mass Screening: Organized periodic procedures performed on large groups of people for the purpose of detecting disease.Proportional Hazards Models: Statistical models used in survival analysis that assert that the effect of the study factors on the hazard rate in the study population is multiplicative and does not change over time.Gene Expression Profiling: The determination of the pattern of genes expressed at the level of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION, under specific circumstances or in a specific cell.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Ophthalmologic Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the eye or any of its parts.Ovarian Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the OVARY. These neoplasms can be benign or malignant. They are classified according to the tissue of origin, such as the surface EPITHELIUM, the stromal endocrine cells, and the totipotent GERM CELLS.Bone Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer located in bone tissue or specific BONES.Kaplan-Meier Estimate: A nonparametric method of compiling LIFE TABLES or survival tables. It combines calculated probabilities of survival and estimates to allow for observations occurring beyond a measurement threshold, which are assumed to occur randomly. Time intervals are defined as ending each time an event occurs and are therefore unequal. (From Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1995)Mice, Nude: Mutant mice homozygous for the recessive gene "nude" which fail to develop a thymus. They are useful in tumor studies and studies on immune responses.RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Obesity, Morbid: The condition of weighing two, three, or more times the ideal weight, so called because it is associated with many serious and life-threatening disorders. In the BODY MASS INDEX, morbid obesity is defined as having a BMI greater than 40.0 kg/m2.Drug Resistance, Neoplasm: Resistance or diminished response of a neoplasm to an antineoplastic agent in humans, animals, or cell or tissue cultures.Gynecologic Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the female genitalia.United StatesDisease Progression: The worsening of a disease over time. This concept is most often used for chronic and incurable diseases where the stage of the disease is an important determinant of therapy and prognosis.Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction: A variation of the PCR technique in which cDNA is made from RNA via reverse transcription. The resultant cDNA is then amplified using standard PCR protocols.Monitoring, Intraoperative: The constant checking on the state or condition of a patient during the course of a surgical operation (e.g., checking of vital signs).Length of Stay: The period of confinement of a patient to a hospital or other health facility.Estradiol: The 17-beta-isomer of estradiol, an aromatized C18 steroid with hydroxyl group at 3-beta- and 17-beta-position. Estradiol-17-beta is the most potent form of mammalian estrogenic steroids.Recurrence: The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.Anesthesia, General: Procedure in which patients are induced into an unconscious state through use of various medications so that they do not feel pain during surgery.Digestive System Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the digestive system or its parts.Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Adenocarcinoma: A malignant epithelial tumor with a glandular organization.Fluorouracil: A pyrimidine analog that is an antineoplastic antimetabolite. It interferes with DNA synthesis by blocking the THYMIDYLATE SYNTHETASE conversion of deoxyuridylic acid to thymidylic acid.Signal Transduction: The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.Patient Selection: Criteria and standards used for the determination of the appropriateness of the inclusion of patients with specific conditions in proposed treatment plans and the criteria used for the inclusion of subjects in various clinical trials and other research protocols.Cyclophosphamide: Precursor of an alkylating nitrogen mustard antineoplastic and immunosuppressive agent that must be activated in the LIVER to form the active aldophosphamide. It has been used in the treatment of LYMPHOMA and LEUKEMIA. Its side effect, ALOPECIA, has been used for defleecing sheep. Cyclophosphamide may also cause sterility, birth defects, mutations, and cancer.Lymph Nodes: They are oval or bean shaped bodies (1 - 30 mm in diameter) located along the lymphatic system.Registries: The systems and processes involved in the establishment, support, management, and operation of registers, e.g., disease registers.Biopsy: Removal and pathologic examination of specimens in the form of small pieces of tissue from the living body.Chi-Square Distribution: A distribution in which a variable is distributed like the sum of the squares of any given independent random variable, each of which has a normal distribution with mean of zero and variance of one. The chi-square test is a statistical test based on comparison of a test statistic to a chi-square