Brassicaceae: A plant family of the order Capparales, subclass Dilleniidae, class Magnoliopsida. They are mostly herbaceous plants with peppery-flavored leaves, due to gluconapin (GLUCOSINOLATES) and its hydrolysis product butenylisotrhiocyanate. The family includes many plants of economic importance that have been extensively altered and domesticated by humans. Flowers have 4 petals. Podlike fruits contain a number of seeds. Cress is a general term used for many in the Brassicacea family. Rockcress is usually ARABIS; Bittercress is usually CARDAMINE; Yellowcress is usually RORIPPA; Pennycress is usually THLASPI; Watercress refers to NASTURTIUM; or RORIPPA or TROPAEOLUM; Gardencress refers to LEPIDIUM; Indiancress refers to TROPAEOLUM.Cardamine: A plant genus of the family BRASSICACEAE that is low-growing in damp meadows of the Northern Hemisphere and has pinnately divided leaves and small white to rose flowers.Lepidium: A plant genus of the family BRASSICACEAE growing in Peru mountains. It is the source of maca root.Self-Incompatibility in Flowering Plants: One of many different processes which occur in ANGIOSPERMS by which genetic diversity is maintained while INBREEDING is prevented.Brassica: A plant genus of the family Cruciferae. It contains many species and cultivars used as food including cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli, Brussel sprouts, kale, collard greens, MUSTARD PLANT; (B. alba, B. junica, and B. nigra), turnips (BRASSICA NAPUS) and rapeseed (BRASSICA RAPA).Capsella: A plant genus of the family CRUCIFERAE.Erysimum: A plant genus of the family BRASSICACEAE. Some members contain CARDIAC GLYCOSIDES.Raphanus: A plant genus of the family BRASSICACEAE known for its peppery red root.Lepidium sativum: A plant species of the genus LEPIDIUM, family BRASSICACEAE that is a fast-growing, often weedy native of western Asia. It is widely grown, especially in its curl-leaved form, and used as a garnishArabis: A plant genus of the family BRASSICACEAE. Member species are ornamentals grown for their numerous small white, yellow, pink, or purplish flowers.Glucosinolates: Substituted thioglucosides. They are found in rapeseed (Brassica campestris) products and related cruciferae. They are metabolized to a variety of toxic products which are most likely the cause of hepatocytic necrosis in animals and humans.Arabidopsis: A plant genus of the family BRASSICACEAE that contains ARABIDOPSIS PROTEINS and MADS DOMAIN PROTEINS. The species A. thaliana is used for experiments in classical plant genetics as well as molecular genetic studies in plant physiology, biochemistry, and development.Brassica rapa: A plant species cultivated for the seed used as animal feed and as a source of canola cooking oil.Brassica napus: A plant species of the family BRASSICACEAE best known for the edible roots.Cleome: A plant genus of the family CAPPARACEAE that contains cleogynol and 15alpha-acetoxycleomblynol (dammaranes) and 1-epibrachyacarpone (a triterpene), and ISOTHIOCYANATES.Sinapis: A plant genus of the family BRASSICACEAE. The common name of white mustard sometimes refers to other plants (MUSTARD PLANT).Flowers: The reproductive organs of plants.DNA, Plant: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of plants.Genes, Plant: The functional hereditary units of PLANTS.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Embryophyta: Higher plants that live primarily in terrestrial habitats, although some are secondarily aquatic. Most obtain their energy from PHOTOSYNTHESIS. They comprise the vascular and non-vascular plants.Genome, Plant: The genetic complement of a plant (PLANTS) as represented in its DNA.Plant Proteins: Proteins found in plants (flowers, herbs, shrubs, trees, etc.). The concept does not include proteins found in vegetables for which VEGETABLE PROTEINS is available.Plant Weeds: A plant growing in a location where it is not wanted, often competing with cultivated plants.Pollen: The fertilizing element of plants that contains the male GAMETOPHYTES.Evolution, Molecular: The process of cumulative change at the level of DNA; RNA; and PROTEINS, over successive generations.Pollination: The transfer of POLLEN grains (male gametes) to the plant ovule (female gamete).Germination: The initial stages of the growth of SEEDS into a SEEDLINGS. The embryonic shoot (plumule) and embryonic PLANT ROOTS (radicle) emerge and grow upwards and downwards respectively. Food reserves for germination come from endosperm tissue within the seed and/or from the seed leaves (COTYLEDON). (Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)Chromosome Painting: A technique for visualizing CHROMOSOME ABERRATIONS using fluorescently labeled DNA probes which are hybridized to chromosomal DNA. Multiple fluorochromes may be attached to the probes. Upon hybridization, this produces a multicolored, or painted, effect with a unique color at each site of hybridization. This technique may also be used to identify cross-species homology by labeling probes from one species for hybridization with chromosomes from another species.Synteny: The presence of two or more genetic loci on the same chromosome. Extensions of this original definition refer to the similarity in content and organization between chromosomes, of different species for example.Solanaceae: A plant family of the order Solanales, subclass Asteridae. Among the most important are POTATOES; TOMATOES; CAPSICUM (green and red peppers); TOBACCO; and BELLADONNA.Gene Expression Regulation, Plant: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in plants.Polyploidy: The chromosomal constitution of a cell containing multiples of the normal number of CHROMOSOMES; includes triploidy (symbol: 3N), tetraploidy (symbol: 4N), etc.Mustard Plant: Any of several BRASSICA species that are commonly called mustard. Brassica alba is white mustard, B. juncea is brown or Chinese mustard, and B. nigra is black, brown, or red mustard. The plant is grown both for mustard seed from which oil is extracted or used as SPICES, and for its greens used as VEGETABLES or ANIMAL FEED. There is no relationship to MUSTARD COMPOUNDS.Chromosomes, Plant: Complex nucleoprotein structures which contain the genomic DNA and are part of the CELL NUCLEUS of PLANTS.Ecotype: Geographic variety, population, or race, within a species, that is genetically adapted to a particular habitat. An ecotype typically exhibits phenotypic differences but is capable of interbreeding with other ecotypes.Arabidopsis Proteins: Proteins that originate from plants species belonging to the genus ARABIDOPSIS. The most intensely studied species of Arabidopsis, Arabidopsis thaliana, is commonly used in laboratory experiments.DNA, Chloroplast: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of CHLOROPLASTS.Seeds: The encapsulated embryos of flowering plants. They are used as is or for animal feed because of the high content of concentrated nutrients like starches, proteins, and fats. Rapeseed, cottonseed, and sunflower seed are also produced for the oils (fats) they yield.Seed Dispersal: The various physical methods which include wind, insects, animals, tension, and water, by which a plant scatters its seeds away from the parent plant.Plant Leaves: Expanded structures, usually green, of vascular plants, characteristically consisting of a bladelike expansion attached to a stem, and functioning as the principal organ of photosynthesis and transpiration. (American Heritage Dictionary, 2d ed)Tetraploidy: The presence of four sets of chromosomes. It is associated with ABNORMALITIES, MULTIPLE; and MISCARRAGES.Plants, Genetically Modified: PLANTS, or their progeny, whose GENOME has been altered by GENETIC ENGINEERING.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Plant Infertility: The failure of PLANTS to complete fertilization and obtain seed (SEEDS) as a result of defective POLLEN or ovules, or other aberrations. (Dict. of Plant Genet. and Mol. Biol., 1998)Verticillium: A mitosporic fungal genus commonly isolated from soil. Some species are the cause of wilt diseases in many different plants.DNA, Ribosomal Spacer: The intergenic DNA segments that are between the ribosomal RNA genes (internal transcribed spacers) and between the tandemly repeated units of rDNA (external transcribed spacers and nontranscribed spacers).Biological Evolution: The process of cumulative change over successive generations through which organisms acquire their distinguishing morphological and physiological characteristics.Sequence Alignment: The arrangement of two or more amino acid or base sequences from an organism or organisms in such a way as to align areas of the sequences sharing common properties. The degree of relatedness or homology between the sequences is predicted computationally or statistically based on weights assigned to the elements aligned between the sequences. This in turn can serve as a potential indicator of the genetic relatedness between the organisms.Plant Shoots: New immature growth of a plant including stem, leaves, tips of branches, and SEEDLINGS.Geography: The science dealing with the earth and its life, especially the description of land, sea, and air and the distribution of plant and animal life, including humanity and human industries with reference to the mutual relations of these elements. (From Webster, 3d ed)Genetic Variation: Genotypic differences observed among individuals in a population.Plant Diseases: Diseases of plants.Gene Duplication: Processes occurring in various organisms by which new genes are copied. Gene duplication may result in a MULTIGENE FAMILY; supergenes or PSEUDOGENES.

An unusual case of 'uncompetitive activation' by ascorbic acid: purification and kinetic properties of a myrosinase from Raphanus sativus seedlings. (1/314)

Myrosinase (thioglucoside glucohydrolase; EC 3.2.3.1) is a plant enzyme that hydrolyses glucosinolates, principally to isothiocyanates. Myrosinase was purified to homogeneity in good yield from 8-day-old seedlings of Raphanus sativus (daikon) using a four-step procedure involving chromatographies on anion exchange, hydrophobic Phenyl-Sepharose, gel filtration and concanavalin A-Sepharose. In order to stabilize the enzyme and to avoid excessive peak broadening during chromatography, 30% (v/v) glycerol was added to dialysis and chromatography buffers. The purified enzyme was eluted as a single peak from a gel-filtration sizing column with an apparent molecular mass of 120 kDa. The enzyme was resolved into two subunits with molecular masses of 61 and 62 kDa by SDS/PAGE. Ascorbic acid activated the purified enzyme more than 100-fold. The V(max) and K(m) values for the hydrolysis of allyl glucosinolate (sinigrin) were 2.06 micromol/min per mg of protein and 23 microM in the absence of ascorbate and 280 micromol/min per mg of protein and 250 microM in the presence of 500 microM ascorbate, respectively. As the ascorbate concentration was increased from 50 to 500 microM, the V(max) and K(m) values increased in parallel, and thus the V(max)/K(m) ratio remained constant. Similarly, raising the concentrations of sinigrin increased the concentration of ascorbic acid required for half-maximal activation (K(a)). At a sinigrin concentration of 250 microM, the K(a) for ascorbic acid was 55 microM. Sulphate, a reaction product, was a competitive inhibitor of activity, having a K(i) of 60 mM with respect to sinigrin and of 27 mM with respect to ascorbate. Thus activation of myrosinase from R. sativus by ascorbic acid exemplifies an unusual and possibly unique example of linear 'uncompetitive activation' (i.e. a proportionate increase in V(max) and K(m)) of an enzyme. The enzyme also had beta-glucosidase activity and hydrolysed p-nitrophenyl-beta-d-glucopyranoside.  (+info)

The binding motif recognized by HU on both nicked and cruciform DNA. (2/314)

The heterodimeric HU protein, highly conserved in bacteria and involved in transposition, recombination, DNA repair, etc., shares similarity with histones and HMGs. HU, which binds DNA with low affinity and without sequence specificity, binds strongly and specifically to DNA junctions and DNA containing single-strand breaks. The fine structure of these specific complexes was studied by footprinting and HU chemically converted into nucleases. The positioning of HUalphabeta on nicked DNA is asymmetrical and specifically oriented: the beta-arm binds the area surrounding the break whereas the alpha-arm lies on the 3' DNA branch. This positioning necessitates a pronounced bend in the DNA at the discontinuous point, which was estimated by circular permutation assay to be 65 degrees. At junctions, HU is similarly asymmetrically positioned in an identical orientation: the junction point plays the role of the discontinuous point in the nicked DNA. The HU binding motif present in both structures is a pair of inclined DNA helices.  (+info)

Sugar-nucleotide-binding and autoglycosylating polypeptide(s) from nasturtium fruit: biochemical capacities and potential functions. (3/314)

Polypeptide assemblies cross-linked by S-S bonds (molecular mass>200 kDa) and single polypeptides folded with internal S-S cross-links (<41 kDa) have been detected by SDS/PAGE in particulate membranes and soluble extracts of developing cotyledons of nasturtium (Tropaeolum majus L.). When first prepared from fruit homogenates, these polypeptides were found to bind reversibly to UDP-Gal (labelled with [(14)C]Gal or [(3)H]uridine), and to co-precipitate specifically with added xyloglucan from solutions made with 67% ethanol. Initially, the bound UDP-[(14)C]Gal could be replaced (bumped) by adding excess UDP, or exchanged (chased) with UDP-Gal, -Glc, -Man or -Xyl. However, this capacity for turnover was lost during incubation in reaction media, or during SDS/PAGE under reducing conditions, even as the glycone moiety was conserved by autoglycosylation to form a stable 41 kDa polypeptide. Polyclonal antibodies raised to a similar product purified from Arabidopsis bound to all the labelled nasturtium polypeptides in immunoblotting tests. The antibodies also inhibited the binding of nasturtium polypeptides to UDP-Gal, the uptake of UDP-[(14)C]Gal into intact nasturtium membrane vesicles and the incorporation of [(14)C]Gal into nascent xyloglucan within these vesicles. This is the first direct evidence that these polypeptides facilitate the channelling of UDP-activated sugars from the cytoplasm through Golgi vesicle membranes to lumenal sites, where they can be used as substrates for glycosyltransferases to synthesize products such as xyloglucan.  (+info)

