BrazilIndians, South American: Individual members of South American ethnic groups with historic ancestral origins in Asia.Translating: Conversion from one language to another language.Translations: Products resulting from the conversion of one language to another.Cultural Characteristics: Those aspects or characteristics which identify a culture.Propolis: A resinous substance obtained from beehives that is used traditionally as an antimicrobial. It is a heterogeneous mixture of many substances.Purpura: Purplish or brownish red discoloration, easily visible through the epidermis, caused by hemorrhage into the tissues. When the size of the discolorization is >2-3 cm it is generally called Ecchymoses (ECCHYMOSIS).Language: A verbal or nonverbal means of communicating ideas or feelings.Bibliometrics: The use of statistical methods in the analysis of a body of literature to reveal the historical development of subject fields and patterns of authorship, publication, and use. Formerly called statistical bibliography. (from The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Trees: Woody, usually tall, perennial higher plants (Angiosperms, Gymnosperms, and some Pterophyta) having usually a main stem and numerous branches.Cross-Cultural Comparison: Comparison of various psychological, sociological, or cultural factors in order to assess the similarities or diversities occurring in two or more different cultures or societies.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.Genotype: The genetic constitution of the individual, comprising the ALLELES present at each GENETIC LOCUS.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Bromeliaceae: A plant family of the order Bromeliales, subclass Zingiberidae, class Liliopsida (monocotyledons).Journal Impact Factor: A quantitative measure of the frequency on average with which articles in a journal have been cited in a given period of time.Cities: A large or important municipality of a country, usually a major metropolitan center.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Polymerase Chain Reaction: In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.Genetic Variation: Genotypic differences observed among individuals in a population.National Health Programs: Components of a national health care system which administer specific services, e.g., national health insurance.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Baccharis: A plant genus of the family ASTERACEAE. Other plants called broom include CYTISUS; SPARTIUM; and BROMUS.Conservation of Natural Resources: The protection, preservation, restoration, and rational use of all resources in the total environment.Endemic Diseases: The constant presence of diseases or infectious agents within a given geographic area or population group. It may also refer to the usual prevalence of a given disease with such area or group. It includes holoendemic and hyperendemic diseases. A holoendemic disease is one for which a high prevalent level of infection begins early in life and affects most of the child population, leading to a state of equilibrium such that the adult population shows evidence of the disease much less commonly than do children (malaria in many communities is a holoendemic disease). A hyperendemic disease is one that is constantly present at a high incidence and/or prevalence rate and affects all groups equally. (Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 3d ed, p53, 78, 80)Malaria, Vivax: Malaria caused by PLASMODIUM VIVAX. This form of malaria is less severe than MALARIA, FALCIPARUM, but there is a higher probability for relapses to occur. Febrile paroxysms often occur every other day.Publishing: "The business or profession of the commercial production and issuance of literature" (Webster's 3d). It includes the publisher, publication processes, editing and editors. Production may be by conventional printing methods or by electronic publishing.Population Density: Number of individuals in a population relative to space.Anacardiaceae: The sumac plant family in the order Sapindales, subclass Rosidae, class Magnoliopsida. They are tropical and subtropical trees, shrubs, and woody vines that have resin ducts in the bark. The sap of many of the species is irritating to the skin.Urban Population: The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.Ecosystem: A functional system which includes the organisms of a natural community together with their environment. (McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Psychometrics: Assessment of psychological variables by the application of mathematical procedures.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Public Sector: The area of a nation's economy that is tax-supported and under government control.Sex Distribution: The number of males and females in a given population. The distribution may refer to how many men or women or what proportion of either in the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Polymorphism, Genetic: The regular and simultaneous occurrence in a single interbreeding population of two or more discontinuous genotypes. The concept includes differences in genotypes ranging in size from a single nucleotide site (POLYMORPHISM, SINGLE NUCLEOTIDE) to large nucleotide sequences visible at a chromosomal level.Biomedical Research: Research that involves the application of the natural sciences, especially biology and physiology, to medicine.Oral Health: The optimal state of the mouth and normal functioning of the organs of the mouth without evidence of disease.Endangered Species: An animal or plant species in danger of extinction. Causes can include human activity, changing climate, or change in predator/prey ratios.Rivers: Large natural streams of FRESH WATER formed by converging tributaries and which empty into a body of water (lake or ocean).Seasons: Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Academies and Institutes: Organizations representing specialized fields which are accepted as authoritative; may be non-governmental, university or an independent research organization, e.g., National Academy of Sciences, Brookings Institution, etc.Plant Extracts: Concentrated pharmaceutical preparations of plants obtained by removing active constituents with a suitable solvent, which is evaporated away, and adjusting the residue to a prescribed standard.American Native Continental Ancestry Group: Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the continents of the Americas.Plasmodium vivax: A protozoan parasite that causes vivax malaria (MALARIA, VIVAX). This species is found almost everywhere malaria is endemic and is the only one that has a range extending into the temperate regions.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.FiresHospitals, Public: Hospitals controlled by various types of government, i.e., city, county, district, state or federal.Insect Vectors: Insects that transmit infective organisms from one host to another or from an inanimate reservoir to an animate host.Gene Frequency: The proportion of one particular in the total of all ALLELES for one genetic locus in a breeding POPULATION.Conjunctivitis, Bacterial: Purulent infections of the conjunctiva by several species of gram-negative, gram-positive, or acid-fast organisms. Some of the more commonly found genera causing conjunctival infections are Haemophilus, Streptococcus, Neisseria, and Chlamydia.Geography: The science dealing with the earth and its life, especially the description of land, sea, and air and the distribution of plant and animal life, including humanity and human industries with reference to the mutual relations of these elements. (From Webster, 3d ed)Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.Dalbergia: A plant genus of the family FABACEAE. Members of this genus can cause CONTACT DERMATITIS.