Brassica rapa: A plant species cultivated for the seed used as animal feed and as a source of canola cooking oil.Brassica: A plant genus of the family Cruciferae. It contains many species and cultivars used as food including cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli, Brussel sprouts, kale, collard greens, MUSTARD PLANT; (B. alba, B. junica, and B. nigra), turnips (BRASSICA NAPUS) and rapeseed (BRASSICA RAPA).Brassica napus: A plant species of the family BRASSICACEAE best known for the edible roots.Genome, Plant: The genetic complement of a plant (PLANTS) as represented in its DNA.Raphanus: A plant genus of the family BRASSICACEAE known for its peppery red root.Chromosomes, Plant: Complex nucleoprotein structures which contain the genomic DNA and are part of the CELL NUCLEUS of PLANTS.Glucosinolates: Substituted thioglucosides. They are found in rapeseed (Brassica campestris) products and related cruciferae. They are metabolized to a variety of toxic products which are most likely the cause of hepatocytic necrosis in animals and humans.Plant Proteins: Proteins found in plants (flowers, herbs, shrubs, trees, etc.). The concept does not include proteins found in vegetables for which VEGETABLE PROTEINS is available.Genes, Plant: The functional hereditary units of PLANTS.Mustard Plant: Any of several BRASSICA species that are commonly called mustard. Brassica alba is white mustard, B. juncea is brown or Chinese mustard, and B. nigra is black, brown, or red mustard. The plant is grown both for mustard seed from which oil is extracted or used as SPICES, and for its greens used as VEGETABLES or ANIMAL FEED. There is no relationship to MUSTARD COMPOUNDS.Gene Expression Regulation, Plant: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in plants.Flowers: The reproductive organs of plants.Synteny: The presence of two or more genetic loci on the same chromosome. Extensions of this original definition refer to the similarity in content and organization between chromosomes, of different species for example.Arabidopsis: A plant genus of the family BRASSICACEAE that contains ARABIDOPSIS PROTEINS and MADS DOMAIN PROTEINS. The species A. thaliana is used for experiments in classical plant genetics as well as molecular genetic studies in plant physiology, biochemistry, and development.Chromosomes, Artificial, Bacterial: DNA constructs that are composed of, at least, a REPLICATION ORIGIN, for successful replication, propagation to and maintenance as an extra chromosome in bacteria. In addition, they can carry large amounts (about 200 kilobases) of other sequence for a variety of bioengineering purposes.Plant Infertility: The failure of PLANTS to complete fertilization and obtain seed (SEEDS) as a result of defective POLLEN or ovules, or other aberrations. (Dict. of Plant Genet. and Mol. Biol., 1998)DNA, Plant: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of plants.Plant Leaves: Expanded structures, usually green, of vascular plants, characteristically consisting of a bladelike expansion attached to a stem, and functioning as the principal organ of photosynthesis and transpiration. (American Heritage Dictionary, 2d ed)Pollen: The fertilizing element of plants that contains the male GAMETOPHYTES.Cotyledon: A part of the embryo in a seed plant. The number of cotyledons is an important feature in classifying plants. In seeds without an endosperm, they store food which is used in germination. In some plants, they emerge above the soil surface and become the first photosynthetic leaves. (From Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)Chromosome Mapping: Any method used for determining the location of and relative distances between genes on a chromosome.Genetic Markers: A phenotypically recognizable genetic trait which can be used to identify a genetic locus, a linkage group, or a recombination event.Polyploidy: The chromosomal constitution of a cell containing multiples of the normal number of CHROMOSOMES; includes triploidy (symbol: 3N), tetraploidy (symbol: 4N), etc.Plants, Genetically Modified: PLANTS, or their progeny, whose GENOME has been altered by GENETIC ENGINEERING.Hybridization, Genetic: The genetic process of crossbreeding between genetically dissimilar parents to produce a hybrid.Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism Analysis: The detection of RESTRICTION FRAGMENT LENGTH POLYMORPHISMS by selective PCR amplification of restriction fragments derived from genomic DNA followed by electrophoretic analysis of the amplified restriction fragments.Quantitative Trait Loci: Genetic loci associated with a QUANTITATIVE TRAIT.Brassicaceae: A plant family of the order Capparales, subclass Dilleniidae, class Magnoliopsida. They are mostly herbaceous plants with peppery-flavored leaves, due to gluconapin (GLUCOSINOLATES) and its hydrolysis product butenylisotrhiocyanate. The family includes many plants of economic importance that have been extensively altered and domesticated by humans. Flowers have 4 petals. Podlike fruits contain a number of seeds. Cress is a general term used for many in the Brassicacea family. Rockcress is usually ARABIS; Bittercress is usually CARDAMINE; Yellowcress is usually RORIPPA; Pennycress is usually THLASPI; Watercress refers to NASTURTIUM; or RORIPPA or TROPAEOLUM; Gardencress refers to LEPIDIUM; Indiancress refers to TROPAEOLUM.Internet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.Web Browser: Software application for retrieving, presenting and traversing information resources on the World Wide Web.User-Computer Interface: The portion of an interactive computer program that issues messages to and receives commands from a user.Software: Sequential operating programs and data which instruct the functioning of a digital computer.Anthocyanins: A group of FLAVONOIDS derived from FLAVONOLS, which lack the ketone oxygen at the 4-position. They are glycosylated versions of cyanidin, pelargonidin or delphinidin. The conjugated bonds result in blue, red, and purple colors in flowers of plants.Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.): An agency of the UNITED STATES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE that conducts and supports programs for the prevention and control of disease and provides consultation and assistance to health departments and other countries.Rape: Unlawful sexual intercourse without consent of the victim.Color: The visually perceived property of objects created by absorption or reflection of specific wavelengths of light.Soil: The unconsolidated mineral or organic matter on the surface of the earth that serves as a natural medium for the growth of land plants.Bees: Insect members of the superfamily Apoidea, found almost everywhere, particularly on flowers. About 3500 species occur in North America. They differ from most WASPS in that their young are fed honey and pollen rather than animal food.Soil Microbiology: The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in the soil. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms.Encyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Vegetables: A food group comprised of EDIBLE PLANTS or their parts.Inflorescence: A cluster of FLOWERS (as opposed to a solitary flower) arranged on a main stem of a plant.Seeds: The encapsulated embryos of flowering plants. They are used as is or for animal feed because of the high content of concentrated nutrients like starches, proteins, and fats. Rapeseed, cottonseed, and sunflower seed are also produced for the oils (fats) they yield.Scarlet Fever: Infection with group A streptococci that is characterized by tonsillitis and pharyngitis. An erythematous rash is commonly present.Gardening: Cultivation of PLANTS; (FRUIT; VEGETABLES; MEDICINAL HERBS) on small plots of ground or in containers.Love: Affection; in psychiatry commonly refers to pleasure, particularly as it applies to gratifying experiences between individuals.Climate: The longterm manifestations of WEATHER. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Genetic Variation: Genotypic differences observed among individuals in a population.Breeding: The production of offspring by selective mating or HYBRIDIZATION, GENETIC in animals or plants.Selection, Genetic: Differential and non-random reproduction of different genotypes, operating to alter the gene frequencies within a population.Quantitative Trait, Heritable: A characteristic showing quantitative inheritance such as SKIN PIGMENTATION in humans. (From A Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)

Functional expression of Cf9 and Avr9 genes in Brassica napus induces enhanced resistance to Leptosphaeria maculans. (1/214)

The tomato Cf9 resistance gene induces an Avr9-dependent hypersensitive response (HR) in tomato and transgenic Solanaceae spp. We studied whether the Cf9 gene product responded functionally to the corresponding Avr9 gene product when introduced in a heterologous plant species. We successfully expressed the Cf9 gene under control of its own promoter and the Avr9 or Avr9R8K genes under control of the p35S1 promoter in transgenic oilseed rape. We demonstrated that the transgenic oilseed rape plants produced the Avr9 elicitor with the same specific necrosis-inducing activity as reported for Cladosporium fulvum. An Avr9-dependent HR was induced in Cf9 oilseed rape upon injection of intercellular fluid containing Avr9. We showed Avr9-specific induction of PR1, PR2, and Cxc750 defense genes in oilseed rape expressing CJ9. Cf9 x Avr9 oilseed rape did not result in seedling death of the F1 progeny, independent of the promoters used to express the genes. The F1 (Cf9 x Avr9) plants, however, were quantitatively more resistant to Leptosphaeria maculans. Phytopathological analyses revealed that disease development of L. maculans was delayed when the pathogen was applied on an Avr9-mediated HR site. We demonstrate that the CJ9 and Avr9 gene can be functionally expressed in a heterologous plant species and that the two components confer an increase in disease resistance.  (+info)

Recombinant pronapin precursor produced in Pichia pastoris displays structural and immunologic equivalent properties to its mature product isolated from rapeseed. (2/214)

2S albumin storage proteins from rapeseed (Brassica napus), called napins, consist of two different polypeptide chains linked by disulphide bridges, which are derived by proteolytic cleavage from a single precursor. The precursor form of the napin BnIb (proBnIb) has been cloned using a PCR strategy and sequenced. The amino-acid sequence deduced from the clone includes 31 residues of the small chain and 75 of the large chain, which are connected by the peptide Ser-Glu-Asn. Expression of the cDNA encoding proBnIb has been carried out in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris. The induced protein was secreted to the extracellular medium at a yield of 80 mg.L(-1) of culture and was purified by means of size-exclusion chromatography and reverse phase-HPLC. Recombinant proBnIb appeared properly folded as its molecular and spectroscopic properties were equivalent to those of the mature heterodimeric protein. As 2S albumin storage proteins from Brassicaceae have been shown to be type I allergy inducers, the immunological activity of the recombinant proBnIb was analysed as a measure of its structural integrity. The immunological properties of the recombinant precursor and the natural napin were indistinguishable by immunoblotting and ELISA inhibition using polyclonal antisera and sera of patients allergic to mustard and rapeseed. In conclusion, the recombinant expression of napin precursors in P. pastoris has been shown to be a successful method for high yield production of homogeneous and properly folded proteins whose polymorphism and complex maturation process limited hitherto their availability.  (+info)

Toxic oil syndrome: the perspective after 20 years. (3/214)

Toxic oil syndrome burst upon the scene in Spain in May of 1981, draining the resources of a newly evolving political and social medicine system. The vehicle of the causative toxic agent was identified as an illicit oil that had been diverted from industrial use and refined in order to remove the aniline denaturant, and that was sold in unlabeled 5-liter containers by itinerant salesmen. Over 20,000 people were ultimately affected, and over 1,200 deaths from all causes have been recorded in the affected cohort. The epidemiologic investigation of toxic oil syndrome involved all facets of investigative and analytical work; from visits to factories and interviewing workers, to sophisticated chemical and statistical analytical techniques. This investigation serves as a further illustration that data and information of all types, and from a wide range of fields, need to be systematically collected and evaluated in order to best resolve an epidemiologic mystery. Astute clinical observation of the patients, however, led to the hypothesis that toxic oil syndrome was a result of a toxic exposure. In this and other epidemics of unknown etiology, clinical observation and the intense scrutiny of patients' histories, signs, and symptoms by treating clinicians have often led to hypotheses that could be tested epidemiologically. When there are medical unknowns, the role of the astute clinician continues to be crucial. The toxic oil syndrome epidemic is an example of how even a developed country can be affected by a massive epidemic of environmental origin if failures occur in the systems that control and regulate the food supply or other consumer products. However, such failures could occur anywhere that large commercial networks operate on the regulatory edge, and if these business lack an in depth knowledge of the consequences of alterations in manufacturing conditions. Such was the case with eosinophilia-myalgia syndrome as well, when apparently minor alterations in manufacturing conditions of L-tryptophan led to an increase in impurities in the product that were later associated with the illness. These risks are even greater in countries with few or inconsistent control systems, making the food and drug supply potential portals of entry for serious health hazards, as is further exemplified by the tragic episode of pediatric renal failure in Haiti associated with a legitimate consumer product, paracetamol elixir, that had been manufactured using a fraudulently supplied toxic ingredient, diethylene glycol (81). The potential toxicants in the adulterated rapeseed oil were present in extremely small amounts. If fatty acid anilides or related compounds are indeed the etiologic agents in toxic oil syndrome, then these compounds must be extremely toxic at the parts per million concentrations at which they were found. Further, the roles of causative agents in the development of disorders such as scleroderma, eosinophilic fasciitis, eosinophilic perimyositis, and other similar diseases are unknown, but scientists can speculate that some sort of low level environmental agent may play a role if such extremely small quantities of contaminants are indeed capable of causing disease. Although the exact identity of the etiologic agent in toxic oil syndrome remains unknown, work on toxic oil syndrome continues. Follow-up clinical studies and long-term mortality studies are under way. Investigation of the mechanisms involved in toxic oil syndrome continues. The identification of suspect chemical compounds, their characterization, and effects will hopefully one day contribute to the prevention of other similar diseases.  (+info)

Male fitness of oilseed rape (Brassica napus), weedy B. rapa and their F(1) hybrids when pollinating B. rapa seeds. (4/214)