Rescuing activity of galactoglycerolipids from cellular lesions induced by 5-aminolevulinic acid. (4/314)

An anti-oxygen radical reagent of a bacterial metabolite, M874 monogalactoglycerolipid (di-O-12-methyl-tetradecanoyl-3-O-beta-D-galactopyranosyl-sn-glycerol ), was tested for its ability to protect two organisms against cellular lesions induced by 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) and light. In Corynebacterium flavescens ATCC 10340, extracellular uroporphyrin and coproporphyrin were the main porphyrin products. Although less than 2 mM ALA increased porphyrin synthesis, ALA levels above 3 mM inhibited the synthesis. Depending on the light intensity, the amount of porphyrin decreased and ALA-induced cytotoxicity increased. The lesion was more severe in the case of coproporphyrin than uroporphyrin. The porphyrin lesion produced in low intensity light (300 lx) was considerably reduced by 100 microM M874 glycolipid, although the reduction in intense light (3,000 lx) was restricted to a lower level. Similar results were obtained with radish (Raphanus sativus). The ALA concentration that inhibited porphyrin synthesis and stem growth was similar to that seen with C. flavescens. Although the exogenous addition of M874 glycolipid to the radish did not prevent ALA-induced cellular injury, the co-culture of radish and a glycolipid producing bacterium (Microbacterium sp. M874) resulted in a significant prevention of cellular injury. This was true only under enforced adhesion conditions through the action of a polysaccharide flocculant H12. Some species of monogalactoglycerolipids were found in Corynebacterium and radish that showed prominent oxygen radical-protecting activities similar to that of M874 glycolipid. These monogalactoglycerolipids might function in vivo as agents to prevent ALA-induced cytological lesions, although the concentrations were low in Corynebacterium and radish.  (+info)

Rapid evolution in plant chitinases: molecular targets of selection in plant-pathogen coevolution. (5/314)

Many pathogen recognition genes, such as plant R-genes, undergo rapid adaptive evolution, providing evidence that these genes play a critical role in plant-pathogen coevolution. Surprisingly, whether rapid adaptive evolution also occurs in genes encoding other kinds of plant defense proteins is unknown. Unlike recognition proteins, plant chitinases attack pathogens directly, conferring disease resistance by degrading chitin, a component of fungal cell walls. Here, we show that nonsynonymous substitution rates in plant class I chitinase often exceed synonymous rates in the plant genus Arabis (Cruciferae) and in other dicots, indicating a succession of adaptively driven amino acid replacements. We identify individual residues that are likely subject to positive selection by using codon substitution models and determine the location of these residues on the three-dimensional structure of class I chitinase. In contrast to primate lysozymes and plant class III chitinases, structural and functional relatives of class I chitinase, the adaptive replacements of class I chitinase occur disproportionately in the active site cleft. This highly unusual pattern of replacements suggests that fungi directly defend against chitinolytic activity through enzymatic inhibition or other forms of chemical resistance and identifies target residues for manipulating chitinolytic activity. These data also provide empirical evidence that plant defense proteins not involved in pathogen recognition also evolve in a manner consistent with rapid coevolutionary interactions.  (+info)

Modification of sorbitol MacConkey medium containing cefixime and tellurite for isolation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 from radish sprouts. (6/314)

A modified version of sorbitol MacConkey medium containing cefixime and tellurite (CT-SMAC medium) was produced by adding salicin and 4-methylumbelliferyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside to CT-SMAC medium; this medium was designated CT-SSMAC medium and was used to isolate Escherichia coli O157:H7 from radish sprouts. Of 101 non-E. coli bacteria isolated from radish sprouts that produced colorless colonies similar to colonies of E. coli O157:H7 grown on CT-SMAC medium, 92 (91%) formed colonies that were red to pink or were beta-galactosidase negative and colorless on CT-SSMAC medium. On the other hand, colonies of E. coli O157:H7 strains were colorless and beta-galactosidase positive on CT-SSMAC medium. Our results suggest that CT-SSMAC medium is more selective than CT-SMAC medium for isolating E. coli O157:H7.  (+info)

Attractive and repulsive interactions between female and male gametophytes in Arabidopsis pollen tube guidance. (7/314)

Sexual reproduction in plants, unlike that of animals, requires the action of multicellular haploid gametophytes. The male gametophyte (pollen tube) is guided to a female gametophyte through diploid sporophytic cells in the pistil. While interactions between the pollen tube and diploid cells have been described, little is known about the intercellular recognition systems between the pollen tube and the female gametophyte. In particular, the mechanisms that enable only one pollen tube to interact with each female gametophyte, thereby preventing polysperm, are not understood. We isolated female gametophyte mutants named magatama (maa) from Arabidopsis thaliana by screening for siliques containing half the normal number of mature seeds. In maa1 and maa3 mutants, in which the development of the female gametophyte was delayed, pollen tube guidance was affected. Pollen tubes were directed to mutant female gametophytes, but they lost their way just before entering the micropyle and elongated in random directions. Moreover, the mutant female gametophytes attracted two pollen tubes at a high frequency. To explain the interaction between gametophytes, we propose a monogamy model in which a female gametophyte emits two attractants and prevents polyspermy. This prevention process by the female gametophyte could increase a plant's inclusive fitness by facilitating the fertilization of sibling female gametophytes. In addition, repulsion between pollen tubes might help prevent polyspermy. The reproductive isolations observed in interspecific crosses in Brassicaceae are also consistent with the monogamy model.  (+info)

Comparative evolutionary analysis of chalcone synthase and alcohol dehydrogenase loci in Arabidopsis, Arabis, and related genera (Brassicaceae). (8/314)

We analyzed sequence variation for chalcone synthase (Chs) and alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) loci in 28 species in the genera Arabidopsis and Arabis and related taxa from tribe Arabideae. Chs was single-copy in nearly all taxa examined, while Adh duplications were found in several species. Phylogenies constructed from both loci confirmed that the closest relatives of Arabidopsis thaliana include Arabidopsis lyrata, Arabidopsis petraea, and Arabidopsis halleri (formerly in the genus Cardaminopsis). Slightly more distant are the North American n = 7 Arabis (Boechera) species. The genus Arabis is polyphyletic-some unrelated species appear within this taxonomic classification, which has little phylogenetic meaning. Fossil pollen data were used to compute a synonymous substitution rate of 1.5 x 10 substitutions per site per year for both Chs and Adh. Arabidopsis thaliana diverged from its nearest relatives about 5 MYA, and from Brassica roughly 24 MYA. Independent molecular and fossil data from several sources all provide similar estimates of evolutionary timescale in the Brassicaceae.  (+info)

*Brassicaceae

"Brassicaceae". The Plantlist. Retrieved 2017-10-09. Al-Shehbaz, I.A. (2012). "Neotropical Brassicaceae". Neotropikey - ... and it was suggested to assign the genera closest to the Brassicaceae to the Cleomaceae. The Cleomaceae and Brassicaceae ... Brassicaceae can be found almost on the entire land surface of the planet, but it is absent from Antarctica, and in some areas ... Brassicaceae have a bisymmetical corolla (left is mirrored by right, stem-side by out-side, but each quarter is not symmetrical ...

*List of Brassicaceae genera

This is a list of genera in the plant family Brassicaceae, the cabbages and mustards. Contents: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P ...

*Sisymbrium erysimoides

... , known as smooth mustard, is a plant in the family Brassicaceae. It is found on roadsides and wasteland ... Brassicaceae. In: Walsh, N.G.; Entwisle, T.J. (eds), Flora of Victoria Vol. 3, Dicotyledons Winteraceae to Myrtaceae. Inkata ...

*Draba fladnizensis

Brassicaceae)". Exkursionsflora für Österreich, Liechtenstein und Südtirol (in German). Linz: Oberösterreichische Landesmuseen ...

*Arabidopsis thaliana

Like most Brassicaceae species, A. thaliana is edible by humans as a salad or cooked, but it does not enjoy a widespread use as ... Brassicaceae)". Journal of Biogeography. 29: 125-134. doi:10.1046/j.1365-2699.2002.00647.x. Mitchell-Olds, Thomas (December ... their structure is that of the typical Brassicaceae. The fruit is a siliqua 5-20 mm long, containing 20-30 seeds. Roots are ... "Brassicaceae species checklist and database". Species 2000 & ITIS Catalogue of Life (26 ed.). Leiden, the Netherlands: Species ...

*Coincya monensis

7. Brassicaceae. BugwoodWiki (Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health at the University of Georgia): Coincya monensis ... Coincya monensis is a plant species in the Brassicaceae (mustard family). Coincya monensis is native to western Europe and ...

*Lepidium pinnatifidum

Brassicaceae). Turk J Bot 31:575-76. Jepson Manual Treatment Photo gallery. ...

*FERONIA

Brassicaceae > Camelineae > Arabidopsis. Arabidopsis thaliana is a weed commonly found alongside roads and is frequently used ...

*Teesdalia

Brassicaceae) In:.. Novon Volume 8, No. 3, 1998, pp. 218 Ihsan Ali Al-Shehbaz, Suzanne I. Warwick. 2008. Proposal to conserve ... Teesdalia is a genus in the plant family Brassicaceae. They are herbaceous plants native mostly to Europe and to the ...

*Diplotaxis (plant)

Diplotaxis (wall-rocket) is a genus of 32-34 species of flowering plants in the family Brassicaceae (Cruciferae), native to ... Brassicaceae, Brassiceae)". Systematics and Biodiversity. 10 (1): 57-70. doi:10.1080/14772000.2012.658881. Retrieved 14 October ...

*Crambe abyssinica

... is an annual oilseed crop of the familiy Brassicaceae. It is mainly cultivated due to the high levels of ... Leptocrambe (Brassicaceae)". Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society. 133 (4): 509-524. doi:10.1111/j.1095-8339.2000.tb01593.x ... what is typical for Brassicaceae. Mostly, these flowers are self-pollinated, but some cases of cross-pollination have been ... cultivation directly after other Brassicaceae species should be avoided as well as cultivation after artificial grassland and ...

*Matthiola

2006). A new species of Matthiola R. Br.(Brassicaceae) from Turkey. Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society 151(3) 431-35. ... 2009). The molecular phylogeny of Matthiola R. Br.(Brassicaceae) inferred from ITS sequences, with special emphasis on the ... 2005). Genetic differentiation of three species of Matthiola (Brassicaceae) in the Sicilian insular system. Archived 2014-02-28 ...

*Rorippa

... is a flowering plant genus in the mustard family, Brassicaceae, native to Europe through central Asia, Africa, and ...

*Geocarpy

Genetics and Genomics of the Brassicaceae. Plant Genetics and Genomics. 9. Springer. pp. 33-66. ISBN 9781441971180. Alex V. ... Suzanne I. Warwick (2010). "Brassicaceae in agriculture". In Renate Schmidt; Ian Bancroft. ... Brassicaceae (Cruciferae), Callitrichaceae, Convolvulaceae, Cucurbitaceae, Fabaceae (Leguminosae), Loganiaceae, Moraceae and ...

*Albugo candida

Hosts: Brassicaceae species. Links, Matthew G.; Holub, Eric; Jiang, Rays HY; Sharpe, Andrew G.; Hegedus, Dwayne; Beynon, Elena ... Albugocandida candida is an obligate biotrophic oomycete that infects Brassicaceae species and cause diseases (white blister ...

*Reveal system

Brassicaceae family 5. Tovariaceae family 6. Resedaceae superorder 10. Malvanae order 1. Cistales family 1. Bixaceae family 2. ...

*Peltaria alliacea

Clive Stace New Flora of the British Isles, p. 421, at Google Books S.I. Warwick, I.A. Al-Shehbaz (2006). Brassicaceae: ... Peltaria alliacea (garlic cress) is a perennial in the family Brassicaceae, endemic in Southeastern Europe. The plant grows up ... doi:10.1007/s00606-006-0421-1. "Brassicaceae Peltaria alliacea Jacq". ipni.org. Retrieved 29 October 2017. "Garlic Cress". ...

*Cakile maritima

"Brassicaceae Cakile maritima Scop". ipni.org. Retrieved 25 November 2017. Allen J. Coombes The A to Z of Plant Names: A Quick ... Brassicaceae)". Ecophysiology of High Salinity Tolerant Plants: 55-67. Münir Öztürk, Yoav Waisel, M. Ajman Khan, Güven Görk ( ...

*Diplotaxis muralis

"Brassicaceae Diplotaxis muralis DC". ipni.org. Retrieved 10 November 2017. Archibald William Smith A Gardener's Handbook of ...

*Stanisław Bonifacy Jundziłł

Brassicaceae) Jundzillia Andrz. ex DC. Syst. Nat. Candolle 2: 529 1821 (IK) Species (Caryophyllaceae) Silene jundzillii Zapał. ...

*Van herbed cheese

Brassicaceae) Gypsophila L. spp. (Caryophyllaceae) Silene vulgaris (Maench) Garcke var. vulgaris (Caryophyllaceae) Anthriscus ...

