Brassica: A plant genus of the family Cruciferae. It contains many species and cultivars used as food including cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli, Brussel sprouts, kale, collard greens, MUSTARD PLANT; (B. alba, B. junica, and B. nigra), turnips (BRASSICA NAPUS) and rapeseed (BRASSICA RAPA).Brassica napus: A plant species of the family BRASSICACEAE best known for the edible roots.Brassica rapa: A plant species cultivated for the seed used as animal feed and as a source of canola cooking oil.Mustard Plant: Any of several BRASSICA species that are commonly called mustard. Brassica alba is white mustard, B. juncea is brown or Chinese mustard, and B. nigra is black, brown, or red mustard. The plant is grown both for mustard seed from which oil is extracted or used as SPICES, and for its greens used as VEGETABLES or ANIMAL FEED. There is no relationship to MUSTARD COMPOUNDS.Brassicaceae: A plant family of the order Capparales, subclass Dilleniidae, class Magnoliopsida. They are mostly herbaceous plants with peppery-flavored leaves, due to gluconapin (GLUCOSINOLATES) and its hydrolysis product butenylisotrhiocyanate. The family includes many plants of economic importance that have been extensively altered and domesticated by humans. Flowers have 4 petals. Podlike fruits contain a number of seeds. Cress is a general term used for many in the Brassicacea family. Rockcress is usually ARABIS; Bittercress is usually CARDAMINE; Yellowcress is usually RORIPPA; Pennycress is usually THLASPI; Watercress refers to NASTURTIUM; or RORIPPA or TROPAEOLUM; Gardencress refers to LEPIDIUM; Indiancress refers to TROPAEOLUM.Glucosinolates: Substituted thioglucosides. They are found in rapeseed (Brassica campestris) products and related cruciferae. They are metabolized to a variety of toxic products which are most likely the cause of hepatocytic necrosis in animals and humans.Plant Proteins: Proteins found in plants (flowers, herbs, shrubs, trees, etc.). The concept does not include proteins found in vegetables for which VEGETABLE PROTEINS is available.Genome, Plant: The genetic complement of a plant (PLANTS) as represented in its DNA.Raphanus: A plant genus of the family BRASSICACEAE known for its peppery red root.Pollen: The fertilizing element of plants that contains the male GAMETOPHYTES.Genes, Plant: The functional hereditary units of PLANTS.2S Albumins, Plant: A major class of water-soluble seed storage proteins. Many proteins from this class are major PLANT ALLERGENS.Gene Expression Regulation, Plant: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in plants.Plant Infertility: The failure of PLANTS to complete fertilization and obtain seed (SEEDS) as a result of defective POLLEN or ovules, or other aberrations. (Dict. of Plant Genet. and Mol. Biol., 1998)Arabidopsis: A plant genus of the family BRASSICACEAE that contains ARABIDOPSIS PROTEINS and MADS DOMAIN PROTEINS. The species A. thaliana is used for experiments in classical plant genetics as well as molecular genetic studies in plant physiology, biochemistry, and development.Chromosomes, Plant: Complex nucleoprotein structures which contain the genomic DNA and are part of the CELL NUCLEUS of PLANTS.DNA, Plant: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of plants.Plants, Genetically Modified: PLANTS, or their progeny, whose GENOME has been altered by GENETIC ENGINEERING.Erucic Acids: cis-13-Docosenoic Acids. 22-Carbon monounsaturated, monocarboxylic acids.Flowers: The reproductive organs of plants.Polyploidy: The chromosomal constitution of a cell containing multiples of the normal number of CHROMOSOMES; includes triploidy (symbol: 3N), tetraploidy (symbol: 4N), etc.Plant Leaves: Expanded structures, usually green, of vascular plants, characteristically consisting of a bladelike expansion attached to a stem, and functioning as the principal organ of photosynthesis and transpiration. (American Heritage Dictionary, 2d ed)Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Hybridization, Genetic: The genetic process of crossbreeding between genetically dissimilar parents to produce a hybrid.Cotyledon: A part of the embryo in a seed plant. The number of cotyledons is an important feature in classifying plants. In seeds without an endosperm, they store food which is used in germination. In some plants, they emerge above the soil surface and become the first photosynthetic leaves. (From Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)Plant Roots: The usually underground portions of a plant that serve as support, store food, and through which water and mineral nutrients enter the plant. (From American Heritage Dictionary, 1982; Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)Plant Structures: The parts of plants, including SEEDS.Herbicide Resistance: Diminished or failed response of PLANTS to HERBICIDES.Chromosome Mapping: Any method used for determining the location of and relative distances between genes on a chromosome.Crops, Agricultural: Cultivated plants or agricultural produce such as grain, vegetables, or fruit. (From American Heritage Dictionary, 1982)Synteny: The presence of two or more genetic loci on the same chromosome. Extensions of this original definition refer to the similarity in content and organization between chromosomes, of different species for example.Plant Shoots: New immature growth of a plant including stem, leaves, tips of branches, and SEEDLINGS.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Verticillium: A mitosporic fungal genus commonly isolated from soil. Some species are the cause of wilt diseases in many different plants.Sinapis: A plant genus of the family BRASSICACEAE. The common name of white mustard sometimes refers to other plants (MUSTARD PLANT).RNA, Plant: Ribonucleic acid in plants having regulatory and catalytic roles as well as involvement in protein synthesis.Plant Diseases: Diseases of plants.Plant Stems: Parts of plants that usually grow vertically upwards towards the light and support the leaves, buds, and reproductive structures. (From Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism Analysis: The detection of RESTRICTION FRAGMENT LENGTH POLYMORPHISMS by selective PCR amplification of restriction fragments derived from genomic DNA followed by electrophoretic analysis of the amplified restriction fragments.Genetic Markers: A phenotypically recognizable genetic trait which can be used to identify a genetic locus, a linkage group, or a recombination event.Self-Incompatibility in Flowering Plants: One of many different processes which occur in ANGIOSPERMS by which genetic diversity is maintained while INBREEDING is prevented.Dahlia: A plant genus of the family ASTERACEAE that contains antifungal plant defensin.Musa: A plant genus of the family Musaceae, order Zingiberales, subclass Zingiberidae, class Liliopsida.Copyright: It is a form of protection provided by law. In the United States this protection is granted to authors of original works of authorship, including literary, dramatic, musical, artistic, and certain other intellectual works. This protection is available to both published and unpublished works. (from Circular of the United States Copyright Office, 6/30/2008)Thymelaeaceae: A plant family of the order Myrtales, subclass Rosidae, class Magnoliopsida. They are mainly trees and shrubs. Many members contain mucilage and COUMARINS.Computer Security: Protective measures against unauthorized access to or interference with computer operating systems, telecommunications, or data structures, especially the modification, deletion, destruction, or release of data in computers. It includes methods of forestalling interference by computer viruses or so-called computer hackers aiming to compromise stored data.Gastric Lavage: Medical procedure involving the emptying of contents in the stomach through the use of a tube inserted through the nose or mouth. It is performed to remove poisons or relieve pressure due to intestinal blockages or during surgery.Gastrointestinal Diseases: Diseases in any segment of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT from ESOPHAGUS to RECTUM.Charcoal: An amorphous form of carbon prepared from the incomplete combustion of animal or vegetable matter, e.g., wood. The activated form of charcoal is used in the treatment of poisoning. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Ipecac: A syrup made from the dried rhizomes of two different species, CEPHAELIS ipecacuanha and C. acuminata. They contain EMETINE, cephaeline, psychotrine and other ISOQUINOLINES. Ipecac syrup is used widely as an emetic acting both locally on the gastric mucosa and centrally on the chemoreceptor trigger zone.

The CLAVATA1 receptor-like kinase requires CLAVATA3 for its assembly into a signaling complex that includes KAPP and a Rho-related protein. (1/1068)

The CLAVATA1 (CLV1) and CLAVATA3 (CLV3) genes are required to maintain the balance between cell proliferation and organ formation at the Arabidopsis shoot and flower meristems. CLV1 encodes a receptor-like protein kinase. We have found that CLV1 is present in two protein complexes in vivo. One is approximately 185 kD, and the other is approximately 450 kD. In each complex, CLV1 is part of a disulfide-linked multimer of approximately 185 kD. The 450-kD complex contains the protein phosphatase KAPP, which is a negative regulator of CLV1 signaling, and a Rho GTPase-related protein. In clv1 and clv3 mutants, CLV1 is found primarily in the 185-kD complex. We propose that CLV1 is present as an inactive disulfide-linked heterodimer and that CLV3 functions to promote the assembly of the active 450-kD complex, which then relays signal transduction through a Rho GTPase.  (+info)

Q-Band resonance Raman investigation of turnip cytochrome f and Rhodobacter capsulatus cytochrome c1. (2/1068)

The results of a comprehensive Q-band resonance Raman investigation of cytochrome c1 and cytochrome f subunits of bc1 and b6f complexes are presented. Q-band excitation provides a particularly effective probe of the local heme environments of these species. The effects of protein conformation (particularly axial ligation) on heme structure and function were further investigated by comparison of spectra obtained from native subunits to those of a site directed c1 mutant (M183L) and various pH-dependent species of horse heart cytochrome c. In general, all species examined displayed variability in their axial amino acid ligation that suggests a good deal of flexibility in their hemepocket conformations. Surprisingly, the large scale protein rearrangements that accompany axial ligand replacement have little or no effect on macrocycle geometry in these species. This indicates the identity and/or conformation of the peptide linkage between the two cysteines that are covalently linked to the heme periphery may determine heme geometry.  (+info)

Molecular cloning and functional expression of a phospholipase D from cabbage (Brassica oleracea var. capitata). (3/1068)

We cloned and expressed a full-length cDNA encoding a phospholipase D of type alpha (PLDalpha) from cabbage. Analysis of the cDNA predicted an 812-amino-acid protein of 92.0 kDa. The deduced amino acid sequence of cabbage PLD has 83% and 80% identity with Arabidopsis PLDalpha and castor bean PLD, respectively. Expression of this cDNA clone in E. coli shows a functional PLD activity similar to that of the natural PLD.  (+info)

Characterization of low-molecular-mass trypsin isoinhibitors from oil-rape (Brassica napus var. oleifera) seed. (4/1068)

A new low-molecular-mass (6767.8 Da) serine proteinase isoinhibitor has been isolated from oil-rape (Brassica napus var. oleifera) seed, designated 5-oxoPro1-Gly62-RTI-III. The 5-oxoPro1-Gly62-RTI-III isoinhibitor is longer than the Asp2-Pro61-RTI-III and the Ser3-Pro61-RTI-III forms, all the other amino acid residues being identical. In RTI-III isoinhibitors, the P1-P1' reactive site bond (where residues forming the reactive site have been identified as PnellipsisP1 and P1'ellipsisPn', where P1-P1' is the inhibitor scissile bond) has been identified at position Arg21-Ile22. The inhibitor disulphide bridges pattern has been determined as Cys5-Cys27, Cys18-Cys31, Cys42-Cys52 and Cys54-Cys57. The disulphide bridge arrangement observed in the RTI-III isoinhibitors is reminiscent of that found in a number of toxins (e.g. erabutoxin b). Moreover, the organization of the three disulphide bridges subset Cys5-Cys27, Cys18-Cys31 and Cys42-Cys52 is reminiscent of that found in epidermal growth factor domains. Preliminary 1H-NMR data indicates the presence of alphaalphaNOEs and 3JalphaNH coupling constants, typical of the beta-structure(s). These data suggest that the three-dimensional structure of the RTI-III isoinhibitors may be reminiscent of that of toxins and epidermal growth factor domains, consisting of three-finger shaped loops extending from the crossover region. Values of the apparent association equilibrium constant for RTI-III isoinhibitors binding to bovine beta-trypsin and bovine alpha-chymotrypsin are 3.3 x 109 m-1 and 2.4 x 106 m-1, respectively, at pH 8.0 and 21.0 degrees C. The serine proteinase : inhibitor complex formation is a pH-dependent entropy-driven process. RTI-III isoinhibitors do not show any similarity to other serine proteinase inhibitors except the low molecular mass white mustard trypsin isoinhibitor, isolated from Sinapis alba L. seed (MTI-2). Therefore, RTI-III and MTI-2 isoinhibitors could be members of a new class of plant serine proteinase inhibitors.  (+info)

The retention and distribution by healthy young men of stable isotopes of selenium consumed as selenite, selenate or hydroponically-grown broccoli are dependent on the isotopic form. (5/1068)