The likelihood that two species hybridise and backcross may depend strongly on environmental conditions, and possibly on competitive interactions between parents and hybrids. We studied the paternity of seeds produced by weedy Brassica rapa growing in mixtures with oilseed rape (B. napus) and their F(1) hybrids at different frequencies and densities. Paternity was determined by the presence of a transgene, morphology, and AFLP markers. In addition, observations of flower and pollen production, and published data on pollen fertilisation success, zygote survival, and seed germination, allowed us to estimate an expected paternity. The frequency and density of B. napus, B. rapa, and F(1) plants had a strong influence on flower, pollen, and seed production, and on the paternity of B. rapa seeds. Hybridisation and backcrossing mostly occurred at low densities and at high frequencies of B. napus and F(1), respectively. F(1) and backcross offspring were produced mainly by a few B. rapa mother plants. The observed hybridisation and backcrossing frequencies were much lower than expected from our compilation of fitness components. Our results show that the male fitness of B. rapa, B. napus, and F(1) hybrids is strongly influenced by their local frequencies, and that male fitness of F(1)hybrids, when pollinating B. rapa seeds, is low even when their female fitness (seed set) is high.  (+info)

Supplementing barley or rapeseed meal to dairy cows fed grass-red clover silage: I. Rumen degradability and microbial flow. (5/214)

The present study was conducted to measure the flow of microbial and nonmicrobial N fractions entering the omasal canal of lactating dairy cows fed grass-red clover silage supplemented with barley and rapeseed meal. Four ruminally cannulated Finnish Ayrshire dairy cows were fed, in a 4 x 4 Latin square design, grass-red clover silage alone or supplemented with (on DM basis) 5.1 kg/d of barley, 1.9 kg/d of rape-seed meal or 5.1 kg/d of barley and 1.9 kg/d rapeseed meal. Nonammonia N flow entering the omasal canal was fractionated into microbial and nonmicrobial N using 15N. Microbial N was fractionated into N associated with liquid-associated bacteria, particle-associated bacteria, and protozoa. Supplementation of diets with barley increased microbial N flow entering the omasal canal (P < 0.01) but had no effect on nonmicrobial N flow. Increased microbial N flow was attributed to liquid-associated bacteria and protozoa. Barley had no effect on apparent ruminal N degradability, but increased true ruminal N degradability (P < 0.01). Barley had no effect on urinary N excretion, but increased daily N retention (P = 0.03). Furthermore, barley supplementation decreased ruminal (P = 0.02) and total tract (P < 0.01) NDF digestibility. Supplementation of diets with rapeseed meal increased apparent ruminal N degradability (P < 0.01) and nonmicrobial N flow entering the omasal canal (P < 0.01), but had no effect on true ruminal N degradability. Despite higher N excretion in urine, rapeseed meal improved daily N retention (P < 0.01). Milk yield was increased (P < 0.01) by barley and rapeseed meal supplements, with the responses being additive. Responses attained with barley were primarily due to increased energy supply for ruminal microbes and improvements in energy and protein supply for the animal. However, provision of readily digestible carbohydrates in barley did not improve microbial capture of ruminal ammonia. Benefits associated with rapeseed meal supplementation were explained as an increase in the supply of ruminally undegradable protein.  (+info)

Supplementing barley or rapeseed meal to dairy cows fed grass-red clover silage: II. Amino acid profile of microbial fractions. (6/214)

Four ruminally cannulated dairy cows were used to examine the effect of diet on the AA composition of rumen bacteria and protozoa, and the flow of microbial and nonmicrobial AA entering the omasal canal. Cows were offered grass-red clover silage alone, or that supplemented with 5.1 kg DM of barley, 1.9 kg DM of rapeseed meal, or 5.1 kg DM of barley and 1.9 kg DM of rapeseed meal according to a 4 x 4 Latin square design with a 2 x 2 factorial arrangement of treatments. During the first 10 d of each period, cows had free access to silage and, thereafter intake was restricted to 95% of ad libitum intake. Postruminal digesta flow was assessed using the omasal canal sampling technique in combination with a triple marker method. Liquid- (LAB) and particle- (PAB) associated bacteria were isolated from digesta in the reticulorumen and protozoa from digesta entering the omasal canal. Microbial protein flow was determined using 15N as a microbial marker. Flows of AA entering the omasal canal were similar in cows fed silage diets supplemented with barley or rapeseed meal. However, rapeseed meal increased nonmicrobial AA flow while barley increased the flow of AA associated with LAB and protozoa. Diet had negligible effects on the AA profile of microbial fractions. Comparison of AA profiles across diets indicated differences between LAB and PAB for 10 out of 17 AA measured. Rumen bacteria and protozoa were found to be different for 14 out of 15 AA measured. For grass silage-based diets, energy and protein supplementations appear to alter postruminal AA supply through modifications in the proportionate contribution of microbial and nonmicrobial pools to total protein flow rather than as a direct result of changes in the AA profile of microbial protein.  (+info)

Coevolution of the S-locus genes SRK, SLG and SP11/SCR in Brassica oleracea and B. rapa. (7/214)

Brassica self-incompatibility (SI) is controlled by SLG and SRK expressed in the stigma and by SP11/SCR expressed in the anther. We determined the sequences of the S domains of 36 SRK alleles, 13 SLG alleles, and 14 SP11 alleles from Brassica oleracea and B. rapa. We found three S haplotypes lacking SLG genes in B. rapa, confirming that SLG is not essential for the SI recognition system. Together with reported sequences, the nucleotide diversities per synonymous and nonsynonymous site (pi(S) and pi(N)) at the SRK, SLG, and SP11 loci within B. oleracea were computed. The ratios of pi(N):pi(S) for SP11 and the hypervariable region of SRK were significantly >1, suggesting operation of diversifying selection to maintain the diversity of these regions. In the phylogenetic trees of 12 SP11 sequences and their linked SRK alleles, the tree topology was not significantly different between SP11 and SRK, suggesting a tight linkage of male and female SI determinants during the evolutionary course of these haplotypes. Genetic exchanges between SLG and SRK seem to be frequent; three such recent exchanges were detected. The evolution of S haplotypes and the effect of gene conversion on self-incompatibility are discussed.  (+info)

Characterization and effects of the replicated flowering time gene FLC in Brassica rapa. (8/214)

Functional genetic redundancy is widespread in plants and could have an important impact on phenotypic diversity if the multiple gene copies act in an additive or dosage-dependent manner. We have cloned four Brassica rapa homologs (BrFLC) of the MADS-box flowering-time regulator FLC, located at the top of chromosome 5 of Arabidopsis thaliana. Relative rate tests revealed no evidence for differential rates of evolution and the ratios of nonsynonymous-to-synonymous substitutions suggest BrFLC loci are not under strong purifying selection. BrFLC1, BrFLC2, and BrFLC3 map to genomic regions that are collinear with the top of At5, consistent with a polyploid origin. BrFLC5 maps near a junction of two collinear regions to Arabidopsis, one of which includes an FLC-like gene (AGL31). However, all BrFLC sequences are more closely related to FLC than to AGL31. BrFLC1, BrFLC2, and BrFLC5 cosegregate with flowering-time loci evaluated in populations derived by backcrossing late-flowering alleles from a biennial parent into an annual parent. Two loci segregating in a single backcross population affected flowering in a completely additive manner. Thus, replicated BrFLC genes appear to have a similar function and interact in an additive manner to modulate flowering time.  (+info)