*Carlo Luigi Giuseppe Bertero

Genera: (Brassicaceae) Berteroa DC. (Cactaceae) Opuntia berteroi (Colla) A.E. Hoffm. (Cactaceae) Opuntia berteri (C.F. Först.) ...

*Heinrich Sylvester Theodor Tiling

Brassicaceae Arabis tilingii (Regel) Berkut. Borodinia tilingii (Regel) Berkut. Braya tilingii Regel Hesperis tilingii Kuntze ...

*APG IV system

J.Presl Brassicaceae Burnett, nom. cons. (= Cruciferae Juss., nom. cons.) Berberidopsidales Doweld Aextoxicaceae Engl. & Gilg, ...

*Tropidocarpum

Brassicaceae). Novon 13:4 392-5 Jepson Manual Treatment USDA Plants Profile Center for Plant Conservation: T. capparideum. ...
On the slopes of the Northern Rocky Mountains, the flowering mustard plant Boechera stricta is undergoing a quiet transformation - that is, evolving into a fitter species better adapted to its local environment. HudsonAlpha faculty investigator Jeremy Schmutz was part of a team led by Thomas Mitchell-Olds of Duke University who analyzed the mechanisms by which Boechera stricta living in a hybrid zone in the Northern Rocky Mountains experienced positive directional selection. Their study was published in Nature Ecology and Evolution in April 2017.. "Here, in Boechera stricta we are capturing that moment of selection - the moment when the subpopulation with the inversion takes over from the pre-inversion genotype and outcompetes it," said DOE JGI Plant Program Head Jeremy Schmutz, a co-author on the study. "The inversion fixes a set of alleles in the population. Here the set of fixed alleles improves survivability over the previous genotypes." Schmutz is also the co-director of the HudsonAlpha ...
Camelina or false flax (Camelina sativa), of the Brassicaceae, is an annual flowering plant native to Europe and Central Asia where it is grown commercially as an oilseed crop. At the end of May 2012, symptoms of downy mildew were observed on camelina plants grown in the Savinja Valley in Slovenia. The disease was found in four monitored fields (total area 3 ha), and the incidence ranged from 2 to 38% depending on the variety. Symptomatic plants showed whitish, abundant, and fluffy mycelia covering the stems, flowers, seed pods, and undersides of the leaves. The disease mainly affected the upper half of the plants, and the stems were reduced and distorted. During disease progression, the mycelium turned from gray to black. Microscopic observations revealed hyaline, straight conidiophores that were branched monopodially (3 to 4 times) with 6 to 12 re-curved tips/branch, and measured 140 to 300 × 12 to 20 μm. Conidia were hyaline, oval to broadly ellipsoidal, 24 to 29 × 18 to 24 μm. Oospores ...
62. Boechera oxylobula (Greene) W. A. Weber, Phytologia. 51: 370. 1982. Arabis oxylobula Greene, Pittonia 4: 195. 1900; A. aprica Osterhout ex A. Nelson; A. demissa Greene; A. rugocarpa Osterhout; Boechera demissa (Greene) W. A. Weber. Perennials; short- to long-lived; (cespitose); sexual; caudex usually not woody. Stems usually 3-7 per caudex branch, arising from margin of rosette near ground surface, or arising laterally proximal to sterile shoots, 0.4-2.5 dm, glabrous or pubescent proximally, trichomes simple and short-stalked, 2-rayed, 0.1-0.4 mm, glabrous distally. Basal leaves: blade linear to linear-oblanceolate, 1-2.5 mm wide, margins usually entire, rarely denticulate, often ciliate, trichomes (simple), 0.3-0.7 mm, surfaces glabrous or sparsely pubescent, trichomes short-stalked, 2- or 3-rayed, 0.1-0.4 mm. Cauline leaves: 3-12, not concealing stem; blade auricles absent, surfaces of distalmost leaves usually glabrous, rarely sparsely pubescent. Racemes 2-12-flowered, unbranched. ...
Read "Expression of cecropin P1 gene increases resistance of Camelina sativa (L.) plants to microbial phytopathogenes, Russian Journal of Genetics" on DeepDyve, the largest online rental service for scholarly research with thousands of academic publications available at your fingertips.
Whereas there is good evidence that the origin of SI is monophyletic in the Brassicaceae, the phylogenetic relationship among S haplotypes in the different genera is less clear (Schierup et al. 2001; Fobis-Loisy et al. 2004). Previous observations of an apparently independent phylogenetic clustering of SRK haplotypes from A. lyrata and cultivated Brassica species (Schierup et al. 2001) have also seemed to favor the notion of separate diversification in the Arabidopsis and Brassica lineages. On the other hand, Schierup et al. (2001) identified a "deviant" A. lyrata SRK haplotype (Aly13-9/AlSRK09), which was more closely related to Brassica class II SRK haplotypes than to other A. lyrata haplotypes. In a recent study, Paetsch et al. (2006) found that putative SRK haplotypes from the self-incompatible Capsella grandiflora, which is more closely related to Arabidopsis than to Brassica (Yang et al. 1999b), clustered with A. lyrata haplotypes but separately from the Brassica haplotypes. From this ...
In Florida, combining the planting of a biofuels crop with a legume and a short-season oilseed crop may make an intensive and short rotation of crops economically profitable, according to research performed by plant pathologist Dan Chellemi.. During 2010, he added a legume cover crop, which would supply part of the nitrogen, into the rotation with sunflowers. Once the sunflowers were harvested, he returned with Camelina sativa, a deep-rooted 70-day mustard crop known for producing seeds with high oil and high protein content. Because camelina also is a good nutrient forager, Chellemi applied no nitrogen to the plots. Chellemi indicated that while the data is preliminary and not yet conclusive, results warrant continuing trials this season. ...
83. Boechera quebecensis Windham & Al-Shehbaz, Harvard Pap. Bot. 12: 246. 2007. Arabis divaricarpa A. Nelson var. dechamplainii B. Boivin. Biennials or perennials; short-lived; apomictic; caudex present or absent. Stems usually 1 per caudex branch, arising from center of rosette near ground surface, 1-4.5 dm, densely pubescent proximally, trichomes sessile, 2-4-rayed, 0.15-0.5 mm, glabrous distally. Basal leaves: blade oblanceolate, 5-15 mm wide, margins denticulate, ciliate proximally, trichomes (simple), to 1 mm, surfaces moderately pubescent, trichomes subsessile, (2- or) 3-7-rayed, 0.1-0.3 mm. Cauline leaves: 4-15, not concealing stem; blade auricles 1-3.5 mm, surfaces of distalmost leaves glabrous. Racemes 11-41-flowered, usually unbranched. Fruiting pedicels horizontal to slightly descending, curved to straight, 3-8(-14) mm, glabrous or with some subappressed, branched trichomes. Flowers divaricate at anthesis; sepals pubescent; petals white, 6-7 × 1-2 mm, glabrous; pollen spheroid. ...
DESCRIPTION: Specific Skin Concern: Sensitive Skin • Super soothing and incredibly calming, this serum is formulated to help even the most sensitive skin restore skins strength and minimize redness. • Incredibly anti-inflammatory, Camelina oil helps to calm and condition irritated & reactive skin. Camelina is also
The Canadian Food Inspection Agencys Plant and Biotechnology Risk Assessment (PBRA) Unit is responsible for assessing the potential risk to the environment from the release of plants with novel traits (PNTs) into the Canadian environment
Synonyms for alyssum in Free Thesaurus. Antonyms for alyssum. 2 synonyms for alyssum: madwort, genus Alyssum. What are synonyms for alyssum?
Sisymbrium altissimum resembles the much more common Sisymbrium irio in most respects, including the yellow flowers, sessile leaves, pinnatifid upper stem leaves, and long ascending fruits. On Sisymbrium altissimum, the fruiting pedicels are about as thick as the siliques, rather than much narrower as with S. irio ...
Succulent annual herb 10 cm - 0.8 m tall Leaves: alternate, 7.5 - 12.5 cm long, lance-shaped to spatula-shaped, wavy-toothed to lobed. Flowers: pale lavender to yellowish white, 5 mm wide. Petals four. Stamens six. Fruit: a pod, 8 mm - 2 cm long, with a somewhat flattened beak. The pod is divided into two dissimilar joints: a small, cylindrical lower joint and a 3 - 9 mm wide, four-angled, egg-shaped or lance- egg-shaped upper joint (see Similar Species). The pods are corky when dry. Stems: upright to spreading, giving the plant a bushy appearance. Similar species: When the upper joint of the pod is 3 - 5 mm wide, lance- egg-shaped and long-beaked, then the plant is referred to as Cakile edentula ssp. edentula var. lacustris. When the upper joint of the pod is 5 - 9 mm wide, egg-shaped and short-beaked, then the plant is referred to as C. edentula ssp. edentula var. edentula.. Flowering: June to late November. Habitat and ecology: A species of coastal sands. In the Chicago Region, this plant is ...
APG IV Classification: Domain: Eukaryota • (unranked): Archaeplastida • Regnum: Plantae • Cladus: angiosperms • Cladus: eudicots • Cladus: core eudicots • Cladus: superrosids • Cladus: rosids • Cladus: eurosids II • Ordo: Brassicales • Familia: Brassicaceae • Tribus: Brassiceae • Genus: Eruca • Species: Eruca vesicaria • Subspecies: Eruca vesicaria subsp. sativa (Mill.) Thell. ...
aut,Hu, H., Hu, Q., Al-Shehbaz, I.A., Luo, X., Zeng, T., Guo, X. and Liu, J.}} 2016. Species delimitation and interspecific relationships of the genus Orychophragmus (Brassicaceae) inferred from whole chloroplast genomes. Frontiers in Plant Science 7: 1826. doi: 10.3389/fpls.2016.01826 Full text HTML ...
Camelina is a new oil crop in North America. Camelina meal, a by-product of the camelina oil extraction process, typically contains 10% to 15% residual oil and 40% crude protein. As camelina oil demand increases, utilization ...
Beyond providing Skin Deep® as an educational tool for consumers, EWG offers its EWG VERIFIED™ mark as a quick and easily identifiable way of conveying personal care products that meet EWGs strict health criteria. Before a company can use EWG VERIFIEDTM on such products, the company must show that it fully discloses the products ingredients on their labels or packaging, they do not contain EWG ingredients of concern, and are made with good manufacturing practices, among other criteria. Note that EWG receives licensing fees from all EWG VERIFIED member companies that help to support the important work we do. Learn more , Legal Disclaimer ...
Beyond providing Skin Deep® as an educational tool for consumers, EWG offers its EWG VERIFIED™ mark as a quick and easily identifiable way of conveying personal care products that meet EWGs strict health criteria. Before a company can use EWG VERIFIEDTM on such products, the company must show that it fully discloses the products ingredients on their labels or packaging, they do not contain EWG ingredients of concern, and are made with good manufacturing practices, among other criteria. Note that EWG receives licensing fees from all EWG VERIFIED member companies that help to support the important work we do. Learn more , Legal Disclaimer ...
Garden cress is a type of fast-growing annual herb in the Brassicaceae family. There are several different uses for garden cress...
Al Schneider. Southwest Colorado Wildflowers. United States, CO, NM, AZ, UT, Four Corners vicinity, within 150 miles of the corners. Usage Requirements.. ...
Health Benefits of Cauliflower - Cauliflower is a cruciferous vegetable and is a part of the brassicaceae family. Its florets are usually consumed, though..
The project uses camelina, a distant relative of oilseed rape and one of Europe s oldest oilseed crops. Camelina is naturally high in omega-3, but these are the short-chain fatty acids and not the long-chain omega-3 fatty acids which bring health benefits. To change the profile of oils, the team introduced synthetic genes into the camelina, similar to those found in algae. The transgenic plants contain the biochemical pathway which produces long-chain omega-3. This oil can then be extracted from the seed and fed to fish in a pure form, as a more sustainable alternative to fish oil sourced from the sea ...
IntroductionIt is rather difficult to delimit recently diverged species and construct their interspecific relationships because of insufficient informative variations of sampled DNA fragments (Schluter, 2000; Arnold, 2006). The genome-scale sequence variations were found to increase the phylogenetic resolutions of both high- and low-taxonomic groups (e.g., Yoder et al., 2013; Lamichhaney et al., 2015). It is still expensive to collect nuclear genome variations between species for most none-model genera without the reference genome. However, chloroplast genomes (plastome) are relatively easy to be assembled to examine interspecific relationships for phylogenetic analyses, especially in addressing unresolved relationship at low taxonomic levels (Wu et al., 2010; Nock et al., 2011; Yang et al., 2013; Huang et al., 2014; Carbonell-Caballero et al., 2015). Plastomes are haploid with maternal inheritance in most angiosperms (Corriveau and Coleman, 1988; Zhang and Liu, 2003; Hagemann, 2004) and are highly
Self-incompatibility in plants of the Brassicaceae family is controlled by a highly diversified molecular lock-and-key system consisting of a large set of specific haplotypic combinations of only two genes. This system has been a textbook example of natural (balancing) selection, in the form of a strong reproductive advantage for individuals expressing rare alleles. These haplotypes also form a striking linear dominance/recessivity hierarchy, whereby most heterozygote combinations express only one self-incompatibility specificity at the phenotypic level. In this seminar, I will detail how we recently identified the molecular determinants of this dominance hierarchy and showed that it is based on a complex regulatory network based on the interactions between a dedicted set of small non-coding RNAs produced by dominant alleles and their target sites in recessive alleles. I will review several key features of the topology of these interactions and combine theoretical modelling and functional ...
Description. Food security is a growing risk with the exponentially increasing population. Current methods of increasing crop output are causing serious damage to valuable habitats. One potential solution to this problem is to increase the yield of crops. Arabidopsis thaliana, the model organism for plants,is a member of the Brassicaceae family of plants; this is an economically important group of plants as it contains many crop plants, such as the cabbage. Using a molecular biology approach, I investigated the potential of using a genetic mutantresistant to a plant growth factor (BZR1-1D)as an alternative to the wildtype (Col-0), the type which appears most commonly in nature, of A.thalianato produce more seeds as a way of increasing yield. This has been done by growing wildtype and BZR1-1D mutant ...
Ill admit it. Im a gambling man. Many gardeners begin cleaning out their garden right after the first frost. While they know that many species in the garden can handle light frosts, many like to go ahead and harvest whatever produce remains, and clean up the garden before a really hard frost kills everything.. But I like to push our gardens limits, because many of the fall and winter vegetables left growing in the garden get sweeter and sweeter as the days get colder and colder, and shorter and shorter. As long as there isnt a killing frost, the garden just gets better and better. That which doesnt kill us makes us sweeter, so to speak. So why does this happen?. Many of the plants from the Brassicaceae family - including brussels sprouts, turnips, broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower and rutabaga - survive the downturn in temperatures by turning some of their stored starches into soluble sugars. This helps prevent the liquid in the leaves from freezing (think of how sugary liquids dont fully ...
To elucidate how and which structural genomic changes may influence the stress tolerance of extremophile organisms, both Dassanayake et al. [3] and Wu et al. [4] take advantage of a priori knowledge of gene function, as inferred through sequence homology, by applying this functional information to a focus on copy number variations. A simple method for identifying the functional categories whose constituent genes are subject to recent expansion is to perform gene set enrichment analyses. These analyses are frequently based on gene ontology annotations and can be used to identify functional groups of genes (or annotations) that are statistically over- or underrepresented in one genome compared with another. In both Thellungiella studies [3, 4], gene set enrichment analysis shows that numerous categories of genes already known to be related to abiotic stress, including response to salt stress, abscisic acid stimulus, transporter activity and development, are indeed overrepresented in the ...