distribution. The oldest of these tests are used to detect whether two or more population distributions differ from one another.DNA, Neoplasm: DNA present in neoplastic tissue.Preoperative Period: The period before a surgical operation.Blood Loss, Surgical: Loss of blood during a surgical procedure.Survivors: Persons who have experienced a prolonged survival after serious disease or who continue to live with a usually life-threatening condition as well as family members, significant others, or individuals surviving traumatic life events.Stapes Surgery: Surgery performed in which part of the STAPES, a bone in the middle ear, is removed and a prosthesis is placed to help transmit sound between the middle ear and inner ear.Apoptosis: One of the mechanisms by which CELL DEATH occurs (compare with NECROSIS and AUTOPHAGOCYTOSIS). Apoptosis is the mechanism responsible for the physiological deletion of cells and appears to be intrinsically programmed. It is characterized by distinctive morphologic changes in the nucleus and cytoplasm, chromatin cleavage at regularly spaced sites, and the endonucleolytic cleavage of genomic DNA; (DNA FRAGMENTATION); at internucleosomal sites. This mode of cell death serves as a balance to mitosis in regulating the size of animal tissues and in mediating pathologic processes associated with tumor growth.Gastric Bypass: Surgical procedure in which the STOMACH is transected high on the body. The resulting small proximal gastric pouch is joined to any parts of the SMALL INTESTINE by an end-to-side SURGICAL ANASTOMOSIS, depending on the amounts of intestinal surface being bypasses. This procedure is used frequently in the treatment of MORBID OBESITY by limiting the size of functional STOMACH, food intake, and food absorption.Epirubicin: An anthracycline which is the 4'-epi-isomer of doxorubicin. The compound exerts its antitumor effects by interference with the synthesis and function of DNA.Feasibility Studies: Studies to determine the advantages or disadvantages, practicability, or capability of accomplishing a projected plan, study, or project.Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulators: A structurally diverse group of compounds distinguished from ESTROGENS by their ability to bind and activate ESTROGEN RECEPTORS but act as either an agonist or antagonist depending on the tissue type and hormonal milieu. They are classified as either first generation because they demonstrate estrogen agonist properties in the ENDOMETRIUM or second generation based on their patterns of tissue specificity. (Horm Res 1997;48:155-63)Abdomen: That portion of the body that lies between the THORAX and the PELVIS.Ki-67 Antigen: A CELL CYCLE and tumor growth marker which can be readily detected using IMMUNOCYTOCHEMISTRY methods. Ki-67 is a nuclear antigen present only in the nuclei of cycling cells.Lung Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the LUNG.Neoplasms: New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic: Works about clinical trials that involve at least one test treatment and one control treatment, concurrent enrollment and follow-up of the test- and control-treated groups, and in which the treatments to be administered are selected by a random process, such as the use of a random-numbers table.Blotting, Western: Identification of proteins or peptides that have been electrophoretically separated by blot transferring from the electrophoresis gel to strips of nitrocellulose paper, followed by labeling with antibody probes.Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized: Antibodies from non-human species whose protein sequences have been modified to make them nearly identical with human antibodies. If the constant region and part of the variable region are replaced, they are called humanized. If only the constant region is modified they are called chimeric. INN names for humanized antibodies end in -zumab.Taxoids: A group of diterpenoid CYCLODECANES named for the taxanes that were discovered in the TAXUS tree. The action on MICROTUBULES has made some of them useful as ANTINEOPLASTIC AGENTS.
The person may also experience seroma, a buildup of fluid; dehiscence (wound separation) and deep vein thrombosis (blood clots ... Targeted areas include the arms, buttocks and thighs, abdomen, and breasts.[44] These procedures are taken slowly, step by step ... Gastric bypass surgery[edit]. Main article: Gastric bypass surgery. A common form of gastric bypass surgery is the Roux-en-Y ... "American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery.. *^ "Bariatric Surgery Linked to Increased Fracture Risk". Science Daily ...
When there is post-operative swelling after breast surgery or core needle biopsy, a breast ultrasound examination may be ... A resolving hematoma may liquify to form a seroma. Post-surgical breast hematomas can also impede wound healing and therefore ... breast injury or surgery) or due to a non-traumatic cause. Symptoms may include visible discoloring (ecchymosis), breast pain, ... for example breast reduction or breast enhancement) and for non-cosmetic surgery (for example lymph node removal, lumpectomy, ...