The mapping and functional analysis of quantitative traits in Brassica rapa can be greatly improved with the availability of physically positioned, gene-based genetic markers and accurate genome annotation. In this study, deep transcriptome RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) of Brassica rapa was undertaken with two objectives: SNP detection and improved transcriptome annotation. We performed SNP detection on two varieties that are parents of a mapping population to aid in development of a marker system for this population and subsequent development of high-resolution genetic map. An improved Brassica rapa transcriptome was constructed to detect novel transcripts and improve the current genome annotation. This is useful for accurate mRNA abundance and detection of expression QTLs (eQTLs) in mapping populations. Deep RNA-Seq of two Brassica rapa genotypes - R500 (var. trilocularis, Yellow Sarson) and IMB211 (a rapid cycling variety) using eight different tissues (root, internode, leaf, petiole, apical ...
BACKGROUND: The present study is the first effort in a comprehensive evaluation of the nutritive and biological properties of the meal from Rapa Catozza Napoletana (RCN) (Brassica rapa L. var. rapa) cultivar seeds as a new and alternative source of proteins.. RESULTS: RCN seed meal revealed a good protein content (382.0 g kg−1) compared with conventional Brassica defatted meals. Total glucosinolates (6.0 g kg−1) were comparable to or even lower than those reported for other yellow- and brown-seeded cultivars. Low levels of both sinapine and phytic acid (10.0 and 10.0 g kg−1 respectively) suggest a minor influence of these compounds on meal mineral availability. The meal revealed quite a high polyphenolic content (13.0 g kg−1) composed of flavonol and hydroxycinnamic derivatives. With regard to meal biological properties, a higher radical-scavenging potential than reducing capacity and a broad antimicrobial spectrum, mainly against food-borne pathogens, were detected.. CONCLUSION: RCN ...
Brassica rapa L. (syn. Brassica campestris L.), commonly known as turnip, turnip rape, fast plants, field mustard, or turnip mustard, is a plant widely cultivated as a leaf vegetable (see mizuna and napa cabbage), a root vegetable (see turnip), and an oilseed (but not normally rapeseed oil, from a different Brassica species).. The oilseeds known as canola are sometimes particular varieties of Brassica rapa (termed Polish Canola) but mostly the related species Brassica napus and Brassica juncea.. ...
p>The checksum is a form of redundancy check that is calculated from the sequence. It is useful for tracking sequence updates.,/p> ,p>It should be noted that while, in theory, two different sequences could have the same checksum value, the likelihood that this would happen is extremely low.,/p> ,p>However UniProtKB may contain entries with identical sequences in case of multiple genes (paralogs).,/p> ,p>The checksum is computed as the sequence 64-bit Cyclic Redundancy Check value (CRC64) using the generator polynomial: x,sup>64,/sup> + x,sup>4,/sup> + x,sup>3,/sup> + x + 1. The algorithm is described in the ISO 3309 standard. ,/p> ,p class="publication">Press W.H., Flannery B.P., Teukolsky S.A. and Vetterling W.T.,br /> ,strong>Cyclic redundancy and other checksums,/strong>,br /> ,a href="http://www.nrbook.com/b/bookcpdf.php">Numerical recipes in C 2nd ed., pp896-902, Cambridge University Press (1993),/a>),/p> Checksum:i ...
Truncated] One of the consequences of climate change is a change in rainfall distribution with more frequent and unpredictable droughts in some regions. Drought threatens supplies of oil produced from oilseed rape/canola (Brassica napus), while at the same time, international demand for oilseeds is growing at an unprecedented rate. B. rapa, one of the diploid progenitor species of the genetically-narrow and relatively recent allopolyploid B. napus, exhibits greater genetic variation and wider natural distribution than B. napus, and therefore is a promising source of drought tolerance alleles for canola breeders. This thesis aims to develop screening methods for drought tolerance in B. rapa during the reproductive phase, and to identify expressed drought tolerance genes that may be transferred to B. napus. An integrated approach was developed to meet this goal, from assessment of genetic diversity, physiological evaluation of drought tolerance to transcriptome analysis of drought-tolerant and ...
Once a field becomes infested, there is really only one option, crop rotations of at least four years, though five to seven years or longer have been recommended, depending on the spore concentration.. Clubroot is reported to have a half-life of four years which implies that every four years, 50% of the existing spores will be unviable. After eight years 50% of the remaining spores present be unviable (meaning that after 8 years 25% of the initial resting spores are still viable). The risk of the disease in a field after the absence of a susceptible crop will depend on the levels of the spores (spore load) after the last brassica crop. In fields that are heavily infested with clubroot, the time between brassica crops may have to be lengthened from the four year (three year between brassica crops).. In order for disease to occur, a pathogen, a susceptible host, and suitable environmental conditions are required. While the best approach to managing any disease is to avoid the introduction of the ...
Once a field becomes infested, there is really only one option, crop rotations of at least four years, though five to seven years or longer have been recommended, depending on the spore concentration.. Clubroot is reported to have a half-life of four years which implies that every four years, 50% of the existing spores will be unviable. After eight years 50% of the remaining spores present be unviable (meaning that after 8 years 25% of the initial resting spores are still viable). The risk of the disease in a field after the absence of a susceptible crop will depend on the levels of the spores (spore load) after the last brassica crop. In fields that are heavily infested with clubroot, the time between brassica crops may have to be lengthened from the four year (three year between brassica crops).. In order for disease to occur, a pathogen, a susceptible host, and suitable environmental conditions are required. While the best approach to managing any disease is to avoid the introduction of the ...
Brassica rapa BCPI-1 protein: isolated from flower buds of Chinese cabbage Brassica camperstris; amino acid sequence in first source; GenBank L41355
Turnip or white turnip (Brassica rapa var. rapa) is a root vegetable commonly grown in temperate climates worldwide for its white, bulbous taproot. Small, tender varieties are grown for human consumption, while larger varieties are grown as feed for livestock. The most common type is mostly white-skinned apart from the upper 1-6 centimeters, which protrude above the…
2007. Characterization of the centromere and peri-centromere retrotransposons in Brassica rapa and their distribution in related Brassica species. ...
Nutritional value of cake and solvent extracted meal from yellow-seeded spring rape (Brassica rapa) and brown-seeded winter rape type (Brassica napus) determined with ...
The mapping and functional analysis of quantitative traits in Brassica rapa can be greatly improved with the availability of physically positioned, gene-based genetic markers and accurate genome annotation. In this study, deep transcriptome RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) of Brassica rapa was undertaken with two objectives: SNP detection and improved transcriptome annotation. We performed SNP detection on two varieties that are parents of a mapping population to aid in development of a marker system for this population and subsequent development of high-resolution genetic map. An improved Brassica rapa transcriptome was constructed to detect novel transcripts and to improve the current genome annotation. This is useful for accurate mRNA abundance and detection of expression QTL (eQTLs) in mapping populations. Deep RNA-Seq of two Brassica rapa genotypes-R500 (var. trilocularis, Yellow Sarson) and IMB211 (a rapid cycling variety)-using eight different tissues (root, internode, leaf, petiole, apical ...
Brassica rapa narinosa is a BIENNIAL growing to 0.9 m (3ft). It is hardy to zone (UK) 7 and is not frost tender. It is in flower from May to August. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Bees, self.The plant is self-fertile. Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and prefers well-drained soil. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It prefers moist soil.
Instructions from the Father of Fast Plants (written by Dr. Paul Williams) about growing Rapid-cycling Brassica rapa (RBR) sucessfully in a Four Cell System (4CS). This file is one of the mini-booklets from Pauls Sandbox--it is made Xerox-ready, containing two sheets that together make four copies of two mini information booklets(each booklet measures 8x12cm).The two pages describe the construction, resourcing of materials, and usage of the 4CS, an alternative growing system to the Film Can S. Published by Learning Registry #GoOpen. 3 Views, 0 Likes on Docs.com. #Educational Resources -- How to build Fast Plant supplies
Dai, Yun-Lei, Gui-Lian Shao, Fang Wang (2015) Extract of Brassica rapa suppresses ovalbumin-induced asthma by down-regulating NF-kB and p38 MAPK activity. [Publication] Full text not available from this repository ...
Field mustard. Non-native, an invader from Europe. Found along roadsides, on our mesas, and on the lower reaches of most trails.. Easily confused with black mustard (Brassica nigra), the best way to distinguish is to look at the upper leaves, in B. rapa these leaves clasp the stem, while in B. nigra they do not. Blooms all year but it is at its peak Jan-Feb. In most places black mustard predominates except at the bloom peak.. ...
Population bottlenecks of two individuals caused an increase in VA for cotyledon surface area in three populations of rapid-cycling B. rapa, relative to a broadly based population. This effect of restricted population size is in agreement with theoretical predictions of quantitative traits, which include dominance and epistatic effects (Goodnight 1988; Willis and Orr 1993; Edwards and Lamkey 2003). Several studies of quantitative traits in animals have had similar results (Bryant et al. 1986; Lopez-Fanjul and Villaverde 1989; Fernandez et al. 1995; Ruano et al. 1996; Cheverud et al. 1999). These studies have reported values only for VA and VP by parent-offspring regression, but not VD. The nested mating design used in our study enables derivation of VD. The VD estimates for the bottleneck are much smaller than those for for the broad population. If an increase in VD occurs due to increases in rare recessives, the VD associated with these genes is not expected to change appreciably. The degree of ...
PubMed Central Canada (PMC Canada) provides free access to a stable and permanent online digital archive of full-text, peer-reviewed health and life sciences research publications. It builds on PubMed Central (PMC), the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) free digital archive of biomedical and life sciences journal literature and is a member of the broader PMC International (PMCI) network of e-repositories.
This paper is a description based on the Sinanthropus materials including5 teeth and two fragments of humerus and tibia recovered since the restorationof the Choukoutien excavation in 1949.The teeth of Sinanthropus are much bigger than those of modern man.Theleft medial upper incisor bears well-developed basal tubercle on the lingualsurface.The upper first and second premolars are robust in size and theirchewing surfaces are covered with wrinkles of special patterns.The crowns ofthe first and second lower molars are characterized by their lowness in relationto their lengths and breadths.Pronounced cingulum is present on the buccalsurface of the crown.The humeral shaft is almost identical with that of modern man.Thetibial shaft is slender and its anterior border is blunt.The walls of the tibiaare extraordinarily thick and its medullary cavity is very narrow.The results of the study of Sinanthropus pekinensis by the present authorsand others clearly show that the upper extremity bones of Sinanthropus
Scarlet Kashmir, also known as Scarlet Ball is an heirloom variety with 3 inch diameter roots which are somewhat flat. The color of the skin is rose red. Excellent greens, but the slugs love them, too. The turnip is a bienneal that is grown as an annual. This temperate climate crop grows best when temperatures
I guess I put my foot in it then :) OK....roll on luminescent rather than normal fluorescent crop plants ;) I do wonder whether if rape was not so garish whether there would be less antagonism towards it.. I often hear...those ugly yellow fields..I just wonder (fancifully) if changing the colour of the petals by (say...) ectopic anthocyanin production in them to produce red/purple/brown petals would lessen the criticisms. (is there a tangible economic factor of public colour antagonism in crop plants ?? ;) Sean ...
Most Asian Greens are moderately hardy annuals and can be sown from early spring through midsummer. Asian greens are in the same family as mustards but tend to have a mild flavor and lack the spiciness that many mustards are known for. Asian greens include an assortment of species that can be grown for baby leaf or full size crops. Heat tolerant greens with dark-green, glossy leaves and white, juicy midribs. Harvest at any stage and use in salads, as braising greens, boiled or pickled. Stronger flavor as plants mature. ...
Most Asian Greens are moderately hardy annuals and can be sown from early spring through midsummer. Asian greens are in the same family as mustards but tend to have a mild flavor and lack the spiciness that many mustards are known for. Asian greens include an assortment of species that can be grown for baby leaf or full size crops. Easy-to-grow Japanese green similar to Mizuna but with long, rounded leaves instead of serrated. Long white stems are borne in rosettes reaching 12" tall. Perfect lightly cooked and seasoned. Slow to bolt. ...
Habit: Annual to shrub; sap pungent, watery. Leaf: generally simple, alternate; generally both basal, cauline; stipules 0. Inflorescence: generally raceme, generally not bracted. Flower: bisexual, generally radial; sepals 4, generally free; petals (0)4, forming a cross, generally white or yellow to purple; stamens generally 6 (2 or 4), 4 long, 2 short (3 pairs of unequal length); ovary 1, superior, generally 2-chambered with septum connecting 2 parietal placentas; style 1, stigma entire or 2-lobed. Fruit: capsule, generally 2-valved, "silique" (length >= 3 × width) or "silicle" (length < 3 × width), dehiscent by 2 valves or indehiscent, cylindric or flat parallel or perpendicular to septum, segmented or not. Seed: 1--many, in 1 or 2 rows per chamber, winged or wingless; embryo strongly curved ...