Based on the Ks values of orthologous genes, the divergence of T. parvula and T. salsuginea from Arabidopsis can be placed at approximately 12 million years ago, and the Thellungiella species separated approximately 8 million years ago. The observed genome structures, inversions, and breaks in the colinearity are consistent with the time of divergence.. An obvious difference with respect to Arabidopsis and a specific feature of the Thellungiella species identified genome sequences around the SOS1 gene, one of the well-established salt tolerance determinants (Shi et al., 2000). Irrespective of extensive synteny of the ORFs and the conservation of gene structures for SOS1 between Arabidopsis and T. parvula, colinearity falls apart starting upstream of the first exon in SOS1 (Fig. 3). A hypothesis based on the analysis of SOS1 expression in T. salsuginea (Oh et al., 2009) suggested different expression strength or, possibly, transcript stability. This is further supported in T. parvula by the ...
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The subspecies of Physaria kingii (S. Watson) OKane and Al-Shehbaz (Brassicaceae) have historically been a difficult group to delimit taxonomically based on morphology, geography, and ecology. The taxa have been moved between genera as well among varieties, subspecies, and full species many times over. This study addressed the systematics relationships of the subspecies of P. kingii using a combination of molecular (both nuclear and chloroplast DNA sequences), morphological, geographical, and ecological data. Three non-coding DNA regions were chosen: the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of nuclear ribosomal DNA and the chloroplast rps intron and the chloroplast ndhC-trnV intergenic spacer. Eighty-seven aligned sequences in total were selected and networks were constructed using SplitsTree for exploratory data analyses to identify any genealogical discordance for each of the regions in addition to a combined chloroplast region. With the prior knowledge of possible hybridization among P. k. subsp
Ali, T., Schmuker, A., Runge, F., Solovyeva, I., Nigrelli, L., Paule, J., Buch, A.K., Xia, X., Ploch, S., Orren, O. & Kummer, V. 2016. Morphology, phylogeny, and taxonomy of Microthlaspi (Brassicaceae: Coluteocarpeae) and related genera. Taxon 65(1): 79-98. DOI: 10.12705/651.6 PDF Reference page ...
This plant can be weedy or invasive according to the authoritative sources noted below.This plant may be known by one or more common names in different places, and some are listed above. Click on an acronym to view each weed list, or click here for a composite list of Weeds of the U.S. ...
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TY - JOUR. T1 - Synthetic redesign of plant lipid metabolism. AU - Haslam, Richard P.. AU - Sayanova, Olga. AU - Kim, Hae Jin. AU - Cahoon, Edgar B.. AU - Napier, Johnathan A.. PY - 2016/7/1. Y1 - 2016/7/1. N2 - Plant seed lipid metabolism is an area of intensive research, including many examples of transgenic events in which oil composition has been modified. In the selected examples described in this review, progress towards the predictive manipulation of metabolism and the reconstitution of desired traits in a non-native host is considered. The advantages of a particular oilseed crop, Camelina sativa, as a flexible and utilitarian chassis for advanced metabolic engineering and applied synthetic biology are considered, as are the issues that still represent gaps in our ability to predictably alter plant lipid biosynthesis. Opportunities to deliver useful bio-based products via transgenic plants are described, some of which represent the most complex genetic engineering in plants to date. ...
GM Plants Promise Fish Oils Aplenty: New research findings support the commercial cultivation of genetically modified (GM) Camelina sativa, one of Europes oldest oil seed crops. Scientis...
Extremophile fishes have emerged as veritable models for investigations in integrative biology. They not only provide insights into biochemical, physiological, and developmental processes that govern...
The plant comes into its own on those sunny dry banks, slopes and mounds that are often a result of backfilling around houses or various other projects. This plant thrives in poor soil in dry areas. It is tough enough to take the strongest sun that zone 5 can produce. It spreads well and its thick growth habit keeps down weeds. Sheering it back by half after blooming keeps it compact and may result in a second waver of blooms. What it will not tolerate is heavy clay or poor draining soil. It will rot in conditions that are too wet.. Yellow alyssum is a spring blooming plant and, when planted indoors, it may be sown 8 to 12 weeks before the last spring frost. It prefers cooler temperatures for germination, 50-70 degrees F, and will emerge in 2 to 4 weeks. Plants should be set out or thinned to 16-24 inches.. Bluestone Perennials carries the cultivar Gold Dust as a plant. The seeds for a shorter version Compacta, which is actually Basket of Gold, can be had from Parks. Harris Seeds carries the ...
Has anybody started Alyssum Easter Basket from seed? Well I had ordered mine thru Jolly farmer in the plug form and it has been postpone.. So Im not a...
Both the Dudley Bluffs bladderpod (Physaria congesta or Lesquerella congesta) and the Dudley Bluffs twinpod (Physaria obcordata) are rare members of the Brassicaceae (mustard) family. Dudley Bluffs bladderpod is an extremely small cushion plant only 0.4 to 1.2 inches in diameter with a congested mass of bright yellow flowers and narrow silvery leaves rising from a long, thin taproot. The cushion growth habit is an adaptation to erosive badland soils, which has evolved independently in several unrelated taxa in this area. Flowering is typically during April and May, and fruit set from late May into June. Dudley Bluffs twinpod is 4.8 to 7.2 inches tall with oblanceolate, entire leaves 0.4 to 0.6 inches wide and 1.6 to 3.8 inches long, with a silvery sheen due to a dense covering of overlapping, dish-shaped trichomes. The species scientific name refers to the hear-shaped silique or fruit. Flowers are yellow, and typically present in May and June. These two rare mustards grow on barren white ...
Ph.D. 2011 Speciality: Boechera systematics and Flora of the Southwestern US. Patrick is currently the curator of the NMSU Dept of Biology Herbarium (NMC). In June (2014) he will move to a full time position in conservation and land management with the Chicago Botanical Garden (but stationed in the Las Cruces, NM). ...
Aristida beyrichiana Trin. & Rupr., more, Aristida stricta var. beyrichiana (Trin. & Rupr.) D.B. Ward, Aristida stricta var. stricta , Chaetaria stricta ...
crucifer definition: 1. a person who carries a cross, as in a church procession 2. Bot. any plant of the crucifer familyOrigin of cruciferEcclesiastical Late Latin from Classical Latin crux, cross + ferre, to bear; crucifersense from arrangement ...
The mobilization of transposable elements (TEs) is suppressed by host genome defense mechanisms. Recent studies showed that the cis-regulatory region of Arabidopsis thaliana COPIA78/ONSEN retrotransposons contains heat-responsive elements (HREs), which cause their activation during heat stress. However, it remains unknown whether this is a common and potentially conserved trait and how it has evolved. We show that ONSEN, COPIA37, TERESTRA, and ROMANIAT5 are the major families of heat-responsive TEs in A. lyrata and A. thaliana. Heat-responsiveness of COPIA families is correlated with the presence of putative high affinity heat shock factor binding HREs within their long terminal repeats in seven Brassicaceae species. The strong HRE of ONSEN is conserved over millions of years and has evolved by duplication of a proto-HRE sequence, which was already present early in the evolution of the Brassicaceae. However, HREs of most families are species-specific, and in Boechera stricta, the ONSEN HRE accumulated
Henriettes herbal is one of the oldest and largest herbal medicine sites on the net. Its been online since 1995, and is run by Henriette Kress, a herbalist in Helsinki, Finland.. ...
In a few short weeks the first Omega-3 enriched crops will be harvested in Rothamsted Research, in England. This ground-breaking trial is the first of its kind as the crops are being grown outdoors, rather than in greenhouses, and have been genetically modified.. The plant, which is a crop of Camelina - or False Flax - has been implanted with genes which produce Omega-3 in order that the seeds will be rich in Omega-3 fatty acids, something usually found in fish. Should the trial be a success, there is talk of feeding the crops to fish to boost their Omega-3 content, turning it into a supplement, or adding it to products such as oils and yoghurts.. Head of this GM project is Professor Jonathan Napier, who explains why this trial is so important: "Fish get omega 3 from their diet when they swim in the sea but when you put them in a cage they cant do that and you have to feed them smaller fish, otherwise fish would have no more Omega-3 in them than chicken.". As the Professor said, it is difficult ...
a href=http://www.selfridges.com/GB/en/cat/beauty/sisley/ style=text-decoration: none,,font color=black,,b,Sisley,/b,,/font,,/a,s,b, Black Rose Skin Infusion Cream ,/b,is the perfect daily skin care for plumping the skin and promoting the complexion's radiance. The silky formula transforms into micro-droplets of water and permeates into the heart of the epidermis. Hydrated, skin is infused with moisture as if rejuvenated. The combination of black rose extract, may rose water, shea and camelina oils leaves the skin soft and imparts an instant sensation of freshness and long-lasting comfort. ...
LOreal Hair Expertise Ultra Riche Replenishing & Taming Conditioner 250ml contains camelina oil that nourishes dry hair. The special formulation tames unruly h
Land cress- Land cress is a biennial herb in the family Brassicaceae. It is native to southwestern Europe, but is also cultivated in Florida. As it requires less water than watercress, it is easier to cultivate. Land cress has been cultivated as a leaf vegetable in England since the 17th century.Land cress is considered a satisfactory substitute for watercress. It can be used in sandwiches, or salads, or cooked like spinach, or used in soup.
Stems (when present) 1-1.5 dm. Basal leaves: petiole 1.2-4 cm; blade 2.5-4.5(-6) cm, lobes 1-4 on each side, margins entire or shallowly dentate, terminal lobe orbicular to broadly ovate, 0.5-1 cm × 4-10 mm, considerably larger than lateral lobes, margins entire or shallowly dentate. Fruiting pedicels: solitary flowers 30-60 mm; racemes 10-25 mm. Flowers: sepals widely spreading, oblong-linear, 3-4.5(-5) × 0.9-1.5 mm; petals spreading, white, lavender, or yellow, spatulate, (5-)6-8(-9) × 1.7-3(-4) mm, claw yellow, 1.8-2.5 mm, apex shallowly emarginate, apical notch 0.1-0.4(-0.6) mm deep; filaments: median 2.2-4.2 mm, lateral 1-1.9 mm; anthers 0.5-0.9 mm. Fruits oblong, (1-)1.5-2.2 cm × (3.5-)4-5(-5.5) mm, smooth, latiseptate, (not margined); valves thin; ovules (4-)6-14 per ovary; style 0.7-1.7(-2.2) mm. Seeds 2.5-3.5 mm diam.; wing 0.2-0.5 mm wide; embryo straight. 2n = 22. Flowering Mar-May. Limestone glades, pastures, near limestone sinks, roadsides, old fields, thin soil over limestone ...
Wildlife Sanctuary protecting wombats, birds, reptiles, fauna & flora. Promoting conservation, wildlife education and understanding
kód: 0785 rod: Aubrieta druh: Aubrieta × cultorum Axcent Blue With Eye čeľaď: Brassicaceae slov. názov: tarička
SELECTED REFERENCES Al-Shehbaz, I. A. 1977. Protogyny in the Cruciferae. Syst. Bot. 2: 327-333. Al-Shehbaz, I. A. 1984. The tribes of Cruciferae (Brassicaceae) in the southeastern United States. J. Arnold Arbor. 65: 343-373. Al-Shehbaz, I. A. 1985. The genera of Brassiceae (Cruciferae; Brassicaceae) in the southeastern United States. J. Arnold Arbor. 66: 279-351. Al-Shehbaz, I. A. 1985b. The genera of Thelypodieae (Cruciferae; Brassicaceae) in the southeastern United States. J. Arnold Arbor. 66: 95-111. Al-Shehbaz, I. A. 1986. The genera of Lepidieae (Cruciferae; Brassicaceae) in the southeastern United States. J. Arnold Arbor. 67: 265-311. Al-Shehbaz, I. A. 1987. The genera of Alysseae (Cruciferae; Brassicaceae) in the southeastern United States. J. Arnold Arbor. 68: 185-240. Al-Shehbaz, I. A. 1988. The genera of Arabideae (Cruciferae; Brassicaceae) in the southeastern United States. J. Arnold Arbor. 69: 85-166. Al-Shehbaz, I. A. 1988b. The genera of Anchonieae (Cruciferae; Brassicaceae) in the ...
We have compared the transcriptomic profiles of microdissected live ovules at four developmental stages between a diploid sexual and diploid apomictic Boechera. We sequenced ,2 million SuperSAGE tags and identified (1) heterochronic tags (n = 595) that demonstrated significantly different patterns of expression between sexual and apomictic ovules across all developmental stages, (2) stage-specific tags (n = 577) that were found in a single developmental stage and differentially expressed between the sexual and apomictic ovules, and (3) sex-specific (n = 237) and apomixis-specific (n = 1106) tags that were found in all four developmental stages but in only one reproductive mode. Most heterochronic and stage-specific tags were significantly downregulated during early apomictic ovule development, and 110 were associated with reproduction. By contrast, most late stage-specific tags were upregulated in the apomictic ovules, likely the result of increased gene copy number in apomictic (hexaploid) ...
The Brassicaceae (the mustard family, or Cruciferae), an angiosperm family includes several plants of major agronomic, scientific and economic importance. Apart from containing several cultivated species (such as radish, rocket, watercress, wasabi, horseradish, vegetable and oil crops), this family is proud to have model species (Arabidopsis, Alyssum and Brassica), and developing model generic systems (Boechera, Brassica, and Cardamine). In particular, Arabidopsis thaliana (being the first plant species to have its genome sequenced), Thlaspi sp., and Brassica oilseed species (holding the third position among oilseed crops and are an important source of vegetable oil) have revolutionized our knowledge in almost every field of modern plant biology. Additionally, several representatives of the family Brassicaceae have potential to grow fast, yield high biomass, well-adapted to a range of environmental conditions; hence, are equally playing significant roles for achieving environmental sustainability
A crucial prerequisite for plant growth and survival is the maintenance of potassium uptake, especially when high sodium surrounds the root zone. The Arabidopsis HIGH-AFFINITY K+ TRANSPORTER1 (HKT1), and its homologs in other salt-sensitive dicots, contributes to salinity tolerance by removing Na+ from the transpiration stream. However, TsHKT1;2, one of three HKT1 copies in Thellungiella salsuginea, a halophytic Arabidopsis relative, acts as a K+ transporter in the presence of Na+ in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Amino-acid sequence comparisons indicated differences between TsHKT1;2 and most other published HKT1 sequences with respect to an Asp residue (D207) in the second pore-loop domain. Two additional T. salsuginea and most other HKT1 sequences contain Asn (n) in this position. Wild-type TsHKT1;2 and altered AtHKT1 (AtHKT1N-D) complemented K+-uptake deficiency of yeast cells. Mutant hkt1-1 plants complemented with both AtHKT1N-D and TsHKT1;2 showed higher tolerance to salt stress than ...
Patrick J. Horn, Jinjie Liu, Jean-Christophe Cocuron, Kathleen McGlew, Nicholas A. Thrower, Matt Larson, Chaofu Lu, Ana P. Alonso, and John Ohlrogge, 2016. Identification of multiple lipid genes with modifications in expression and sequence associated with the evolution of hydroxy fatty acid accumulation in Physaria fendleri. The Plant Journal 86(4), 322-348. Saroj Poudel, Niranjan Aryal, and Chaofu Lu, 2015. Identification of microRNAs and transcript targets in Camelina sativa by deep sequencing and computational methods. PLoS One 10(3), e0121542. Anna R. Snapp, Jinling Kang, Xiaoli Qi, and Chaofu Lu, 2014. A fatty acid condensing enzyme from Physaria fendleri increases hydroxy fatty acid accumulation in transgenic oilseeds of Camelina sativa. Planta 240(3), 599-610. Anna Snapp and Chaofu Lu, 2013. Engineering industrial fatty acids in oilseeds. Frontiers in Biology 8:323-332. Huu Nguyen, Jillian Silva, Ram Podicheti, Jason Macrander, Wenyu Yang, Tara Nazarenus, Jeong-Won Nam, Jan Jaworski, ...
PubMed journal article Eruca sativa seeds possess antioxidant activity and exert a protective effect on mercuric chloride induced renal toxicit were found in PRIME PubMed. Download Prime PubMed App to iPhone or iPad.
CRISPR cas9 flaws, GMO dangers, Industrial Agriculture, flaws with evolutionary theory, argument from poor design, examples of bad science, Camelina oilseed production, Yield10 Bioscience, what is non-coding DNA, difference between coding and non-coding DNA, function of epigentic switches, Oxford Science Blog articles, gene-editing white button mushrooms, Paul Stamets research, videos explaining function of non-coding DNA, research of genome from Salk Institute, tunnel vision science memes, examples of junk dna, Capitol Press Agriculture posts, what is blogriculture?, what plants are in the Brassicaceae family, no regulation for CRISPR technology, flaws of consensus