Twenty-seven healthy young men were randomly assigned to diets that supplied low (32.6 microg/d) or high (226.5 microg/d) levels of selenium for a 105-d study. After consuming the diets for 85 d, subjects were fed a test meal that contained 74Se in the form of selenite or selenate and 82Se incorporated into hydroponically-raised broccoli. Urine, fecal and blood samples were collected daily. Isotope absorption was not different (P > 0.05) for selenate and Se in broccoli; Se absorption from selenite was highly variable and was not included in statistical analyses. Significantly more isotope was absorbed by subjects fed the high Se diet (P = 0. 015). Urinary isotope excretion was greater when selenate was fed than when broccoli was fed (P = 0.0001), and consequently more Se from broccoli (as compared to selenate) was retained (59.2 +/- 2.4 and 36.4 +/- 4.6% for Se in broccoli and selenate, respectively; P = 0.0001). Despite the higher retention, less isotope from broccoli than from selenate was present in the plasma. Plasma proteins separated by gel permeation chromatography showed that most of the isotopes were distributed between two medium molecular weight peaks. Less isotope was found in plasma proteins of subjects fed the high Se diet, but the form of Se had no effect on isotope distribution. These results show that dietary Se intake alters the retention of stable isotopes of Se and that humans retain and distribute Se from broccoli in a different manner than Se from inorganic salts.  (+info)

Polyisoprenyl phosphate (PIPP) signaling regulates phospholipase D activity: a 'stop' signaling switch for aspirin-triggered lipoxin A4. (6/1068)

It is of wide interest to understand how opposing extracellular signals (positive or negative) are translated into intracellular signaling events. Receptor-ligand interactions initiate the generation of bioactive lipids by human neutrophils (PMN), which serve as signals to orchestrate cellular responses important in host defense and inflammation. We recently identified a novel polyisoprenyl phosphate (PIPP) signaling pathway and found that one of its components, presqualene diphosphate (PSDP), is a potent negative intracellular signal in PMN that regulates superoxide anion generation by several stimuli, including phosphatidic acid. We determined intracellular PIPP signaling by autocoids with opposing actions on PMN: leukotriene B4 (LTB4), a potent chemoattractant, and lipoxin A4 (LXA4), a 'stop signal' for recruitment. LTB4 receptor activation initiated a rapid decrease in PSDP levels concurrent with activation of PLD and cellular responses. In sharp contrast, activation of the LXA4 receptor reversed LTB4-initiated PSDP remodeling, leading to an accumulation of PSDP and potent inhibition of both PLD and superoxide anion generation. Thus, an inverse relationship was established for PSDP levels and PLD activity with two PMN ligands that evoke opposing responses. In addition, PSDP directly inhibited both isolated human recombinant (Ki = 6 nM) and plant (Ki = 20 nM) PLD. Together, these findings link PIPP remodeling to intracellular regulation of PMN function and suggest a role for PIPPs as lipid repressors in signal transduction, a novel mechanism that may also explain aspirin's suppressive actions in vivo in cell signaling.  (+info)

Recombination and selection at Brassica self-incompatibility loci. (7/1068)

In Brassica species, self-incompatibility is controlled genetically by haplotypes involving two known genes, SLG and SRK, and possibly an as yet unknown gene controlling pollen incompatibility types. Alleles at the incompatibility loci are maintained by frequency-dependent selection, and diversity at SLG and SRK appears to be very ancient, with high diversity at silent and replacement sites, particularly in certain "hypervariable" portions of the genes. It is important to test whether recombination occurs in these genes before inferences about function of different parts of the genes can be made from patterns of diversity within their sequences. In addition, it has been suggested that, to maintain the relationship between alleles within a given S-haplotype, recombination is suppressed in the S-locus region. The high diversity makes many population genetic measures of recombination inapplicable. We have analyzed linkage disequilibrium within the SLG gene of two Brassica species, using published coding sequences. The results suggest that intragenic recombination has occurred in the evolutionary history of these alleles. This is supported by patterns of synonymous nucleotide diversity within both the SLG and SRK genes, and between domains of the SRK gene. Finally, clusters of linkage disequilibrium within the SLG gene suggest that hypervariable regions are under balancing selection, and are not merely regions of relaxed selective constraint.  (+info)

RNA polymerase I transcription in a Brassica interspecific hybrid and its progenitors: Tests of transcription factor involvement in nucleolar dominance. (8/1068)

In interspecific hybrids or allopolyploids, often one parental set of ribosomal RNA genes is transcribed and the other is silent, an epigenetic phenomenon known as nucleolar dominance. Silencing is enforced by cytosine methylation and histone deacetylation, but the initial discrimination mechanism is unknown. One hypothesis is that a species-specific transcription factor is inactivated, thereby silencing one set of rRNA genes. Another is that dominant rRNA genes have higher binding affinities for limiting transcription factors. A third suggests that selective methylation of underdominant rRNA genes blocks transcription factor binding. We tested these hypotheses using Brassica napus (canola), an allotetraploid derived from B. rapa and B. oleracea in which only B. rapa rRNA genes are transcribed. B. oleracea and B. rapa rRNA genes were active when transfected into protoplasts of the other species, which argues against the species-specific transcription factor model. B. oleracea and B. rapa rRNA genes also competed equally for the pol I transcription machinery in vitro and in vivo. Cytosine methylation had no effect on rRNA gene transcription in vitro, which suggests that transcription factor binding was unimpaired. These data are inconsistent with the prevailing models and point to discrimination mechanisms that are likely to act at a chromosomal level.  (+info)

*Brassica

... vegetables are rich in indole-3-carbinol, a chemical which boosts DNA repair in cells in vitro and appears to block ... Media related to Brassica at Wikimedia Commons Data related to Brassica at Wikispecies. ... Brassica species are sometimes used as food plants by the larvae of a number of Lepidoptera species-see List of Lepidoptera ... The genus Brassica is known for its important agricultural and horticultural crops and includes a number of weeds, both of wild ...

*Brassica tournefortii

The mustard species Brassica tournefortii is known by the common names Asian mustard, pale cabbage, African mustard, and Sahara ... "Brassica tournefortii". Natural Resources Conservation Service PLANTS Database. USDA. Retrieved 10 January 2016. "BSBI List ...

*Brassica elongata

... , the elongated mustard or long-stalked rape, is a species of the mustard plant that is native to parts of ... Brassica elongata is a perennial plant. Its habitat is often located in semi-arid to arid climates in regions located in Europe ... Brassica elongata has the propagative potential of turning into a horticultural product from what is currently a noxious weed. ... Brassica elongata is a native species that spreads from Eastern European countries starting from Austria to the Asian-Temperate ...

*Brassica carinata

... cytogenetics and origin of crop Brassicas, a review", Opera Botanica, 55:1-57 U, N. (1935), "Genome-analysis in Brassica with ... and is thought to result from an ancestral hybridisation event between Brassica nigra (genome composition BB) and Brassica ... Brassica carinata (Ethiopian rape, Ethiopian mustard, Abyssinian mustard) is a member of the Triangle of U species (U, 1935) in ... 1997), making it a poor choice for general cultivation as an oilseed crop in comparison to the closely related Brassica napus ( ...

*Hexaplex brassica

... is a species of sea snail, a marine gastropod mollusk in the family Muricidae, the murex snails or rock ... Hexaplex brassica (Lamarck, 1822). Retrieved through: World Register of Marine Species on 24 April 2010.. ...

*Brassica rapa

Brassica napus). The oilseeds known as canola are sometimes particular varieties of Brassica rapa (termed Polish Canola) but ... "Brassica rapa subsp. oleifera". Turnip Rape. EOL. Retrieved 13 April 2013. Clive Stace (1997). New Flora of the British Isles. ... Brassica rapa is a plant consisting of various widely cultivated subspecies including the turnip (a root vegetable); napa ... Since the turnip had been named first by Linnaeus, the name Brassica rapa was adopted. Many butterflies, including the small ...

*Brassica nigra

... ) and yellow mustard (Brassica alba) seeds and their products". Arch Latinoam Nutr. 65 (2): 128-35. Retrieved 9 ... "Brassicaceae Brassica nigra (L.) W.D.J.Koch". ipni.org. Retrieved 9 November 2017. Allen J. Coombes The A to Z of Plant Names: ... Brassica nigra, the black mustard, is an annual plant cultivated for its black or dark brown seeds, which are commonly used as ... "Brassica nigra (L.) K.Koch is an accepted name". theplantlist.org. 23 March 2012. Retrieved 9 November 2017. " ...

*Brassica fruticulosa

... fruticulosa Brassica fruticulosa glaberrima Brassica fruticulosa mauritanica Brassica fruticulosa numidica ... Brassica fruticulosa at Florabase - The Western Australian Flora. Brassica fruticulosa at www.calflora.org. "Brassica ... Brassica fruticulosa, the Mediterranean cabbage or twiggy turnip, is a member of the agriculturally significant genus Brassica ... Brassica fruticulosa pomeliana Brassica fruticulosa radicata Brassica fruticulosa has been synthetically cross-bred with ...

*Brassica juncea

... another mustard variety Brassica oleracea - wild cabbage Brassica nigra - black mustard, another mustard variety Brassica rapa ... Brassica juncea (especially the seeds) is more pungent than greens from the closely related Brassica oleracea (kale, broccoli, ... ISBN 0-89672-614-2. PROTAbase on Brassica juncea Brassica juncea " Multilingual taxonomic information". University of Melbourne ... Brassica juncea is also known as gai choi, siu gai choi, xaio jie cai, baby mustard, Chinese leaf mustard or mostaza. In 100 ...

*Brassica oleracea

Media related to Brassica oleracea at Wikimedia Commons PROTAbase on Brassica oleracea (Brussels sprouts) PROTAbase on Brassica ... and broccoflower Brassica oleracea Capitata Group - cabbage Brassica oleracea Gemmifera Group - brussels sprouts Brassica ... Brassica oleracea Acephala Group - kale and collard greens Brassica oleracea Alboglabra Group - kai-lan (Chinese broccoli) ... "Brassica sect. Brassica (Brassicaceae) I. Taxonomy and Variation". Willdenowia. 19 (2): 271-365. Verhoeven, D. T.; Goldbohm, R ...

*Brassica hilarionis

... is a hairless perennial up to 1 m high with a basal rosette of roundish, fleshy, flat-stalked leaves, upper ...

*Brassica 'Petit Posy'

... is a cross between brussels sprouts and kale. "Which? guide to new veg 2010". telegraph.co.uk. London. 17 ...

*BBCH-scale (other brassica vegetables)

In biology, the BBCH-scale for other brassica vegetables describes the phenological development of vegetables such as brussels ... The phenological growth stages and BBCH-identification keys of other brassica vegetables are: 1 For broccoli 2 For brussels ...

*List of Lepidoptera that feed on Brassica

Pests and diseases of Brassica (on Wikibooks) "Search Results - Hostplant Genus: Brassica" at HOSTS - a Database of the World's ... Brassica species are used as food plants by the larvae of a number of Lepidoptera species including: Arctiidae Giant leopard ... recorded on Brassica in Malta Garden carpet (Xanthorhoe fluctuata) Hepialidae Common swift (Korscheltellus lupulina) Ghost moth ...

*British NVC community MC4 (Brassica oleracea maritime cliff-ledge community)

... is one of the maritime cliff communities in the ... Four constant species are found in this community: Red Fescue (Festuca rubra) Wild Cabbage (Brassica oleracea) Cock's-foot ( ...

*Cabbage

... "brassicas". The wild ancestor of cabbage, Brassica oleracea, originally found in Britain and continental Europe, is tolerant of ... A related species, Brassica rapa, is commonly named Chinese, napa or celery cabbage, and has many of the same uses. It is also ... Cabbage (Brassica oleracea or B. oleracea var. capitata, var. tuba, var. sabauda or var. acephala) is a member of the genus ... The word brassica derives from bresic, a Celtic word for cabbage. Many European and Asiatic names for cabbage are derived from ...

*Lacanobia thalassina

Brassica spp., Rubus idaeus, Sorbus aucuparia, Pisum sativum. ^ The flight season refers to Belgium and The Netherlands. This ...

*Lacanobia suasa

Brassica sp., Brassica campestris, Rubus idaeus, Malus domestica, Trifolium sp., Galium sp., Cirsium arvense. . Seitz, A. Ed., ...

*List of wort plants

Colewort - Brassica oleracea. Cabbage. Coralwort - Tooth violet. Crosswort - Eupatorium perfoliatum. Lysimachia quadrifolia. ...

*Colza oil

Brassica napus var. oleifera Delile, Brassica campestris subsp. napus (L.) Hook.f. & T.Anderson.) Colza is extensively ... In commerce, colza is a traditional rapeseed oil (with turnip rape oil, sarson oil, toria oil (Brassica rapa ssp.), and ravison ... Colza oil or colza is a nondrying oil obtained from the seeds of rapeseed (Brassica napus subsp. napus. syn. ...