Youre seeing this message because youre using an older version of Internet Explorer that is unsupported on our website. Please use these links to upgrade to a modern web browser that fully supports our website and protects your computer from security risks. ...
Classification for Kingdom Plantae Down to Variety Brassica rapa L. var. trilocularis (Roxb.) Kitam. Click on names to expand them, and on P for PLANTS profiles ...
Results Ex-vivo expansion of Tregs in the presence of ATRA significantly induced the expression of a4b7 compared to Rapamycin alone (5.57%±3.12 vs 82.8%±9.5, p=0.0057) Cells treated with Rapa+ATRA maintained their superior suppressive ability compared to Rapamycin treated Tregs (95.8%±3.5% vs 91.15%±10.1% p=ns; at Treg:Teff 1:1 ratio). RAPA+ATRA Tregs did not produce IFNy or IL17 under pro-inflammatory cytokine challenge. When flowed through a MAdCAm-1 coated chamber, significantly higher numbers of Rapa+ATRA treated cells were observed to roll (Rapa 0.83±0.40 vs Rapa+ATRA 10.17±2.54 p=0.005), crawl (Rapa 0 vs Rapa+ATRA 4±0.89 p=0.001) and firmly adhere (Rapa 0.33±0.21 vs Rapa+ATRA 36.8±1.78, p,0.001) than those treated with Rapa alone. When Tregs were transferred into mice, a higher proportion of Tregs were found in xenografts of animals treated with Rapa+ATRA Tregs compared Rapa Tregs (12.10 (7.54-22.83) vs 4.97 (1.72-7.63), p=0.0056). Importantly there was a higher proportion of ...
Arabidopsis Proteins, Brassica rapa/*genetics/growth & development, Chromosome Mapping, DNA-Binding Proteins/genetics, Evolution; Molecular, Gene Dosage, Gene Duplication, MADS Domain Proteins/genetics, Plant Proteins/genetics, Polymorphism; Restriction Fragment Length, Quantitative Trait; Heritable, Sequence Homology; Nucleic Acid, Transcription Factors/genetics, Variation (Genetics) ...
Today, more than 500 million people are suffering from a lack of adequate protein in their diet. Each year, the number of human beings increases by 80 million, a figure which is equivalent to the present population of Germany. ...
Monsanto Canada Inc. and Zeneca Seeds have developed three Brassica rapa canola lines, ZSR500, ZSR502 and ZSR503, derived from inter-specific crosses with the Brassica napus line GT73, that expresses Roundup-Ready™ genes. These genes confer novel tolerance to glyphosate, the active ingredient of Roundup® herbicide, which can control or suppress economically important weeds in canola production ...
(45 days) Brassica rapa (narinosa group) Open pollinated. What grows quickly, can be seeded as late as August, withstands frost and is, according to Orlando Sentinel columnist Sherry Boas, just as versatile as spinach? Yes, Tatsoi, also known as Tah Tsai. Anne Elder has picked it all fall into December even after a snow melt. Remains sweet and unburnt by cold during mild winters. A dream come true for snow-dwelling beings craving greens. Spoon-shaped thick dark green leaves make beautiful compact rosettes with mild brassica flavor. Make great microgreens. Also good in place of lettuce in sandwiches, stir-fried, in quiche, lasagna or soup. Will come back when cut. An essential ingredient in our salads and mesclun. 13,600 seeds/oz. Tested negative for BR and BL. Cold-hardy through at least part of the Maine winter.
Synonyms for tendergreen in Free Thesaurus. Antonyms for tendergreen. 3 synonyms for tendergreen: Brassica perviridis, Brassica rapa perviridis, spinach mustard. What are synonyms for tendergreen?
How do organisms adapt to different environments? We are interested in understanding the genetic and molecular changes that take place as organisms adapt to different environments. Which genes change, what types of genetic changes occur, and how do these changes affect the organism at the biochemical, physiological, and ecological levels? Since plants are rooted in their environment, they are particularly adept at coping with their environment. Furthermore different species, and populations within species, have adapted to different environments. Therefore plants are well suited for studying adaptation mechanisms. Because light is fundamental to plant growth, we have focused on how plants sense and respond to environmental light cues. We are focused on light perception by the phytochrome photoreceptors. Phytochromes sense red and far-red light and provide information about the density of neighboring foliage (among other things). We work on domesticated and wild tomato, Brassica rapa, Arabidopsis ...
Sick of invasive snakes eating through your wiring and biting your babies? Dont have any tylenol-doped mice to lob at them? You might be in luck, we have a few ideas of what to invasive species that insist on making pests of themselves.. Idea #1: Make Them Into Dinner. Become a part of the "invasivore" movement by ingesting some tasty lionfish (pictured) or asian carp, and by nomming on some kudzu or Japanese knotweed. One "almost serious" invasivore, Rachel Kesel, blogged on the subject and talked to The New York Times:. She said in an interview that she was studying in London when she wrote the post, which grew out of conversations about diet and ecology. "If you really want to get down on conservation you should eat weeds," she decided. And so she blogged. She now works for the parks department of San Francisco and said she did indeed pursue the vegetable side of the diet she proposed. "Im really looking forward to some of our spring weeds here," she said, notably Brassica rapa, also known ...
Buy college application essay yourself Airline reservation system thesis Brassica rapa research paper Essay for lord of the fliescharacters Cardiac mri thesis Clemson university admissions essay Art history term papers Cover letter retail buyer position Catholic education important essay Buy science projects in delhi
Nottingham plant scientists to play a lead role in combating losses experienced by two of the UKs most economically valuable vegetable crops.
Research by an international team, including Brian Popp, a UH Manoa professor, challenges the traditional narrative of the ancient people of Rapa Nui
Background: Diabetes mellitus is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. The elevated mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling contributes to the pathogenesis of diabetes. mTOR inhibition by Rapamycin (Sirolimus®, RAPA) is able to ameliorate diabetes-induced renal dysfunction and blocks the onset of type 1 diabetes. The purpose of the present study is to demonstrate the beneficial effect of chronic treatment with RAPA on the type 2 diabetic heart and to determine the mechanisms underlying this cardioprotection against ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury.. Methods and Results: Adult male db/db mice (n=20/group) were treated daily for 28 days with vehicle (5% DMSO, i.p.) or RAPA (0.25 mg/kg, i.p.). This treatment regimen significantly reduced body weight (33±1 gm vs 51±1 gm, p,0.0001), plasma glucose levels (436±22 mg/dL vs 557±23 mg/dL, p,0.005), triglycerides (60.4±3.5 mg/dL vs 92.5±13.2 mg/dL, p,0.05) and insulin (3.4±0.5 ng/ml vs 14.4±3.1 ng/ml, p,0.05) compared to ...
Drought is one of the major abiotic stresses affecting the productivity of Brassica crops. To understand the role of phytohormones in drought tolerance, we subjected Chinese cabbage (B. rapa ssp. pekinensis), white cabbage (B. oleracea var. capitata), and kale (B. oleracea var. acephala) to drought and examined the stress response on the physiological, biochemical and hormonal levels. The phytohormones abscisic acid (ABA), auxin indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), brassinosteroids (BRs), cytokinins (CKs), jasmonates (JAs), and salicylic acid (SA) were analyzed by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS). Based on the physiological and biochemical markers the Chinese cabbage exhibited the lowest tolerance, followed by the white cabbage, while the kale appeared to be the most tolerant to drought. The drought tolerance of the kale correlated with increased levels of SA, ABA, IAA, CKs iP(R) and cZ(R), and typhasterol (TY), a precursor of active BRs. In contrast, the
Environmental concerns over the cultivation of Genetically Modified (GM) crops largely centre on the ecological consequences following gene flow to wild relatives. One attractive solution is to deploy biocontainment measures that prevent hybridization. Chloroplast transformation is the most advanced biocontainment method but is compromised by chloroplast capture (hybridization through the maternal lineage). To date, however, there is a paucity of information on the frequency of chloroplast capture in the wild. Oilseed rape (Brassica napus, AACC) frequently hybridises with wild Brassica rapa (AA, as paternal parent) and yields B. rapa-like introgressed individuals after only two generations. In this study we used chloroplast CAPS markers that differentiate between the two species to survey wild and weedy populations of B. rapa for the capture of B. napus chloroplasts. A total of 464 B. rapa plants belonging to 14 populations growing either in close proximity to B. napus (i.e. sympatric 1 km) were ...
The Effect of Zinc and Copper on Male Gametophytes of FloweringPlants1) The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of heavy metals in the development of male gametophytes in flowering plants. Several experiments were conducted to find the best germination medium for the maximum percent germination and pollen tube growth of pollen. Temperature was also found to be an important factor influencing pollen tube growth.2) Three plant species were used in this study. They were Kalanchoe fedtschenkoi, Brassica rapa and Hippeastrum. The optimum germination medium for the pollen under study was found to be species-specific. 3) The best in vitro germination medium for the maximum percent germination and pollen tube growth for Kalanctioe fedtsclienl<oi was 10% PEG and 10% sucrose, while for Brassica rapa dwf2 it was 15% PEG and 10% sucrose.4) A 5 C difference of germination temperature was shown to alter pollen tube growth length in two cultivars of Brassica rapa.5) Presence of zinc in the ...
Kai-lan, also known as Chinese broccoli, is a leaf vegetable featuring thick, flat, glossy blue-green leaves with thick stems and a small number of tiny, almost vestigial flower heads similar to those of broccoli. Broccoli and kai-lan belong to the same species Brassica oleracea, but kai-lan is in the group alboglabra [Latin albus+glabrus white and hairless].…
Available evidence strongly suggests that the first to settle on Rapa Nui were Polynesians arriving from the west around AD 1200-1253. There are, however, also signs of an early contact between Rapa Nui and South America, but genetic evidence of an early contribution of Native Americans to the peopling of Rapa Nui has until recently been lacking. In this review our own genetic studies of blood-derived DNA collected on Rapa Nui since 1971 are summarized. For the first time human molecular genetic data are obtained which strongly suggest that some Native Americans arrived early at Rapa Nui, probably as early as AD 1280-1495. Whether they sailed directly from South America to Rapa Nui on their own rafts or whether they came with Polynesians returning from visits to South America cannot be established by our studies, but the latter possibility may be the most likely given other evidence of early visits by Polynesians to South America. In any case, our data suggest that some Native Americans arrived Rapa Nui
62. Euphorbia pekinensis Ruprecht in Maximowicz, Prim. Fl. Amur. 239. 1859. 大戟 da ji Euphorbia barbellata Hurusawa; E. cavaleriei H. Léveillé & Vaniot; E. hurusawae Oudejans; E. hurusawae var. imaii (Hurusawa) Oudejans; E. imaii Hurusawa; E. jesonii Oudejans; E. kitagawae (Hurusawa) Kitagawa; E. labbei H. Léveillé; E. lanceolata T. N. Liou; E. lasiocaula Boissier; E. lasiocaula var. pseudolucorum Hurusawa; E. sinensis Jesson; E. sampsonii Hance; E. tchen-ngoi (Soják) Radcliffe-Smith; E. virgata Waldstein & Kitaibel var. kitagawae Hurusawa; Tithymalus tchen-ngoi Soják.. Herbs, perennial, 40-80(-90) cm tall. Rootstock vertical, cylindric, 20-30 cm × 6-14 mm thick, sometimes branched. Stems single or clustered, 3-6(-7) mm thick, upper parts 4- or 5-branched, pilose or glabrous. Leaves alternate; stipules absent; petiole absent or nearly so; leaf blade very variable, usually elliptic, occasionally lanceolate, narrowly oblong or oblanceolate, rarely linear, 3-7(-9.5) × 0.7-1.7(-2.4) cm, ...
Circadian rhythms, the subset of endogenous rhythms with a period of approximately 24 h, are widely encountered in most organisms from cyanobacteria to humans. Although eukaryotes employ a common mechanistic logic of interlocked negative feedback loops to generate robust circadian oscillations, different components have been recruited to form the clock in different taxa (Bell-Pedersen et al., 2005; McClung, 2006; Wijnen and Young, 2006). Thus, fungal, animal, and plant clocks share a common architectural plan yet are composed of largely distinct components. This suggestion of polyphyletic origins of clocks implies strong selection for clock function. Indeed, in many organisms, including cyanobacteria, fruit fly, ground squirrel, and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), experimental evidence indicates that a robust circadian clock whose period resonates with the environmentally imposed diurnal cycle confers a fitness advantage (Yerushalmi and Green, 2009).. Among plants, most that is known about ...
Circadian rhythms, the subset of endogenous rhythms with a period of approximately 24 h, are widely encountered in most organisms from cyanobacteria to humans. Although eukaryotes employ a common mechanistic logic of interlocked negative feedback loops to generate robust circadian oscillations, different components have been recruited to form the clock in different taxa (Bell-Pedersen et al., 2005; McClung, 2006; Wijnen and Young, 2006). Thus, fungal, animal, and plant clocks share a common architectural plan yet are composed of largely distinct components. This suggestion of polyphyletic origins of clocks implies strong selection for clock function. Indeed, in many organisms, including cyanobacteria, fruit fly, ground squirrel, and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), experimental evidence indicates that a robust circadian clock whose period resonates with the environmentally imposed diurnal cycle confers a fitness advantage (Yerushalmi and Green, 2009).. Among plants, most that is known about ...