These experiences come from living at Harvard Forest, and traveling within Massachusetts and New York with my mentors Mercedes Harris and Erin Coates, two master students from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst.. All the sites that I have traveled to are characteristically similar second-growth forests that are invaded by the Eurasian herbaceous plant garlic mustard (Alliaria petiolata). Garlic mustard is an invasive plant from the Brassicaceae family. It was introduced to North America in the 1860s. The Brassica produces chemicals within its roots and leaves. Through release of its secondary compounds, garlic mustard disrupts the relationships between fungi and water conducting native plants. Garlic mustard has no natural predators in North America, which allows for its successful high abundance. To reduce the effects of native plant displacement by invasive garlic mustard, actions to remove it have been developed, such as herbicide spraying and manually hand pulling the plant and its ...
Premise of the study : Cryptic species are superfi cially morphologically indistinguishable and therefore erroneously classifi ed under one single name. The identifi cation and delimitation of these species is usually a diffi cult task. The main aim of this study is to provide an inclusive methodology that combines standard and new tools to allow accurate identifi cation of cryptic species. We used Erysimum nervosum s.l. as a model system. • Methods : Four populations belonging to E. nervosum s.l. were sampled at their two distribution ranges in Morocco (the Atlas Mountains and the Rif Mountains). Fifteen individuals per population were collected to assess standard taxonomic traits. Additionally, corolla color and shape were quantifi ed in 30 individuals per population using spectrophotometry and geometric morphometrics, respectively. Finally, we collected tissue samples from each population per species to study the phylogenetic relationships among them. • Key results : Using the standard ...
Wild rocket [Diplotaxis tenuifolia (L.) DC.] belongs to the Brassicaceae family and has its origin in the Mediterranean region. The effect of conventional and integrated cultivation practices on the nutritional properties and benefits of wild rocket [Diplotaxis tenuifolia (L.) DC.] were studied. Bioactive molecules content (vitamin C, quercetin, lutein), antioxidant properties and bioactivity of polyphenolic extracts from the edible part of rocket in Caco-2 cells were determined. Regarding antioxidant properties, FRAP (Ferric Reducing Antioxidant Power) values ranged from 4.44 ± 0.11 mmol/kg fw to 9.92 ± 0.46 mmol/kg fw for conventional rocket and from 4.13 ± 0.17 fw mmol/kg to 11.02 ± 0.45 mmol/kg fw for integrated rocket. The characteristics of wild rocket as a dietary source of antioxidants have been pointed out. Significant differences in the quality of conventional and integrated rocket have been shown, while no influence of agronomic practice on biological activity was reported. A significant
INTRODUCTION The cabbage (Brassica oleraceae var. capitata) is an herbaceous and leafy plant which belongs to the Brassicaceae family, native to coastal southern and Western Europe. It presents a high versatility, not only due to its nutritive value, being rich in calcium, protein and vitamin C, but also due to its social character, due to the fact of being cultivated essentially by small-scale farmers(12, 28, 29). Brassica sp. is reported to have been utilized for over one thousand years in the healing process of abscesses, idiopathic cephalgias, internal ulcers; the Romans utilized Brassica sp. in the treatment of injuries(4). Cheney(13) verified that the patients who utilized the fresh cabbage juice obtained a healing action for gastric disorders, particularly for the peptic ulcer, presenting healing effects of the lesion. The chronic administration of non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is associated with the development of gastrointestinal adverse effects, such as gastric ...
Perennials; short- to long-lived; sexual; caudex usually not woody. Stems usually 2-4 per caudex branch, arising from center of rosette near ground surface, or arising laterally proximal to sterile shoots, 0.6-2 dm, glabrous throughout. Basal leaves: blade oblanceolate, 2-6 mm wide, margins entire, rarely ciliate along petiole, trichomes (simple), 0.5-0.7 mm, surfaces glabrous. Cauline leaves: 5-9, rarely concealing stem proximally; blade auricles 0.7-2.5 mm, surfaces of distalmost leaves glabrous. Racemes 4-12-flowered, usually unbranched. Fruiting pedicels divaricate-ascending to horizontal, straight, 2.5-8 mm, glabrous. Flowers ascending at anthesis; sepals glabrous; petals lavender, 4-5.5 × 1.5-2 mm, glabrous; pollen ellipsoid. Fruits usually divaricate-ascending, rarely slightly descending, usually secund, straight to slightly curved, 1.9-4 cm × 2-3 mm; valves glabrous; ovules 52-72 per ovary; style 0.05-0.2 mm. Seeds biseriate, 1.1-1.4 × 0.8-1 mm; wing continuous, 0.07-0.15 mm wide ...
This article discusses vegetables which belong to the Brassicaceae family, including broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower. History, origin, varieties and cooking techniques are discussed.
Like Brussels sprouts, cauliflower is one of those misunderstood vegetables. Its certainly not the prettiest veggie on campus, but its one of the healthiest.. When properly cooked and seasoned, cauliflower is delicious-one of my favorites. I buy it at least once a week, usually to steam or roast as a side dish.. These days, cauliflower is available year-round. A member of the Brassicaceae family (broccoli, cabbage, kale, Brussels sprouts, collard greens), it delivers a cancer-fighting compound called sulforaphane. A half-cup of cooked cauliflower provides 45% of your daily vitamin C requirement, as well as 2 g fiber, while weighing in at only 15 calories.. When choosing an organic cauliflower, look for a head thats white or creamy, firm, compact, and heavy for its size. Toss aside heads that have dark spots, brown patches or other discolorations.. When you arrive home, place your cauliflower (stem side up) in your refrigerators crisper, where it should last for up to five days. If you buy ...
When shopping at farmers markets, I often stumble upon familiar-looking vegetables cloaked in exotic colors-green zebra tomatoes, purple potatoes, yellow lemon cucumbers and black radishes, to name a few. Cauliflower, a readily available but mostly unpopular member of the Brassicaceae family, comes in several eye-catching colors: light green (with funky-looking spikes), orange, traditional white and, my favorite-purple.
Horseradish (Armoracia rusticana Gaertn) is a perennial crop belonging to the Brassicaceae family, widely used as spice in foods and herbal ingredient in ethno-medicine. In this study, were evaluated the phenolic compounds content, antioxidant capacity and anti-lipase activity of methanol, methanol/water (70/30, v/v) and methanol/water (50/50, v/v) extracts of horseradish roots and leaves. Among the extracts tested, both roots and leaves aqueous methanolic (70/30, v/v and 50/50, v/v) extracts showed higher total phenol and flavonoid contents and antioxidant capacity than the corresponding methanol extracts. But extraction yield was high for methanol/water (50/50, v/v) extracts, in both roots and leaves. The extracts exhibited anti-lipase activity in dose-dependent manner. The results showed that the extraction yield and the antioxidant capacity were strictly dependent on the solvent polarity. The results suggest that A. rusticana could provide opportunities for the development of functional food ...
Horseradish: Studies have indicated that some horseradish constituents have antibiotic activity. Clinical study has used a combination product that contained nasturtium herb and horseradish root to treat sinusitis. Although the treatment had similar results as the standard antibiotic therapy control, the effect of horseradish alone cannot be isolated due to the use of a combination product. Additional high-quality clinical studies are needed before a conclusion can be made. Avoid if allergic or hypersensitive to horseradish (Armoracia rusticana), its constituents, or members of the Brassicaceae family. Large oral doses may provoke allergic reactions. Use cautiously with clotting disorders, hypotension (low blood pressure), thyroid disorders, kidney disorders, kidney inflammation, gastrointestinal conditions, skin ulcers, and stomach ulcers. Use cautiously if taking anticoagulants or antiplatelets (blood thinning agents), antihypertensives (blood pressure-lowering agents), anti-inflammatory ...
Horseradish: Studies have indicated that some horseradish constituents have antibiotic activity. Clinical study has used a combination product that contained nasturtium herb and horseradish root to treat sinusitis. Although the treatment had similar results as the standard antibiotic therapy control, the effect of horseradish alone cannot be isolated due to the use of a combination product. Additional high-quality clinical studies are needed before a conclusion can be made. Avoid if allergic or hypersensitive to horseradish (Armoracia rusticana), its constituents, or members of the Brassicaceae family. Large oral doses may provoke allergic reactions. Use cautiously with clotting disorders, hypotension (low blood pressure), thyroid disorders, kidney disorders, kidney inflammation, gastrointestinal conditions, skin ulcers, and stomach ulcers. Use cautiously if taking anticoagulants or antiplatelets (blood thinning agents), antihypertensives (blood pressure-lowering agents), anti-inflammatory ...
Three Australian Sisymbrium orientale and one Brassica tournefortii biotypes are resistant to acetolactate synthase (ALS)-inhibiting herbicides due to their possession of an ALS enzyme with decreased sensitivity to these herbicides. Enzyme kinetic studies revealed no interbiotypic differences within species in Km (pyruvate) (the substrate concentration at which the reaction rate is half maximal) but a greater Vmax (the rate when the enzyme is fully saturated with substrate) for two of the resistant S. orientale biotypes over susceptible levels. F1 hybrids from reciprocal crosses between resistant and susceptible biotypes of S. orientale showed an intermediate response to chlorsulfuron compared to the parental plants. ALS herbicide resistance in S. orientale segregated in a 3:1 (resistant:susceptible) ratio in F2 plants with a single rate of chlorsulfuron, indicating that resistance is inherited as a single, incompletely dominant nuclear gene. Two regions of the ALS structural gene known to vary ...
APHOTOFLORA - Photographic Stock Image Library Page for Brassica napus subspecies oleifera - Oil Seed Rape (Brassicaceae Images). A-P-H-O-T-O - Furthering environmental awareness and education through the medium of photography.
Autor: Sharbel, T. F. et al.; Genre: Zeitschriftenartikel; Im Druck veröffentlicht: 2001; Keywords: aneuploid; apomixis; Arabis holboelii; chloroplast; haplotype; polyploid|br/|Chromosome-number; rust infection; evolution; mechanisms; genetics; apomixis; pathways; plants; Titel: Recurrent polyploid origins and chloroplast phylogeography in the Arabis holboellii complex (Brassicaceae)
Camelina is an alternative oilseed crop species with limited information about the origin and diversity of available germplasm. Therefore, a set of 130 camelina accessions from a world collection was evaluated for oil content, protein content and 1000-seed weight in field experiments grown in three macro-environments in Austria. Based on phenotypic data, accessions were categorized into four groups with different seed characteristics using k-means cluster analysis or principal component extraction. Subsequently, a representative set of 41 accessions was subjected to random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis. Of 24 primers, 15 were polymorphic producing a total of 30 marker loci. Genetic distance estimates between the 41 accessions were calculated, based both on RAPD polymorphism and on seed quality characteristics, and dendrograms were generated for comparison. Similarities were found between the two different clustering approaches, and grouping was partly in agreement with pedigree ...
cerastium, hardy ice plant, snow-in-summer, delosperma, gaillardia, blanket flower, laurentia, blue star creeper, belamcanda, blackberry lily
Over the course of 2017 we have focused on generating proof points in key crops for our C3003 yield trait gene," said Oliver Peoples, Ph.D., President and Chief Executive Officer of Yield10. "We remain on track to report results from field tests of C3003 in Camelina and canola as well as initial greenhouse studies in soybean in the fourth quarter of 2017 which will enable us to plan and prioritize our research and development activities for C3003 in 2018. In addition, we have made good progress this year developing our genome editing capabilities with the goal of creating plants with desirable performance and yield characteristics and a potentially shorter path to market in the U.S. We look forward to continuing to advance development of our novel yield traits in key crops in field tests and greenhouse studies in 2018.". Yield10s 2017 development program for the novel yield trait gene C3003 involves testing the trait in Camelina, canola, soybean and rice. In the third quarter, Yield10 completed ...
I always use these two products in combination. I mostly use them at night - applying around 3 or 4 drops of Omega 3 Night Repair Serum and one pump of the Frankincense Revitalising Night Cream. I use this combo a few times during the day as well (when I need some extra hydration). They are suitable for all skin types; I have normal to dry skin and they work amazing. They are both delicately scented - the serum has a sweet scent while the cream has a herbal scent (I am not the biggest fan of the scent of cream, but it vanishes relatively quick). The result is radiant and smoothed skin (as they promise at REN). The serum is light and relatively quickly absorbed in to my skin (therefore it might be great for those with oily skin type as well). The night cream is thick, but not heavy; it has a calming effect on my skin. If I look down at the ingreditent list, I must say that I see only the best - such as Camelina Sativa Oil in Omega 3 Night Repair Serum (rich in omega 3 fatty acids). Overall, I can ...
Use of 3 ruch oilseed cameline (Camelina sativa) as a fish oil replacement in aquaculture feeds: Implications for growth and lipid biochemistry of farmed Atlantic cod (Gadus morhus), Rainbow trout (Oncrhynchus mykiss) and atlantic salmon (Salmo salar ...
Read "Evolutionary divergence of LFY function in the mustards Arabidopsis thaliana and Leavenworthia crassa, Plant Molecular Biology" on DeepDyve, the largest online rental service for scholarly research with thousands of academic publications available at your fingertips.
Citation: N/A Interpretive Summary: Technical Abstract: All the species of Lesquerella and the closely related genus Physaria (Brassicaceae) possess seed-oil rich in one of three types of hydroxy fatty acids (HFA) as the main component of their oil profiles. These HFAs (lesquerolic, densipolic, auricolic) could be used as replacements for imported castor oil in the production of plastics, lubricants, protective coatings, surfactants, cosmetics, and pharmaceuticals. Because of considerable genetic variation for chemical composition of the seed oil and other important agronomic characteristics both within and among species, new germplasm is required to assist the commercialization efforts; therefore, we have made new collections from the US and Mexico. Hybridization and polyploidy shows promise for increasing favorable traits, so cytology is being carried out on new accessions. Several new chromosome counts have been attained along with the first record of an inversion in Physaria. ...
p>The checksum is a form of redundancy check that is calculated from the sequence. It is useful for tracking sequence updates.,/p> ,p>It should be noted that while, in theory, two different sequences could have the same checksum value, the likelihood that this would happen is extremely low.,/p> ,p>However UniProtKB may contain entries with identical sequences in case of multiple genes (paralogs).,/p> ,p>The checksum is computed as the sequence 64-bit Cyclic Redundancy Check value (CRC64) using the generator polynomial: x,sup>64,/sup> + x,sup>4,/sup> + x,sup>3,/sup> + x + 1. The algorithm is described in the ISO 3309 standard. ,/p> ,p class="publication">Press W.H., Flannery B.P., Teukolsky S.A. and Vetterling W.T.,br /> ,strong>Cyclic redundancy and other checksums,/strong>,br /> ,a href="http://www.nrbook.com/b/bookcpdf.php">Numerical recipes in C 2nd ed., pp896-902, Cambridge University Press (1993),/a>),/p> Checksum:i ...