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Age Distribution: The frequency of different ages or age groups in a given population. The distribution may refer to either how many or what proportion of the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Educational Status: Educational attainment or level of education of individuals.Dissertations, Academic as Topic: Dissertations embodying results of original research and especially substantiating a specific view, e.g., substantial papers written by candidates for an academic degree under the individual direction of a professor or papers written by undergraduates desirous of achieving honors or distinction.Databases, Bibliographic: Extensive collections, reputedly complete, of references and citations to books, articles, publications, etc., generally on a single subject or specialized subject area. Databases can operate through automated files, libraries, or computer disks. The concept should be differentiated from DATABASES, FACTUAL which is used for collections of data and facts apart from bibliographic references to them.Statistics, Nonparametric: A class of statistical methods applicable to a large set of probability distributions used to test for correlation, location, independence, etc. In most nonparametric statistical tests, the original scores or observations are replaced by another variable containing less information. An important class of nonparametric tests employs the ordinal properties of the data. Another class of tests uses information about whether an observation is above or below some fixed value such as the median, and a third class is based on the frequency of the occurrence of runs in the data. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p1284; Corsini, Concise Encyclopedia of Psychology, 1987, p764-5)Saccharum: A plant genus of the family POACEAE widely cultivated in the tropics for the sweet cane that is processed into sugar.Tropical Climate: A climate which is typical of equatorial and tropical regions, i.e., one with continually high temperatures with considerable precipitation, at least during part of the year. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Authorship: The profession of writing. Also the identity of the writer as the creator of a literary production.Famous PersonsPsychodidae: Small, hairy, moth-like flies which are of considerable public health importance as vectors of certain pathogenic organisms. Important disease-related genera are PHLEBOTOMUS, Lutzomyia, and Sergentomyia.DMF Index: "Decayed, missing and filled teeth," a routinely used statistical concept in dentistry.History of NursingNeurology: A medical specialty concerned with the study of the structures, functions, and diseases of the nervous system.Medicine, Traditional: Systems of medicine based on cultural beliefs and practices handed down from generation to generation. The concept includes mystical and magical rituals (SPIRITUAL THERAPIES); PHYTOTHERAPY; and other treatments which may not be explained by modern medicine.Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever: An acute febrile illness caused by RICKETTSIA RICKETTSII. It is transmitted to humans by bites of infected ticks and occurs only in North and South America. Characteristics include a sudden onset with headache and chills and fever lasting about two to three weeks. A cutaneous rash commonly appears on the extremities and trunk about the fourth day of illness.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA Technique: Technique that utilizes low-stringency polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification with single primers of arbitrary sequence to generate strain-specific arrays of anonymous DNA fragments. RAPD technique may be used to determine taxonomic identity, assess kinship relationships, analyze mixed genome samples, and create specific probes.Nursing: The field of nursing care concerned with the promotion, maintenance, and restoration of health.Malpighiaceae: A plant family of the order Polygalales, subclass Rosidae class, Magnoliopsida that are mostly shrubs and small trees. Many of the members contain indole alkaloids.Biodiversity: The variety of all native living organisms and their various forms and interrelationships.Alleles: Variant forms of the same gene, occupying the same locus on homologous CHROMOSOMES, and governing the variants in production of the same gene product.Seroepidemiologic Studies: EPIDEMIOLOGIC STUDIES based on the detection through serological testing of characteristic change in the serum level of specific ANTIBODIES. Latent subclinical infections and carrier states can thus be detected in addition to clinically overt cases.Polymorphism, Restriction Fragment Length: Variation occurring within a species in the presence or length of DNA fragment generated by a specific endonuclease at a specific site in the genome. Such variations are generated by mutations that create or abolish recognition sites for these enzymes or change the length of the fragment.Blood DonorsTime Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Dipteryx: A plant genus of the family FABACEAE. Members contain COUMARINS.Characiformes: An order of fresh water fish with 18 families and over 1600 species. The order includes CHARACINS, hatchetfish, piranhas, and TETRAS.Reference Values: The range or frequency distribution of a measurement in a population (of organisms, organs or things) that has not been selected for the presence of disease or abnormality.Hospitals, University: Hospitals maintained by a university for the teaching of medical students, postgraduate training programs, and clinical research.South AmericaTooth Injuries: Traumatic or other damage to teeth including fractures (TOOTH FRACTURES) or displacements (TOOTH LUXATION).Arecaceae: The palm family of order Arecales, subclass Arecidae, class Liliopsida.Dental Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to dental or oral health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Rickettsia rickettsii: A species of gram-negative, aerobic bacteria that is the etiologic agent of ROCKY MOUNTAIN SPOTTED FEVER. Its cells are slightly smaller and more uniform in size than those of RICKETTSIA PROWAZEKII.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Plants, Medicinal: Plants whose roots, leaves, seeds, bark, or other constituent parts possess therapeutic, tonic, purgative, curative or other pharmacologic attributes, when administered to man or animals.Hospitals, Private: A class of hospitals that includes profit or not-for-profit hospitals that are controlled by a legal entity other than a government agency. (Hospital Administration Terminology, AHA, 2d ed)Genetic Markers: A phenotypically recognizable genetic trait which can be used to identify a genetic locus, a linkage group, or a recombination event.Combretaceae: A plant family of the order Myrtales, subclass Rosidae, class Magnoliopsida. They are mostly trees and shrubs growing in warm areas.Space-Time Clustering: A statistically significant excess of cases of a disease, occurring within a limited space-time continuum.Mimosa: A plant genus of the family FABACEAE that contains kukulkanin, a CHALCONE.Dental Caries: Localized destruction of the tooth surface initiated by decalcification of the enamel followed by enzymatic lysis of organic structures and leading to cavity formation. If left unchecked, the cavity may penetrate the enamel and dentin and reach the pulp.Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.History, 19th Century: Time period from 1801 through 1900 of the common era.Triatominae: A subfamily of assassin bugs (REDUVIIDAE) that are obligate blood-suckers of vertebrates. Included are the genera TRIATOMA; RHODNIUS; and PANSTRONGYLUS, which are vectors of TRYPANOSOMA CRUZI, the agent of CHAGAS DISEASE in humans.Demography: Statistical interpretation and description of a population with reference to distribution, composition, or structure.Chi-Square Distribution: A distribution in which a variable is distributed like the sum of the squares of any given independent random variable, each of which has a normal distribution with mean of zero and variance of one. The chi-square test is a statistical test based on comparison of a test statistic to a chi-square distribution. The oldest of these tests are used to detect whether two or more population distributions differ from one another.Rhizophoraceae: A plant family of the order Rhizophorales, subclass Rosidae, class Magnoliopsida, that includes mangrove trees.Biomphalaria: A genus of planorbid freshwater snails, species of which are intermediate hosts of Schistosoma mansoni.Chagas Disease: Infection with the protozoan parasite TRYPANOSOMA CRUZI, a form of TRYPANOSOMIASIS endemic in Central and South America. It is named after the Brazilian physician Carlos Chagas, who discovered the parasite. Infection by the parasite (positive serologic result only) is distinguished from the clinical manifestations that develop years later, such as destruction of PARASYMPATHETIC GANGLIA; CHAGAS CARDIOMYOPATHY; and dysfunction of the ESOPHAGUS or COLON.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Population Dynamics: The pattern of any process, or the interrelationship of phenomena, which affects growth or change within a population.Haplotypes: The genetic constitution of individuals with respect to one member of a pair of allelic genes, or sets of genes that are closely linked and tend to be inherited together such as those of the MAJOR HISTOCOMPATIBILITY COMPLEX.African Continental Ancestry Group: Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the continent of Africa.Didelphis: A genus of large OPOSSUMS in the family Didelphidae, found in the Americas. The species Didelphis virginiana is prominent in North America.PortugalToothache: Pain in the adjacent areas of the teeth.Canidae: A family of terrestrial carnivores with long snouts and non-retractable claws. Members include COYOTES; DOGS; FOXES; JACKALS; RACCOON DOGS; and WOLVES.Microsatellite Repeats: A variety of simple repeat sequences that are distributed throughout the GENOME. They are characterized by a short repeat unit of 2-8 basepairs that is repeated up to 100 times. They are also known as short tandem repeats (STRs).Public Health Dentistry: A dental specialty concerned with the prevention of disease and the maintenance of oral health through promoting organized dental health programs at a community, state, or federal level.Malocclusion: Such malposition and contact of the maxillary and mandibular teeth as to interfere with the highest efficiency during the excursive movements of the jaw that are essential for mastication. (Jablonski, Illustrated Dictionary of Dentistry, 1982)Drugs, Essential: Drugs considered essential to meet the health needs of a population as well as to control drug costs.Chiroptera: Order of mammals whose members are adapted for flight. It includes bats, flying foxes, and fruit bats.Private Sector: That distinct portion of the institutional, industrial, or economic structure of a country that is controlled or owned by non-governmental, private interests.Dentition, Permanent: The 32 teeth of adulthood that either replace or are added to the complement of deciduous teeth. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)Rickettsia Infections: Infections by the genus RICKETTSIA.Dermatology: A medical specialty concerned with the skin, its structure, functions, diseases, and treatment.Constitution and Bylaws: The fundamental principles and laws adopted by an organization for the regulation and governing of its affairs.BooksMyxozoa: Single-celled, aquatic endoparasitic worms that are currently considered belonging to the phylum CNIDARIA. They have a complex life cycle and parasitize a wide range of hosts including FISHES; ANNELIDA; and BRYOZOA.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Amaranthaceae: A family of flowering plants in the order Caryophyllales, with about 60 genera and more than 800 species of plants, with a few shrubs, trees, and vines. The leaves usually have nonindented edges.Genetics, Population: The discipline studying genetic composition of populations and effects of factors such as GENETIC SELECTION, population size, MUTATION, migration, and GENETIC DRIFT on the frequencies of various GENOTYPES and PHENOTYPES using a variety of GENETIC TECHNIQUES.Leishmania guyanensis: A parasitic hemoflagellate of the subgenus Leishmania viannia that infects man and animals and causes mucocutaneous leishmaniasis (LEISHMANIASIS, MUCOCUTANEOUS). Transmission is by Lutzomyia sandflies.Government Agencies: Administrative units of government responsible for policy making and management of governmental activities.Porcupines: Common name for large, quilled rodents (RODENTIA) comprised of two families: Old World porcupines (Hystricidae) and New World porcupines (Erethizontidae).Genetic Predisposition to Disease: A latent susceptibility to disease at the genetic level, which may be activated under certain conditions.Research Personnel: Those individuals engaged in research.Pulmonary Medicine: A subspecialty of internal medicine concerned with the study of the RESPIRATORY SYSTEM. It is especially concerned with diagnosis and treatment of diseases and defects of the lungs and bronchial tree.History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.Environmental Policy: A course of action or principle adopted or proposed by a government, party, business, or individual that concerns human interactions with nature and natural resources.Antibodies, Protozoan: Immunoglobulins produced in a response to PROTOZOAN ANTIGENS.Pedigree: The record of descent or ancestry, particularly of a particular condition or trait, indicating individual family members, their relationships, and their status with respect to the trait or condition.Anti-Bacterial Agents: Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.Steel: A tough, malleable, iron-based alloy containing up to, but no more than, two percent carbon and often other metals. It is used in medicine and dentistry in implants and instrumentation.DNA, Protozoan: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of protozoa.Felidae: The cat family in the order CARNIVORA comprised of muscular, deep-chested terrestrial carnivores with a highly predatory lifestyle.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Orchidaceae: A plant family of the order Orchidales, subclass Liliidae, class Liliopsida (monocotyledons). All orchids have the same bilaterally symmetrical flower structure, with three sepals, but the flowers vary greatly in color and shape.Entomophthorales: An order of fungi comprising mostly insect pathogens, though some infect mammals including humans. Strict host specificity make these fungi a focus of many biological control studies.Scorpions: Arthropods of the order Scorpiones, of which 1500 to 2000 species have been described. The most common live in tropical or subtropical areas. They are nocturnal and feed principally on insects and other arthropods. They are large arachnids but do not attack man spontaneously. They have a venomous sting. Their medical significance varies considerably and is dependent on their habits and venom potency rather than on their size. At most, the sting is equivalent to that of a hornet but certain species possess a highly toxic venom potentially fatal to humans. (From Dorland, 27th ed; Smith, Insects and Other Arthropods of Medical Importance, 1973, p417; Barnes, Invertebrate Zoology, 5th ed, p503)Forestry: The science of developing, caring for, or cultivating forests.Cylindrospermopsis: A form-genus of CYANOBACTERIA in the order Nostocales, characterized by thin trichomes, cylindrical akinetes, and terminal heterocysts.Agriculture: The science, art or practice of cultivating soil, producing crops, and raising livestock.Bignoniaceae: A plant family of the order Lamiales. The family is characterized by oppositely paired, usually compound leaves and bell- or funnel-shaped, bisexual flowers having a five-lobed calyx and corolla.