*Bok choy

... or pak choi (Chinese: 上海青; Brassica rapa subsp. chinensis) is a type of Chinese cabbage. Chinensis varieties do not ... This group was originally classified as its own species under the name Brassica chinensis by Linnaeus.[citation needed] Other ...

*Sukuma wiki

"Brassica oleracea var. acephala". Floridata. 2007-02-06. Retrieved 2012-07-26. "Birney Imes: Amazing collards - The Dispatch". ...

*Turnip

The turnip or white turnip (Brassica rapa subsp. rapa) is a root vegetable commonly grown in temperate climates worldwide for ... "Turnip - Brassica Rapa". Self Sufficientish. Retrieved 14 January 2013. Zohary, Daniel; Hopf, Maria; Weiss, Ehud (2012). ... Brassica) also known as swede (from "Swedish turnip"). The most common type of turnip is mostly white-skinned apart from the ...

*Brassicaceae

Brassica juncea and B. nigra respectively). Vegetable oils is produced from the seeds of several species such as Brassica napus ... Brassica oleracea), turnip, napa cabbage, bomdong, bok choy and rapini (Brassica rapa), rocket salad/arugula (Eruca sativa), ... Brassica rapa (turnip, Chinese cabbage, etc.), Brassica napus (rapeseed, etc.), Raphanus sativus (common radish), Armoracia ... The genus name comes from the Classical Latin word brassica, referring to cabbage and other cruciferous vegetables. The ...