By the time this article is posted, I will be high up in the Andes mountains of Peru working with maca, a plant I have focused on for over 12 years. It seems fitting, then, to share some information about maca with you.. Maca, Lepidium meyenii , is the only cruciferous plant native to Peru. The cruciferous plants include rapeseed (the source of canola oil), radish, cauliflower, cabbage, brussel sprouts, Chinese cabbage, mustard, garden rocket, and watercress. Maca is an annual plant with a rosette of frilly leaves lying close to the ground. The plant produces a turnip-like "hypocotyl," a tuber which matures within approximately seven months after seeds are planted. The tubers may be red, green, black, pink, purplish, yellow, or cream colored. Locals in the Peruvian highlands claim that yellow roots are preferable, because they are sweeter. Yellow maca accounts for just over 36 percent of harvest on average. The root of maca is dried and stored before use and will keep for seven years.. Details ...
ID ARALY_100_PE2 STANDARD; PRT; 100 AA. AC ARALY_100_PE2; DT 00-JAN-0000 (Rel. 1, Created) DT 00-JAN-0000 (Rel. 2, Last sequence update) DT 00-JAN-0000 (Rel. 3, Last annotation update) DE (ARALY_100.PE2). OS ARABIDOPSIS LYRATA. OC cellular organisms; Eukaryota; Viridiplantae; Streptophyta; Streptophytina; OC Embryophyta; Tracheophyta; Euphyllophyta; Spermatophyta; Magnoliophyta; OC eudicotyledons; core eudicotyledons; rosids; eurosids II; Brassicales; OC Brassicaceae; Arabidopsis. OX NCBI_TaxID=59689; RN [0] RP -.; RG -.; RL -.; CC -!- SEQ. DATA ORIGIN: Translated from the HOGENOM CDS ARALY_100.PE2. CC Arabidopsis lyrata scaffold scaffold_133 JGI8X full sequence 1..18967 CC annotated by Ensembl Genomes CC -!- GENE_FAMILY: HBG000000000 [ FAMILY / ALN / TREE ] DR HOGENOM:Arabidopsis_lyrata;AL_SCAFFOLD_0133_2;AL_SCAFFOLD_0133_2;AL_SCAFFOLD_0133_2. DR HOGENOMDNA; ARALY_100.PE2; -. KW Al_scaffold_0133_21_AT2G39210.11; Al_scaffold_0133_21_AT2G39210.11. SQ SEQUENCE 100 AA; UNKNOWN MW; UNKNOWN CRC64; ...
ID ARALY_100_PE1 STANDARD; PRT; 80 AA. AC ARALY_100_PE1; DT 00-JAN-0000 (Rel. 1, Created) DT 00-JAN-0000 (Rel. 2, Last sequence update) DT 00-JAN-0000 (Rel. 3, Last annotation update) DE (ARALY_100.PE1). OS ARABIDOPSIS LYRATA. OC cellular organisms; Eukaryota; Viridiplantae; Streptophyta; Streptophytina; OC Embryophyta; Tracheophyta; Euphyllophyta; Spermatophyta; Magnoliophyta; OC eudicotyledons; core eudicotyledons; rosids; eurosids II; Brassicales; OC Brassicaceae; Arabidopsis. OX NCBI_TaxID=59689; RN [0] RP -.; RG -.; RL -.; CC -!- SEQ. DATA ORIGIN: Translated from the HOGENOM CDS ARALY_100.PE1. CC Arabidopsis lyrata scaffold scaffold_133 JGI8X full sequence 1..18967 CC annotated by Ensembl Genomes CC -!- GENE_FAMILY: HBG000000000 [ FAMILY / ALN / TREE ] DR HOGENOM:Arabidopsis_lyrata;SCAFFOLD_13300001.1;SCAFFOLD_13300001.1;SCAFFOLD_13300001.1. DR HOGENOMDNA; ARALY_100.PE1; -. KW scaffold_13300001.1_AT2G39210.11; scaffold_13300001.1_AT2G39210.11. SQ SEQUENCE 80 AA; UNKNOWN MW; UNKNOWN CRC64; ...
Botanical Name ; Raphanus sativus Family: Brassicaceae Genus: Raphanus Species: sativus Kingdom: Plantae Order: Brassicales Common Names: Daikon, Indian Radish
3. Traka MH. Chapter nine - Health benefits of glucosinolates. Advances in Botanical Research. 2016;80:247-279.. a study in which no experimental intervention or treatment is applied. Participants are simply observed over time.nal Studies case control…cohort studies prospective cohort studies. 24 case-control and 11 prospective cohort studies. 21. Sergentanis TN, Economopoulos KP. GSTT1 and GSTP1 polymorphisms and breast cancer risk: a meta-analysis. Breast Cancer Res Treat. 2010;121(1):195-202. (PubMed). 22. Bryan HK, Olayanju A, Goldring CE, Park BK. The Nrf2 cell defence pathway: Keap1-dependent and -independent mechanisms of regulation. Biochem Pharmacol. 2013;85(6):705-717. (PubMed). 34. Liu X, Lv K. Cruciferous vegetables intake is inversely associated with risk of breast cancer: a meta-analysis. Breast. 2013;22(3):309-313. (PubMed). 42. Hu J, Hu Y, Hu Y, Zheng S. Intake of cruciferous vegetables is associated with reduced risk of ovarian cancer: a meta-analysis. Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. ...
our lab is primarily interested in understanding the genetics and molecular biology of [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Auxin auxin] and other [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plant_hormone plant hormone] responses in the tiny weed [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arabidopsis_thaliana arabidopsis thaliana] and related [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brassicaceae brassicaceae]. phytohormones are one of the classic fields in [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plant_physiology plant physiology] and the past has shown that understanding hormone action in plants bears great potential for agricultural and horticultural applications. by contributing to the current state of knowledge of hormone biology we hope to participate in the advancement of [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crop_science crop science ...
Angiosperm Phylogeny Group. (2009). An update of the Angiosperm Phylogeny Group classification for the orders and families of flowering plants: APG III. ,em,Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society.,/em, 161(2): 105-121. 10.1111/j.1095-8339.2009.00996.x ...
Flora of North America Editorial Committee, eds., 1993. Flora of North America North of Mexico. Flora of North America Association, New York, NY, US and Oxford, UK ...
Cruciferous vegetables are great for you! They provide cancer-fighting nutrients, vitamins, minerals, and so many other health benefits.
Nutrition: Eating cruciferous vegetables lowers inflammation. In a study of more than 1,000 Chinese women, those who ate the most cruciferous…
Watercress is a peppery vegetable in the family Brassicaceae, which includes broccoli. Eating watercress may help protect against carcinogens and chemotherapy drugs.
This test method is used to determine the composition of fatty acid alkyl hydrocarbon chains in an oil and can be used to discriminate characteristic ratios for carbon chain length, saturated from unsaturated chains, as well as polyunsaturated chains. The method is a compositional mass balance determination which can provide information to discriminate soybean, canola, camelina, and other common vegetable oils and animal fats. This analysis may also support RINS validation by assuring qualified feedstocks are used.. ...
Researchers are all abuzz over a promising new source of biofuel that flourished almost 3,500 years ago in Europe. Camelina, if planted on a large scale on marginal farmland from eastern Washington to North Dakota, could provide a significant source of
Bioactive Lipids, Sam Huttenbauer, Jr., Using Engineered Camelina to produce Bioactive Lipids for Manufacturing Biosimilar Fish Oil and a Biosimilar Anti-Inflammatory Therapeutic, CEO Interviews 2017, Healthcare Companies, Industrial Company, Clean Energy Companies
In an effort to confirm no difference in performance exists between a 50/50 camelina biofuel blend and standard petroleum-based JP-5, the U.S. Navy will log 23 test flight hours with the biofuel in an unmodified F/A-18 Super Hornet dubbed Green Hornet. The most recent flight was on Earth Day, April 22, when the aircraft broke the sound barrier, travelling at 1.2 mach, according to Billy Ray Brown, public affairs officer for the Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division.READ MORE ...
WHAT IT IS The next generation of oil care. Natural oil blend of coriander and camelina for dull, normal to fine hair that is normal to chemically and/or mechan
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Habit: Annual to shrub; sap pungent, watery. Leaf: generally simple, alternate; generally both basal, cauline; stipules 0. Inflorescence: generally raceme, generally not bracted. Flower: bisexual, generally radial; sepals 4, generally free; petals (0)4, forming a cross, generally white or yellow to purple; stamens generally 6 (2 or 4), 4 long, 2 short (3 pairs of unequal length); ovary 1, superior, generally 2-chambered with septum connecting 2 parietal placentas; style 1, stigma entire or 2-lobed. Fruit: capsule, generally 2-valved, "silique" (length >= 3 × width) or "silicle" (length < 3 × width), dehiscent by 2 valves or indehiscent, cylindric or flat parallel or perpendicular to septum, segmented or not. Seed: 1--many, in 1 or 2 rows per chamber, winged or wingless; embryo strongly curved ...
Its not technically winter, but it sure feels like it. Cold, rain, and darkness are here as the winter solstice approaches in less than two weeks. Imagine my surprise then to find a sunflower blooming in my Davis, CA garden […]. ...
My customer support wrote me that people constantly write us "freaking out" about a widely circulated article on the internet saying that cruciferous vegetables essentially damage your thyroid gland. Crucifers include broccoli, kale, cabbage, and cauliflower.. People are susceptible to fear and paranoia-which are antithetical to empowerment and faith. Ive written about this in Ch. 1 of 12 Steps to Whole Foods, but I need to take a stronger stand, since its Top Five (questions I am asked, via email and everytime I speak in public).. As with food-combining theories (DAdamo, etc.), or the idea that too many of one green food is "toxic" (Boutenko), or the idea that oxalates in greens harm us (another dubious internet-circulated claim)…..my reaction is like that line from Jerry Maguire, "Show me the money!". My variation on that quote is, "Show me the data!". Evidence that cruciferous vegetables are phenomenally powerful anti-cancer foods is voluminous. They also reduce bad estrogens; this is ...
Citation: Berhow, M.A., Polat, U., Glinski, J., Glensk, M., Vaughn, S.F., Isbell, T., Ayala-Diaz, I., Marek, L., Gardner, C.A. 2011. Purification of glucosinolates from Camelina sativa seeds. Meeting Abstract. Interpretive Summary: Technical Abstract: Camelina sativa L. Crantz defatted seed press cake contains a number of phytochemicals, including the flavonoid rutin (quercetin 3-O-rutinoside), an acylated quercetin glycoside, and three glucosinolates: glucoarabin (9-(methylsulfinyl)nonyl-glucosinolate) glucocamelinin (10-(methylsulfinyl)decyl-glucosinolate), and 11-(methylsulfinyl)undecyl-glucosinolate. We have developed methods to isolate mg quantities of these glucosinolates and flavonoids using a combination of reverse phase flash countercurrent chromatography and preparative HPLC methods. An analytical method has been developed to accurately measure glucosinolate levels in seeds, seed meal and sprouts. The camelina glucosinolates have not been assessed for their phytochemical activities in ...
Recently, there has been considerable interest in the use of terrestrial plants as a green technology for the remediation of surface soils contaminated with toxic heavy metals. This technology, termed phytoremediation, uses plants to extract heavy metals from the soil and to concentrate them in the harvestable shoot tissue (1, 2). A major factor behind the interest in phytoremediation of metal-polluted soils has been the growing awareness of the existence of a number of metal-accumulating plant species. These plant species, called hyperaccumulators, are endemic to metalliferous soils and can accumulate and tolerate high levels of heavy metals in the shoot (3, 4). Among the best known hyperaccumulators is Thlaspi caerulescens. This member of the Brassicaceae family has attracted the interest of plant biologists for over a century because of its ability to colonize calamine and serpentine soils containing naturally elevated levels of heavy metals such as Zn, Pb, Cd, Ni, Cr, and Co. Certain ...
Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) is a member of the genus Caulimovirus, one of the six genera in the Caulimoviridae family, which are pararetroviruses that infect plants. Pararetroviruses replicate through reverse transcription just like retroviruses, but the viral particles contain DNA instead of RNA. Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) is the type species of the family Caulimoviridae. This family is grouped together with Hepadnaviruses into the Pararetrovirus group due to its mode of replication via reverse transcription of a pre-genomic RNA intermediate. CaMV infects mostly plants of the Brassicaceae family (such as cauliflower and turnip) but some CaMV strains (D4 and W260) are also able to infect Solanaceae species of the genera Datura and Nicotiana. CaMV induces a variety of systemic symptoms such as mosaic, necrotic lesions on leaf surfaces, stunted growth, and deformation of the overall plant structure. The symptoms exhibited vary depending on the viral strain, host ecotype, and environmental ...
Cruciferous vegetables, such as broccoli, cabbage and kale, are rich sources of sulfur-containing compounds called glucosinolates. Isothiocyanates are biologically active hydrolysis (breakdown) products of glucosinolates. Cruciferous vegetables contain a variety of different glucosinolates, each of which forms a different isothiocyanate when hydrolyzed (see Figure) (1). For example, broccoli is a good source of glucoraphanin, the glucosinolate precursor of sulforaphane (SFN), and sinigrin, the glucosinolate precursor of allyl isothiocyanate (AITC) (2). Watercress is a rich source of gluconasturtiin, the precursor of phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC), while garden cress is rich in glucotropaeolin, the precursor of benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC). At present, scientists are interested in the cancer-preventive activities of vegetables that are rich in glucosinolates (see Cruciferous Vegetables), as well as individual isothiocyanates (3).. Summary. * Isothiocyanates are derived from the hydrolysis ...
This study was carried out to identify unknown Alternaria species or less known as plant pathogenic anamorphic fungi from Benghazi District. Plant materials with fungal signs and symptoms were collected and examined to identify causal agents. Five species-A. brassicae (on Eruca sativa), A. longipes (on Nicotiana glauca), A. tenuissima (on Ficus carica), A. triticicola (on Hordeum vulgare L.) and Alternaria state of Pleospora infectoria (on Avena sativa)-were reported as plant pathogenic and new to Libyan mycobiota.
by Rochel Weiss. This cookbook is my most recent purchase and so far I love it. I have made three of the recipes and all have come out fantastic. The cookbook is gluten-free, grain-free, refined sugar-free, lactose-free and yeast-free.. So why are these kugelettes good for you? Broccoli is a cruciferous vegetable - one of the big reasons to eat plenty of cruciferous vegetables is that they may help to lower your risk of getting cancer. Cruciferous vegetables have compounds called glucosinolates. Non-cruciferous vegetables do not not have glucosinolates. These compounds KILL carcinogens before they can damage our DNA and prevent healthy cells from turning into cancerous cells. They provide vitamin A, B6, C, K, folic acid, potassium, maganese and iron. Some other cruciferous vegetables are kale, bok choy, cauliflower and brussels sprouts. This dish also contains onions, which help to regulate blood sugar levels. This, in turn, reduces insulin secretion and IGF (insulin-like growth factors), and ...
Epidemiological data indicate that dietary consumption of cruciferous vegetables may reduce the risk of many cancers including breast cancer. Cruciferous vegetables contain high levels of glucosinolates; stable phytochemicals that when metabolized produce cancer-preventing active isothiocyanates. Isothiocyanates, such as sulforaphane (SFN) found in broccoli sprouts, are thought to prevent tumorigenesis through epigenetic mechanisms controlling the expression of tumor-related genes. Ingestion of broccoli sprouts results in rapid distribution of SFN to breast epithelium, however, the effect of chronic exposure to low levels of SFN on the growth of breast cells has not been fully explored.. In the present study we assessed the effect of SFN on the growth of an immortalized breast cell line (MCF10A), and two breast cancer cell lines; the estrogen receptor positive MCF-7 cell line, and the estrogen receptor negative TMX2-28 cell line. We first determined the seeding densities for each cell line that ...
White blister rust in the Brassicaceae is emerging as a superb model for exploring how plant biodiversity has channeled speciation of biotrophic parasites. The causal agents of white rust across a wide breadth of cruciferous hosts currently are named as variants of a single oomycete species, Albugo candida. The most notable examples include a major group of physiological races that each are economically destructive in a different vegetable or oilseed crop of Brassica juncea (A. candida race 2), B. rapa (race 7), or B. oleracea (race 9); or parasitic on wild crucifers such as Capsella bursa-pastoris (race 4). Arabidopsis thaliana is innately immune to these races of A. candida under natural conditions; however, it commonly hosts its own molecularly distinct subspecies of A. candida (A. candida subsp. arabidopsis). In the laboratory, we have identified several accessions of Arabidopsis thaliana (e.g.,. Ws-3) that can permit varying degrees of rust development following inoculation with A. candida ...