Seromas are particularly common after breast surgery (for example after mastectomy), abdominal surgeries, and reconstructive ... A seroma is a pocket of clear serous fluid that sometimes develops in the body after surgery. This fluid is composed of blood ... In some cases a seroma may need to be drained prior to a course of radiotherapy adjuvant to surgery[citation needed]. The main ... Essentials of Breast Surgery: A Volume in the Surgical Foundations Series. Elsevier Health Sciences. p. 177. ISBN 0-323-07464-2 ...
"A malignant late seroma 20 years after breast cancer and saline implants". Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. 131 (4): 655e-7e ... Breast surgery is a form of surgery performed on the breast. Types include: Breast reduction surgery Augmentation mammoplasty ... a less radical cancer surgery than mastectomy Mastopexy, or breast lift surgery Surgery for breast abscess, including incision ... surgeries. The combined effects of radiation and breast cancer surgery can in particular lead to complications such as breast ...
... is the plastic surgery procedure for reducing the size of large breasts. In a breast reduction surgery for re-establishing a ... The post-operative complications occurred included seroma, wound dehiscence, hematoma; whereas partial NAC necrosis occurred in ... breast-surgery and breast-disease histories, family history of breast cancer, and complaints of neck, back, shoulder pain, ... 500 gm increase per breast) or with gigantomastia (>1,000 gm increase per breast). Breast reduction surgery has two (2) ...
The American Society of Plastic Surgery (ASPS) states, "CD30 is the main diagnostic test that must be performed on the seroma ... The breast implant has no clinical bearing upon lumpectomy breast-conservation surgery for women who developed breast cancer ... "Cohesive silicone gel breast implants in aesthetic and reconstructive breast surgery". Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. 116 ... Breastfeeding after Breast Surgery, La Leche League, contains references.. *^ Breastfeeding and Breast Implants, Selected ...
The American Society of Plastic Surgery (ASPS) states, "CD30 is the main diagnostic test that must be performed on the seroma ... The breast implant has no clinical bearing upon lumpectomy breast-conservation surgery for women who developed breast cancer ... "Cohesive silicone gel breast implants in aesthetic and reconstructive breast surgery". Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. 116 ... Redirected from Breast augmentation surgery). "Boob job" redirects here. For the stimulation of the penis by the breasts and ...
The American Society of Plastic Surgery (ASPS) states, "CD30 is the main diagnostic test that must be performed on the seroma ... The breast implant has no clinical bearing upon lumpectomy breast-conservation surgery for women who developed breast cancer ... Breast Breast augmentation (Augmentation mammoplasty) Breast enlargement supplements Breast reconstruction Breast reduction ... "Cohesive silicone gel breast implants in aesthetic and reconstructive breast surgery". Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. 116 ...
"Cohesive silicone gel breast implants in aesthetic and reconstructive breast surgery". Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. 116 ... seroma (fluid accumulation), incision-site breakdown (wound infection). Complications specific to breast augmentation include ... The augmented breast The woman with breast implants is able to breast-feed her infant; yet breast implant devices occasionally ... breast reduction, breast reconstruction, and liposuction of the breast. Nonetheless, detecting breast cancer is primary, and ...
A check-up appointment is carried out after a week for puncture of seroma. If the surgery has minimal complications, the ... Ho Quoc Ch, Chaput B, Garrido I, André A, Grolleau JL, Chavoin JP; Management of breast asymmetry associated with primary ... Theresa D. Luu MD (November 2009). "Surgery for Recurrent Pectus Deformities". The Annals of Thoracic Surgery. 88 (5): 1627- ... "Use of CT scans in selection of patients for pectus excavatum surgery: a preliminary report". Journal of Pediatric Surgery. 22 ...
The surgery is aimed to remove all breast tissue that could potentially develop into breast cancer. The surgery is generally ... and the seroma (buildup of clear fluid in the wound). If the lymph nodes are also removed, additional side effects may occur.[2 ... "Surgery for Breast Cancer." Surgery for Breast Cancer. N.p., n.d. Web. 02 Aug. 2014. ... List of surgeries by type. References[edit]. *^ "Mastectomy , Lumpectomy , Breast Cancer , MedlinePlus". Retrieved 2018-11-07. ...