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.Nursing Services: A general concept referring to the organization and administration of nursing activities.Luffa: A plant genus of the family CUCURBITACEAE known for the fruit which is the source of the luffa sponge and the seeds which contain luffin.Parasitic Sensitivity Tests: Tests that demonstrate the relative effectiveness of chemotherapeutic agents against specific parasites.Leishmaniasis, Visceral: A chronic disease caused by LEISHMANIA DONOVANI and transmitted by the bite of several sandflies of the genera Phlebotomus and Lutzomyia. It is commonly characterized by fever, chills, vomiting, anemia, hepatosplenomegaly, leukopenia, hypergammaglobulinemia, emaciation, and an earth-gray color of the skin. The disease is classified into three main types according to geographic distribution: Indian, Mediterranean (or infantile), and African.Atlantic Islands: Widely scattered islands in the Atlantic Ocean as far north as the AZORES and as far south as the South Sandwich Islands, with the greatest concentration found in the CARIBBEAN REGION. They include Annobon Island, Ascension, Canary Islands, Falkland Islands, Fernando Po (also called Isla de Bioko and Bioko), Gough Island, Madeira, Sao Tome and Principe, Saint Helena, and Tristan da Cunha.Atlantic OceanStudents: Individuals enrolled in a school or formal educational program.Income: Revenues or receipts accruing from business enterprise, labor, or invested capital.European Continental Ancestry Group: Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the continent of Europe.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Lippia: A plant genus of the family VERBENACEAE. Lippsidoquinone; TRITERPENES; SESQUITERPENES; and THYMOL have been found in this genus. Plant extracts have cytotoxic activity. It is sometimes called Mexican oregano but that confuses it with real oregano (ORIGANUM).Parasite Egg Count: Determination of parasite eggs in feces.HIV Infections: Includes the spectrum of human immunodeficiency virus infections that range from asymptomatic seropositivity, thru AIDS-related complex (ARC), to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).Rural Population: The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.Species Specificity: The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.Spatial Analysis: Techniques which study entities using their topological, geometric, or geographic properties.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Arachnida: A class of Arthropoda that includes SPIDERS; TICKS; MITES; and SCORPIONS.Disease Vectors: Invertebrates or non-human vertebrates which transmit infective organisms from one host to another.Leprosy: A chronic granulomatous infection caused by MYCOBACTERIUM LEPRAE. The granulomatous lesions are manifested in the skin, the mucous membranes, and the peripheral nerves. Two polar or principal types are lepromatous and tuberculoid.Body Mass Index: An indicator of body density as determined by the relationship of BODY WEIGHT to BODY HEIGHT. BMI=weight (kg)/height squared (m2). BMI correlates with body fat (ADIPOSE TISSUE). Their relationship varies with age and gender. For adults, BMI falls into these categories: below 18.5 (underweight); 18.5-24.9 (normal); 25.0-29.9 (overweight); 30.0 and above (obese). (National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)Herpesvirus 5, Bovine: A species of VARICELLOVIRUS that causes a fatal MENINGOENCEPHALITIS in calves.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Clusiaceae: The mangosteen plant family (sometimes classified as Guttiferae; also known as Hypericaceae) of the order THEALES, subclass Dilleniidae, class Magnoliopsida. It includes trees and shrubs with resinous, sticky sap, usually with broad-ended, oblong, leathery leaves with a strong, central vein, flowers with many stamens.Comprehensive Dental Care: Providing for the full range of dental health services for diagnosis, treatment, follow-up, and rehabilitation of patients.Cross Infection: Any infection which a patient contracts in a health-care institution.Schools, Nursing: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of nursing.Biomass: Total mass of all the organisms of a given type and/or in a given area. (From Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990) It includes the yield of vegetative mass produced from any given crop.Speech-Language Pathology: The study of speech or language disorders and their diagnosis and correction.ArgentinaEnvironmental Monitoring: The monitoring of the level of toxins, chemical pollutants, microbial contaminants, or other harmful substances in the environment (soil, air, and water), workplace, or in the bodies of people and animals present in that environment.Students, Dental: Individuals enrolled a school of dentistry or a formal educational program in leading to a degree in dentistry.Fingersucking: Sucking of the finger. This is one of the most common manipulations of the body found in young children.Phylogeography: A field of study concerned with the principles and processes governing the geographic distributions of genealogical lineages, especially those within and among closely related species. (Avise, J.C., Phylogeography: The History and Formation of Species. Harvard University Press, 2000)Cluster Analysis: A set of statistical methods used to group variables or observations into strongly inter-related subgroups. In epidemiology, it may be used to analyze a closely grouped series of events or cases of disease or other health-related phenomenon with well-defined distribution patterns in relation to time or place or both.Societies, Medical: Societies whose membership is limited to physicians.Asteraceae: A large plant family of the order Asterales, subclass Asteridae, class Magnoliopsida. The family is also known as Compositae. Flower petals are joined near the base and stamens alternate with the corolla lobes. The common name of "daisy" refers to several genera of this family including Aster; CHRYSANTHEMUM; RUDBECKIA; TANACETUM.Mangifera: A plant genus of the family ANACARDIACEAE best known for the edible fruit.Latin America: The geographic area of Latin America in general and when the specific country or countries are not indicated. It usually includes Central America, South America, Mexico, and the islands of the Caribbean.Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay: An immunoassay utilizing an antibody labeled with an enzyme marker such as horseradish peroxidase. While either the enzyme or the antibody is bound to an immunosorbent substrate, they both retain their biologic activity; the change in enzyme activity as a result of the enzyme-antibody-antigen reaction is proportional to the concentration of the antigen and can be measured spectrophotometrically or with the naked eye. Many variations of the method have been developed.Chronic Periodontitis: Chronic inflammation and loss of PERIODONTIUM that is associated with the amount of DENTAL PLAQUE or DENTAL CALCULUS present. Chronic periodontitis occurs mostly in adults and was called adult periodontitis, but this disease can appear in young people.Chromobacterium: A genus of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria occurring in soil and water. Its organisms are generally nonpathogenic, but some species do cause infections of mammals, including humans.Epidemiologic Studies: Studies designed to examine associations, commonly, hypothesized causal relations. They are usually concerned with identifying or measuring the effects of risk factors or exposures. The common types of analytic study are CASE-CONTROL STUDIES; COHORT STUDIES; and CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDIES.Microbial Sensitivity Tests: Any tests that demonstrate the relative efficacy of different chemotherapeutic agents against specific microorganisms (i.e., bacteria, fungi, viruses).Diagnostic Techniques, Respiratory System: Methods and procedures for the diagnosis of diseases of the respiratory tract or its organs. It includes RESPIRATORY FUNCTION TESTS.