The Brassicaceae - Agri-Horticultural and Environmental Perspectives | Frontiers Research TopicThe Brassicaceae - Agri-Horticultural and Environmental Perspectives | Frontiers Research Topic

Additionally, several representatives of the family Brassicaceae have potential to grow fast, yield high biomass, well-adapted ... This Frontiers Research Topic The Brassicaceae- Agri-Horticultural and Environmental Perspectives is an effort to provide a ... The Brassicaceae (the mustard family, or Cruciferae), an angiosperm family includes several plants of major agronomic, ... Taxonomy of family Brassicaceae; - Contribution of Brassicaceae family to plant taxonomy research; -Brassicaceae-phylogeny and ...
more infohttps://www.frontiersin.org/research-topics/3959/the-brassicaceae---agri-horticultural-and-environmental-perspectives

STORRE: Using complementary techniques to distinguish cryptic species: A new Erysimum (Brassicaceae) species from North AfricaSTORRE: Using complementary techniques to distinguish cryptic species: A new Erysimum (Brassicaceae) species from North Africa

Brassicaceae. corolla color. corolla shape. cryptic species. Erysimum nervosum. Erysimum riphaeanum sp. nov.. geometric ... Using complementary techniques to distinguish cryptic species: A new Erysimum (Brassicaceae) species from North Africa. ... Abdelaziz (2011) Using complementary techniques to distinguish cryptic species_A new Erysimum (Brassicaceae) species from North ... Brassicaceae) species from North Africa, American Journal of Botany, 98 (6), pp. 1049-1060. ...
more infohttps://dspace.stir.ac.uk/handle/1893/17369