Native to the eastern Mediterranean and Asia and one of the earliest cultivated crops, broccoli rabe was at first eaten for its roots and leaves. It was also allowed to flower and its seeds collected and crushed for their high oil content (40 percent). The oil, in its crude form, was and still is used as lamp oil and lubricant. Botanically, Brassica campestris, Brassica rapa and Brassica napus are identical. According to Fereidoon Shahidi in "Canola and Rapeseed: Production, Chemistry, Nutrition and Processing Technology" (Van Nostrand Reinhold 1990), "There are three basic species [of rapeseed]: B. nigra, B. oleracea, and B. campestris. By hybridization and chromosome doubling, the three species B. carinata, B. juncea, and B. napus were artificially synthesized." ...
False-colour scanning electron micrograph of a fractured leaf of the turnip, Brassica rapa. The horizontal lines of cells near top & bottom form the epidermis of the leaf. The epidermis, partic- ularly the underside, is dotted with stomata: pores that regulate the leafs exchange of gases with the outside. The leaf interior contains mesophyll cells, some seen broken open. They consist of palisade mesophyll (top) & spongy mesophyll (bottom). The tightly packed palisade cells contain chloroplasts, sites of photosynthes- is. The spongy mesophyll cells are loosely packed, with few chloroplasts; they are more involved with gas exchange. Magnification: x55 at 35mm size. Green tint (leech). BW original is B745/074. Ref: MICROCOSMOS, fig. 4.9, page 72 - Stock Image B745/0125
p,Ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation is a common feature in diverse plant cell signaling pathways; however, the factors that control the dynamics of regulated protein turnover are largely unknown. One of the best-characterized families of E3 ubiquitin ligases facilitates ubiquitination of auxin (aux)/indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) repressor proteins in the presence of auxin. Rates of auxin-induced degradation vary widely within the Aux/IAA family, and sequences outside of the characterized degron (the minimum region required for auxin-induced degradation) can accelerate or decelerate degradation. We have used synthetic auxin degradation assays in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and in plants to characterize motifs flanking the degron that contribute to tuning the dynamics of Aux/IAA degradation. The presence of these rate motifs is conserved in phylogenetically distant members of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Aux/IAA family, as well as in their putative Brassica rapa orthologs. We ...
The fact that this disease occurs only rarely is little consolation when it has messed up your crop. The culprit is a virus which is transmitted by a soil borne fungus Olpidium brassicae. Something to do, you might think, with Brassica crops but there is little evidence that the disease is worse after a Brassica crop. In fact our knowledge about this disease and what are the predisposing conditions are quite limited. It has been recorded in the Netherlands since 1924, where the name ABC disease was adopted after the way in which the symptoms were first descibed viz. (A) dark, slightly raised, dark brown patches, (B) dark, almost sunken patches often resembling horseshoes and (C) lighter groups of brown patches with often parallel cracks. Apparently the virus is not transmitted from seed to daughter tubers. Eersteling (Duke of York), Doré and Bintje appear to have been most frequently affected. A couple of cases have been brought to my attention in the UK in recent years, one in Markies and ...
371825DNAArtificial sequenceChimeric promoter sequence using enhancer from Brassica rapa 1ctgatacaca cttaagcatc atgtggaaag ccaaagacaa ttggagcgag actcagggtc 60gtcataatac caatcaaaga cgtaaaacca gacgcaacct ctttggttga atgtaatgaa 120agggatgtgt cttggtatgt atgtacgaat aacaaaagag aagatggaat tagtagtaga 180aatatttggg agctttttaa gcccttcaag tgtgcttttt atcttattga tatcatccat 240ttgcgttgtt taatgcgtct ctagatatgt tcctatatct ttctcagtgt ctgataagtg 300aaatgtgaga aaaccatacc aaaccaaaat attcaaatct tatttttaat aatgttgaat 360cactcggagt tgccaccttc tgtgccaatt gtgctgaatc tatcacacta gaaaaaaaca 420tttcttcaag gtaatgactt gtggactatg ttctgaattc tcattaagtt tttattttct 480gaagtttaag tttttacctt ctgttttgaa atatatcgtt cataagatgt cacgccagga 540catgagctac acatcgcaca tagcatgcag atcaggacga tttgtcactc acttcaaaca 600cctaagagct tctctctcac agcgcacaca catatgcatg caatatttac acgtgatcgc 660catgcaaatc tccattctca cccaggacga tttgtcactc acttcaaaca cctaagagct 720tctctctcac agcgcacaca catatgcatg caatatttac acgtgatcgc catgcaaatc 780tccattctca cctataaatt ...
A brief history of Fonterras Te Rapa location, which has had a massive impact on dairy production and the economy of surrounding Waikato. The site celebrates 50 years since its opening. Read more about how Te Rapa has been a place of employment, a home, and a community hub for New Zealanders over the years.
Ricotta gnocchi is both much faster to make than its potato based counterpart, much harder to mess up, and gets a nice tang from the ricotta making it fresher and lighter. Or so it seems anyways. Think soft little pillows of happiness. |br /| |br /|I paired them with what I had in the fridge : a boozy onion jam (the recipe comes from the great Caravan book ) and some butter fried Cima di Rapa that was long overdue. Cima di Rapa is popular in Italy, which makes it perfect for this dish of course, but it also has a nice bitterness working really well with the sweetness of the jam and the creaminess of the gnocchi. I had none and felt no need to, but feel free to add some crème fraîche or normal cream to bind it all together. You could also add some nuts in there for the crunchy component, or toasted breadcrumbs if feeling quite indulgent.
ra03-05_clubroot - clubroot catma-2 - Characterisation of the transcriptional changes (host genes up- and down-regulated) during the P. brassicae / A. thaliana interaction. - The objective was to identify the genes up and down-regulated between susceptible and partially resistant plants. The Arabidopsis accession Bur-0 shows partial resistance against the isolate eH of P. brassicae, whereas it is susceptible against the isolate e2. The transcriptome patterns of Bur-0 plants inoculated either by isolate e2 or isolate eH were compared at one week after inoculation. A similar comparison was done on roots. The entire experiment was repeated (biological repetition) and each comparison was performed in two independent hybridisations (technical repetition). Keywords: organ comparison
The Physical Map database will contain physical maps of the Brassica A and C genomes. These will be intergrated to the Arabidopsis genome sequence by hybridisation with selected gene anchor probes.
Seed was sown in Metro Mix Soil in flats containing 14 rows of seven cells each (cells were ∼3.81 cm in diameter and ∼20 cm deep). Flats were organized into two replicate blocks in a 1002 foot indoor grow room at the University of Wisconsin Biotron Facility. Outer rows of each flat were seeded with border plants, and each of the remaining inner 12 rows were seeded in random order with an individual S0, S5, or parental line of B. rapa or B. oleracea (each cell was double seeded and thinned to one plant). Each block contained 10 flats, and each line was represented once per block. Within each block, the positions of flats were randomized daily. Plants were watered daily and fertilized every other day with dilute (1 tableapoon/20 liters) Peters Professional Peat Lite Special 20-10-20. Temperature was maintained at 21°C, humidity at 60%, and light maintained at ∼450 μmol/m2/s−1 for 16 h each day.. All plants were harvested at the same developmental stage, when the second and third true ...
RASFF - Salmonella enterica ser. Tennessee (presence /25g) in rapeseed meal from Russia in Finland RASFF-Salmonella enterica ser. Tennessee (presence /25g) in rapeseed meal from Russia in Finland RASFF-Salmonella enterica ser. Tennessee (presence /25g) in rape seed meal from Germany in Finland
Research by an international team, led by the University of Bristol, has shed new light on the fate of the ancient people of Rapa Nui (Easter Island).
The breeding programme of high-oleic-acid rapeseed (HOAR) was started at NPZ/Lembke almost 10 years ago. The idea was to improve the quality of rapeseed oil for human consumption as well as for...
If you are a society or association member and require assistance with obtaining online access instructions please contact our Journal Customer Services team ...
red cabbage nutrition details. red cabbage calories, fat, protein, carbohydrates and vitamins. red cabbage recipes, red cabbage articles and red cabbage videos.
Robin, J.; Inquello, V.M.mouni, B.A.anza, J., 1991: Relationship between immunological properties and structural model of 11S rapeseed globulin
Variation in flowering time induces phenological assortative mating-early bloomers tend to mate with other early bloomers while late mates with late-and this has interesting consequences for short-term evolution. The genetic variance for flowering time will be inflated by assortative mating, and this may accelerate its response to natural selection. I have a number of experiments underway, with post-doc Dr. Steven Franks. We are evaluating the degree of genetic variance inflation in B. rapa, and testing if this inflation is sufficient to allow evolutionary tracking of the expansion and contraction of the growing season caused by el Niño cycles ...
Lookup the definition of cabbage synomyns, antonyms, anagrams of the word. What does the word cabbage mean? What words can be made with cabbage
The rape stem weevil, Ceutorhynchus napi Gyll., is a serious pest of winter oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) crops in Europe causing severe yield loss. In currently used oilseed rape cultivars no resistance to C. napi has been identified. Resynthesized lines of B. napus have potential to broaden the genetic variability and may improve resistance to insect pests. In this study, the susceptibility to C. napi of three cultivars, one breeding line and five resynthesized lines of oilseed rape was compared in a semi-field plot experiment under multi-choice conditions. Plant acceptance for oviposition was estimated by counting the number of C. napi larvae in stems. The larval instar index and the dry body mass were assessed as indicators of larval performance. The extent of larval feeding within stems was determined by the stem injury coefficient. Morphological stem traits and stem contents of glucosinolates were assessed as potential mediators of resistance. The resynthesized line S30 had ...
Brassicas are a cold-climate crop, ideally suited to regions with mild summers and moderately cool springs and autumns. Gardeners in regions with hot summers should strive for two crops of brassicas per year: an early spring crop, harvested before the temperatures peak in the summer months, and a late-autumn crop, planted mid-summer for harvest in the fall. With suitable climate conditions and careful scheduling, its even possible to harvest three crops of brassicas in one growing season.. "Our early spring transplants get planted the beginning of May, with all varieties of brassica crops seeded or transplanted by mid-May. We have a June 15 frost date," says Jenny Tuckey, co-owner of EverGood Farm in northern Wisconsin, which produces organically grown vegetables. "Our salad crops are planted every week; Brussels sprouts once per season; broccoli, cauliflower and cabbage are planted every three weeks; and kohlrabi every two weeks. This allows us to continually harvest our brassica crops from ...
Indian J. of Agricult. Sciences, 61, (12),1991, pp. 872-876. An experiment was conducted to find out the production potential, economical feasibility and nutrient removal of different rice-based cropping systems, including sugarcane as the component crop.. The six cropping systems tested were viz.-wheat-fallow; S2, rice-maize (Zea mays L.)-maize + cowpea [Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp.] fodder (1:1); S3, rice-toria [Brassica rapa (L.) Thell. emend. Metzger var napus L.; syn B. napus L. var napus L. sensu stricto; B. campestris L. var toria Duth. & Full.]-wheat-dhaincha [Sesbania cannabina (Retz.). Pers.] green-manure; S4 rice-potato + Indian mustard [Brassica juncea(L.) Czernj. & Cosson] 3:1 - blackgram (Phaseolus mungo L.); S5, rice-wheat + Indian mustard (9:1)-greengram; S6, rice-wheat + sugarcane 4:1-ratoon-wheat (3-year rotation). Randomized block design was followed with 4 replications.. Rice (Oryza sativa L.) - potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) - wheat (Triticum aestivum L. emend. Fiori & ...
Although rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) is known to be affected by waterlogging, the genetic basis of waterlogging tolerance by rapeseed is largely unknown. In this study, the transcriptome under 0 h and 12 h of waterlogging was assayed in the roots of ZS9, a tolerant variety, using digital gene expression (DGE). A total of 4432 differentially expressed genes were identified, indicating that the response to waterlogging in rapeseed is complicated. The assignments of the annotated genes based on GO (Gene Ontology) revealed there were more genes induced under waterlogging in
Evans, D. E., Taylor, P. E., Singh, M. B. and Knox, R. B. 1991, Quantitative analysis of lipids and protein from the pollen of Brassica napus L, Plant science, vol. 73, no. 1, pp. 117-126, doi: 10.1016/0168-9452(91)90133-S. ...
Classical microparasite evolution theory predicts a trade-off between virulence and transmission [1-3]. This trade-off balances virulence and within-host reproduction so that transmission is maximized over the lifetime of infection. Microparasites expressing intermediate levels of virulence are favoured under those conditions, as seen in several empirical examples of viruses with high transmission success (e.g. infections of myxoma virus in rabbits, HIV in humans, and cauliflower mosaic virus in Brassica rapa) [4-6]. However, not all studies found evidence for evolution towards intermediate virulence, but instead suggested evolution towards high or low virulence [7, 8].. Host population density is a key factor in determining whether low or high virulence will be optimal [9-11]. This mechanism can be understood in the framework of a trade-off between a microparasites competitive ability and its persistence. When transmission rates are lower at low host densities, a strain that can maintain a ...
Brassica napus provides approximately 13-16% of global vegetable oil for human consumption and biodiesel production. Plant height (PH) is a key trait that affects plant architecture, seed yield and harvest index. However, the genetic mechanism of PH in B. napus is poorly understood. A dwarf mutant df59 was isolated from a large-scale screening of an ethyl methanesulphonate-mutagenized rapeseed variety Ningyou 18. A genetic analysis showed that the dwarfism phenotype was controlled by one semi-dominant gene, which was mapped on C9 chromosome by quantitative trait loci sequencing analysis and designated as BnaDwf.C9. To fine-map BnaDwf.C9, two F2 populations were constructed from crosses between conventional rapeseed cultivars (Zhongshuang 11 and Holly) and df59. BnaDwf.C9 was fine-mapped to the region between single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers M14 and M4, corresponding to a 120.87-kb interval of the B. napus Darmor-bzh genome. Within this interval, seven, eight and nine annotated or predicted