*List of invasive species in Australia

Brassica tournefortii alien range. Global Invasive Species Database. Retrieved on 2009-04-09. Bromus rubens alien range. Global ... Brassica tournefortii (African mustard) Bromus rubens (Foxtail brome) Chrysanthemoides monilifera (Bitou bush) Cinnamomum ...
In a field experiment in 1985/86 at the Kabele Field Station (alt. 1940 m a.s.l) B. oleracea var. acephala cultivars Thousand Headed (kale) and Georgia (collard) received 0, 47, 94 or 188 kg N/ha. Petiole and, more particularly, lamina thiocyanate concentrations decreased as N application rate increased. Petiole and lamina thiocyanate concentrations were 120 and 127% greater, respectively, in the kale than in the collard ...
INTRODUCTION The cabbage (Brassica oleraceae var. capitata) is an herbaceous and leafy plant which belongs to the Brassicaceae family, native to coastal southern and Western Europe. It presents a high versatility, not only due to its nutritive value, being rich in calcium, protein and vitamin C, but also due to its social character, due to the fact of being cultivated essentially by small-scale farmers(12, 28, 29). Brassica sp. is reported to have been utilized for over one thousand years in the healing process of abscesses, idiopathic cephalgias, internal ulcers; the Romans utilized Brassica sp. in the treatment of injuries(4). Cheney(13) verified that the patients who utilized the fresh cabbage juice obtained a healing action for gastric disorders, particularly for the peptic ulcer, presenting healing effects of the lesion. The chronic administration of non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is associated with the development of gastrointestinal adverse effects, such as gastric ...
Lets face it. You either love Brussels sprouts or… you dont. If you love them then this recipe will knock your Brussels-loving socks off. If you dont, maybe you should give them another try…. First of all, lets take a quick peek at the amazing health benefits of these little nutritional powerhouses. Brussels sprouts are a cruciferous veggie, which immediately raises them on the charts of healthy foods. Whats so special about cruciferous vegetables? Why, glucosinolates of course! What in the world is that? Glucosinolates are phytonutrients that are the chemical starting points for a variety of cancer-protective substances. All cruciferous vegetables contain glucosinolates and have great health benefits for this reason. But recent research has revealed just how valuable Brussels sprouts are in this regard.. The cancer protection we get from Brussels sprouts is mostly related to four specific glucosinolates found in this special vegetable: glucoraphanin, glucobrassicin, sinigrin, and ...
Chinese broccoli is a leaf vegetable with thick, flat, leaves and thick stems with flower heads smaller than normal broccoli. Its flavor is stronger than broccoli and slightly more bitter. Gai lan is widely used in Chinese Vietnamese and Thai
To steam Brussels sprouts, place a steamer basket in a saucepan filled with a ½-inch of water (water should not touch the bottom of the steamer basket). Place halved Brussels sprouts in steamer basket. Cover tightly and heat to boiling; reduce heat to low and steam 20 to 25 minutes or until tender. Meanwhile, in a small saucepan combine mayonnaise, milk and cheddar cheese. Over medium heat, cook and stir until heated through and cheese is melted. Add cooking sherry and stir until combined. Pour over steamed Brussels sprouts. Cooks note: Try steamed asparagus, broccoli or cauliflower instead of Brussels sprouts. ...
All values presented in this section are for 100 grams of Brussels sprouts, either raw or cooked (meaning boiled, drained and with added salt). As general observations go, Brussels sprouts are recommended in any diet (they are especially useful when aiming for weight loss) due to their containing extremely low amounts (virtually negligible) of cholesterol and other saturated fats. The sprouts are also an excellent source of dietary fiber, Vitamin C, Vitamin A and Vitamin K while also scoring decent points for their concentration of Potassium, Manganese, and Folate. Raw Brussels sprouts have an ideal caloric ratio - as three-quarters are represented by carbohydrates, 6 percent by fat and 19 percent is protein. The situation changes somewhat in the case of the cooked variety as the amount of fat doubles at the expense of both protein and carbs. In both cases, 100 grams of Brussels sprouts account for about 3 percent of the sugars needed to lead a healthy life, which is a first-class glycemic ...
Background and Objectives: Diazinon is one of the organophosphorus poisons that is widely used as insecticide and causes male infertility. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of broccoli hydroalcholic extract on the changes of the cells of testicular tissue and the control of oxidative stress by ...
p>The checksum is a form of redundancy check that is calculated from the sequence. It is useful for tracking sequence updates.,/p> ,p>It should be noted that while, in theory, two different sequences could have the same checksum value, the likelihood that this would happen is extremely low.,/p> ,p>However UniProtKB may contain entries with identical sequences in case of multiple genes (paralogs).,/p> ,p>The checksum is computed as the sequence 64-bit Cyclic Redundancy Check value (CRC64) using the generator polynomial: x,sup>64,/sup> + x,sup>4,/sup> + x,sup>3,/sup> + x + 1. The algorithm is described in the ISO 3309 standard. ,/p> ,p class="publication">Press W.H., Flannery B.P., Teukolsky S.A. and Vetterling W.T.,br /> ,strong>Cyclic redundancy and other checksums,/strong>,br /> ,a href="http://www.nrbook.com/b/bookcpdf.php">Numerical recipes in C 2nd ed., pp896-902, Cambridge University Press (1993),/a>),/p> Checksum:i ...
An open polinated variety with a classic flavour. By harvesting the lower sprouts first you can enjoy a steady supply without them all maturing at the same time. Produce dark green with medium size that suitable for market o
Benefits Of Brussels sprouts. Brussels sprouts belong to the Brassica family of plants and are a vegetable that bears similarity to a mini-cabbage. This mini cabbage has a diameter of about one inch and grow in bunches. Each bunch contains about 20 to 40 Brussels on the stem and the height of the plant is approximately two to three feet. When cooked perfectly Brussels sprouts have a dense, crisp texture, are bright green color and have a slightly sweet taste. They are usually added in the preparation of cold salads and also make an excellent side dish. Brussel sprouts are an extremely nourishing food and have numerous benefits to our health:. 1.Rich source of vitamin C ...
S locus glycoprotein (SLG) and S locus receptor kinase (SRK) cDNAs were isolated from an S allele present in a number of self-compatible Brassica napus lines. This A10 allele did not segregate with self-incompatibility in crosses involving other self-incompatible B. napus lines. The SLG-A10 cDNA was found to contain an intact open reading frame and was predicted to encode an SLG protein with sequence similarities to those previously associated with phenotypically strong self-incompatibility reactions. SLG-A10 transcripts were detected in the developing stigma at steady state levels even higher than those detected for SLG alleles linked with self-incompatibility. Analysis of the corresponding SRK-A10 cDNA showed that it was very similar to other S locus receptor kinase genes and was expressed predominantly in the stigma. However, a 1-bp deletion was detected in the SRK gene toward the 3 end of the SLG homology domain. This deletion would lead to premature termination of translation and the ...
For those who dont eat fish or seafood, eating enough omega-3 fatty acids can be a challenge. Plant foods only contain alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), a type of omega-3 fatty acid thats used less effectively in your body than the omega-3 fats from fish and seafood. This is because your body can only convert ALA to the more active forms of omega-3 fatty acids in limited quantities. For this reason, you would need to consume a greater amount of ALA omega-3 fatty acids to meet your daily omega-3 needs, compared to if you were getting your omega-3 fats from fish or seafood. Brussels sprouts are one of the best plant sources of omega-3 fatty acids, with 135 mg of ALA in each half-cup (78-gram) serving of cooked Brussels sprouts. Omega-3 fatty acids have been shown to reduce blood triglycerides, slow cognitive decline, reduce insulin resistance and decrease inflammation. Including a few servings of Brussels sprouts in your diet each week can help you easily meet your omega-3 fatty acid needs, with a ...
For those who dont eat fish or seafood, eating enough omega-3 fatty acids can be a challenge. Plant foods only contain alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), a type of omega-3 fatty acid thats used less effectively in your body than the omega-3 fats from fish and seafood. This is because your body can only convert ALA to the more active forms of omega-3 fatty acids in limited quantities. For this reason, you would need to consume a greater amount of ALA omega-3 fatty acids to meet your daily omega-3 needs, compared to if you were getting your omega-3 fats from fish or seafood. Brussels sprouts are one of the best plant sources of omega-3 fatty acids, with 135 mg of ALA in each half-cup (78-gram) serving of cooked Brussels sprouts. Omega-3 fatty acids have been shown to reduce blood triglycerides, slow cognitive decline, reduce insulin resistance and decrease inflammation. Including a few servings of Brussels sprouts in your diet each week can help you easily meet your omega-3 fatty acid needs, with a ...
1# Immune system. The first important thing cabbage juice does is improve your immune system function by stimulating T cells, which are responsible for a variety of immune responses in the body.. Owing to its ingredient - histidine, cabbage juice also relieves symptoms of allergies.. 2# Anemia. Cabbage juice is packed with large amounts of folic acid, which stimulates the creation of new blood cells in the body.. Thats why drinking raw cabbage juice is highly recommended as a natural treatment of anemia.. 3# Cancer. One of the largest benefits cabbage juice provides is its valuable effects on prevention and treatment of several cancers.. The sulforaphane content in cabbage inhibits carcinogens from attacking healthy cells. Moreover, the isocyanate prevents, stomach, breast, colon and prostate cancers.. Cabbage juice also promotes fast recovery after cancer treatments because it stimulates the self-healing process of the body.. 4# Arthritis. The rich selenium content in cabbage juice effectively ...
By exploiting the resources generated by the Arabidopsis genome project in a targeted comparative mapping study, we constructed high-resolution physical maps of a 510-kb chromosomal region that encompasses the S locus in B. campestris and of a 275-kb homeologous region in Arabidopsis. The value of comparative mapping for traits that are unique to one of the two species being compared has been questioned (Van Deynze et al., 1995). However, in our study, the comparative mapping approach was clearly useful, despite the fact that Arabidopsis lacks a functional SI system.. The close physical and genetic linkage of the ETR1 marker to the Brassica S locus identifies the Brassica homolog of this well-characterized Arabidopsis gene and its map position, and it provides a clear landmark for the genomic location of the S locus. Furthermore, due to the synteny exhibited by the two homeologous regions on a submegabase scale, the comparative study generated several molecular markers for the Brassica S locus ...
Brussels sprouts tend to bring out strong opinions: You either love them or you hate them. If you love them, youre in luck - these tiny cabbages are packed with nutrition. As a bonus, they thrive in colder temperatures, so theyre at their peak when there are few other fresh, local produce options available. If youve always thought you hated them, you just might want to give them another chance. Brussels sprouts are enjoying a moment in the spotlight, which means there are all kinds of new ways to prepare them. These new methods might just be tasty enough to make you forget all about those childhood dinners of overcooked, mushy "little brains.". ...
There are 88 calories in 1 cup of Cooked Brussels Sprouts (from Fresh, Fat Added in Cooking). Get full nutrition facts and other common serving sizes of Cooked Brussels Sprouts (from Fresh, Fat Added in Cooking) including 1 sprout and 1 oz.
Brussels sprouts are a delicious, simple to prepare, nutrient dense vegetable -- they are my husbands favorite! The trick to making mouth-watering Brussels sprouts is to roast them, not boil or steam them. This brings out their rich, nutty flavor -- no fancy ingredients required. All you need is fat, salt, and pepper and you will have an amazing side dish in about a half hour!
Ive never understood why brussels sprouts have such a bad reputation. Smothered in butter and sprinkled with salt, they have always been one of my favorites. Lately Ive switched to olive oil and still love them. Given their long list of amazing health benefits, brussels sprouts are vegetables that should be added to everyones grocery…
Comprehensive nutrition resource for Brussels Sprouts. Learn about the number of calories and nutritional and diet information for Brussels Sprouts. This is part of our comprehensive database of 40,000 foods including foods from hundreds of popular restaurants and thousands of brands.
Calories in Green Giant Steams In Bag Brussels Sprouts. Find nutrition facts for Green Giant Steams In Bag Brussels Sprouts and over 2,000,000 other foods in MyFitnessPal.coms food database.
Full nutritional breakdown of the calories in Oven Seared Brussels Sprouts based on the calories and nutrition in each ingredient, including Olive Oil, Brussels sprouts, fresh, Salt and the other ingredients in this recipe.
Waldorf Brussels Sprout Salad is our take on the traditional Waldorf salad with shredded Brussels sprouts, celery, apples, and nuts.
A water-soluble Chl a/b-protein (CP673) was isolated and purified from Brussels sprouts (Brassica oleracea L. var. gemmifera DC). The protein had a molecular mass of 78 kDa and an isoelectric point of 4.7, consisted of three or four subunits of 22 kDa and was extremely heat-stable. Although CP673 contained about one Chl a per protein, the blue and red absorption bands of Chl a that consisted of three or four Chl a forms with different absorption maxima suggested that there are several different modes or sites of binding for Chl a. Chl a/b ratio of larger than 10 also indicated that Chl b is present only in a small fraction of CP673. The heterogeneity of CP673 in terms of composition and binding of Chl suggests that Chl is not an intrinsic component of the Chl-protein. Homology search showed that the N-terminal amino acid sequence of CP673 is highly homologous with that of a 22 kDa protein that accumulates in water-stressed leaves of two Brassicaceae plants, rapeseed and radish, but not with ...
Green cabbage (Brassica oleracea capitata var. alba) and purple cabbage (Brassica oleracea var. capitata f. rubra), also called red cabbage, taste pretty much the same. The chief difference is that the color of purple cabbage may vary according to how you grow or cook it, and it contains compounds that are thought ...
Resistance of nine cabbage (Brassica oleracea var. capitata) cultivars, Big cropper, Cape Spitz, Copenhagen Market, Conquistador, Drumhead, Giant Drumhead, Glory of Enkhuizen, Grandslam and Hercules to cabbage aphid (Brevicoryne brassicae) was studied in greenhouse experiments conducted at the Botswana College of Agriculture, Gaborone, Botswana. Cabbage aphids caused 85 % leaf damage on the most susceptible cultivar, Drumhead, and only 30.9 and 44.6 % on the more resistant cultivars, Grandslam and Copenhagen Market, respectively. Drumhead had the lowest number of aphids per leaf, showing the antibiosis mechanism of resistance to B. brassicae and yet it suffered the most severe damage. Although Copenhagen Market was resistant to cabbage aphid damage, it had the greatest abundance of aphids per leaf, showing that it used the tolerance resistance mechanism against cabbage aphids. Conquistador, Glory of Enkhuizen, Grandslam and Hercules, which gave the lowest combined effect of number of aphids multiplied
The leafy kale (Brassica oleracea var. acephala) is known as valuable source of different minerals. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of two kale genotypes cultivation in three phosphorus deficient soils common for coastal Croatia, on mineral composition of shoots and roots. The study was conducted in a greenhouse located in Split, Croatia during winter 2012. Plants of kale genotypes, cultivar Red Russian and Croatian accession Pula were planted in (3 L) pots filled with three soils: Rhodic cambisol NDASH terra rossa, Rendzic leptosol, and Fluvisol Eutric Calcaric. The design was a randomized complete block with four replications. Shoot and root samples were analyzed using inductively coupled plasma NDASH optical emission spectrometry for Ca, Mg, Mn, Zn, Fe, Cu, and Mo concentrations. In the shoots, concentrations of all minerals were significantly affected by cultivation in different soil. Also, genotypes differed in Ca, Mg, Mn and Zn concentrations, while interactive ...
ID A0A0D3E3S2_BRAOL Unreviewed; 141 AA. AC A0A0D3E3S2; DT 29-APR-2015, integrated into UniProtKB/TrEMBL. DT 29-APR-2015, sequence version 1. DT 25-OCT-2017, entry version 4. DE RecName: Full=V-type proton ATPase subunit a {ECO:0000256,RuleBase:RU361189}; OS Brassica oleracea var. oleracea. OC Eukaryota; Viridiplantae; Streptophyta; Embryophyta; Tracheophyta; OC Spermatophyta; Magnoliophyta; eudicotyledons; Gunneridae; OC Pentapetalae; rosids; malvids; Brassicales; Brassicaceae; Brassiceae; OC Brassica. OX NCBI_TaxID=109376 {ECO:0000313,EnsemblPlants:Bo9g028680.1, ECO:0000313,Proteomes:UP000032141}; RN [1] {ECO:0000313,EnsemblPlants:Bo9g028680.1, ECO:0000313,Proteomes:UP000032141} RP NUCLEOTIDE SEQUENCE. RC STRAIN=cv. TO1000 {ECO:0000313,Proteomes:UP000032141}; RX PubMed=24916971; DOI=10.1186/gb-2014-15-6-r77; RA Parkin I.A., Koh C., Tang H., Robinson S.J., Kagale S., Clarke W.E., RA Town C.D., Nixon J., Krishnakumar V., Bidwell S.L., Denoeud F., RA Belcram H., Links M.G., Just J., Clarke C., ...
ID A0A0D3CJ70_BRAOL Unreviewed; 488 AA. AC A0A0D3CJ70; DT 29-APR-2015, integrated into UniProtKB/TrEMBL. DT 29-APR-2015, sequence version 1. DT 22-NOV-2017, entry version 17. DE RecName: Full=Glutamate decarboxylase {ECO:0000256,RuleBase:RU361171}; DE EC=4.1.1.15 {ECO:0000256,RuleBase:RU361171}; GN Name=106293289 {ECO:0000313,EnsemblPlants:Bo5g122630.1}; OS Brassica oleracea var. oleracea. OC Eukaryota; Viridiplantae; Streptophyta; Embryophyta; Tracheophyta; OC Spermatophyta; Magnoliophyta; eudicotyledons; Gunneridae; OC Pentapetalae; rosids; malvids; Brassicales; Brassicaceae; Brassiceae; OC Brassica. OX NCBI_TaxID=109376 {ECO:0000313,EnsemblPlants:Bo5g122630.1, ECO:0000313,Proteomes:UP000032141}; RN [1] {ECO:0000313,EnsemblPlants:Bo5g122630.1, ECO:0000313,Proteomes:UP000032141} RP NUCLEOTIDE SEQUENCE. RC STRAIN=cv. TO1000 {ECO:0000313,Proteomes:UP000032141}; RX PubMed=24916971; DOI=10.1186/gb-2014-15-6-r77; RA Parkin I.A., Koh C., Tang H., Robinson S.J., Kagale S., Clarke W.E., RA Town C.D., ...
Complex proteomic and physiological approaches to study cold and heat stress responses in plant mitochondria are still limited. Variations in the mitochondrial proteome of cauliflower (Brassica oleracea var. botrytis) curds after cold and heat and after stress recovery were assayed by 2D PAGE in relation to respiratory parameters. Quantitative analysis of the mitochondrial proteome revealed numerous stress-affected protein spots. In cold alternative oxidase isoforms were extensively upregulated; major downregulations in the level of photorespiratory enzymes, porine isoforms, oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) and some low-abundant proteins were observed. On the contrary, distinct proteins, including carbohydrate metabolism enzymes, heat-shock proteins, translation, protein import, and OXPHOS components were involved in heat response and recovery. Few metabolic regulations were suggested. Cauliflower plants appeared less susceptible to heat; closed stomata in heat stress resulted in moderate
This section provides useful information about Brassica campestris and research studies to improve our overall understanding of a disorder or a specific Brassica campestris .
Brassica species belong to the Brassicaceae family, which contains about 3700 species from 338 genera, including the widely studied model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Brassica species include both vegetable and oilseed crops that contribute about 10% of the worlds vegetable production and about 12% of worlds edible vegetable oil production [1, 2]. The diploid genomes of the six widely cultivated Brassica species are described by the famous "Us triangle" (genome A, B, C, AB, BC and AC, corresponding to B. rapa, B. oleracea, B. nigra, B. juncea, B. napus, and B. carinata, respectively [3]. The A genome species, B. rapa, is a major vegetable and also an oil crop in Asia and Europe. Because of their importance as crops and as models to study complex genome hybridization and polyploidization [4, 5], genetic and genomic research on Brassicas has intensified over recent years, generating ever increasing sets of data, such as Brassica genome sequences, genetic markers, expressed sequence tags (ESTs) ...