Cardamine hirsuta bittercressCardamine hirsuta bittercress

Family: Brassicaceae (or Cruciferae), Mustard family. Common name: This weed has a tremendous variety of common names, most ...
more infohttp://oregonstate.edu/dept/nursery-weeds/weedspeciespage/bittercress/bittercress_page.html

Classification |
	USDA PLANTSClassification | USDA PLANTS

Family Brassicaceae - Mustard family. Genus Cardamine L. - bittercress P. Species Cardamine maxima (Nutt.) Alph. Wood - large ...
more infohttps://www.plants.usda.gov/java/ClassificationServlet?source=profile&symbol=CAMA36&display=31

Great Plains Herbaria - Arabis holboellii var. retrofractaGreat Plains Herbaria - Arabis holboellii var. retrofracta

Family: Brassicaceae [Arabis arcuata var. secunda (Howell) B.L.Rob., more, Arabis caduca A.Nelson, Arabis consanguinea Greene, ...
more infohttp://ngpherbaria.org/portal/taxa/index.php?taxon=62389

Lepidium meyenii maca female libido abstract - Libido For Her Homeopathic Spray. - Dec 14, 2017Lepidium meyenii maca female libido abstract - Libido For Her Homeopathic Spray. - Dec 14, 2017

Brassicaceae) were for its supposed libido stimulant effect [9-11,16], sperm production [2-7] and December 21, 2013. Maca Root ... Brassicaceae) were for its supposed libido stimulant effect [9-11,16], sperm production [2-7] and December 7, 2013. Maca - ... Brassicaceae), " maca.... January 27, 2017. Maca Products - Increase Energy and Libido , Forrest Health (https://www. ...
more infohttp://libidoforher.herbalous.com/lepidium-meyenii-maca-female-libido-abstract.html

Tropicos | Name - !!Cleomaceae Bercht. & J. PreslTropicos | Name - !!Cleomaceae Bercht. & J. Presl

Both groups have long been regarded as close relatives of the Brassicaceae, but the phylogenetic relationships between the ... Morphologically and phytochemically, the Brassicaceae in the restricted sense are a relatively easily recognized group ... Brassicaceae) or to recognize two or three separate families (Hall et al., 2002). What has become apparent is that if Cleome ... that the largely herbaceous Brassicaceae and Cleomaceae are sister groups and that this assemblage shared a common ancestor ...
more infohttp://www.tropicos.org/Name/50309053?projectid=23&keystyle=in

Shepherds Purse - IndianSpringHerbs.comShepherd's Purse - IndianSpringHerbs.com

Family: Brassicaceae (Mustard Family). Other Names: Witchs pouches, Pickpocket, Pepper and salt,. Mothers heart. Flowers: ...
more infohttp://www.indianspringherbs.com/shepherds-purse/

The ecological genetics of aliphatic glucosinolates. - Oxford Big Data InstituteThe ecological genetics of aliphatic glucosinolates. - Oxford Big Data Institute

They occur in the Brassicaceae and related families. A wide variety of glucosinolates exists owing to modification of the side- ... They occur in the Brassicaceae and related families. A wide variety of glucosinolates exists owing to modification of the side- ...
more infohttps://www.bdi.ox.ac.uk/publications/276007

The Perks of Being a Literal Wallflower (Erysimum scoparium) | Golden WordsThe Perks of Being a Literal Wallflower (Erysimum scoparium) | Golden Words

Life as an angiosperm isnt too exciting and I often go unnoticed in the family Brassicaceae. What I really want more than ...
more infohttp://goldenwords.ca/the-perks-of-being-a-literal-wallflower-erysimum-scoparium/

Brassicaceae - WikipediaBrassicaceae - Wikipedia

"Brassicaceae". The Plantlist. Retrieved 2017-10-09.. *^ a b c d Al-Shehbaz, I.A. (2012). "Neotropical Brassicaceae". ... Brassicaceae (/ˌbræsɪˈkeɪsii/) or Cruciferae (/kruːˈsɪfəri/)[2] is a medium-sized and economically important family of ... The Brassicaceae also includes ornamentals, such as species of Aethionema, Alyssum, Arabis, Aubrieta, Aurinia, Cheiranthus, ... The name Brassicaceae comes to international scientific vocabulary from New Latin, from Brassica, the type genus, + -aceae,[11] ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brassicaceae

Brassicaceae - WiktionaryBrassicaceae - Wiktionary

Capparaceae + [ Cleomaceae + Brassicaceae ] ] forms a clade within Brassicales, as does [ Cleomaceae + Brassicaceae ], but no ... Brassicaceae. *A taxonomic family within the order Brassicales - the mustard or cabbage family. The alternative name is ... Retrieved from "https://en.wiktionary.org/w/index.php?title=Brassicaceae&oldid=48530305" ...
more infohttps://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Brassicaceae

BrassicaceaeBrassicaceae

... Name. Synonyms. Arabidaceae. Cruciferae. Drabaceae. Erysimaceae. Isatidaceae. Raphanaceae. Schizopetalaceae. ... Brassicaceae. Common names. Kreuzblütler in German. crucifers in English. kruisbloemenfamilie in Dutch. moutardes in French. ... Brassicaceae Dataset GBIF Backbone Taxonomy Rank FAMILY Published in Outl. Bot.: 854, 1093, 1123. Feb http://creativecommons. ...
more infohttps://www.gbif.org/species/3112

Brassicaceae - WikispeciesBrassicaceae - Wikispecies

Brassicaceae Burnett Outlines Bot. (Burnett) 854, 1093, 1123. (1835), nom. cons. *. Type genus. : Brassica L. Sp. Pl. 2: 666. ( ... Brassicaceae: species checklist and database on CD-Rom. Plant Systematics and Evolution 259(2-4): 249-258. DOI: 10.1007/s00606- ... A synopsis of the genus Noccaea (Coluteocarpeae, Brassicaceae). Harvard Papers in Botany 19(1): 25-51. DOI: 10.3100/hpib. ... BrassiBase: Introduction to a novel database on Brassicaceae evolution. Plant and Cell Physiology 55(1): e3. DOI: 10.1093/pcp/ ...
more infohttps://species.wikimedia.org/wiki/Brassicaceae?uselang=az

Neotropical Brassicaceae - Neotropikey from KewNeotropical Brassicaceae - Neotropikey from Kew

... flora.huh.harvard.edu/Brassicaceae/navikey/Brassicaceae_Genera_World/Brassicaceae_Genera_World_NaviKey.html ... The Brassicaceae include several important crop plants grown in the Neotropics as vegetables (e.g., species of Brassica and ... The Neotropical Brassicaceae include 274 species in 45 genera, of which the 238 native species belong to 28 genera. *The 36 ... The Brassicaceae (also known as Cruciferae) is type family of the order Brassicales that includes 17 other families, including ...
more infohttp://www.kew.org/science/tropamerica/neotropikey/families/Brassicaceae.htm

Tropicos | Name - !!Brassicaceae BurnettTropicos | Name - !!Brassicaceae Burnett

The petals of most species of Brassicaceae are arranged in the shape of a cross, leading to the common name crucifer and the ...
more infohttp://tropicos.org/Name/42000136?projectid=23

Arabis Genus - Brassicaceae FamilyArabis Genus - Brassicaceae Family

Images, descriptions and identification of plants growing in the wilds of Montana. Edible, poisonous and plants for medicinal use.
more infohttp://montana.plant-life.org/cgi-bin/genus03.cgi?Brassicaceae_Arabis

Brassicaceae in Flora of Pakistan @ efloras.orgBrassicaceae in Flora of Pakistan @ efloras.org

Brassicaceae S. M. H. JAFRI Herbarium, Department of Botany, University of Karachi, Karachi ...
more infohttp://efloras.org/florataxon.aspx?flora_id=5&taxon_id=10120

Flowers - Mustard Family, Brassicaceae - NatureGateFlowers - Mustard Family, Brassicaceae - NatureGate

Mustard Family, Brassicaceae. The Mustard family (Cabbage family, Brassicaceae, also known as Cruciferae) is familiar through ...
more infohttp://www.luontoportti.com/suomi/en/kukkakasvit/?c=Brassicaceae

Brassicaceae in Flora of North America @ efloras.orgBrassicaceae in Flora of North America @ efloras.org

1994) recommended that the Brassicaceae and Capparaceae (including Cleomaceae) be united into one family, Brassicaceae. ... Brassicaceae Burnett Cruciferae Jussieu, Ihsan A. Al-Shehbaz Herbs or subshrubs [shrubs or, rarely, lianas or trees], annual, ... The Brassicaceae include important crop plants that are grown as vegetables (e.g., Brassica, Eruca, Lepidium, Nasturtium, ... The Brassicaceae have been regarded as a natural group for over 250 years, beginning with their treatment by Linnaeus in 1753 ...
more infohttp://www.efloras.org/florataxon.aspx?flora_id=1&taxon_id=10120&key_no=2

Brassicaceae in Flora of North America @ efloras.orgBrassicaceae in Flora of North America @ efloras.org

1994) recommended that the Brassicaceae and Capparaceae (including Cleomaceae) be united into one family, Brassicaceae. ... Brassicaceae Burnett Cruciferae Jussieu, Ihsan A. Al-Shehbaz Herbs or subshrubs [shrubs or, rarely, lianas or trees], annual, ... The Brassicaceae include important crop plants that are grown as vegetables (e.g., Brassica, Eruca, Lepidium, Nasturtium, ... The Brassicaceae have been regarded as a natural group for over 250 years, beginning with their treatment by Linnaeus in 1753 ...
more infohttp://www.efloras.org/florataxon.aspx?flora_id=1&taxon_id=10120&key_no=6
  • Abdelaziz Mohamed M, Lorite J, Munoz-Pajares AJ, Herrador MB, Perfectti F & Gomez JM (2011) Using complementary techniques to distinguish cryptic species: A new Erysimum (Brassicaceae) species from North Africa, American Journal of Botany, 98 (6), pp. 1049-1060. (stir.ac.uk)
  • This Frontiers Research Topic ' The Brassicaceae- Agri-Horticultural and Environmental Perspectives' is an effort to provide a common platform to agronomists, horticulturists, plant breeders/tissue culturists, plant geneticists/molecular biologists, plant physiologists and environmental plant scientists addressing sustainable approaches to improve crop productivity and quality, and sustainably resolving varied environmental contamination issues. (frontiersin.org)
  • Bidirectional but asymmetrical sexual hybridization between Brassica carinata and Sinapis arvensis (Brassicaceae). (nih.gov)
  • 4. A gluten-free biscuit according to any one of claims 1 to 3 wherein the Brassicaceae seed protein is obtained from seeds selected from the group consisting of Brassica napus, Brassica rapa, Brassica juncea, Brassica nigra, Brassica hirta and combinations of these. (sumobrain.com)
  • In sum, this thesis provides new insights into the broad conservation of dominance hierarchies at the Brassicaceae S -locus, and the role of dominant S -alleles in allopolyploid speciation and plant mating system shifts. (diva-portal.org)
  • Moreover, they appear to belong to a lineage that diverged from the ancestral Brassicaceae S -locus genes before allelic diversification at the S locus. (plos.org)
  • From our analyses, we conclude that both genes that comprise the ancestral S locus in the Brassicaceae were lost in Leavenworthia. (plos.org)
  • Self-incompatibility (SI) in the Brassicaceae plant family is controlled by the SRK and SCR genes situated at the S locus. (genetics.org)
  • BrassiBase: Tools and biological resources to study characters and traits in the Brassicaceae - version 1.1. (wikimedia.org)
  • Hyperaccumulation and hypertolerance traits associated with Brassicaceae ignited interests in scientific community to understand and investigate the range of mechanisms and omics in these plants with relation to accumulation of metals and their detoxification. (springer.com)
  • Closing the gaps: phylogenetic relationships in the Brassicaceae based on DNA sequence data of nuclear ribosomal ITS region. (wikimedia.org)
  • In this chapter we will try to discuss the mechanism of heavy metal uptake in Brassicaceae and their tolerance and detoxification pathways in these plants. (springer.com)
  • In this context, Brassicaceae are considered important vegetables due to several evidences of their health promoting effects that are associated to bioactive compounds present in the edible parts of the plants. (mdpi.com)
  • The present invention generally relates to gluten-free food products.In particular, the present invention concerns gluten-free biscuits comprising a starch-containing material and Brassicaceae seed protein. (sumobrain.com)
  • Brassicaceae seed protein on a dry basis and a gluten-free starch-containing material having a particle size distribution D90 less than 1000 μιτι. (sumobrain.com)
  • Brassicaceae seed protein, 15 to 75 wt. (sumobrain.com)
  • 5. A gluten-free biscuit according to any one of claims 1 to 4 wherein the Brassicaceae seed protein is rapeseed or canola protein. (sumobrain.com)
  • In addition, the impact of industrial and domestic processing on the amount of these compounds have been considered, in order to identify the best conditions that are able to preserve the functional properties of the Brassicaceae products before consumption. (mdpi.com)