Brazilian Integralism. References[edit]. *^ a b c Caldwell, Wilbur W. American Narcissism: the Myth of National Superiority. ... Brazilian Integralism[edit]. Somewhat rooted in the Portuguese integralist tradition, the Brazilian integralist movement led by ...
... caput of the Brazilian Constitution and as a duty of the State in Article 208, Items I, IV and V, of the Brazilian Constitution ...
The Brazilian Highlands or Brazilian Plateau (Portuguese: Planalto Brasileiro) are an extensive geographical region, covering ... The Brazilian Highlands are recognized for the great diversity to be found there: within the region there are several different ... The highest point of the Brazilian Highlands is the Pico da Bandeira in the Serra do Caparaó, 2,891 meters (9,485 ft). ... Due to their size and diversity, the Brazilian Highlands are usually divided into three main areas: *Atlantic Plateau, ...
He researched Brazilian folklore and folk music and used it in his books, avoiding the European style. His Brazilian anti-hero ... Brazilian literature is the literature written in the Portuguese language by Brazilians or in Brazil, including works written ... Brazilian science fiction. References[edit]. *^ Arnaldo Nogueira Jr. "Olavo Bilac - Lнngua portuguesa". Releituras.com. ... One of the first extant documents that might be considered Brazilian literature is the Carta de Pero Vaz de Caminha (Pero Vaz ...
... today[edit]. Personnel[edit]. As of 2011, the Brazilian Navy has a reported strength of 60,000 active personnel, ... The Brazilian Marine Corps (Portuguese: Corpo de Fuzileiros Navais; CFN)[82] is the land combat branch of the Brazilian Navy. ... The Brazilian Navy (Portuguese: Marinha do Brasil) is the naval service branch of the Brazilian Armed Forces, responsible for ... Notable naval battles involving the Brazilian Navy[edit]. Brazilian War of Independence[edit]. *Battle of 4 May - The largest ...
Samba is a lively, rhythmical dance of Afro-Brazilian origin in 2/4(2 by 4) time danced to Samba music whose origins include ... This is the type of Samba one sees in the Brazilian Carnival parades and in other Samba carnivals over the world. This is also ... Several Brazilian dance studios use elements and techniques from these two dances to teach Samba de Gafieira steps and dance ... Samba Axé is a solo dance that started in 1992 during the Brazilian Carnival season in Bahia when the Axé rhythm replaced the ...
Brazilian standard NBR 14136 (Type N)[edit]. See also: IEC 60906-1 § Brazilian NBR 14136 standard ... 3.3 Brazilian standard NBR 14136 (Type N). *3.4 British and compatible standards *3.4.1 BS 546 and related types (Type D and M) ... Brazilian 10 A. 20 A 250 V Yes[b] Yes No Yes Yes ... Brazilian 10 A. 20 A 250 V No No No Yes Yes ...
4.3 Brazilian standard NBR 14136 (Type N). *4.4 British and compatible standards *4.4.1 BS 546 and related types (Type D and M) ... Brazilian standard NBR 14136 (Type N)[edit]. Brazil, which had been using mostly Europlugs, and NEMA 1-15 and NEMA 5-15 ... Brazilian NBR 14136 (3 pin). 10 A. 20 A. 250 V. Yes[b]. Yes. No. Yes. Yes. ... Brazilian NBR 14136 (2 pin). 10 A. 20 A. 250 V. No. No. No. Yes. Yes. ...
The last Brazilian B-25 was finally declared surplus in 1970. Free French[edit]. The Royal Air Force issued at least 21 ... Brazilian Air Force operated 75 aircraft including B-25B, B-25C, B-25J) ...
Brazilian aircraft carrier São Paulo (A12). Citations[edit]. *^ a b c d e f g h i j k Sharpe (ed.), Jane's Fighting Ships, 1996 ... a b c d e f g h i j k l m Corless, The Brazilian Navy blazes a trail in the South Atlantic ... NAeL Minas Gerais (pennant number A 11) was a Colossus-class aircraft carrier operated by the Marinha do Brasil (MB, Brazilian ... a b Jane's Navy International, Carrier Aviation - Skyhawks set to land on Brazilian carrier, p. 6 ...
Brazilian Operation Car Wash[edit]. In November 2018 Global Witness asked the UK's Serious Fraud Office and the US authorities ... to investigate alleged ties between the Brazilian Operation Car Wash scandal and three oil trading companies, one of which was ...
... mostly in the two first centuries of the Brazilian colonization by the Portuguese people. It also uses native Brazilian ... Popularity in the isolated Brazilian north[edit]. The jangada reached Brazil as a part of the rich exchange between India, ... Diegues, Antonio Carlos (2002) Sea Tenure, traditional knowledge and management among brazilian artisanal fishermen. NUPAUB, ... The four men arrived in what was then the Brazilian capital to file their grievances directly to President Getúlio Vargas. The ...
Even with Portuguese heritage, many Portuguese-Brazilians identify themselves as being simply Brazilians, since Portuguese ... Portuguese ancestry in the Brazilian population[edit]. This section's factual accuracy may be compromised due to out-of-date ... Black Brazilians have an average of 48% non-African genes, most of them may come from Portuguese ancestors. On the other hand, ... In Europe, the A25-B18-DR15 gene is only found in Portugal, and is also observed in white North Americans and in Brazilians ( ...
Most[quantify] analysts discounted this figure, however, and contended that between 300,000 and 350,000 Brazilians lived in the ... The immigrant ethnic groups kept their cultures and languages to some extent, especially Brazilians - known as "Brasiguayos". ... According to the 1982 census, 99,000 Brazilians resided in Paraguay. ... Brazilians; and Argentines are among those who have settled in Paraguay. There are also an estimated 234,000 Afro-Paraguayans, ...