MAIN CONCLUSION : Small RNAs and microRNAs were found to vary extensively in synthetic Brassica napus and subsequent generations, accompanied by the activation of transposable elements in response to hybridization and polyploidization. Resynthesizing B. napus by hybridization and chromosome doubling provides an approach to create novel polyploids and increases the usable genetic variability in oilseed rape. Although many studies have shown that small RNAs (sRNAs) act as important factor during hybridization and polyploidization in plants, much less is known on how sRNAs change in synthetic B. napus, particularly in subsequent generations after formation. We performed high-throughput sequencing of sRNAs in S₁-S₄ generations of synthetic B. napus and in the homozygous B. oleracea and B. rapa parent lines. We found that the number of small RNAs (sRNAs) and microRNAs (miRNAs) doubled in synthetic B. napus relative to the parents. The proportions of common sRNAs detected varied from the S₁ to ...
Rapeseed (Brassica napus), also known as rape, oilseed rape, rapa, rappi, rapaseed (and, in the case of one particular group ofcultivars, canola), is a bright yellow flowering member of the family Brassicaceae (mustard or cabbage family). The name derives from the Latin for turnip, rapa or rapum, and is first recorded in English at the end of the 14th century. Older writers usually distinguished the turnip and rape by the adjectives round and long(-rooted), respectively.See also Brassica napobrassica, which may be considered a variety of Brassica napus.
Influence of the lime on inorganic ion and glucosinolate contents in Chinese cabbage - Calcium;Chinese cabbage;Inorganic ion;Glucosinolates;Slaked lime;
Looking for diploidization? Find out information about diploidization. The process by which a tetraploid organism attains the diploid state, involving repeated chromosome loss Explanation of diploidization
How are your brassica plants coming along? Its likely youve planted them out by now and are keeping an eye on them, particularly for signs of pest and disease. If you havent planted them out, its a little late but you can get away with it for a later crop. Once planted, water them especially well because theyre thirsty plants and August can be a dry month.. If youre growing broccoli, manuring the ground before planting can mean it grows with all mouth and no trousers - that is, leaves galore but fewer spears! A little nitrogen-rich feed, such as liquid seaweed or Growmore, through summer can help as they grow, and every month after that give them a small boost to help them along. This goes for cauliflowers, cabbages and other leafy brassicas.. Its a waiting game for brassicas, though, as itll be a good few months until any harvesting potential appears, but its worth the effort for tasty, home-grown greens! ...
... Compare Lettuce to Chinese cabbage by vitamins and minerals using the only readable nutrition comparison tool.
15 August 1997 Recall for Canadian GM rape seed By FW staff MORE than 60,000 bags of genetically modified rape seed was recalled from the Canadian market e
Brassica oleracea BOFH protein: homolog of LFY (Arabidopsis) & FLO (Antirrhinum); from cauliflower, Brassica oleracea; aa sequence given in first source; GenBank Z18362
Here, the allotetraploid species Brassica napus L. is a global crop of major economic importance, providing canola oil (seed) and vegetables for human consumption and fodder and meal for livestock feed. Characterizing the genetic diversity present in the extant germplasm pool of B. napus is fundamental to better conserve, manage and utilize the genetic resources of this species. We used sequence-based genotyping to identify and genotype 30,881 SNPs in a diversity panel of 782 B. napus accessions, representing samples of winter and spring growth habits originating from 33 countries across Europe, Asia, and America. We detected strong population structure broadly concordant with growth habit and geography, and identified three major genetic groups: spring (SP), winter Europe (WE), and winter Asia (WA). Subpopulation-specific polymorphism patterns suggest enriched genetic diversity within the WA group and a smaller effective breeding population for the SP group compared to WE. Interestingly, the ...
HOSTS White rust most commonly occurs on: field mustard (Brassica campestris L.), leaf or Chinese mustard (B. juncea Zerj, & Coss.), black mustard (B. nigra (L.) Koch), broccoli and cauliflower (B. oleracea L. var. botrytis L.), Chinese or celery cabbage (B. pekinensis (Lour.) Rupr.), rutabaga ...
Brussel sprouts are getting some height now and should be ready just before Christmas. They are getting on to be about 1 metre tall. I like to keep all the brassicas together like this so that I can regulate club root infection. I did get a little clubroot in the summer cauliflowers and the calabrese but this ground will not be used for brassicas for another six years and by then there will be few spores in the ground to infect the plants. The new brassica bed has the sweet peas on at the moment. These will be dug in to give a little more nitrogen to the soil because they are legumes and have root nodules that fix atmospheric nitrogen. The new bed will be limed in the spring to make sure that this soil is not a good habitat for the club root fungi. The new brassica bed has not had brassicas on it for about six years. Rotating strictly like this enables you to eradicate diseases like club root ...
Animal Feed Products Exporters - Aggarwal Impex Suppliers of Sorghum India,Rapeseed Meal,Sorghum Supplier,Animal Feed Products Exporter,Animal Feed Products,Sorghum,Rapeseed Meal
Chicken With Chinese Cabbage & Noodles - Pasta and Noodles Are you up for a delicious, steaming and aromatic Chinese style noodles? Then try this recipe. Its a bet, youll be left asking for more.
See all results for Memorial Day Chinese Cabbage Lettuce Recipes. Find more recipes at Foodily.com - the largest recipe search site - and see the ones your friends like.
مدیریت تلفیقی علف‌های هرز کلزا (رقم هایولا 401) با اجرای آزمایشی در سال 94-1393 در شهرستان کهگیلویه واقع در استان کهگیلویه و بویراحمد بررسی گردید. این آزمایش به-صورت کرت‌های خرد شده نواری در قالب طرح بلوک‌های کامل تصادفی با سه تکرار به اجرا درآمد که در آن نحوه خاک‏ورزی با 3 سطح شامل (خاک‏ورزی مرسوم یعنی انجام شخم توسط گاوآهن برگردان‌دار + دو بار دیسک عمود برهم + لولر + بذرکار، خاک‏ورزی کاهش یافته با استفاده از گاوآهن قلمی یا چیزل و دیسک زنی، و بدون خاک‏ورزی یعنی کاشت مستقیم بذور کلزا در بقایای ذرت با بذرکار) و مصرف علف-کش در 5 سطح شامل مصرف علف‌کش‌های
مدیریت تلفیقی علف‌های هرز کلزا (رقم هایولا 401) با اجرای آزمایشی در سال 94-1393 در شهرستان کهگیلویه واقع در استان کهگیلویه و بویراحمد بررسی گردید. این آزمایش به-صورت کرت‌های خرد شده نواری در قالب طرح بلوک‌های کامل تصادفی با سه تکرار به اجرا درآمد که در آن نحوه خاک‏ورزی با 3 سطح شامل (خاک‏ورزی مرسوم یعنی انجام شخم توسط گاوآهن برگردان‌دار + دو بار دیسک عمود برهم + لولر + بذرکار، خاک‏ورزی کاهش یافته با استفاده از گاوآهن قلمی یا چیزل و دیسک زنی، و بدون خاک‏ورزی یعنی کاشت مستقیم بذور کلزا در بقایای ذرت با بذرکار) و مصرف علف-کش در 5 سطح شامل مصرف علف‌کش‌های
Neutrófilos são as primeiras células do sistema imune a migrarem para o tecido inflamado e exercem a importante função de fagocitose e eliminação imediata de patógenos invasores. A ativação de neutrófilos é um processo de múltiplos passos e de alta complexidade. A busca por agentes biológicos capazes de modular o processo de ativação, migração, fagocitose e produção de espécies reativas de oxigênio (ROS) é importante pois aumentam a gama de opções para utilização na pesquisa. Nesse trabalho utilizamos a lectina extraída de Brassica oleracea (BOL) a fim de avaliar a sua capacidade na modulação da resposta de neutrófilos. Para os ensaios nós purificamos neutrófilos de camundongo tanto do sangue periférico quanto da cavidade peritoneal buscando avaliar sua capacidade migratória, o índice de CD62L na superfície e o índice fagocítico de neutrófilos pré-incubados com BOL. A lectina apresentou diversos efeitos de acordo com a dose utilizada, sendo possível ...
Raphanus sativus is a ANNUAL growing to 0.5 m (1ft 8in) by 0.2 m (0ft 8in) at a fast rate. It is not frost tender. It is in flower from Jun to August, and the seeds ripen from Jul to September. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Bees, flies.Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils. Suitable pH: neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It prefers moist soil.
Aim by fine-tuning the sound: Adjust, first the NOTE and then DETUNE controls so that the original and resynthesized sounds are closely matched (if that is your goal). A good technique is to fade the BALANCE knob fully left/right after making adjustments, if you have the perfect resynthesis the sound wont change (much) as the BALANCE knob is moved. NOTES: 1. The resynthesized sound is only a preview, always Import charged sample (described below) to hear the final resynthesized sound. 2. Untuned noises are difficult to resynthesize. For example the human voice, plosives, breath and similar untuned percussive sounds tend to acquire a vocoded quality. To help resolve these issues the Noise Generator can be used to restore untuned noises to the patch. Note that you can load your own custom Noise Samples to the library if needed ...
Finds sub-sequences or patterns in the sequence and highlights the matching regions. The tool works with standard single letter nucleotide or protein codes including ambiguities and can match Prosite patterns in protein sequences. More... ...
Finds sub-sequences or patterns in the sequence and highlights the matching regions. The tool works with standard single letter nucleotide or protein codes including ambiguities and can match Prosite patterns in protein sequences. More... ...
Deutsche Saatveredelung AG (DSV) is one of the leading German plant breeding companies in agriculture focussing on research, breeding, production, advisory service and sales. The main species are grasses, oilseed rape and cereals.
Green cabbage (Brassica oleracea capitata var. alba) and purple cabbage (Brassica oleracea var. capitata f. rubra), also called red cabbage, taste pretty much the same. The chief difference is that the color of purple cabbage may vary according to how you grow or cook it, and it contains compounds that are thought ...
Greyhound is a solid Irish variety, it is the only brassica I did not grow from seed, I picked up some sets in Dangan House nursary centre in Galway. They were planted by Mr Lance Spring on a visit here to the west ...
Yesterday we spent the day up at our allotment, with the aim of sowing mini-meadows and planting out Brassica plants. But firstly the grass paths separating the plot into its four beds needed a good cut. That done we prepared two narrow borders along one edge of the plot, raking the soil finely but adding…
Brassica species belong to the Brassicaceae family, which contains about 3700 species from 338 genera, including the widely studied model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Brassica species include both vegetable and oilseed crops that contribute about 10% of the worlds vegetable production and about 12% of worlds edible vegetable oil production [1, 2]. The diploid genomes of the six widely cultivated Brassica species are described by the famous "Us triangle" (genome A, B, C, AB, BC and AC, corresponding to B. rapa, B. oleracea, B. nigra, B. juncea, B. napus, and B. carinata, respectively [3]. The A genome species, B. rapa, is a major vegetable and also an oil crop in Asia and Europe. Because of their importance as crops and as models to study complex genome hybridization and polyploidization [4, 5], genetic and genomic research on Brassicas has intensified over recent years, generating ever increasing sets of data, such as Brassica genome sequences, genetic markers, expressed sequence tags (ESTs) ...
Brassica napus ; oilseed rape ; Leptosphaeria maculans ; Leptosphaeria biglobosa ; phoma stem canker ; leaf spot ; pseudothecia ; ascospore
FLEA BEETLES: PLANT LATE BRASSICAS FAR FROM SPRING CROPS. (from Mass. Veg. Notes) Mid July is often a time of year when adult FB numbers decline, because a large part of the population is underground, in larval and pupal stages. After larvae feed on roots, they pupate in the soil, then emerge again into the light as adults-ready to feed on foliage. The time when you will first see these new adults depends on when eggs were first laid on spring Brassica crops, and on soil temperatures since then. Dissections of flea beetles collected from the field in the Connecticut Valley in April and May detected eggs present in early May this year; hence new adults are likely to be emerging now. In fields where Brassica crops are always present, because succession crops are planted close together, it may appear that flea beetles never go away all summer. In fact, they are likely to increase dramatically and feed heavily in early August because of the new summer adults. If you plant fall brassicas close to ...
Synonyms for Brassica arvensis in Free Thesaurus. Antonyms for Brassica arvensis. 5 synonyms for Sinapis arvensis: Brassica kaber, chadlock, charlock, field mustard, wild mustard. What are synonyms for Brassica arvensis?
Authors. Stephen A. Ferreira, Extension Plant Pathologist. Rebecca A. Boley, Educational Specialist. Department of Plant Pathology,CTAHR. University of Hawaii at Manoa. HOSTS. In Hawaii, white rust most commonly occurs on: field mustard (Brassica campestris L.), leaf or Chinese mustard (B. juncea Zerj, & Coss.), black mustard (B. nigra (L.) Koch), broccoli and cauliflower (B. oleracea L. var. botrytis L.), Chinese or celery cabbage (B. pekinensis (Lour.) Rupr.), rutabaga (B. campestris L. var. napobrassica (L.) DC.), pak-choi (B. chinensis L.), turnip (B. rapa L.), radish (Raphanus sativus L.), and daikon (R. sativus L. var. longipinnatus Bailey). Less common hosts are spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.), horseradish (Armoracia lapthifolia Gilib.), and pepper grass (Lepidium L. sp.). Outside of Hawaii, white rust occasionally occurs on cabbage (B. oleracea L. var. capitata L.) and brussel sprouts (B. oleracea L. var. gemmifera DC), but has not been reported from Hawaii. DISTRIBUTION. A. candida ...