"Clinical Policy Bulletin: Breast Reduction Surgery and Gynecomastia Surgery". Aetna Inc. 2012. Retrieved 12 February 2013. are ... changes in sensation in the breast, necrosis of the areola or nipple, seroma, noticeable or painful scars, and contour ... Many insurance companies deny coverage for surgery for gynecomastia treatment or male breast reduction on the basis that it is ... However, since breast cancer is a rare cause of breast tissue enlargement in men, mammography is rarely needed. If mammography ...
"Clinical Policy Bulletin: Breast Reduction Surgery and Gynecomastia Surgery". Aetna Inc. 2012. Retrieved 12 February 2013.. are ... changes in sensation in the breast, necrosis of the areola or nipple, seroma, noticeable or painful scars, and contour ... In the United States, many insurance companies deny coverage for surgery for gynecomastia treatment or male breast reduction on ... Other causes of male breast enlargement such as mastitis,[14][36] breast cancer, pseudogynecomastia, lipoma, sebaceous cyst, ...
Gynecomastia surgery is a breast reduction surgery for men. The condition Gynecomastia has numerous causes to the growth of ... Some of the common risks are the development of a hematoma, organ damage, deep vein thrombosis, seroma, excessive bleeding, ... Body modification "cosmetic surgery". Retrieved 2015-09-01. "Cosmetic Surgery vs. Plastic Surgery ,American Board of Cosmetic ... Ear Surgery is performed in order to improve the look of the ear. Common reasons one feels they require the surgery can be due ...
This type of surgery is performed to treat a breast condition known as hypertrophy, which refers to oversized breasts. This ... Seroma Suture rupture Swelling Visible scar Death The cost of a "tummy tuck" varies from country to country and even within ... Breast reduction, or reduction mammoplasty, is the cosmetic surgery used in resizing the breast, in women with oversized ... Abdominoplasty or "tummy tuck" is a cosmetic surgery procedure used to make the abdomen thinner and more firm. The surgery ...
Puncture wounds in the organs (visceral perforations) may require surgery for repair. They can also prove fatal. Seroma is a ... In 2015 liposuction surpassed breast augmentation surgery as the most commonly performed cosmetic procedure in the US. ... Jewell, M (2008). "Innovation in Plastic and Aesthetic Surgery Lipoplasty". Innovations in Plastic and Aesthetic Surgery. pp. ... Liposuction, or simply lipo, is a type of cosmetic surgery that removes fat from the human body in an attempt to change its ...
"Tummy Tuck Surgery Explained -Dr Lanzer The Leading Surgeron". Dr Lanzer Cosmetic Surgeon. Retrieved 2016-01-26. "Brand Name ... Lipotucks can have the risk of seroma, which happens when some fluid collects in the surgical area that requires a small ... most commonly breast augmentation. These have been called the "mommy makeover trifecta." Abdominoplasty Liposuction Plastic ... The procedure is a single cosmetic surgery combining abdominoplasty (a.k.a. a "tummy tuck") and liposuction. Some ...
Breast implant Breast reduction (reduction mammoplasty) Mammoplasty Plastic surgery De la Torre, Jorge (2009). "Breast ... Serious medical complications include occurrences of seroma, a pocket of locally accumulated serous fluid, and occurrences of ... Post-operative surgery scars upon the breast hemisphere can alter the way that the woman conducts her breast self-examination ... In surgical praxis, the modified breast lift often is a sub-ordinate surgery within a mastopexy-breast augmentation procedure, ...
Breast lift or mastopexy. By trimming excess tissue from the upper breast, the surgeon can move breasts which usually droop to ... 2014). "Body contouring surgery after bariatric surgery: A study of cost as a barrier and impact on psychological well-being". ... The patient may also experience seroma, a buildup of fluid; dehiscence (wound separation) and deep vein thrombosis (blood clots ... Bariatric surgery (weight loss surgery) includes a variety of procedures performed on people who have obesity. Weight loss is ...
Post-operative surgery scars upon the breast hemisphere can alter the way that the woman conducts her breast self-examination ... Serious medical complications include occurrences of seroma, a pocket of locally accumulated serous fluid, and occurrences of ... Surgical anatomy of the breastEdit. Main article: Breast. CompositionEdit. Surgically, the breast is a milk-producing apocrine ... In surgical praxis, the modified breast lift often is a sub-ordinate surgery within a mastopexy-breast augmentation procedure, ...