... (前田 光世, Maeda Mitsuyo, born November 18, 1878 - November 28, 1941),[1] a Brazilian naturalized as Otávio Maeda ( ... Influence on the creation of Brazilian Jiu Jitsu[edit]. Gastão Gracie was a business partner of the American Circus in Belém. ... This was part of a large tract in the Amazon forest set aside for Japanese settlement by the Brazilian government.[5] The crops ... Maeda was fundamental to the development of Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, including through his teaching of Carlos Gracie and others of ...
ISBN 1-57488-452-2. Page, Joseph A. (1995). The Brazilians. Addison-Wesley. p. 429. ISBN 0-201-40913-5. Brazilian Army First ... What became known as the tenente movement came to public notice on 5 July 1922 when a group of young Brazilian Army officers ... p. 2. ISBN 0-275-97738-2. McCann, Frank D. (2004). Soldiers of the Pátria: A History of the Brazilian Army, 1889-1937. Stanford ... ISBN 0-521-56526-X. McCann, Frank D. (2004). Soldiers of the Pátria: A History of the Brazilian Army, 1889-1937. Stanford ...
Brazilian Academy of Sciences biography (In English) Carlos Chagas Filho. Notable Brazilians. Instituto Brasileiro de ... He was a Brazilian delegate and ambassador (1966) to UNESCO in Paris, and member of the Research Council of the Pan American ... Brazilian Academy of Letters biography (in Portuguese) Pinto-Dias, JC. Carlos Chagas Filho e a doença de Chagas. Alguns traços ... In Brazil he was a member, vice-president and president of the Brazilian Academy of Sciences (1941-2000) and member of the ...
... is also known as Bene and is a key Afro-Brazilian politician. According to da Silva her mother's matriarchal ... Neither the loss of two husbands, nor the hostility of the Brazilian press deterred her politically. Today, she is an advocate ... During her life she faced prejudice for her humble origin, but overcoming this, became the first female and Afro-Brazilian ... Da Silva's biography, "Benedita da Silva: An Afro-Brazilian woman's story of politics and love", tells, through a collection of ...
Cuban Brazilians (Spanish: Cubanobrasileño, Portuguese: Cubano-brasileiro) are Brazilians of full, partial, or predominantly ...
Afro-Brazilian bell patterns. Play 1 (help·info), 2 (help·info), 3 (help·info), 4 (help·info) ... Other Brazilian examples[edit]. The examples below are transcriptions of several patterns resembling the Cuban clave that is ... Therefore, it is not surprising that we find the bell pattern the Cubans call clave in the Afro-Brazilian music of Macumba and ... The structure of Afro-Brazilian bell patterns can be understood in terms of the clave concept (see below). Although a few ...
1970 saw Brazilian newcomer Emerson Fittipaldi win the race in only his fourth start in a Formula One race. Stewart retired his ... with Argentine Carlos Reutemann winning with Brazilian Carlos Pace second. 1975 saw a medium speed chicane added to the Esses ...
Antônio Carlos Silva[4] (born September 14, 1979) is a Brazilian mixed martial artist and kickboxer who formerly competed in ... After training with Brazilian Top Team during the dispute, Silva joined American Top Team in Coconut Creek, Florida.[6] He also ... After 13 years of karate training, Silva transitioned to Brazilian jiu-jitsu and judo at the age of 17.[5] ...
Prior to 1980, the Sri Aurobindo Society, Pondicherry, legally owned all of the city's assets. In 1980, the Government of India passed the Auroville Emergency Provision Act 1980, under which it took over the city's management. The change was initiated when after Mirra Alfassa's death in 1973, serious fissures in the day-to-day management developed between the Society and the city's residents. The residents appealed to Indira Gandhi, then Prime Minister of India for an intervention. The Society challenged the Government's action in the Supreme Court of India. The final verdict upheld the constitutional validity of the government's action and intervention. In 1988, after the verdict, a need was felt to make a lasting arrangement for the long term management of Auroville. The city's representatives along with Sh. Kireet Joshi, then Educational Advisor to the Union government met for consultations with the then Prime Minister, Rajiv Gandhi. Later that year, the Auroville Foundation Act 1988, was ...
Pedro Augusto Rizzo (Portuguese pronunciation: [ˈpedɾu ˈʁizu]; born May 3, 1974) is a retired Brazilian mixed martial artist, ...
... (born May 6, 1983) is a Brazilian model. Raquel was announced as a Revlon ambassador in January 2018. ...
Fabaceae (brazilian rosewood) during germination. Carrijo, Lanna Clicia ; Borges, Eduardo Euclydes de Lima e ; Pontes, Claudia ... this study was conducted using Brazilian rosewood seeds. Seeds were kept in a germinator at 25oC under continuous light for ...
Tail Graft - Brazilian Rosewood with B/W purfling and Green Abalone Heart ...
Spanish Brazilians, Swiss Brazilians, French Brazilians, German Brazilians, Austrian Brazilians, Greek Brazilians and Brazilian ... 1940 Brazilian Census[edit]. The Brazilian Census of 1940 asked Brazilians where their fathers came from. The Census revealed ... Italian Brazilians (Italian: italobrasiliani, Portuguese: ítalo-brasileiros) are Brazilian citizens of full or partial Italian ... a b c d IBGE.Brazilian Census of 1940. *^ a b Schwartzman, Simon (November 1999). "Fora de foco: diversidade e identidades ...
Brazilians, Afro-Brazilians, Indigenous peoples in Brazil, White Brazilians, Indo-Brazilian. In Brazil, Pardo (Portuguese ... They are typically a mixture of white Brazilian, Afro-Brazilian and Native Brazilian.[3] ... Important or famous Pardo Brazilians[edit]. Politics[edit]. Pardos have made a minor impact in the Brazilian political arena ... The term "pardo" is a complex one, more commonly used to refer to Brazilians of mixed ethnic ancestries. Pardo Brazilians ...
Under Brazilian law, terminating pregnancies is illegal except in cases of rape and when the mothers life is at risk. ... a virus that infected 1.6 million Brazilians last year. ...
Brazilian Jiu Jitsu (BJJ) is about efficiency. It s about learning how to use your body in the best possible way - to take down ... Brazilian Jiu Jitsu (BJJ) classes for people living in Manhattan, NYC, Brooklyn, the Bronx, Queens, Staten Island, Long Island ...