The Citrus stubborn disease is a plant disease affecting species in the genus Citrus. Spiroplasma citri, a Mollicute bacterium species, is the causative agent of the disease. It is present in the phloem of the affected plant and transmitted by several leafhoppers including Circulifer tenellus (beet leafhopper) and Scaphytopius nitridus in citrus-growing regions of California and Arizona and Circulifer haematoceps in the Mediterranean region. The host most notably affected is sweet orange but the bacterium can also infect weeds such as periwinkle (Vinca rosea) and London rocket (Sisymbrium irio). Yellowed plants of Chinese cabbage and pak-choi (Brassica rapa) can be infected by S. citri. In the wild, shortpod mustard (Hirschfeldia incana) infested by the beet leafhopper, Circulifer tenellus, can prove to be an important reservoir of infection. S. citri can also be transmitted to China aster (Callistephus chinensis), Shasta daisy (Leucanthemum × superbum), red clover (Trifolium pratense) and ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Antibacterial activity of Borago officinalis and Brassica juncea aqueous extracts evaluated in vitro and in situ using different food model systems. AU - Settanni, Luca. AU - Sardina, Maria Teresa. AU - Mammina, Caterina. AU - Miceli, Alessandro. AU - Corona, Onofrio. AU - Aleo, Aurora. PY - 2014. Y1 - 2014. N2 - The present study was undertaken to characterize the antibacterial activity of the aqueous extracts (AEs)obtained from the leaves of Borago officinalis L. and Brassica juncea L. The antagonistic activity wasevaluated against several bacteria (42 strains of Listeria monocytogenes, 35 strains of Staphylococcusaureus, 38 strains of Enterobacter spp. and 18 strains of Salmonella enterica) commonly associated withfoodborne diseases by paper disc diffusion method. The susceptibility to the plant extracts was strainspecific. Thirty-five strains (7 L. monocytogenes, 11 S. aureus, 1 S. Enteritidis, 1 S. Veneziana, 7 Enterobacterhormaechei, 5 Enterobacter cloacae, 1 Enterobacter ...
... or pak choi (Chinese: 上海青; Brassica rapa subsp. chinensis) is a type of Chinese cabbage. Chinensis varieties do not ... Baby bok choy B. rapa chinensis B. rapa chinensis has yellow flowers Choy sum List of vegetables "Help is on the way for ... This group was originally classified as its own species under the name Brassica chinensis by Linnaeus.[citation needed] Other ...
The turnip or white turnip (Brassica rapa subsp. rapa) is a root vegetable commonly grown in temperate climates worldwide for ... "Turnip - Brassica Rapa". Self Sufficientish. Retrieved 14 January 2013. Zohary, Daniel; Hopf, Maria; Weiss, Ehud (2012). ... Brassica) also known as swede (from "Swedish turnip"). The most common type of turnip is mostly white-skinned apart from the ...
Brassica rapa rapa. Bengena. Eggplant. Solanum melongena. Bhekuri. Indian Nightshade. Solanum anguivi. ...
... (Brassica rapa subsp. narinosa or Brassica rapa var. rosularis) is an Asian variety of Brassica rapa grown for greens. ... "Sorting Brassica rapa names". Multilingual Multiscript Plant Name Database. The University of Melbourne. Retrieved 17 March ...
Colza oil, from Brassica rapa, var. oleifera (turnip) is closely related to rapeseed (or canola) oil. It is a major source of ...
Brassica rapa subsp. rapa) and pak-choi (Brassica rapa subsp. chinensis). Artificial crosses between these two species and also ... Napa or nappa cabbage (Brassica rapa subsp. pekinensis or Brassica rapa Pekinensis Group) is a type of Chinese cabbage ... ISBN 978-971-92973-0-7. Toxopeus, H & Baas, J (2004) Brassica rapa L.. - In: Grubben, G.J.H. & Denton, O.A. (2004) Plant ... There exist some wild accessions of Brassica rapa subsp. pekinensis with resistance to Alternaria brassicae but not on ...
Young-Matthews, A (June 2012). "Plant guide for field mustard (Brassica rapa ssp. rapa" (PDF). USDA-NRCS Plant Materials Center ...
Cabbage family or Brassica leafy vegetables) komatsuna - (B. rapa var. perviridis) mizuna - (B. rapa var. nipposinica) napa ... cabbage (hakusai ) - (B. rapa var. glabra) takana (Japanese vegetable) (タカナ) - (Brassica juncea var. integrifolia or var. of ... mustard) Nozawana - (cultivar of B. rapa var. hakabura) na-no-hana (rapeseed or coleseed flowering-stalks, used like broccoli ...
... but has also been treated as Brassica rapa ruvo, Brassica rapa rapifera, Brassica ruvo, and Brassica campestris ruvo. The young ... Kai-lan Chinese cabbage Collard greens Mustard greens Rutabaga Turnip Brassica rapa "Brassica rapa subsp. rapa". Germplasm ... Rapini is classified scientifically as Brassica rapa subspecies rapa, in the same subspecies as the turnip, ... Mun JH, Yu HJ, Shin JY, Oh M, Hwang HJ, Chung H (October 2012). "Auxin response factor gene family in Brassica rapa: genomic ...
2010). "Sequence and structure of Brassica rapa chromosome A3". Genome Biology. 11: R94. doi:10.1186/gb-2010-11-9-r94. PMC ... Conifers Cultivar R570 Brassica Euphrasia Paspalum dilatatum Few fungi have been researched so far, possibly due to the low ...
"The genome of the mesopolyploid crop species Brassica rapa". Nature Genetics. 43 (10): 1035-1039. August 28, 2011. doi:10.1038/ ... In 2011 Tang studied Chinese cabbage species B. rapa and flowering plants such as A. thaliana. In December of the same year he ...
October 2011). "The genome of the mesopolyploid crop species Brassica rapa". Nature Genetics. 43 (10): 1035-1039. doi:10.1038/ ... The most recent event took place before the divergence of the Arabidopsis and Brassica lineages, about 20 million years ago to ...
It was first isolated from turnip (Brassica campestris ssp. rapa). TCV is a small (4054 base pairs), single-stranded, positive- ...
2011). "The genome of the mesopolypoid crop species Brassica rapa". Nature Genetics. 43: 1035-1039. doi:10.1038/ng.919. PMID ... Brassica napus, oil plant (2009) Elaeis guineensis, oil palm (2007) Corchorus olitorius, fibre plant (2010) Fraxinus excelsior ...
... brassica napus (wd , gwp gwe g , in it p) MeSH B06.388.100.157.200.277 --- brassica rapa (wd , gwp gwe g , in it p) MeSH ... brassica (wd , gwp gwe g , in it p) MeSH B06.388.100.157.200.249 --- ...
Brassica rapa subsp. chinensis) is a type of Chinese cabbage. Chinensis varieties do not form heads and have green leaf blades ... This group was originally classified as its own species under the name Brassica chinensis by Carl Linnaeus.[citation needed] ...
The plant specimen studied in the PGF was Brassica rapa (turnip). The Extravehicular Activity Development Flight Test - 05 ( ...
"The Biosynthesis of Erucic Acid in Developing Embryos of Brassica rapa". Plant Physiol. 118 (1): 183-190. doi:10.1104/pp.118.1. ... but especially so in members of the Brassica genus. For industrial purposes and production of erucic acid, rapeseed is used; ...
The name şalgam is Persian in origin; in Persian it is written شلغم and means "turnip" (Brassica rapa). Kanji (drink) is a ...
... was formerly known for the Teltower Rübchen (Brassica rapa ssp. rapa f. teltowiensis), a special type of turnip quite ...
... haplotype of Brassica campestris (syn. rapa)". Genetics. 153 (1): 391-400. PMC 1460755 . PMID 10471721. Takayama S, Shiba H, ... February 2000). "The pollen determinant of self-incompatibility in Brassica campestris". Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 97 (4): ... Schopfer CR, Nasrallah ME, Nasrallah JB (November 1999). "The male determinant of self-incompatibility in Brassica". Science. ... October 2001). "Direct ligand-receptor complex interaction controls Brassica self-incompatibility". Nature. 413 (6855): 534-8. ...
The 3D structure of Brassica rapa (Turnip) cyt f has been determined. The lumen-side segment of cyt f includes two structural ...
Brassica rapa var. perviridis) is a leaf vegetable. It is a variety of Brassica rapa, the plant species that yields the turnip ... Brassica juncea "小松菜 (こまつな) - 語源由来辞典". 語源由来辞典. Retrieved 20 May 2015. Queensland Government, Department of Primary
Brassica rapa) Dodder (Cuscuta reflexa) Euphorbia jolkinii Lingzhi mushroom or Reishi mushroom (Ganoderma lucidum)Ganoderic ... "5 alpha-reductase and aromatase inhibitory constituents from Brassica rapa L. pollen". Chemical & pharmaceutical bulletin. 57 ( ...
"Seeds of a possible natural hybrid between herbicide-resistant Brassica napus and Brassica rapa detected on a riverbank in ... "Transgenic Brassica napus fields and Brassica rapa weeds in Québec: sympatry and weedcrop in situ hybridization". Canadian ... Transgenic rapeseed Brassicus napus, hybridized with a native Japanese species Brassica rapa, was found in Japan in 2011 after ... The case of an herbicide resistance transgene in a weedy Brassica rapa population". Molecular Ecology. 17 (5): 1387-1395. doi: ...
Studies using Brassica rapa indicate that the light quality and ratio available to seedlings is sensed in the cotyledons, which ... "Cotyledon-Generated Auxin Is Required for Shade-Induced Hypocotyl Growth in Brassica rapa". 165 (3): 1285-1301. doi:10.1104/pp. ...
Brassica oleracea), turnip, napa cabbage, bomdong, bok choy and rapini (Brassica rapa), rocket salad/arugula (Eruca sativa), ... Brassica rapa (turnip, Chinese cabbage, etc.), Brassica napus (rapeseed, etc.), Raphanus sativus (common radish), Armoracia ... Brassica, wasabi (Eutrema japonicum), white, Indian and black mustard (Sinapis alba, Brassica juncea and B. nigra respectively ... The name Brassicaceae comes to international scientific vocabulary from New Latin, from Brassica, the type genus, + -aceae,[11] ...
"Inferring the Brassica rapa Interactome Using Protein-Protein Interaction Data from Arabidopsis thaliana". Frontiers in Plant ... Xanthomonas oryzae Arabidopsis thaliana Tomato Brassica rapa Maize, corn (Zea mays) Populus trichocarpa Protein interaction ...
This restorer introgression is located on the Brassica C genome making it only of use for B. napus and not for B. rapa or B. ... Genetic variation exists in Raphanus that could be of use to Brassica breeders. Of particular interest is the Ogura system of ... This thesis describes the development of the materials necessary for the introgression into the Brassica A genome of a defined ... Comparative mapping between the Raphanus genome map and previously generated Brassica A genome RFLP maps demonstrated large ...
... the name Brassica rapa was adopted. Many butterflies, including the small white, pollinate the B. rapa flowers. "Brassica rapa ... and cime di rapa (leaf vegetables); and Brassica rapa subsp. oleifera, an oilseed which has many common names, including turnip ... Brassica napus). The oilseeds known as canola are sometimes particular varieties of Brassica rapa (termed Polish Canola) but ... "Brassica rapa subsp. oleifera". Turnip Rape. EOL. Retrieved 13 April 2013. Clive Stace (1997). New Flora of the British Isles. ...
calcium-binding protein [Brassica rapa] calcium-binding protein [Brassica rapa]. gi,1255540,dbj,BAA09634.1, ...
The Plants Database includes the following 5 subspecies of Brassica rapa . Click below on a thumbnail map or name for ... click on a thumbnail to view an image, or see all the Brassica thumbnails at the Plants Gallery ... Brassica rapa var. amplexicaulis field mustard Brassica rapa var. dichotoma toria Brassica rapa var. rapa field mustard ...
Youre seeing this message because youre using an older version of Internet Explorer that is unsupported on our website. Please use these links to upgrade to a modern web browser that fully supports our website and protects your computer from security risks. ...
BRASSICA RAPA LEAF EXTRACT; EXTRACT OF BRASSICA RAPA LEAF; EXTRACT OF TURNIP (BRASSICA RAPA) LEAF; TURNIP (BRASSICA RAPA) LEAF ... About BRASSICA RAPA (TURNIP) LEAF EXTRACT: Brassica Rapa (Turnip) Leaf Extract is an extract of the leaves of the turnip, ... Show all 2 recent products that contain BRASSICA RAPA (TURNIP) LEAF EXTRACT.. ... Brassica rapa.. Function(s): Not Reported; SKIN CONDITIONING. Synonym(s): ...
... Dr S T May lsrei at csv.warwick.ac.uk Tue Jul 12 08:56:12 EST 1994 *Previous message: ...
Brassica rapa subsp. pekinensis (Chinese cabbage) (Brassica pekinensis)Imported. ,p>Information which has been imported from ... tr,M4CDI9,M4CDI9_BRARP Peroxidase OS=Brassica rapa subsp. pekinensis OX=51351 PE=3 SV=1 ... Brassica napus (Rape). Eutrema salsugineum (Saltwater cress) (Sisymbrium salsugineum). Arabidopsis lyrata subsp. lyrata (Lyre- ... Brassica napus (Rape). Eutrema salsugineum (Saltwater cress) (Sisymbrium salsugineum). Arabidopsis lyrata subsp. lyrata (Lyre- ...
Brassica rapa subsp. pekinensis (Chinese cabbage) (Brassica pekinensis)Imported. Automatic assertion inferred from database ... tr,M4CS77,M4CS77_BRARP Uncharacterized protein OS=Brassica rapa subsp. pekinensis OX=51351 PE=4 SV=1 ...
Brassica rapa narinosa is a BIENNIAL growing to 0.9 m (3ft). It is hardy to zone (UK) 7 and is not frost tender. It is in ... Brassica rapa narinosa is a BIENNIAL growing to 0.9 m (3ft). It is hardy to zone (UK) 7 and is not frost tender. It is in ... Brassica juncea integrifolia strumata. Large Petiole Mustard. 4. 2. Brassica juncea integrifolia subintegrifolia. Leaf Mustard ...
Brassica rapa L. (syn. Brassica campestris L.), commonly known as turnip, turnip rape, fast plants, field mustard, or turnip ... The oilseeds known as canola are sometimes particular varieties of Brassica rapa (termed Polish Canola) but mostly the related ... Retrieved from "https://simple.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Brassica_rapa&oldid=4505852" ...
Brassica rapa. © 2016 Neal Kramer. Brassica rapa. © 2008 Keir Morse. Brassica rapa. © 2008 Neal Kramer. Brassica rapa. © 2004 ... More photos of Brassica rapa in CalPhotos. Geographic subdivisions for Brassica rapa: CA-FP, SNE;. Markers link to CCH specimen ... Brassica rapa. © 2008 Neal Kramer. Brassica rapa. © 2008 Neal Kramer. ... Brassica rapa L.. NATURALIZED. Habit: Annual, biennial, erect; hairs 0 or few. Stem: 3--10 dm, simple or branched. Leaf: basal ...
Compared with the Brassica oleracea group, Brassica rapa lacks glucoraphanin and sinigrin but contains gluconapin and ... Genetic variation in glucosinolate content within Brassica rapa vegetables. Author(s). He, H.; Ping, L.; Bonnema, G.; Dekker, M ... Glucosinolates (GSs) were analyzed in 56 accessions of Brassica rapa grown in the greenhouse. Eight different glucosinolates ... The total glucosinolate contents in Brassica rapa group varied substantially between the different accessions. The highest ...
Comparison of Flowering Time Genes in Brassica rapa, B. napus and Arabidopsis thaliana T. C. Osborn, C. Kole, I. A. P. Parkin, ... Comparison of Flowering Time Genes in Brassica rapa, B. napus and Arabidopsis thaliana T. C. Osborn, C. Kole, I. A. P. Parkin, ... Comparison of Flowering Time Genes in Brassica rapa, B. napus and Arabidopsis thaliana T. C. Osborn, C. Kole, I. A. P. Parkin, ... The major difference between annual and biennial cultivars of oilseed Brassica napus and B. rapa is conferred by genes ...
Scarlet Kashmir, also known as Scarlet Ball is an heirloom variety with 3 inch diameter roots which are somewhat flat. The color of the skin is rose red. Excellent greens, but the slugs love them, too. The turnip is a bienneal that is grown as an annual. This temperate climate crop grows best when temperatures
