Branchioma: A tumor derived from branchial epithelium or branchial rests. (Dorland, 27th ed)Forkhead Transcription Factors: A subclass of winged helix DNA-binding proteins that share homology with their founding member fork head protein, Drosophila.Disclosure: Revealing of information, by oral or written communication.Truth Disclosure: Truthful revelation of information, specifically when the information disclosed is likely to be psychologically painful ("bad news") to the recipient (e.g., revelation to a patient or a patient's family of the patient's DIAGNOSIS or PROGNOSIS) or embarrassing to the teller (e.g., revelation of medical errors).Interleukin-2 Receptor alpha Subunit: A low affinity interleukin-2 receptor subunit that combines with the INTERLEUKIN-2 RECEPTOR BETA SUBUNIT and the INTERLEUKIN RECEPTOR COMMON GAMMA-CHAIN to form a high affinity receptor for INTERLEUKIN-2.CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes: A critical subpopulation of T-lymphocytes involved in the induction of most immunological functions. The HIV virus has selective tropism for the T4 cell which expresses the CD4 phenotypic marker, a receptor for HIV. In fact, the key element in the profound immunosuppression seen in HIV infection is the depletion of this subset of T-lymphocytes.T-Lymphocyte Subsets: A classification of T-lymphocytes, especially into helper/inducer, suppressor/effector, and cytotoxic subsets, based on structurally or functionally different populations of cells.Methylation: Addition of methyl groups. In histo-chemistry methylation is used to esterify carboxyl groups and remove sulfate groups by treating tissue sections with hot methanol in the presence of hydrochloric acid. (From Stedman, 25th ed)DNA Methylation: Addition of methyl groups to DNA. DNA methyltransferases (DNA methylases) perform this reaction using S-ADENOSYLMETHIONINE as the methyl group donor.Immune Tolerance: The specific failure of a normally responsive individual to make an immune response to a known antigen. It results from previous contact with the antigen by an immunologically immature individual (fetus or neonate) or by an adult exposed to extreme high-dose or low-dose antigen, or by exposure to radiation, antimetabolites, antilymphocytic serum, etc.Parotid Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the PAROTID GLAND.Search Engine: Software used to locate data or information stored in machine-readable form locally or at a distance such as an INTERNET site.Hyalin: A clear, homogenous, structureless, eosinophilic substance occurring in pathological degeneration of tissues.Adenoma: A benign epithelial tumor with a glandular organization.Sweat Gland NeoplasmsAdenoma, Liver Cell: A benign epithelial tumor of the LIVER.Epithelial Cells: Cells that line the inner and outer surfaces of the body by forming cellular layers (EPITHELIUM) or masses. Epithelial cells lining the SKIN; the MOUTH; the NOSE; and the ANAL CANAL derive from ectoderm; those lining the RESPIRATORY SYSTEM and the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM derive from endoderm; others (CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM and LYMPHATIC SYSTEM) derive from mesoderm. Epithelial cells can be classified mainly by cell shape and function into squamous, glandular and transitional epithelial cells.Stromal Cells: Connective tissue cells of an organ found in the loose connective tissue. These are most often associated with the uterine mucosa and the ovary as well as the hematopoietic system and elsewhere.Carcinoma, Basal Cell: A malignant skin neoplasm that seldom metastasizes but has potentialities for local invasion and destruction. Clinically it is divided into types: nodular, cicatricial, morphaic, and erythematoid (pagetoid). They develop on hair-bearing skin, most commonly on sun-exposed areas. Approximately 85% are found on the head and neck area and the remaining 15% on the trunk and limbs. (From DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p1471)Adenoma, Basophil: A small tumor of the anterior lobe of the pituitary gland whose cells stain with basic dyes. It may give rise to excessive secretion of ACTH, resulting in CUSHING SYNDROME. (Dorland, 27th ed)Bibliometrics: The use of statistical methods in the analysis of a body of literature to reveal the historical development of subject fields and patterns of authorship, publication, and use. Formerly called statistical bibliography. (from The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Gills: Paired respiratory organs of fishes and some amphibians that are analogous to lungs. They are richly supplied with blood vessels by which oxygen and carbon dioxide are exchanged directly with the environment.Qi: The vital life force in the body, supposedly able to be regulated by acupuncture. It corresponds roughly to the Greek pneuma, the Latin spiritus, and the ancient Indian prana. The concept of life-breath or vital energy was formulated as an indication of the awareness of man, originally directed externally toward nature or society but later turned inward to the self or life within. (From Comparison between Concepts of Life-Breath in East and West, 15th International Symposium on the Comparative History of Medicine - East and West, August 26-September 3, 1990, Shizuoka, Japan, pp. ix-x)Publications: Copies of a work or document distributed to the public by sale, rental, lease, or lending. (From ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983, p181)Radiology: A specialty concerned with the use of x-ray and other forms of radiant energy in the diagnosis and treatment of disease.Research: Critical and exhaustive investigation or experimentation, having for its aim the discovery of new facts and their correct interpretation, the revision of accepted conclusions, theories, or laws in the light of newly discovered facts, or the practical application of such new or revised conclusions, theories, or laws. (Webster, 3d ed)Heart-Assist Devices: Small pumps, often implantable, designed for temporarily assisting the heart, usually the LEFT VENTRICLE, to pump blood. They consist of a pumping chamber and a power source, which may be partially or totally external to the