The Brazilian Scholarship is available to students at Gadsden State Community College. You must be a student from Brazil to ...
Brazilian literature, the body of written works produced in the Portuguese language in Brazil. Brazil was claimed for Portugal ... Scholars dispute the actual beginning of Brazilian literature. Afrânio Coutinho, for instance, interprets Brazilian literature ... Although Brazilian literature is considered to have its "official" origins in the 19th century, during the decade following ... Father José de Anchieta, recognized as the "father of Brazilian literature," spent most of his life in Brazil catechizing the ...
Youll also get new recommendations based on your past Brazilian music purchases and so much more. ... buy and download Brazilian music from your favourite artists on iTunes. ... View Brazilian in iTunes. Open iTunes to preview, buy and download songs from these genres. ...
Retired Brazilian police officer Andre Luiz Pinheiro has been called in to help police patrol the crime-ridden streets of ...
Looking for food delivery in Orlando? Heres a delicious way to explore the City Beautiful: get a world of cuisines delivered to your door. As a global destination located in the heart of the Sun Belt, Orlando is primed to showcase its culinary chops. And youll find a wide variety of options available at Amazon Restaurants, whether you explore on desktop or on the Prime Now or Amazon mobile apps. To see which restaurants offer food delivery to you, enter your ZIP code at www.amazon.com/restaurants, and browse by cuisine or search for a specific restaurant. The Theme Park Capital of the World has plenty of fun and thrills to be had, and the cuisine is no exception. Portuguese, Mexican, Asian, and Columbian influences are especially prominent. Not to be missed are classic BBQ dishes, hot chicken, and Asian street food. Even vegetarians can find a feast - the Polite Pig features a tomato and watermelon salad, BBQ cauliflower, and grilled street corn. Orlandos international flair and humid ...
Brazilian jiu-jitsu is a martial art and combat sport, that focuses on grappling and especially ground fighting. BJJ promotes ... Intro to Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu: Part 1 -- The History - Duration: 8:00. Art of Manliness 1,060,677 views ... Brazilian jiu-jitsu is a martial art and combat sport, that focuses on grappling and especially ground fighting. BJJ promotes ...
Brazilians in a northeastern town near Germanys training base adopted an if you cant beat them, join them approach to ... Several hundred Brazilians waited for hours in the pouring rain to cheer the Germany players as they disembarked their team bus ... SANTA CRUZ CABRALIA Brazil (Reuters) - Brazilians in a northeastern town near Germanys training base adopted an "if you cant ...
Full text is unavailable for this digitized archive article. Subscribers may view the full text of this article in its original form through TimesMachine ...
If technology achieved a relevant role in the daily life of the Brazilian citizen, the law should follow this change, ...
We organize immigrant workers in the Brazilian community, educating and advocating for their labor rights.We provide ESOL ... We organize immigrant workers in the Brazilian community, educating and advocating for their labor rights. ...
The Brazilian Journal of Physics is a peer-reviewed international journal published by the Brazilian Physical Society (SBF). ... Brazilian Journal of Physics. Editor-in-Chief: Antonio M. Figueiredo Neto. ISSN: 0103-9733 (print version). ISSN: 1678-4448 ( ... Authors submitting to the Brazilian Journal of Physics will benefit from the global network of reviewers established by the ... Get the table of contents of every new issue published in Brazilian Journal of Physics. ...
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The Brazilian Arts Foundation is a non-profit organization dedicated to providing cultural education and building community ... through the preservation and sharing of Brazilian culture. The organization ... The Brazilian Arts Foundation is a non-profit organization dedicated to providing cultural education and building community ...
Allrecipes has more than 110 trusted Brazilian recipes complete with ratings, reviews and serving tips. ... Brazilian Recipes Looking for Brazilian recipes? Allrecipes has more than 110 trusted Brazilian recipes complete with ratings, ... Brazilian Rice Rice is cooked with onion, garlic, fresh cilantro, and lemon juice in this flavorful Brazilian side dish that is ... Chef Johns Brazilian Feijoada This traditional Brazilian bean stew is cooked with lots of smoked meats for a rich, hearty meal ...
8, 1928/29, Campos, Braz.-died May 12, 2001, Rio de Janeiro, Braz.), was a key inside-right midfielder on the Brazilian ... Ronaldo, Brazilian football (soccer) player who led Brazil to a World Cup title in 2002 and who received three Player of the ... Garrincha, Brazilian football (soccer) player considered by many to be the best right winger in the history of the sport. An ... Pelé, Brazilian football (soccer) player, in his time probably the most famous and possibly the best-paid athlete in the world ...
Brazilian (?). Medium:. Wood, cane, fiber. Dimensions:. H. 26 13/16 x Diam. 2 in. (68.2 x 5.1 cm) Classification:. Wood- ...
With 44 poems, this is the first book in English to present this new poetic form: the Brazilian Sonnet ... With 44 poems, this is the first book in English to present this new poetic form: the Brazilian Sonnet ... A collection of Brazilian Sonnets and Haikus, written on the website AllPoetry. ... A collection of Brazilian Sonnets and Haikus, written on the website AllPoetry. ...
Prohibited in Michigan Brazilian elodea is a bushy aquatic plant with dense whorls of bright green leaves. It can be found in ... Brazilian Elodea Invasive Species Alert - Printable PDF. MDARD Weed Risk Assessment for Brazilian Elodea (Egeria densa) - This ... U.S. Distribution: Brazilian elodea has been reported down the west coast and in the southeast from Texas up to Vermont and New ... Brazilian elodea can be found in ponds, lakes, and sluggish rivers and streams. ...