Washington, April 27 (ANI): Penn State College of Medicine researchers have revealed that a topical compound called ISC-4 found in cruciferous vegetables like broccoli and brussels sprouts may increase sunscreens abilities to prevent melanoma lesion formation. Despite the
Cabbage is a very popular food for people who lead a healthy life. It contains a few calories, and the rich are vegetable fibers. As a result of the nutritional composition, it is useful in accelerating the metabolism and losing weight in kilograms. In many diets are included recipes cabbage juice, the main dishes with cabbage and cabbage juice.. Characteristic of cabbage is that it is rich in vitamins, and there is a small number of calories. Therefore, the juice is perfect for those who struggle with the excess of kilograms. It is especially pronounced when the cabbage juice is compared with the juices of the other vegetable and fruit that have a high content of sugar and many calories.. Tip: If you do not like to eat fresh vegetables, drink the juice from the vegetables. The adults in the course of one day should bring about 3½ glasses of vegetable and fruit. Cabbage juice is a simple and nutritious way to increase the number of vegetables you consume without having to enter too many ...
The recipe sections of this book are categorized by type of plant: Kale, Cauliflower, Brussels Sprouts and Cabbage, Broccoli, Leafy Brassicas, Asian Brassicas and Root Brassicas and Kohlrabi. Since some of these plants are just starting to come into season in my area, I loaded up at the farmers market and tried out some recipes. I love cauliflower, and it really is underrated. I tried out the super simple Roman Cauliflower Saute with olive oil, garlic, salt, pepper and cheese. This was very simple, quick and tasty. Brussels sprouts are another favorite of mine. The Brussels Sprouts with Parmesan Crust is very similar to how I usually prepare sprouts, with the addition of white wine vinegar which turned out well. There are a lot of different things to do with broccoli, so I tried out the Lemony Broccoli Chop, which is sort of like a slaw. It was definitely a different flavor palate than I am used to, very Mediterranean, but good ...
Most of the health benefits of Brussels Sprouts are similar to those of the cabbage, due to the important phytonutrient sulforaphane ...
Dear Brussels Sprouts, I think you should know how much I appreciate you. Firstly you look like a cabbage, grown by a fairy, which makes me want to make a teeny tiny jar of Saurkraut out of you, or put you in the garden of my daughters dolls house. I love that you chose to…
120 days from setting out transplants.There has never been a Brussels Sprout as delicious, as perfectly formed, and as ruggedly cold-hardy as Bitesize! Unlike most gourmet vegetables, Bitesize actually holds longer on the plant than any other variety, extending your season of delicious eating well into winter!As the name suggests, these are mini-sprouts, just the right size for a satisfying mouthful. The flavor is extraordinary, especially after sweetening by frost: many-layered, succulent, and peppery. The less you cook them, the better to bring out all the layers of flavors.Start seeds indoors in spring, 6 to 8 weeks before setting out plants. Bitesize Hybrid loves chilly weather, which improves the flavor of the sprouts tremendously. Pkt is 50 seeds.
Posted on 12/22/2012 7:30:41 PM PST by NormsRevenge. A man from Ayrshire had to be hospitalised after eating too many Brussels sprouts last Christmas, it has emerged. The traditional Christmas vegetable contain lots of vitamin K which promotes blood clotting. However, this counteracted the effect of anticoagulants the man was taking because he had a mechanical heart. Doctors at the Golden Jubilee Hospital in Clydebank eventually realised too many sprouts were to blame ...
I promise this is the end of the Brussels sprouts for a while! But I thought I would throw this one in because if you have a sprout-hater coming to your table (and since B. sprouts have such a bad rep there are a lot of haters out there), this is a nice way to disguise them almost beyond recognition, at least until the first bite
Healthful brussels sprouts become an indulgent side dish with the simple addition of freshly shaved Parmesan cheese. Trim the sprouts to a uniform size to ensure they cook evenly.
Washed & Ready to Use. Brussels Sprouts, Onion, Walnuts, Tomato Pesto Sauce (Sunflower Seed Oil, Tomato Paste, Basil, Ricotta Cheese [Whey {from Pasteurized Cows Milk}, Pasteurized Cream, Salt, Calcium Chloride], Grana Padano Cheese [Milk, Salt, Rennet, Egg Lysozyme], Cashew Nuts, Sundried Tomatoes, Salt, Sugar, Cornstarch, Hot Chili Pepper, Black Pepper, Acidity Corrector: Lactic Acid), Basting Oil (Organic Sunflower Oil, Dried Parsley, Dried Thyme, Natural Garlic Flavor). -- Keep Refrigerated.. ...
Being a carnivore, this is exactly the type of dish Id usually toss a bit of sausage into. As a dietitian, I know its important to incorporate protein into carb-heavy meals to help control blood sugar spikes. Yet in a moment of pure nutritionist geekery, I decided to run a nutritional analysis on this dish before adding any meat, and I found that it packs 18 grams of protein! Thats more than an entire pre-cooked sausage!. At Meatless Monday, we often talk about how foods like beans, tofu and quinoa are excellent sources of protein - and they definitely are! - but I think its easy to forget that when you pack together enough plant foods that may be relatively low in protein on their own, youll end up with a dish thats just as high in protein as a serving of meat. Here, the gnocchi, Brussels sprouts, and pepitas (pumpkin seeds) all add to the total. Its just a bonus that theyre some of my favorite fall foods!. Serves 3.. Ingredients. ...
4. In a small saucepan melt butter with olive oil and garlic. Once the garlic starts to sizzle, add the peri peri and then pour the mixture over the pasta. Top with Parmesan and bake at 400F (youll have to lower your ovens temperature after roasting the Brussels sprouts) for about 20 minutes or until the cheese is a pretty golden color ...
... - BellaOnline Nutrition Database - BellaOnline is committed to helping our visitors become healthy and happy. Our BellaOnline Nutrition Database will help you choose the healthiest foods for your chosen lifestyle.
... - BellaOnline Nutrition Database - BellaOnline is committed to helping our visitors become healthy and happy. Our BellaOnline Nutrition Database will help you choose the healthiest foods for your chosen lifestyle.
... - Get a bar chart of the top 10 nutrients, and click to see an expanded list of over 151 nutrients, including amino acids.
I wonder if you really thought about the link you posted. Yes, there is saturated fat in lard, but there is slightly more monounsaturated fat as well. The point of the video was that cooking something in lard isnt horrible like people have been lead to believe. Lard has been unfairly demonized for the past 30 years as a horrible saturated fat. But lard is a mixed source of fat, and its totally natural. In the video, the host shows that only about 1-2 tablespoons of lard have actually been used. Thats for what looks like 4 servings of Brussels sprouts. Compare that to a lean burger ...
A recipe for tender, juicy chicken thighs roasted with brussels sprouts in ginger, garlic, orange juice and soy sauce for an incredibly easy and flavorful one-dish meal. Gluten-free and dairy-free.
A recipe for tender, juicy chicken thighs roasted with brussels sprouts in ginger, garlic, orange juice and soy sauce for an incredibly easy and flavorful one-dish meal. Gluten-free and dairy-free.
Shredded Brussels Sprouts with pan-fried bacon, and shallots come together to make one tasty low-carb salad perfect as a side, or its own meal!
do not disclude brussels sprouts from your menu! theyre very healthy and despite what you might think it very tasty and enjoyable. now that you can enjoy
Roasted Brussels sprouts and chicken thighs are a match we go back to over and over again in the Test Kitchen. Paired with cumin, thyme, sweet potatoes and a hit of sherry vinegar, they create one of our favorite easy dinner recipes.
Easy to prepare and exceptionally renal-friendly, Jamies Chicken Pasta with Brussels Sprouts is loaded with lean protein and is, quite frankly, delicious.
By Nutri People. First cultivated by the Romans, broccoli is related to the cabbage, cauliflower and Brussels sprout. Broccoli sprouts contain high amounts of active parts called sulphoraphanes. These act as indirect antioxidants, boosting what are called phase 2 detoxification enzymes, which trigger antioxidant activity throughout the body. Indirect antioxidants last longer in the body than direct antioxidants. Sulphoraphane levels drop as the broccoli plant grows older. Three-day old broccoli sprouts contain 20 to 50 times more sulphoraphanes than the mature cooked vegetable. Broccoli supplements should be free from goitrens.. ...
The Cross-Striped Cabbage Worm is a pest of brassicas, especially cabbage, broccoli, and brussels sprouts. We do see season-to-season and year-to-year variations in the total population size, as well as the population ratio between these and other cabbage worms (such as the Imported Cabbageworm). More often than not, the Cross-Striped Cabbage Worms are the most prolific here.. These caterpillars can quickly defoliate brassica plants, such as the Brussels Sprout plant shown below.. We use several strategies to try to keep damage within acceptable levels. Weve had some success using shade cloth on hoops over fall cabbage beds to exclude adult moths and prevent them from laying eggs on the plants. Trap crops of collard plants, which are a favored food, can sometimes help, if we keep on top of controlling the populations on the collards plants ...
Brassica is a broad term for a genus of plants in the mustard family (Brassicaceae). The members of this genus are collectively known either as cabbages or mustards. Crops from this genus are sometimes called cole crops, a phrase derived from the Latincaulis, meaning stem or cabbage. The Brassica group includes many familiar vegetables and "flowers" such as broccoli, brussels sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower, collards, kale, rutabaga and turnip - some grown specifically for their ornamental leaves. They begin to appear in earnest at the flower market in fall, coming into high season in winter. To request brassica by name at a flower shop, you may have to ask for "kale" or "cabbage" - some vendors think its too highfalutin to use the genus name! After the jump, Ill show you some ways to display and arrange brassica at home. Lets get started! ...
Alternative Chemical name: (R)-1-isothiocyanate-4-methyl-butane sulfonyl Sulforaphane is a compound with antioxidant properties and is capable of stimulating detoxifying enzymes present in the body, and thus a potent preventive agent against cancer. Phytochemical belonging to the family of isothiocyanates, compounds that contain sulfur. It occurs in plants attached to a sugar molecule, the glicosinato sulfarafano (glucorafanina). Only after eating the sulfarafano will be released by an enzyme called myrosinase, and can be found on plants in the family Brassicaceae (Cruciferae) such as broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, kale (Brassica oleracea) and Chinese cabbage (B . rapa). However the greatest concentration of Sulforaphane is present in shoots of broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. var. Italica). Many epidemiological studies, supported by in vitro and in vivo (Gasper et al., 2006), have been reported associated with the potential to reduce the risk of various cancers by substances contained in ...
Brassica oleracea BOFH protein: homolog of LFY (Arabidopsis) & FLO (Antirrhinum); from cauliflower, Brassica oleracea; aa sequence given in first source; GenBank Z18362
A third important anti-inflammatory component in Brussels sprouts is not one that you might expect. Its their omega-3 fatty acids. We dont tend to think about vegetables in general as important sources of omega-3s, and certainly no vegetables that are as low in total fat as Brussels sprouts. But 100 calories worth of Brussels sprouts (about 1.5 cups) provide about 480 milligrams of the most basic omega-3 fatty acid (called alpha-linolenic acid, or ALA). That amount is more than one-third of the daily ALA amount recommended by the National Academy of Sciences in the Dietary Reference Intake recommendations, and its about half of the ALA contained in one teaspoon of whole flaxseeds. Omega-3 fatty acids are the building blocks for the one of the bodys most effective families of anti-inflammatory messaging molecules ...
Cabbage is a popular cultivar of the species Brassica oleracea Linne(Capitata Group) of the Family Brassicaceae (or Cruciferae) and is used as a leafy green vegetable. It is a herbaceous, biennial, dicotyledonous flowering plant distinguished by a short stem upon which is crowded a mass of leaves, usually green but in some varieties red or purplish, which…
In the investigation of regular consumption of fresh and cooked Brassicaceae and its effect in reducing the risk of cancer and heart disease found that Anti-proliferative and chemoprotective effects towards DNA oxidative damage of fresh and cooked vegetable extracts were evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium and Comet assays on HT-29 human colon carcinoma cells. The fresh vegetable extracts showed the highest anti-proliferative and antioxidant activities on HT-29 cells (broccoli,cauliflower = Brussels sprouts). No genotoxic activity was detected in any of the samples tested. The cooking methods that were applied influenced the anti-proliferative activity of Brassica extracts but did not alter considerably the antioxidant activity presented by the raw vegetables. Raw, microwaved, boiled (except broccoli) and steamed vegetable extracts, at different concentrations, presented a protective antioxidative action comparable with vitamin C ...
Behavioral improvements occur transiently during febrile illnesses in autism, and include decreased repetitive behaviors and improved speech. These changes have been recorded in 38% of autistic children in a clinical survey and 83% in an observational study, respectively. The cellular basis for this fever effect is unknown but is likely to involve heat shock proteins (HSP) and cellular stress responses (CSR) that lead to changes in synaptic function and network connectivity.. Sulforaphane (1-isothiocyanato-4R- (methylsulfinyl)butane) is an isothiocyanate that is delivered by lyophilized extracts of 3-day-old broccoli sprouts. Broccoli sprouts are widely consumed as a food item all over the world by very large numbers of individuals, without any reports of adverse effects. Our preliminary work in vitro shows that sulforaphane stimulates HSP and mitochondrial biogenesis in several genetic disorders.. This study of sulforaphane-rich Broccoli Sprout Extract in autism is a randomized, ...
According to the National Cancer Institute, cancer is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. The number of cancer patients is expected to increase to a staggering 22 million within the next two decades. This statistic is quite alarming. However, these projections may be prevented from coming true by eating broccoli sprouts.. The sulforaphane in broccoli sprouts prevents and kills cancer cells. Studies show that eating three to five servings of broccoli sprouts per week decreases the risk of cancer by 30 - 40%. Sulforaphane inhibits enzymes that can activate pro-carcinogens and induce enzymes that cause the elimination of chemicals that, in turn, damage the DNA. It also kills cancer cells.. ...
Like Brussels sprouts, cauliflower is one of those misunderstood vegetables. Its certainly not the prettiest veggie on campus, but its one of the healthiest.. When properly cooked and seasoned, cauliflower is delicious-one of my favorites. I buy it at least once a week, usually to steam or roast as a side dish.. These days, cauliflower is available year-round. A member of the Brassicaceae family (broccoli, cabbage, kale, Brussels sprouts, collard greens), it delivers a cancer-fighting compound called sulforaphane. A half-cup of cooked cauliflower provides 45% of your daily vitamin C requirement, as well as 2 g fiber, while weighing in at only 15 calories.. When choosing an organic cauliflower, look for a head thats white or creamy, firm, compact, and heavy for its size. Toss aside heads that have dark spots, brown patches or other discolorations.. When you arrive home, place your cauliflower (stem side up) in your refrigerators crisper, where it should last for up to five days. If you buy ...
Accumulating evidence suggests a role of oxidative stress in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. The potent antioxidant sulforaphane (SFN) is an organosulfur compound derived from a glucosinolate precursor found in cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli, Brussels sprouts and cabbage. The protection afforded by SFN is thought to be mediated via activation of the NF-E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) pathway and subsequent up-regulation of phase II detoxification enzymes and antioxidant proteins, through an enhancer sequence referred to as the electrophilic responsive element or antioxidant responsive element. Recently, we reported that SFN could attenuate behavioral abnormalities in mice after the NMDA receptor antagonist phencyclidine. Considering the potent antioxidant effects of SFN, we have a hypothesis that SFN would be a potential therapeutic drug for schizophrenia. The purpose of this study is to determine whether SFN-rich broccoli sprout extract have beneficial effects in patients with ...
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Kai-lan, also known as Chinese broccoli, is a leaf vegetable featuring thick, flat, glossy blue-green leaves with thick stems and a small number of tiny, almost vestigial flower heads similar to those of broccoli. Broccoli and kai-lan belong to the same species Brassica oleracea, but kai-lan is in the group alboglabra [Latin albus+glabrus white and hairless].…
Broccoli sprouts, also called Brassica oleracea italica, are broccoli harvested when the broccoli plant is 3 to 4 days old. Consuming this type of broccoli...
aphids_that_eat_brussels_sprouts_are_smaller_than_normal_and_live_in_undersized_populations_which_has_a_negative_knockon_effect_up_the_food_chain_according_to_new_research_published_today_8_february_in_science
The total number of unemployed, job-seeking Mainers in September was 26,100, down 1,500 from a year earlier, the department said. The report says the September rate was half a percentage point under the year-ago rate of 3.3 percent. Albertsons, Randalls, Tom Thumb stores in Texas, Louisiana, and Arkansas are among the stores voluntarily recalling Ready.. The recalled veggies were distributed throughout the US and Canada with "best if used by" dates from October 11-20 listed on the front of the packaging.. If you have any of the above products, then the FDA advises that you either discard it immediately or return it to its point of purchase for a full refund.. Archer Farms (Target): 12-oz. bags of broccoli slaw, broccoli cauliflower florets, broccoli medley and brussels sprouts, along with 9-oz. bags of shaved brussels sprouts, and 10-oz. bags of cauliflower florets. "This voluntary recall is a reflection of our commitment to ensuring the safety of our consumers". The infection can cause ...
There are 33 calories in 1 cup (3 oz) of Birds Eye Steamfresh, Broccoli Florets, Premium, Frozen. Youd need to walk 9 minutes to burn 33 calories. Visit CalorieKing to see calorie count and nutrient data for all portion sizes.
Crop plants are adversely affected by a variety of environmental factors, with air temperature being one of the most influential. Plants have developed a number of methods in the adaptation to air temperature variations. However, there is limited research to determine what impact air temperature has on the production of secondary plant compounds, such as carotenoid pigments. Kale (Brassica oleracea L.) and spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) have high concentrations of lutein and ß-carotene carotenoids. The objectives of this study were to determine the effects of different growing air temperatures on plant biomass production and the accumulation of elemental nutrients, lutein, ß-carotene, and chlorophyll pigments in the leaves of kale and spinach. Plants were grown in nutrient solutions in growth chambers at air temperatures of 15, 20, 25, and 30 °C for `Winterbor kale and 10, 15, 20, and 25 °C for `Melody spinach. Maximum tissue lutein and ß-carotene concentration occurred at 30 °C for kale and 10
How are your brassica plants coming along? Its likely youve planted them out by now and are keeping an eye on them, particularly for signs of pest and disease. If you havent planted them out, its a little late but you can get away with it for a later crop. Once planted, water them especially well because theyre thirsty plants and August can be a dry month.. If youre growing broccoli, manuring the ground before planting can mean it grows with all mouth and no trousers - that is, leaves galore but fewer spears! A little nitrogen-rich feed, such as liquid seaweed or Growmore, through summer can help as they grow, and every month after that give them a small boost to help them along. This goes for cauliflowers, cabbages and other leafy brassicas.. Its a waiting game for brassicas, though, as itll be a good few months until any harvesting potential appears, but its worth the effort for tasty, home-grown greens! ...