The use of FG following breast and axillary surgery did not reduce the incidence of postoperative seroma, mean volume of seroma ... Fibrin glue instillation under skin flaps to prevent seroma-related morbidity following breast and axillary surgery. A higher ... The use of FG under skin flaps following breast and axillary surgery failed to reduce the incidence of postoperative seroma ( ... breast and axillary surgery and to establish whether FG is an efficient modality to prevent postoperative seroma and seroma- ...
The findings suggest that the type of surgery is a predicting factor for seroma formation in breast cancer patients. ... received breast preservation surgery. Seroma occurred in 35% of patients. In multivariate logistic regression analysis an ... No other factor studied was found to significantly effect the seroma formation after breast cancer surgery. ... Seroma formation was studied in relation to age, type of surgery, tumor size, nodal involvement, preoperative chemotherapy, ...
A common development after any breast surgery. Find out all about it here. Should I worry? Should it be drained? and much more. ... Breast Seroma. Seroma is a pocket of clear fluid which sometimes develops following surgery. ... Modified Radical Mastectomy (MRM) versus Breast-conserving Surgery (BCS). Treatments of seroma. The good news is that the body ... Only the severity of breast surgery has a proven bearing on seroma development. Other studies suggest that the risk of seromas ...
Saline breast implants are available to women 18+.. Seroma. A seroma is an accumulation of fluid that collects under the ... See "Shaped Breast Implant" or "Anatomical Breast Implant.". Textured Breast Implants. Textured breast implants go through a ... See "Teardrop Breast Implant" or "Anatomical Breast Implant.". Silicone Breast Implant. Silicone breast implants are composed ... Breast revision surgery is required to remove the damaged breast implant and, often, the surrounding capsule.. Saline Breast ...
The type of surgery youve had will affect the side effects you experience. Not all women have these side effects, but most ... Seroma. In some cases, when drains have been removed, extra fluid collects in or under the wound. This is called a seroma, and ... Home , Cancer information , Managing cancer side effects , Breast prostheses and reconstruction , Breast reconstruction ... We are grateful to Amoena Australia Pty Ltd for supplying the breast form images, which appear in this section. The breast ...
Fifty patients who had breast cancer were included in the ... conservative surgery and locally advanced breast cancer were ... Patients who underwent simultaneous reconstructive surgery and breast conservative. surgery. - Locally advanced breast cancer. ... Seroma formation , interval of Seroma resolution , Seroma aspirated volume and number of. postoperative visits Seroma formation ... axillary surgery or patients who underwent simultaneous reconstructive surgery and breast. ...
Mesh use in surgical breast reconstruction is becoming increasingly common; however, there is still no consensus on whether ... Seroma formation. Animated image of seroma development between breast tissue envelope and pectoralis major/mesh (ADM) layer [28 ... "breast reconstruction AND synthetic mesh," "breast reconstruction AND Vicryl," "breast reconstruction AND TIGR," and "breast ... Kim T, Cho H. The suitability of absorbable mesh insertion for oncoplastic breast surgery in patients with breast cancer ...
Find out what to expect if youre considering breast reconstruction. Learn about the options, incuding TRAM, DIEP and ... surgery that removes your breast to treat or prevent breast cancer. Breast reconstruction with flap surgery involves taking a ... Breast reconstruction with flap surgery is a complex procedure performed by a plastic surgeon. Much of the breast ... Breast reconstruction with flap surgery is the most complex breast reconstructive option. Your surgeon transfers a section of ...
However, after the surgery, I developed an inguinal seroma which I j... ... A quick primer on the different ways breast cancer can be treated. ... After the seroma formed, he did the second surgery (three weeks later). At the time of seroma removal, he sent a slide to the ... After the seroma formed, he did the second surgery (three weeks later). At the time of seroma removal, he sent a slide to the ...
They are most common as a side effect of breast surgery, usually during treatment for breast cancer or benign lumps. Learn ... A seroma is a buildup of fluid where tissue has been removed from a persons body, often occurring after surgery or an injury. ... All you need to know about breast reconstruction surgery Breast reconstruction surgery is carried out after removing one or ... One study of 158 participants found that 35 percent of patients experienced a seroma after surgery for breast cancer. Another ...