  • The head of Brazil's energy regulator has told Reuters that the two countries are likely to sign a memorandum which would open the way for Brazilian companies to participate in the modernization of Iran's oil sector. (rferl.org)
  • FRANKFURT, July 15 (Reuters) - European engineering firms Siemens and Alstom are cooperating with Brazilian authorities investigating anti-competitive practices in relation to a major rail tender, the companies said on Monday. (reuters.com)
  • Google Inc., which refused in the past year to hand over user search data to U.S. authorities fighting children's access to pornography, said yesterday that it was complying with a Brazilian court's orders to turn over data that could help identify users accused of taking part in online communities that encourage racism, pedophilia and homophobia. (washingtonpost.com)
  • Although Brazilian literature is considered to have its "official" origins in the 19th century, during the decade following Brazil's independence (1822), most scholars, like Cândido, recognize local literature as emerging in the 18th century. (britannica.com)
  • Ricardo Teixeira has resigned as both the president of the Brazilian Football Confederation (CBF) and head of Brazil's organizing committee for the 2014 World Cup finals. (cnn.com)
  • Brazilian Cardinal Odilo Pedro Scherer, ordained by Benedict XVI in 2007 and who heads Brazil's largest archdiocese with five million Catholics, said in a press conference that nationality and age should not be key factors in choosing who will succeed Benedict XVI. (chicagotribune.com)
  • Meet Brazil's silver surfers Jump to media player Each week a group of Brazilian pensioners gather on the beach to take part in their favourite hobby - surfing. (bbc.co.uk)
  • But there's nothing comedic about what the fall of Rousseff and her left-leaning Workers Party will mean for the 35 million Brazilians who've been lifted out of poverty over the past decade, or for the 40 million newly minted members of the middle class - that's one-fifth of Brazil's 200 million people. (commondreams.org)
  • Companies, including electricity transmission group Transmissora Aliança de Energia Elétrica (TAESA), were downgraded in December 2015 after Brazil's sovereign credit rating fell below investment grade earlier that month, which made dollar debt more expensive for Brazilian borrowers. (reuters.com)
  • Tufi Duek's collection is sold at K-la, as is Zoomp, one of the country's biggest clothing exports, was featured in Elle magazine this spring in an article on the Brazilian denim craze. (wwd.com)
  • The Brazilian government, however, automatically gives an 18 percent discount off all exports, which wholesale prices reflect. (wwd.com)
  • The agreement will help boost Brazilian exports to a region already feasting on Brazilian drumsticks. (csmonitor.com)
  • When Asian producers were laid low by Avian influenza earlier this year, their Brazilians competitors moved in, and exports to Asia went up 84 percent between January and October. (csmonitor.com)
  • Nicknamed Boca do Inferno ("Hell's Mouth"), owing to his vicious barbs concerning the social injustices in the colony, Matos wrote in a colloquial tone that already betrayed impulses of a Brazilian style. (britannica.com)
  • More important, in the past eight years we have lifted over 40m Brazilians-almost the size of Spain's population-out of poverty and into the middle classes, with access to health, education, credit and formal employment. (economist.com)
  • Brazilians moving to South Florida are often upper-middle-class families who want to enjoy their prosperity earned in their homeland as professionals and entrepreneurs. (prweb.com)
  • In short, fully 61 percent of Brazilians who consider themselves "white" also have African or Indian ancestry, a result of the nation's history of miscegenation. (encyclopedia.com)
  • In 2014, Brazilians registered 11 percent of all South Florida international real estate deals, according to a report conducted by the National Association of Realtors for MIAMI. (prweb.com)
  • This comes in a country where just short of 51 percent of Brazilians describe themselves as black or mixed. (commondreams.org)
  • They would just go crazy for them," the 25-year-old said.The interest in Brazilian fashions, as well as a desire to run her own business, prompted Mesquita and her younger sister, Julie, to open K-la in May.Although the Brazilian aesthetic is popular with the fashion crowd, Mesquita said she was concerned how the store would be received. (wwd.com)
  • I think they are as creative as Italian designers," she said.To keep up with Brazilian trends and brands, Mesquita visits Sao Paulo's cutting-edge boutiques and writes collections twice a year in her major lines' showrooms.K-la mimics a true Brazilian boutique, beyond just clothing, said Mesquita. (wwd.com)
  • Former Brazilian president Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva has walked free from jail after a year-and-a-half behind bars for corruption following a court ruling that could release thousands of convicts. (rte.ie)
  • The 30-year-old, who joined Milan from Barcelona in 2008, had also been linked to Brazilian teams Gremio and Palmeiras but has signed a deal until 2014. (bbc.co.uk)
  • I don't have all the details (I'm not even a Brazilian citizen), but, for example, the change to summer time this year is supposed to happen on November 3rd, while glibc thinks it has already happened. (gnu.org)
  • Buoyed by fresh opportunities in the Middle East and Asia, Brazilian poultry farmers have sharply increased production and are expected to overtake the United States and end the year as the world's No. 1 chicken exporter. (csmonitor.com)
  • Brazilian pulp and paper company Klabin launched a US$1.1bn five-year deal in the first week of November which includes a revolving credit and a term loan, and follows a blueprint set earlier this year by Petrobras when the country's largest oil firm raised a US$4.35bn revolver in March. (reuters.com)
  • The tour involved shared concerts with four Brazilian vocal ensembles: the Coral dos Canarinhos de Petrópolis, the Juiz de Fora University Choir, the Ouro Preto University Choir, and the Renaissance male quartet Terno Vocal of Rio de Janeiro. (haverford.edu)
  • The Alcool Economy: Fuel Ethanol and the Brazilian Experience , Frances Pinter,London. (nature.com)
  • Everyone asks if I carry Brazilian bikinis, so it's sort of a must," said Mesquita, who's a little doubtful about Americans warming to the idea of baring more. (wwd.com)
  • When George Bush received word of the losses of these brave men he asks, 'Those three Brazilian soldiers. (ebaumsworld.com)
  • With bright yellow stripes on their jersey and a nickname like the Yellow Canaries ( Sari Kanaryalar ), it is fitting that Turkish giants Fenerbahce have a large Brazilian contingent in their ranks as they look to write a glorious new chapter in the club's history. (fifa.com)
  • The term " pardo " is a complex one, more commonly used to refer to Brazilians of mixed ethnic ancestries. (wikipedia.org)
  • As Brazilians put it, "money whitens," so the higher the social class, the lighter the racial category to which an individual belongs. (encyclopedia.com)
  • While the investigation did not yield evidence as to whether the fraudsters were successful in collecting on all of these compromised transactions, RSA researchers did find evidence of their value - estimated to be up to US$3.75 billion ($8.57 billion Brazilian Real)," Marcus said . (theregister.co.uk)
  • Select your job title and find out how much you could make at Tam Brazilian Airlines. (glassdoor.com)