A L A B A M A A & M A N D A U B U R N U N I V E R S I T I E S ANR-1135 Guide to Commercial Cabbage Production Historical Perspective Cabbage (Brassica oleracea L. var. capitata) is a member of the Brassicaceae
Sulfur in Brassica oleracea. Gracie Gordon Michael Lorentsen James Helzberg. http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/0/03/Broccoli_and_cross_section_edit.jpg. http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/44/Sulfur-sample.jpg. Why is Sulfur Important for Human Nutrition?. Slideshow 2133335 by kane
Brassica oleracea REM1 protein: expressed in cauliflower reproductive meristems; orthologue of arabidopsis REM1; amino acid sequence in first source
Apple, Escalloped 1/2 cup - 20 mg. Asparagus 5 pcs - 135 mg. Beans, Green Fresh Steamed 1/2 cup - 250 mg. Beans, Asian Green 1/2 cup - 170 mg. Beef, BBQ 3 oz - 160 mg. Beef, Machaca 3 oz - 230 mg. Beef, Carne Guisada 1/2 cup - 380 mg. Beef, Pot Pie 1 piece - 470 mg. Beef, Pot Roast 1/2 cup - 320 mg. Beef, Roast Carved 3 oz - 115 mg. Beef, Taco Meat 1/2 cup - 330 mg. Beef, Tips, Marinated Sirloin 3 oz - 250 mg. Beef, Tips Marinated Chuck 3 oz - 250 mg. Broccoli, Steamed 1/2 cup - 85 mg. Brussels Sprouts in sauce 1/2 cup - 230 mg. Brussels Sprouts steamed 1/2 cup - 190 mg. Cabbage, Kettle Cooked 1/2 cup - 180 mg. Carrot Souffle 1/2 cup- 140 mg. Carrots, Baby Steamed 1/2 cup - 220 mg. Cauliflower Steamed 1/2 cup - 65 mg. Chicken Breast Grilled 1 each - 390 mg. Chicken, Bourbon Street 3 oz - 350 mg. Chicken Fajita 3 oz - 500 mg. Chicken Livers, Fried 3 each 370 mg. Chicken, Machaca 3 oz - 470 mg. Chicken Pot Pie 1 piece - 380 mg. Chicken, Sweet and Sour 1 cup - 370 mg. Chicken Wings (no sauce) 3 ...
Neutrófilos são as primeiras células do sistema imune a migrarem para o tecido inflamado e exercem a importante função de fagocitose e eliminação imediata de patógenos invasores. A ativação de neutrófilos é um processo de múltiplos passos e de alta complexidade. A busca por agentes biológicos capazes de modular o processo de ativação, migração, fagocitose e produção de espécies reativas de oxigênio (ROS) é importante pois aumentam a gama de opções para utilização na pesquisa. Nesse trabalho utilizamos a lectina extraída de Brassica oleracea (BOL) a fim de avaliar a sua capacidade na modulação da resposta de neutrófilos. Para os ensaios nós purificamos neutrófilos de camundongo tanto do sangue periférico quanto da cavidade peritoneal buscando avaliar sua capacidade migratória, o índice de CD62L na superfície e o índice fagocítico de neutrófilos pré-incubados com BOL. A lectina apresentou diversos efeitos de acordo com a dose utilizada, sendo possível ...
Today I would like to focus on the case study (see my March 28th post). The first mention can be found in the abstract: The present study describes a case in which bronchitis developed upon turmeric intake for gastrointestinal complaints. Further on (page 266), the authors state that they feel the need to express a word of caution based on a case in which the use of moderate doses of turmeric induced some toxicity, possibly related to immunosuppression. Well, before I begin growling (hehe, thanks, Sandy, you gave me a good chuckle with your comment…), lets have a closer look at this part of the study.. The case: a 57-year-old man with an IgG1 deficiency and borderline hypogammaglobulinemia who had suffered from all sorts of ailments, poor dear!, from early childhood. These included middle ear infections (=otitis media), chronic rhinosinusitis (Stefano has the same thing, chronic rhinosinusitis I mean, so I know how nasty it can be…he frequently cannot breathe through his nose, and only when ...
Ingredients: 1 medium butternut squash, peeled and sliced, 1 medium DOLE® Sweet Potato, peeled and thinly sliced, 2 large DOLE Carrots, peeled and sliced lengthwise, 2 large parsnips, peeled and sliced lengthwise, 12 DOLE Brussels Sprouts, halved, Nonstick olive oil spray, salt to taste, 3 tablespoons olive oil, 2 teaspoons grated fresh ginger, 1 teaspoon ground cumin, 1/2 cup all-purpose flour, 3 cups fat-free milk, 1-1/2 cups grated Emmenthal cheese, 1/2 cup grated parmesan cheese, pinch nutmeg, 1 (5 oz) package DOLE Organic Super Spinach, Directions:Preheat oven to 400°F.Arrange butternut squash, sweet potatoes, carrots, parsnips and Brussels sprouts on two baking pans. Spritz vegetables with nonstick olive oil spray and season with salt. Roast vegetables 20 minutes or until soft. Set asideHeat olive oil in a saucepan. Add ginger, cumin and flour; stir consistently for 2 minutes. Slowly add milk and stir consistently until smooth. Simmer for 5 minutes, until sauce thickens. Remove from ...
This article discusses vegetables which belong to the Brassicaceae family, including broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower. History, origin, varieties and cooking techniques are discussed.
Foods rich in vitamin K include spinach, mustard greens, kale, Brussels sprouts, parsley and beet greens. Kale has one of the highest percentages of vitamin K, while Brussels sprouts are much lower...
Medical Advisor journals] [The world healthy foods List] [The world healthy food recipes] Cauliflower is the species Brassica oleracea, including cabbage, brussels sprouts, kale and broccoli , belong to the family Brassicaceae, native to Italy. Nutritional Supplements 1. Carbohydrates 2. Sugars 3. Fiber 4. Omega 3 fatty acid 5. Protein 6. Thiamine (Vitamin B1) 7. …. ...
Find quality and healthy broccoli sprout extract in bulk here with EO Extract. Were one of leading broccoli sprout extract manufacturers and suppliers in China, please be free to buy or wholesale quality products from our factory.
1. Place a large rimmed baking sheet on an oven rack in the lowest position and heat the oven to 500 degrees . Trim the bottom of the sprouts, peel and discard any unhappy-looking leaves, and halve the sprouts.. 2. In a large bowl, drizzle the sprouts with the oil and toss until theyre evenly coated. Sprinkle with the salt and the sugar and toss gently to combine.. 3. Remove the hot baking sheet from the oven. Carefully transfer the sprouts to the sheet and spread them evenly, flat sides down.. 4. Place the sprouts in the oven and roast them until theyre well browned and tender, 10 to 12 minutes. Serve immediately with lemon wedges. ...
This humble cabbage relative is undergoing a renaissance. Cookbooks are full of conversion stories and recipes. Food writer T. Susan Chang shares hers: The delectable versions she now enjoys bear no resemblance to the boiled, greenish-yellow sprouts of her youth.
Brussels Sprouts are one of my favorite vegetables. The first time I laid my eyes on these miniature cabbages, I thought they were the cutest thing I ever saw. Unfortunately, the flavor failed me. I guess, I was then expecting something sweet (duh!) from such a delicate thing, instead of the bitter tang that greeted my tongue. I have since changed my opinion about Brussels Sprouts though. Now, they are a semi-staple in our home ...
Brussels sprout is a member of the cabbage family. These green buds contain tons of vitamins K and C. They are also a good source of vitamin A and B6, protein, iron, folate, fibre, potassium, manganese and other nutrients. The vitamin content of Brussels sprouts strengthens bones, reduces the risk of cancer as well as several types of cardiovascular disease, heart attack and diabetes. It helps to lower blood pressure and cholesterol, provides support for the bodys detox system, and benefits digestive system ...
Significantly reduced the incidence, multiplicity and rate of development of chemically induced mammary tumors in rats. It has demonstrated an ability to detoxify a number of carcinogens and thus might have the ability to protect against a variety of cancers (by keeping cancer from forming). Abundant in three-day old broccoli sprouts. The levels in three-day old broccoli sprouts are from 10 to 100 times greater than in mature broccoli. Also found in cabbage, brussels sprouts, cauliflower, cauliflower sprouts, bok choy, kale, collards, arugula, kohlrabi, mustard, turnip, red radish and watercress. See also indoles.. ...
Our goal is to raise awareness of the dramatic impact of diet on personal and global health. We celebrate the extraordinary benefits of delicious Whole Food Plant-Based Cooking and Eating for Optimum Health and Weight for people of all ages. A Plant-Based diet provides all nutrients for active living. It consists of whole grains, vegetables, fruits and beans. It excludes all animal protein (meat, poultry, fish, eggs, cheese, milk) refined grains and added oils while limiting sugar and salt. ...
ok first veganism of any kind i think is totaly unnessecary why limit the potential for nurishment to plant material only it seems pointless when you think of all the other tasty things out there to eat and what happens if all plant life on the planet is extinguished by some kind of alien viral infection will you die for your ideals i think not. not eating something because you can see into its eyes is stupid does the lion care about that when it eats the young child lost in the savanah NO what about the dingo when it steals a baby out of a tent NO or the python that strangles and eats the sleeping 7 year old girl in her own home NO its called the food chain and like it or not we are in it so man up eat that steak and yes its true if you have the right equiptment you can here plants emit noises when they are in pain enjoy your baby peas ...
Roasted butternut squash and Brussels sprouts make up the bones of this hearty dish, tossed with toasted bread cubes, red onions and shaved Parmesan cheese. The trick, of course, is replacing the juiciness of tomatoes - what ultimately soaks the bread - with something equally enticing. Since its the beginning of the indulgent season, Ive crafted a vinaigrette out of nutty brown butter, freshly squeezed lemon juice and a hint of maple syrup. Coating shrimp in shredded coconut and panko crumbs elevates the shellfish from an appetizer to a full meal, especially when paired with seasonal sweet potatoes. Use pre-cut butternut squash, found in the produce section of most grocery stores, for this cool-weather version of toasted bread salad. 4 cups day-old Italian bread or levain, cut into 1-inch cubes7 tablespoons olive oil-- Kosher salt and ground black pepper, to taste1 pound butternut squash, cut into 3/4-inch pieces1 pound Brussels sprouts, quartered, ends trimmed3 tablespoons unsalted butter1
Instructions: Preheat oven to 450 degrees. Toss Brussels sprouts, parsnips, carrots, fennel, garlic, sage, rosemary, and olive oil in large bowl; season with salt and pepper. Arrange in single layer on parchment-paper lined baking sheet. Set bowl aside without wiping clean. Add chestnuts to bowl; stir to coat lightly with olive oil and bits of herbs remaining in bowl. Set aside. Roast veggie mixture, 15 min; stir. Continue roasting, about 15 min, until just starting to brown. Add chestnuts; roast, 5 min, to heat through. Transfer to large bowl. Add vinegar, basil, and 1 Tbsp minced fennel fronds; season with salt. Toss to combine. Ingrediants: White Wine Vinegar with The Mother Extra Virgin Toscano Olive Oil Fennel (Anise) Carrots Sage Basil Rosemary Garlic, Cleaned and Cut, Peeled Parsnips Brussels Sprouts Chestnuts, Organic, Roasted ...
Before you take INVOKANA®, tell your doctor if you have a history of amputation; heart disease or are at risk for heart disease; blocked or narrowed blood vessels (usually in leg); damage to the nerves (neuropathy) of your leg; diabetic foot ulcers or sores; kidney problems; liver problems; history of urinary tract infections or problems with urination; are on a low sodium (salt) diet; are going to have surgery; are eating less due to illness, surgery, or change in diet; pancreas problems; drink alcohol very often (or drink a lot of alcohol in short-term); ever had an allergic reaction to INVOKANA®; or have other medical conditions. Tell your doctor if you are or plan to become pregnant, are breastfeeding, or plan to breastfeed. INVOKANA® may harm your unborn baby. If you become pregnant while taking INVOKANA®, tell your doctor right away. INVOKANA® may pass into your breast milk and may harm your baby. Do not breastfeed while taking INVOKANA®. Tell your doctor about all the medicines you ...
The % Daily Values (%DVs) are based on the Daily Value recommendations for key nutrients but only for a 2,000calorie daily diet - not 2,500 calories ...
There are so many other benefits to be had from consuming turmeric and the concentrated extracts of the curcuminoids in this age-old spice. It acts as a natural liver detoxifier, can be used as an antiseptic for cuts, burns, and bruises (applied as a paste with water), works as a potent anti-inflammatory without the side effects of Rx drugs, can reduce inflammation from hives, swollen glands, arthritis, etc., It can calm an upset stomach. There are so many more benefits that I wont get into here.. * Note: For the most therapeutic benefit, you will probably want to take curcumin extracts in capsule form, in addition to using the spice in cooking.. Disclaimer: Please consult with your doctor before taking curcumin supplements. The information Ive presented is accurate to the best of my knowledge and I have presented it for educational purposes only. It is not meant to replace medical advice or supervision by your chosen health care provider.. My Naturopathic physician, Dr. Jonathan Psenka of ...
Low fat and low carb recipes. Hundreds of low-calorie, diet-friendly recipes. Searchable collection, including low-carb, low-fat, low-sodium, gluten-free, dairy-free, and more. New recipes added regularly.
Weiser Family Farms is growing the classic variety Rubine and is selling it at markets including Santa Monica, Hollywood, Pasadena and Long Beach Sunday.
Glucosinolates are Brassicaceae-specific secondary metabolites that act as crop protectants, flavor precursors and cancer-prevention agents, which shows strong evidences of anticarcinogentic, antioxidant and antimicrobial activities. MYB28, the R2R3-MYB28 transcription factor, directly activates genes involved in aliphatic glucosinolate biosynthesis. In this study, the MYB28 homology (BoaMYB28) was identified in Chinese kale (Brassica oleracea var. alboglabra Bailey). Analysis of the nucleotide sequence indicated that the cDNA of BoaMYB28 was 1257 bp with an ORF of 1020 bp. The deduced BoaMYB28 protein was a polypeptide of 339 amino acid with a putative molecular mass of 38 kDa and a pI of 6.87. Sequence homology and phylogenetic analysis showed that BoaMYB28 was most closely related to MYB28 homologs from the Brassicaceae family. The expression levels of BoaMYB28 varies across the tissues and developmental stages. BoaMYB28 transcript levels were higher in leaves and stems compared with those in
Olea europaea, etc ; Arachis hypogaea; Beta vulgaris; Brassica oleracea var. italica; Carthamus tinctorius; Cucumis sativus; Cynodon dactylon; Daucus carota; Festuca arundinacea; Ficus carica; Fragaria ananassa; Glycine max; Hordeum vulgare; Lolium perenne; Lotus corniculatus; Oryza sativa; Phalaris; Phaseolus vulgaris; Phoenix dactylifera; Punica granatum; Solanum lycopersicum; Sorghum bicolor subsp. drummondii; Thinopyrum intermedium; Thinopyrum ponticum; Triticum aestivum; aquifers; barley; beans; broccoli; carrots; cotton; crop yield; cucumbers; groundwater; hydrogeochemistry; irrigation management; irrigation water; leaching; models; peanuts; pomegranates; salt tolerance; soil water; soybeans; statistics; strawberries; sugar beet; tomatoes; water quality; water salinity; weathering; wheat; India; Show all 53 Subjects ...
Environmental concerns over the cultivation of Genetically Modified (GM) crops largely centre on the ecological consequences following gene flow to wild relatives. One attractive solution is to deploy biocontainment measures that prevent hybridization. Chloroplast transformation is the most advanced biocontainment method but is compromised by chloroplast capture (hybridization through the maternal lineage). To date, however, there is a paucity of information on the frequency of chloroplast capture in the wild. Oilseed rape (Brassica napus, AACC) frequently hybridises with wild Brassica rapa (AA, as paternal parent) and yields B. rapa-like introgressed individuals after only two generations. In this study we used chloroplast CAPS markers that differentiate between the two species to survey wild and weedy populations of B. rapa for the capture of B. napus chloroplasts. A total of 464 B. rapa plants belonging to 14 populations growing either in close proximity to B. napus (i.e. sympatric 1 km) were ...
Radish sprouts and broccoli sprouts have been implicated in having a potential chemoprotective effect against certain types of cancer. Each contains a glucosinolate that can be broken down to an isothiocyanate capable of inducing chemoprotective factors known as phase 2 enzymes. In the case of broccoli, the glucosinolate, glucoraphanin, is converted to an isothiocyanate, sulforaphane, while in radish a similar glucosinolate, glucoraphenin, is broken down to form the isothiocyanate, sulforaphene. When sprouts are consumed fresh (uncooked), however, the principal degradation product of broccoli is not the isothiocyanate sulforaphane, but a nitrile, a compound with little anti-cancer potential. By contrast, radish sprouts produce largely the anti-cancer isothiocyanate, sulforaphene. The reason for this difference is likely to be due to the presence in broccoli (and absence in radish) of the enzyme cofactor, epithiospecifier protein (ESP). In vitro induction of the phase 2 enzyme, quinone reductase ...
A Saskatchewan study examined hybridization between two mustard (Brassica juncea and B. carinata) crops that were either adjacent to a glyphosate-resistant canola (B. napus) crop or separated by a 5-m strip. Overall, field hybridization levels, detected with glyphosate resistance and species-specific AFLP markers, were low: 0.024% and up to 400 m in the adjacent B. juncea field and 0.013% (up to 350 m) in the separated field, and 0.005% (up to 150 m) in the adjacent B. carinata field and 0.002% (up to 65 m) in the separated field. Based on fitness information under controlled conditions, the fertility of hybrid plants is expected to be low. ...
Ingredients: Water, Glycerin, Dipropylene Glycol, Glycereth-26, Methylpropanediol, Cyclopentasiloxane, Niacinamide, BIFIDA Ferment Lysate, Raffinose, Dioscorea, Japonica Root Extract, 12-Hexanediolm Diglycerin, BIS-PEG-18 Methyl Ether Dimethyl Silane, Pentylene Glycol, Piper Methysticum Leaf/Root/Stem Extract, Beta Vulgaris (beet) Root Extract, Phellinus Linnets Extract, Arctic Lappa Root Extract, Portulaca Oleracea Extract, Pueraria Thunbergiana Root Extract, Glycyrrhiza Glabra (Licorice) Root Extract, Paeonia Lactiflora Root Extract, Conidium Officinale Root Extract, Brassica Oleracea Italica (Broccoli) Sprout Extract, Brassica Campestris (Rapeseed) Sprout Extract, Brassica Oleracea Acephala Leaf Extract, Helianthus Annuus (Sunflower) Sprout Extract, Pearl Extract, Sargassum Multicum Extract, Hypnea Musciformis Extract, Ulva Lactuca Extract, Ecklonia Cava Root Extract, Codium Tomentosum Extract, Agarum Cribosum Extract, Enteromorpha Compressa Extract, Laminaria Japonica Extract, Dunaliella ...
White Rubber Mask. Water, Glycerin, Glucose, 1,2-Hexanediol, Algin, Methylpropanediol, Potassium Alginate, Arctium Lappa Root Extract, Squalane, Synthetic Fluorphlogopite, C12-14 Pareth-12, Titanium Dioxide, Perilla Ocymoides Seed Extract, Cetyl Ethylhexanoate, Neopentyl Glycol Diheptanoate, Xanthan Gum, Hydrogenated Phosphatidylcholine, Alcohol Denat., Fragrance, Tetrapotassium Pyrophosphate, Egg Yolk Extract, Musa Sapientum (Banana) Fruit Extract, Polyglyceryl-10 Myristate, Prunus Amygdalus Dulcis (Sweet Almond) Seedextract, Pyrus Pyrifolia (Pear) Fruit Extract, Solanum Tuberosum (Potato) Pulp Extract, Tricholoma Matsutake Extract, Allium Cepa (Onion) Bulb Extract, Brassica Oleracea Botrytis (Cauliflower) Extract, Brassica Oleracea Gemmifera (Brussels Sprouts)Extract, Cetearyl Alcohol, Lecithin, Polyglyceryl-2 Stearate, Stearic Acid, Beta-Glucan, Carthamus Tinctorius (Safflower) Seed Oil, Oenothera Biennis (Evening Primrose) Oil, Polyglutamic Acid, Hydrogenated Lecithin, Piper Methysticum ...
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Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) is a member of the genus Caulimovirus, one of the six genera in the Caulimoviridae family, which are pararetroviruses that infect plants. Pararetroviruses replicate through reverse transcription just like retroviruses, but the viral particles contain DNA instead of RNA. Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) is the type species of the family Caulimoviridae. This family is grouped together with Hepadnaviruses into the Pararetrovirus group due to its mode of replication via reverse transcription of a pre-genomic RNA intermediate. CaMV infects mostly plants of the Brassicaceae family (such as cauliflower and turnip) but some CaMV strains (D4 and W260) are also able to infect Solanaceae species of the genera Datura and Nicotiana. CaMV induces a variety of systemic symptoms such as mosaic, necrotic lesions on leaf surfaces, stunted growth, and deformation of the overall plant structure. The symptoms exhibited vary depending on the viral strain, host ecotype, and environmental ...