Breast implants are considered cosmetic surgery, so insurance companies typically wont cover them. However, "Breast Implants ... Breasts may be deflated after pregnancy. You may have heard that breast implants are the only reliable way to lift breasts. ... Many patients have concerns that after getting breast implants it may result in less accurate testing for breast cancer, but ... and Body Dysmorphic Disorder and Cosmetic Surgery (2006) reported that the woman who underwent breast augmentation surgery also ...
... has been the one consistently excellent reference for every specialist who uses plastic surgery techniques or works in ... For more than 50 years Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery® ... Discussion: Diagnosis and Management of Seroma following Breast ... Discussion: Diagnosis and Management of Seroma following Breast Augmentation: An Update. Haeck, Phillip C.; Eaves, Felmont F. ... Decolonization Strategies to Control Staphylococcus aureus Infections in Breast Implant Surgery. Silvestri, Luciano; van Saene ...
Material and methods : One hundred and fifty breast cancer patients were prospectively enrolled in the study. All patients had ... Introduction : The aim of the work was to analyze the impact of selected factors on the incidence of seroma formation in breast ... Seroma formation following breast cancer surgery. Breast J 2003; 9: 385-8. 33. Petrek JA, Peters MM, Nori S, Knauer C, Kinne DW ... Aetiology of seroma formation in patients undergoing surgery for breast cancer. Breast 2000; 9: 144-8. 9. OHea BJ, Ho MN, ...
... on total seroma volumes from the breast, axilla and back (donor site) after LD breast reconstruction. Secondary outcomes were ... Breast Reduction Surgery and Gynecomastia Surgery, and CPB 0244 - Wound Care.. Background. Breast reconstruction surgery ... revision surgery involving the breast and/or donor site, and surgery on the opposite breast to correct asymmetry. ... Aetna considers breast reconstructive surgery to correct breast asymmetry cosmetic except for the following conditions:. * ...
Learn about implant surgery after breast cancer and side effects. ... Breast implants are made of rubberized silicone, filled with ... Breast implant surgery may cause:* infection. * buildup of fluid (called seroma) in the breast ... Women with larger breasts may need surgery on the other, unaffected breast to balance the appearance of their breasts. ... Types of surgery for breast implants. A breast implant is placed in a space under chest muscle. Doctors can use the following ...
Learn about the types of operations used to treat breast cancer, including lumpectomy, mastectomy, lymph node surgery and ... Collection of fluid at the operative site (seroma). *Pain. *Permanent scarring. *Loss of or altered sensation in the chest and ... Breast cancer surgery. Overview. Breast cancer surgery is a key component of breast cancer treatment that involves removing the ... Breast cancer surgery is used to treat most stages of breast cancer, including:. *A high risk of breast cancer. People with a ...
Some women have their breast(s) reconstructed using muscle, fat and skin from their back. This is called a latissimus dorsi ... Surgery to the other breast. Some women have surgery to the other breast so it matches with the size of the reconstructed ... Fluid under the back wound (seroma). This is the most common problem soon after LD flap surgery. Seromas usually get better ... If breast-conserving surgery removes a large amount of tissue from your breast, reconstructive surgery may be an option for you ...
6. Breast Implant Size Breast implant size is one of the most important decisions in breast implants surgery. Because of this, ... 7. Do you perform revisional / correctional breast surgery? An entire page has been devoted to Breast Revisional Surgery. ... Thai Surgery Nightmare Another Thai breast augmentation surgery disaster that Dr Tavakoli will now take on as a patient to ... There are three choices about where to make the skin incisions for breast enlargement surgery. They can be in the breast fold ( ...
The person may also experience seroma, a buildup of fluid; dehiscence (wound separation) and deep vein thrombosis (blood clots ... Targeted areas include the arms, buttocks and thighs, abdomen, and breasts.[44] These procedures are taken slowly, step by step ... Gastric bypass surgery[edit]. Main article: Gastric bypass surgery. A common form of gastric bypass surgery is the Roux-en-Y ... "American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery.. *^ "Bariatric Surgery Linked to Increased Fracture Risk". Science Daily ...