De Milan produces crops in early spring. Roots have red shoulders and a white bottom half. The turnip is a bienneal that is grown as an annual. This
Vigorous plant of pretty, ferny leaves. Sweet, slightly mustard-flavoured greens for salad or stir-fries. Very winter hardy on the coast. Also called Kyona.
Xiao D, Zhao JJ, Hou XL, Basnet RK, Carpio DP, Zhang NW, Bucher J, Lin K, Cheng F, Wang XW (2013) The Brassica rapa FLC ... Huang F, Tang J, Hou X (2016) Molecular cloning and characterization of BcCSP1, a Pak-choi (Brassica rapa ssp. chinensis) cold ... Here, we functionally described an FLC homologous gene, BcFLC2, that negatively regulated flowering in Pak-choi (Brassica rapa ... Isolation and functional characterization of a floral repressor, BcFLC2, from Pak-choi (Brassica rapa ssp. chinensis). ...
... Afaf Ahmedi,1 ... Brassica rapa) Peroxidase," Enzyme Research, vol. 2015, Article ID 575618, 9 pages, 2015. doi:10.1155/2015/575618 ...
Brassica rapaenvironmentFast Plantshealthy plantsWisconsin Fast Plants Inheritance and Genetics: Observing Variation and ... AP BiologyBrassica rapaeducationevolutionFast Plantsfloweringinheritancelife cycleobservationSelectiontraitsVariation ... Brassica rapaeducationenvironmentFast Plantsgrowth and developmenthealthy plantsphenotypeVariation ... Brassica rapaeducationFast Plantsgrowth and developmentlife cyclelife scienceteaching ...
Given that they have several functional roles, it is important to investigate their roles in Brassica rapa. In the present ... rapa, Arabidopsis thaliana, Oryza sativa and Populus trichocarpa helped us to categorize the gene family into 15 subfamilies ... rapa LRR-RLK (BrLRR-RLK) genes. Additionally, computational function annotation and expression analysis was used to predict ... study, 303 LRR-RLKs were identified in the genome of B. rapa and comparative phylogenetic analysis of 1213 combined LRR-RLKs of ...
... and a cultivated oilseed brassica species, Brassica rapa (2n = 20; AA ... Intergeneric hybridization between Erucastrum canariense and Brassica rapa. Genetic relatedness between EC and A genomes. * P. ... Bhaskar, .P., Ahuja, .I., Janeja, .H. et al. Intergeneric hybridization between Erucastrum canariense and Brassica rapa. ... Brassica rapa (2n = 20; AA), was synthesized through ovary culture in Whites basal medium supplemented with casein hydrolysate ...
We developed a model artificial selection system in the laboratory using rapid-cycling Brassica rapa. Responses to 10 cycles of ... We developed a model artificial selection system in the laboratory using rapid-cycling Brassica rapa to investigate aspects of ... Genetic Variation and Selection Response in Model Breeding Populations of Brassica rapa Following a Diversity Bottleneck. ... Genetic Variation and Selection Response in Model Breeding Populations of Brassica rapa Following a Diversity Bottleneck. ...
... isolated from flower buds of Chinese cabbage Brassica camperstris; amino acid sequence in first source; GenBank L41355 ... Brassica rapa BCPI-1 protein. Subscribe to New Research on Brassica rapa BCPI-1 protein ... isolated from flower buds of Chinese cabbage Brassica camperstris; amino acid sequence in first source; GenBank L41355 ...
Brassica rapa: info from PIER from the Pacific Island Ecosystems at Risk project (PIER) (http://www.hear.org/pier/). ... Brassica rapa L., Brassicaceae Click on an image for links to BIGGER PICTURES. ... As Brassica pekinensis Rupr. State of Hawaii Hawaiian Islands Hawai i (Big) Island introduced invasive cultivated Wagner, ... As Brassica pekinensis Rupr. New Caledonia New Caledonia Archipelago Île Grande Terre introduced invasive cultivated Jérémie, J ...
  • Of particular interest is the Ogura system of cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) which has been worked on extensively in a Brassica napus background. (usask.ca)
  • This restorer introgression is located on the Brassica C genome making it only of use for B. napus and not for B. rapa or B. juncea. (usask.ca)
  • Progeny of these individuals will allow an assessment of the pattern and extent of recombination that occurs between the chromosomes of the Raphanus and Brassica A genomes and should lead to the development of 'B. napus' lines carrying Ogura CMS restorer alleles from Raphanus. (usask.ca)
  • In Arabidopsis, analysis of gene expression in transgenic plants in which luciferase activity is expressed from clock-regulated promoters has proven a useful tool, although technical challenges associated with the regeneration of transgenic plants has hindered the implementation of this powerful tool in B. rapa . (plantphysiol.org)
  • 2007. Flowering time QTL analysis of oilseed Brassica in multiple environments and genomewide alignment with Arabidopsis. (yplim.info)
  • 2006. A Survey of the Brassica rapa Genome through BAC-End Sequence Analysis, and Comparative Analysis with Arabidopsis thaliana. (yplim.info)
  • The mapping and functional analysis of quantitative traits in Brassica rapa can be greatly improved with the availability of physically positioned, gene-based genetic markers and accurate genome annotation. (g3journal.org)
  • Here, we describe high-density SNP discovery and genetic map construction for a B. rapa recombinant inbred line (RIL) population derived from field collected RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) data. (g3journal.org)
  • In Chapter 2 we evaluated the genetic diversity of a B. rapa core collection of 168 accessions representing different crop types and geographic origins. (thesica.org)
  • Screening for drought tolerance in Brassica rapa L.: from genetic vari. (edu.au)
  • First, genetic diversity in a global collection of 173 accessions of B. rapa from eight regions was assessed by 51 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers which revealed 715 polymorphic alleles. (edu.au)
  • 2007. The Reference Genetic Linkage Map for the Brassica rapa Genome Sequencing Project. (yplim.info)
  • Under field conditions, the E. canariense intergeneric hybrid and the amphiploid appeared to be moderately resistant to Alternaria blight and also harboured a significantly lower population of mustard aphid than the cultivated B. rapa . (springer.com)
  • White Mustard (Brassica Alba Boiss. (chestofbooks.com)
  • Deep RNA-Seq of two Brassica rapa genotypes - R500 (var. (g3journal.org)
  • This paper describes the construction of a low-cost, high-resolution root phenotyping platform, requiring no sophisticated equipment and adaptable to most laboratory and glasshouse environments, and its application to quantify environmental and temporal variation in root traits between genotypes of Brassica rapa L. Plants were supplied with a complete nutrient solution through the wick of a germination paper. (nottingham.ac.uk)
  • The Plants Database includes the following 5 subspecies of Brassica rapa . (usda.gov)
  • Due to the relatively high mutation frequencies detected (up to 24.51%), this study paves the way for regeneration of precisely mutated Brassica plants without the use of transgenesis. (frontiersin.org)
  • studied how young B. rapa plants grown in a controlled environment with a steady supply of water responded when watering stopped. (elifesciences.org)
  • In order to discount these B. rapa plants as F1 crop-wild hybrids, we used a C-genome-specific marker and found that 45 out of 53 plants lacked the C-genome and so were at least second generation introgressants. (aber.ac.uk)
  • Instructions from the Father of Fast Plants (written by Dr. Paul Williams) about growing Rapid-cycling Brassica rapa (RBR) sucessfully in a Four Cell System (4CS). (docs.com)
  • Widely used in genetics research, Brassica rapa is one of the first plants to have its genome sequenced. (nativeplanttrust.org)
  • BACKGROUND: Rapid-cycling Brassica rapa (RCBr), also known as Wisconsin Fast Plants, are small robust plants with a short lifecycle that are widely used in biology teaching. (usda.gov)
  • However under interspecific competition with wheat or more weed-like conditions i.e. representing a situation where hybrid plants emerge as volunteer weeds in subsequent cropping systems, there was a positive correlation between the number of B. rapa weed-specific AFLP markers and seed yield r = 0.70, P = 0.0001, although no such correlation was detected for vegetative biomass. (duhnnae.com)
  • Glucosinolates (GSs) were analyzed in 56 accessions of Brassica rapa grown in the greenhouse. (wur.nl)
  • Gluconapin, glucobrassicanapin, progoitrin and gluconasturtiin are the most abundant GSs in the Brassica rapa, but there is considerable variation in content among accessions. (wur.nl)
  • The total glucosinolate contents in Brassica rapa group varied substantially between the different accessions. (wur.nl)
  • We analyzed the BrFLC2 sequence in nine B. rapa accessions, and identified a 57-bp insertion/deletion (InDel) across exon 4 and intron 4 resulting in a non-functional allele. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • The InDel was used to develop a PCR-based marker, which was used to screen a collection of 159 B. rapa accessions. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • Group 1 consisted of 42 accessions from Europe and west Asia-north Africa, which had the highest richness of SSR allelic diversity, and included all the seven wild type B. rapa ssp. (edu.au)
  • sarson (Prain) Denford, Brassica rapa ssp. (allpaedia.com)
  • The inheritance of yellow seed coat-colour in brown sarson (Brassica rapa L.) was investigated in two crosses involving two brown sarson cultivars viz Gulchin and KOS-1 and a yellow seeded genotype Yellow Sarson-1.The segregating pattern of seed coat colour in F2, BC1 and BC2 revealed the monogenic control of seed coat colour with black colour dominant over yellow colour. (ejplantbreeding.org)
  • Analyses of different segregating populations have suggested that BraA.FLC.a ( BrFLC1 ) and BraA.FLC.b ( BrFLC2 ) play major roles in controlling flowering time in B. rapa . (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • The phenotyping platform described here can be used to quantify environmental and temporal variation in traits contributing to root system architecture in B. rapa and can be extended to screen the large populations required for breeding for efficient resource acquisition. (nottingham.ac.uk)
  • Brassica rapa narinosa is a BIENNIAL growing to 0.9 m (3ft). (pfaf.org)
  • They found that the average vegetative growth and nitrogen use efficiency of the transgenic hybrids were lower than the wild-type B. rapa parent indicating that the transgenic Brassica hybrids would likely be less fit in an agronomic setting. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Our results suggest that the naturally occurring deletion mutation across exon 4 and intron 4 in BrFLC2 gene contributes greatly to variation in flowering time in oil-type B. rapa . (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • The observed different relationship between BrFLC1 or BrFLC2 and flowering time variation indicates that the control of flowering time has evolved separately between oil-type and vegetable-type B. rapa groups. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • Flowering time shows an extensive variation from different Pak-choi (Brassica rapa ssp. (usda.gov)
  • The aim of this thesis is to unravel the genetics of seed germination and seedling vigour under different conditions in Brassica rapa , using a systems genetics approach. (thesica.org)
  • Researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have selectively bred one subspecies of B. rapa to have an extremely short life cycle for use as a model organism in education and experiment. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is a subspecies of B. rapa with the A genome [ 1 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • Our results provide a comprehensive view of the SSR sequence distribution and evolution for comparison among morphotypes B. rapa ssp. (frontiersin.org)
  • The whole genome sequence (WGS) of Brassica A has been released with the B. rapa ssp. (biomedcentral.com)
  • We have determined and analyzed the sequence of B. rapa chromosome A3. (biomedcentral.com)
  • 2007. Genomic Distribution of Simple Sequence Repeats in Brassica rapa. (yplim.info)
  • 2006. Sequence-level analysis of the diploidization process in the Triplicated FLC region of Brassica rapa. (yplim.info)
  • The recently released Brassica rapa draft genome provides an ideal opportunity to update our knowledge of the conserved genomic structures in Brassica , and to study evolutionary innovations of the mesohexaploid plant, B. rapa . (biomedcentral.com)
  • Our previous comparative genomic study revealed conserved linkage arrangements and collinear chromosome segments between B. rapa and A. thaliana , which diverged from a common ancestor approximately 13 to 17 million years ago. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Analysis of chromosome collinearity with the A. thaliana genome identified conserved synteny blocks encompassing the whole of the B. rapa chromosome A3 and sections of four A. thaliana chromosomes. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Analysis of 'ancestral karyotype' genome building blocks enabled the development of a hypothetical model for the derivation of the B. rapa chromosome A3. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Herein, the cytological investigations demonstrated that chromosome behaviors such as univalent and multivalent at prophase I, chaotic alignments at metaphase, aberrant segregation at telophase, were frequently observed during meiosis in autotetraploid Brassica rapa . (biomedcentral.com)
  • The functional analysis showed that DEPs assigned to "chromatin structure and dynamics", "cell cycle control, cell division, chromosome partitioning" and "cytoskeleton" were preferentially up-regulated, which suggested a robust regulation of cell division in autotetraploid B. rapa . (biomedcentral.com)
  • Brassica rapa narinosa - (L.H.Bailey. (pfaf.org)
  • Brassica Rapa (Turnip) Leaf Extract is an extract of the leaves of the turnip, Brassica rapa. (ewg.org)
  • Liang YS, Kim HK, Lefeber AW, Erkelens C, Choi YH, Verpoorte R (2006) Identification of phenylpropanoids in methyl jasmonate treated Brassica rapa leaves using two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. (springer.com)
  • Phytochemical Study, Antioxidant and Cytotoxic Activities of Brassica rapa L. leaves Extract and Its Silver Nanoparticles', Egyptian Journal of Chemistry , 61(2), pp. 237-247. (ekb.eg)
  • 4 Gaps in the current genome assembly of B. rapa are highlighted by our identification of 780 unmapped transcripts. (g3journal.org)
  • Molecular cloning of Brassica rapa nitrilases and their expression during clubroot development. (semanticscholar.org)
  • SUMMARY Three isoforms of nitrilase were cloned from turnip, Brassica rapa L., and their expression during clubroot development caused by Plasmodiophora brassicae was investigated. (semanticscholar.org)