Restoring enzyme activity in nonfunctional low erucic acid Brassica napus fatty acid elongase 1 by a single amino acid...Restoring enzyme activity in nonfunctional low erucic acid Brassica napus fatty acid elongase 1 by a single amino acid...

Restoring enzyme activity in nonfunctional low erucic acid Brassica napus fatty acid elongase 1 by a single amino acid ... [email protected]: Restoring enzyme activity in nonfunctional low erucic acid Brassica napus fatty acid elongase 1 by a single amino acid ... Restoring enzyme activity in nonfunctional low erucic acid Brassica napus fatty acid elongase 1 by a single amino acid ... Restoring enzyme activity in nonfunctional low erucic acid Brassica napus fatty acid elongase 1 by a single amino acid ...
more infohttp://nparc.cisti-icist.nrc-cnrc.gc.ca/eng/view/object/?id=bd983c9c-1c9d-42be-ba7b-4d20240e76a2

Genome analysis and genetic mapping of restorer loci in raphanusGenome analysis and genetic mapping of restorer loci in raphanus

This restorer introgression is located on the Brassica C genome making it only of use for B. napus and not for B. rapa or B. ... Genetic variation exists in Raphanus that could be of use to Brassica breeders. Of particular interest is the Ogura system of ... This thesis describes the development of the materials necessary for the introgression into the Brassica A genome of a defined ... Comparative mapping between the Raphanus genome map and previously generated Brassica A genome RFLP maps demonstrated large ...
more infohttps://ecommons.usask.ca/handle/10388/etd-10212004-002524