... surgery involves creating a breast mound that comes as close as possible to the form and appearance of the natural breast. ... What is breast reconstruction?. Breast reconstruction is surgery to create a new breast shape in place of a breast that has ... The surgery may be done to reconstruct either one breast (unilateral) or both breasts (bilateral). The goal of the surgery is ... Breast Cancer Surgery Preserves Artery For Future Heart Surgery. *"love Handles" Repurposed For Breast Reconstruction In Women ...
Seroma formation after breast cancer surgery: what we have learned in the last two decades. J Breast Cancer. 2012;15(4):373-80 ... Seroma formation following breast cancer surgery. Breast J. 2003;9(5):385-8, http://dx.doi.org/10.1046/j.1524-4741.2003.09504.x ... Ebner F, deGregorio N, Vorwerk E, Janni W, Wöckel A, Varga D. Should a drain be placed in early breast cancer surgery? Breast ... Key words: Breast Cancer; Breast-conserving Surgery; Lymph Node Excision; Drainage; Postoperative Complications ...
Seroma formation in cancer breast surgery. Treatment of auricular haematoma by suction drainage.. Non absorbable intermittent ... before surgery for lobectomy, or in any patient having difficulty with retained secretions. A side effect of the treatment in ... short duration closed suction drainage appeared advantageous for decreasing the incidence and degree of seroma formation and ...
... flap breast reconstruction replaces lost breast tissue. Visit Nuffield Health to find out more... ... Further surgery needed. *Seroma - fluid buildup in your wound. *Wound breakdown. *Loss of sensation or numbness ... All the surgery on your breast, including lymph nodal surgery (if required) will be performed through the same scar. Therefore ... flap breast reconstruction is suitable for some patients whose breast cancer is in the outer part of the breast. The procedure ...
2004) showed that seroma formation after breast surgery was independent of compression bandage.. Post surgical breast binders ... The day after his surgery, he posted his photo on Instagram, sitting in a wheelchair, his head wrapped in compression bandage ... facing keyhole surgery, knows all too well ...
table border=0 cellpadding=0 cellspacing=0 width=525, ,tr, ,td, Women who are diagnosed with localized breast cancer, ... Seroma (clear fluid trapped in the wound) *Lymphedema: chronic arm swelling (if lymph nodes are removed) ... Women who are diagnosed with localized breast cancer, cancer that has not spread past the breast, typically undergo surgery and ... Once the breast cancer was found to have progressed in the women on drug therapy, they then received surgery, radiation, or ...
  • Additional information noted in article anaplastic large cell lymphoma of the breast arising around mammary implant capsule: an italian report written in aesthetic plastic surgery 2013 article notes in regards to the right side, "necrosis and chronic inflammation signs are present" and "skin above the implant became red and painful and the patient had febrile episodes. (fda.gov)
  • Increased breast width and size of AlloDerm matrix implanted were correlated with higher rates of both minor and significant skin necrosis and of cellulitis. (rti.org)
  • A literature search returned key articles that showed a significant decrease in surgical-site infections by performing nasal swab evaluation to treat methicillin-sensitive and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus before surgery with mupirocin nasal ointment and 5 days of chlorhexidine scrub to the surgical area. (semanticscholar.org)
  • A seroma is a collection of liquid that happens in a surgical site. (go.com)
  • Postbiopsy craniocaudal mammogram of the breast obtained immediately after stereotactic biopsy of a lesion (same patient as in Image above). (medscape.com)
  • Any patient who has completely refused the recommended standard primary treatment plan following biopsy confirmation of breast cancer is considered as refusal of standard treatment. (scienceblogs.com)
  • Riegler M, Cosentini E, Bischof G. Update and economic aspects of the harmonic scalpel in general surgery. (springer.com)
  • Shamim M. Diathermy vs. scalpel skin incisions in general surgery: double-blind, randomized, clinical trial. (springer.com)
  • The assumed duration until drain removal after surgery was 7.2 days in the control group (conventional use of an electrocautery scalpel and suture ligation) and 5.8 days in the study group (use of the LigaSure TM Small Jaw). (aacrjournals.org)