Brassica junceaBrassica juncea

Brassica oleracea var. acephala. ( kale, collards, flowering cabbage, cole ). Brassica oleracea var. botrytis. ( broccoli, ... Brassica oleracea var. capitata. ( cabbage, heading cabbage, Savoy cabbage ). Brassica oleracea var. gongylodes. ( kohlrabi, ... Brassica juncea. ( mustard greens, leaf mustard, Indian mustard, brown mustard ). Brassica napus. ( rutabaga, Swedish turnip, ... 613 Brassica juncea. Common Names: mustard greens, leaf mustard, Indian mustard, brown mustard Family: Brassicaceae (cabbage ...
more infohttps://floridata.com/Plants/Brassicaceae/Brassica%20juncea/613

Brassica junceaBrassica juncea

Genus: Brassica. View Description. Dichotomous Key. Common Name: MUSTARD. Habit: Annual to perennial herb; hairs simple or 0. ... Brassica juncea (L.) Czern.. NATURALIZED. Habit: Annual, glabrous, +- glaucous. Stem: 2--10 dm, branched distally. Leaf: basal ... Geographic subdivisions for Brassica juncea: GV MAP CONTROLS 1. You can change the display of the base map and layers by ... Etymology: (Latin: cabbage) Note: Brassica including most important vegetable, seed-oil, condiment crops in Brassicaceae. ...
more infohttp://ucjeps.berkeley.edu/eflora/eflora_display.php?tid=16072

Category:Brassica ruvo - Wikimedia CommonsCategory:Brassica ruvo - Wikimedia Commons

Media in category "Brassica ruvo". The following 12 files are in this category, out of 12 total. ... Brassica • Species: Brassica ruvo L.H.Bailey (1940) ... GRIN link : Brassica ruvo L.H.Bailey . Brassica rapa ... ITIS link: Brassica ruvo L.H.Bailey (mirror). * ... Category:Brassica ruvo. From Wikimedia Commons, the free media ... Retrieved from "https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?title=Category:Brassica_ruvo&oldid=105067058" ...
more infohttps://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Category:Brassica_ruvo

Brassica macrocarpa - WikispeciesBrassica macrocarpa - Wikispecies

Retrieved from "https://species.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?title=Brassica_macrocarpa&oldid=3395457" ...
more infohttps://species.wikimedia.org/wiki/Brassica_macrocarpa

Category:Brassica oleracea var. gongylodes - Wikimedia CommonsCategory:Brassica oleracea var. gongylodes - Wikimedia Commons

Brassica • Species: Brassica oleracea • Varietas: Brassica oleracea var. gongylodes ... Media in category "Brassica oleracea var. gongylodes". The following 76 files are in this category, out of 76 total. ... Category:Brassica oleracea var. gongylodes. From Wikimedia Commons, the free media repository ... Starr-101030-9380-Brassica oleracea var gongylodes-Early White Vienna habit in vegetable garden-Olinda-Maui (24962861421).jpg ...
more infohttps://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Category:Brassica_oleracea_var._gongylodes

Brassica spp.Brassica spp.

... Common name(s) Mustard.. Toxin(s) Mustard oils including isothiocyanate and betaphenyl isothiocyanate.. Toxic ...
more infohttp://maxshouse.com/ToxPlantDesc/brassica_spp.htm

Brassica rapa - Frostburg State UniversityBrassica rapa - Frostburg State University

Youre seeing this message because youre using an older version of Internet Explorer that is unsupported on our website. Please use these links to upgrade to a modern web browser that fully supports our website and protects your computer from security risks. ...
more infohttps://www.frostburg.edu/ethnobotany/herbarium-collection/genus-homepage/brassica-rapa/

calcium-binding protein [Brassica rapa] - Protein - NCBIcalcium-binding protein [Brassica rapa] - Protein - NCBI

calcium-binding protein [Brassica rapa] calcium-binding protein [Brassica rapa]. gi,1255540,dbj,BAA09634.1, ...
more infohttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/protein/BAA09634.1

BrassicasBrassicas

Platekompaniet - For å gi deg en bedre opplevelse av nettbutikken bruker Platekompaniet cookies. I innstillingene til din nettleser kan du selv velge å slette informasjonskapsler ...
more infohttps://www.platekompaniet.no/bok/brassicas-cooking-the-worlds-healthiest-vegetables-kale-cauliflower-broccoli-brussels-sprouts-laura-byrne-russell/

Brassica juncea mitochondrion, complete genome - Nucleotide - NCBIBrassica juncea mitochondrion, complete genome - Nucleotide - NCBI

Brassica juncea mitochondrion, complete genome Brassica juncea mitochondrion, complete genome. gi,353531331,ref,NC_016123.1,, ...
more infohttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/nuccore/353531331

Paint Colours |  Brassica  | Farrow & BallPaint Colours | Brassica | Farrow & Ball

Brassicas rich lavender tones feel both feminine and charming in light areas, but become much more sophisticated and grey in ... Brassicas rich lavender tones feel both feminine and charming in light areas, but become much more sophisticated and grey in ...
more infohttp://www.farrow-ball.com/brassica/colours/farrow-ball/fcp-product/100271

Paint Colours |  Brassica  | Farrow & BallPaint Colours | Brassica | Farrow & Ball

Brassicas rich lavender tones feel both feminine and charming in light areas, but become much more sophisticated and grey in ... Brassicas rich lavender tones feel both feminine and charming in light areas, but become much more sophisticated and grey in ...
more infohttp://www.farrow-ball.com/brassica/paint-colours/farrow-ball/fcp-product/100271

Brassica oleracea var. italica - WikispeciesBrassica oleracea var. italica - Wikispecies

Brassica oleracea var. italica L. Vernacular names[edit]. Boarisch: Brókkóli, Broccoli. Deutsch: Broccoli, Grüner Blumenkohl. ... Genus: Brassica Species: Brassica oleracea Variety: B. o. var. italica Name[edit]. ... For more multimedia, look at Brassica oleracea var. italica on Wikimedia Commons. ... Retrieved from "https://species.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?title=Brassica_oleracea_var._italica&oldid=3581780" ...
more infohttps://species.wikimedia.org/wiki/Brassica_oleracea_var._italica

What common name for Brassica rapa?What common name for Brassica rapa?

... Dr S T May lsrei at csv.warwick.ac.uk Tue Jul 12 08:56:12 EST 1994 *Previous message: ...
more infohttp://www.bio.net/bionet/mm/plantbio/1994-July/003594.html

Plants Profile for Brassica rapa (field mustard)Plants Profile for Brassica rapa (field mustard)

click on a thumbnail to view an image, or see all the Brassica thumbnails at the Plants Gallery ... The Plants Database includes the following 5 subspecies of Brassica rapa . Click below on a thumbnail map or name for ...
more infohttps://plants.usda.gov/core/profile?symbol=BRRA

Endochitinase CH25 precursor - Brassica napus (Rape)Endochitinase CH25 precursor - Brassica napus (Rape)

Brassica napus (Rape). Brassica oleracea var. oleracea. Noccaea caerulescens (Alpine penny-cress) (Thlaspi caerulescens). ... Brassica napus (Rape). Brassica oleracea var. oleracea. Noccaea caerulescens (Alpine penny-cress) (Thlaspi caerulescens). ... Brassica rapa subsp. pekinensis (Chinese cabbage) (Brassica pekinensis). Raphanus sativus (Radish). Eutrema salsugineum ( ... Brassica rapa subsp. pekinensis (Chinese cabbage) (Brassica pekinensis). Raphanus sativus (Radish). Eutrema salsugineum ( ...
more infohttp://www.uniprot.org/uniprot/Q09023

LEAFY BRASSICA - GRASSHOPPER | GreenbookLEAFY BRASSICA - GRASSHOPPER | Greenbook

LEAFY BRASSICA. RESTRICTIONS: Do not exceed 16 fl oz per acre. Do not use on turnip cultivars or varieties which produce a ...
more infohttps://www.greenbook.net/node/36536

Phytoalexins from Brassica (Cruci... preview & related info | MendeleyPhytoalexins from Brassica (Cruci... preview & related info | Mendeley

Phytoalexins from Brassica (Cruciferae) as oviposition stimulants for the cabbage root fly, Delia radicum. *Baur R ... Brassica oleracea) extract. Thus the three active phytoalexins can explain only part of the activity of host-pant extracts but ...
more infohttps://www.mendeley.com/research-papers/phytoalexins-brassica-cruciferae-oviposition-stimulants-cabbage-root-fly-delia-radicum/

Brassica juncea Brown Mustard PFAF Plant DatabaseBrassica juncea Brown Mustard PFAF Plant Database

Brassica juncea is a ANNUAL growing to 0.8 m (2ft 7in) by 0.3 m (1ft). It is hardy to zone (UK) 7 and is not frost tender. It ... Brassica juncea integrifolia strumata. Large Petiole Mustard. 4. 2. Brassica juncea integrifolia subintegrifolia. Leaf Mustard ... Brassica juncea is a ANNUAL growing to 0.8 m (2ft 7in) by 0.3 m (1ft). It is hardy to zone (UK) 7 and is not frost tender. It ... Noxious Weed Information: Michigan, US (Brassica mustard) Noxious weed.. Conservation Status. IUCN Red List of Threatened ...
more infohttps://pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Brassica+juncea

Brassica juncea Brown Mustard PFAF Plant DatabaseBrassica juncea Brown Mustard PFAF Plant Database

Brassica juncea is a ANNUAL growing to 0.8 m (2ft 7in) by 0.3 m (1ft). It is hardy to zone (UK) 7 and is not frost tender. It ... Brassica juncea integrifolia strumata. Large Petiole Mustard. 4. 2. Brassica juncea integrifolia subintegrifolia. Leaf Mustard ... Brassica juncea is a ANNUAL growing to 0.8 m (2ft 7in) by 0.3 m (1ft). It is hardy to zone (UK) 7 and is not frost tender. It ... Chinese hot mustard in this case is Brassica Juncea. November 9, 2009 Potato farmers fight pests with hot mustard The Spokesman ...
more infohttp://www.pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Brassica+juncea

Peroxidase - Brassica rapa subsp. pekinensis (Chinese cabbage)Peroxidase - Brassica rapa subsp. pekinensis (Chinese cabbage)

Brassica rapa subsp. pekinensis (Chinese cabbage) (Brassica pekinensis)Imported. ,p>Information which has been imported from ... Brassica napus (Rape). Eutrema salsugineum (Saltwater cress) (Sisymbrium salsugineum). Arabidopsis lyrata subsp. lyrata (Lyre- ... Brassica napus (Rape). Eutrema salsugineum (Saltwater cress) (Sisymbrium salsugineum). Arabidopsis lyrata subsp. lyrata (Lyre- ... tr,M4CDI9,M4CDI9_BRARP Peroxidase OS=Brassica rapa subsp. pekinensis OX=51351 PE=3 SV=1 ...
more infohttp://www.uniprot.org/uniprot/M4CDI9

Brassica rapa - Simple English Wikipedia, the free encyclopediaBrassica rapa - Simple English Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Brassica rapa L. (syn. Brassica campestris L.), commonly known as turnip, turnip rape, fast plants, field mustard, or turnip ... but mostly the related species Brassica napus and Brassica juncea. ... The oilseeds known as canola are sometimes particular varieties of Brassica rapa (termed Polish Canola) ... Retrieved from "https://simple.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Brassica_rapa&oldid=4505852" ...
more infohttps://simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brassica_rapa
  • Crop rotations away from brassica crops, of at least 4 years will be necessary to reduce the population of spores in a field. (gov.mb.ca)
  • Brassica weeds should be managed to eliminate a potential reservoir of the pathogen that could contribute to future outbreaks. (gov.mb.ca)
  • Brassica vegetables are highly regarded for their nutritional value. (wikipedia.org)
  • Brassica vegetables are rich in indole-3-carbinol, a chemical which boosts DNA repair in cells in vitro and appears to block the growth of cancer cells in vitro. (wikipedia.org)
  • Researchers at the University of California at Berkeley have recently discovered that 3,3'-diindolylmethane in Brassica vegetables is a potent modulator of the innate immune response system with potent antiviral, antibacterial and anticancer activity. (wikipedia.org)
  • Here, we review the significance of phenolic compounds as a source of beneficial compounds for human health and the influence of environmental conditions and processing mechanisms on the phenolic composition of Brassica vegetables. (mdpi.com)
  • Velasco, P. Phenolic Compounds in Brassica Vegetables. (mdpi.com)
  • Cartea ME, Francisco M, Soengas P, Velasco P. Phenolic Compounds in Brassica Vegetables. (mdpi.com)