body and activated by electromagnetic motors.Biomedical Research: Research that involves the application of the natural sciences, especially biology and physiology, to medicine.Academies and Institutes: Organizations representing specialized fields which are accepted as authoritative; may be non-governmental, university or an independent research organization, e.g., National Academy of Sciences, Brookings Institution, etc.Publishing: "The business or profession of the commercial production and issuance of literature" (Webster's 3d). It includes the publisher, publication processes, editing and editors. Production may be by conventional printing methods or by electronic publishing.RNA, Double-Stranded: RNA consisting of two strands as opposed to the more prevalent single-stranded RNA. Most of the double-stranded segments are formed from transcription of DNA by intramolecular base-pairing of inverted complementary sequences separated by a single-stranded loop. Some double-stranded segments of RNA are normal in all organisms.Patents as Topic: Exclusive legal rights or privileges applied to inventions, plants, etc.Nucleic Acid Conformation: The spatial arrangement of the atoms of a nucleic acid or polynucleotide that results in its characteristic 3-dimensional shape.RNA: A polynucleotide consisting essentially of chains with a repeating backbone of phosphate and ribose units to which nitrogenous bases are attached. RNA is unique among biological macromolecules in that it can encode genetic information, serve as an abundant structural component of cells, and also possesses catalytic activity. (Rieger et al., Glossary of Genetics: Classical and Molecular, 5th ed)Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.RNA, Viral: Ribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of viruses.RNA, Small Interfering: Small double-stranded, non-protein coding RNAs (21-31 nucleotides) involved in GENE SILENCING functions, especially RNA INTERFERENCE (RNAi). Endogenously, siRNAs are generated from dsRNAs (RNA, DOUBLE-STRANDED) by the same ribonuclease, Dicer, that generates miRNAs (MICRORNAS). The perfect match of the siRNAs' antisense strand to their target RNAs mediates RNAi by siRNA-guided RNA cleavage. siRNAs fall into different classes including trans-acting siRNA (tasiRNA), repeat-associated RNA (rasiRNA), small-scan RNA (scnRNA), and Piwi protein-interacting RNA (piRNA) and have different specific gene silencing functions.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.RNA Interference: A gene silencing phenomenon whereby specific dsRNAs (RNA, DOUBLE-STRANDED) trigger the degradation of homologous mRNA (RNA, MESSENGER). The specific dsRNAs are processed into SMALL INTERFERING RNA (siRNA) which serves as a guide for cleavage of the homologous mRNA in the RNA-INDUCED SILENCING COMPLEX. DNA METHYLATION may also be triggered during this process.RNA Editing: A process that changes the nucleotide sequence of mRNA from that of the DNA template encoding it. Some major classes of RNA editing are as follows: 1, the conversion of cytosine to uracil in mRNA; 2, the addition of variable number of guanines at pre-determined sites; and 3, the addition and deletion of uracils, templated by guide-RNAs (RNA, GUIDE).Inventions: A novel composition, device, or process, independently conceived de novo or derived from a pre-existing model.Drug Carriers: Forms to which substances are incorporated to improve the delivery and the effectiveness of drugs. Drug carriers are used in drug-delivery systems such as the controlled-release technology to prolong in vivo drug actions, decrease drug metabolism, and reduce drug toxicity. Carriers are also used in designs to increase the effectiveness of drug delivery to the target sites of pharmacological actions. Liposomes, albumin microspheres, soluble synthetic polymers, DNA complexes, protein-drug conjugates, and carrier erythrocytes among others have been employed as biodegradable drug carriers.Nanoparticles: Nanometer-sized particles that are nanoscale in three dimensions. They include nanocrystaline materials; NANOCAPSULES; METAL NANOPARTICLES; DENDRIMERS, and QUANTUM DOTS. The uses of nanoparticles include DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEMS and cancer targeting and imaging.MicroRNAs: Small double-stranded, non-protein coding RNAs, 21-25 nucleotides in length generated from single-stranded microRNA gene transcripts by the same RIBONUCLEASE III, Dicer, that produces small interfering RNAs (RNA, SMALL INTERFERING). They become part of the RNA-INDUCED SILENCING COMPLEX and repress the translation (TRANSLATION, GENETIC) of target RNA by binding to homologous 3'UTR region as an imperfect match. The small temporal RNAs (stRNAs), let-7 and lin-4, from C. elegans, are the first 2 miRNAs discovered, and are from a class of miRNAs involved in developmental timing.Biotechnology: Body of knowledge related to the use of organisms, cells or cell-derived constituents for the purpose of developing products which are technically, scientifically and clinically useful. Alteration of biologic function at the molecular level (i.e., GENETIC ENGINEERING) is a central focus; laboratory methods used include TRANSFECTION and CLONING technologies, sequence and structure analysis algorithms, computer databases, and gene and protein structure function analysis and prediction.Hominidae: Family of the suborder HAPLORHINI (Anthropoidea) comprising bipedal primate MAMMALS. It includes modern man (HOMO SAPIENS) and the great apes: gorillas (GORILLA GORILLA), chimpanzees (PAN PANISCUS and PAN TROGLODYTES), and orangutans (PONGO PYGMAEUS).Paleodontology: The study of the teeth of early forms of life through fossil remains.Nanocapsules: Nanometer-sized, hollow, spherically-shaped objects that can be utilized to encapsulate small amounts of pharmaceuticals, enzymes, or other catalysts (Glossary of Biotechnology and Nanobiotechnology, 4th ed).Anthropology: The science devoted to the comparative study of man.Dermoid Cyst: A tumor consisting of displaced ectodermal structures along the lines of embryonic fusion, the wall being formed of epithelium-lined connective tissue, including skin appendages, and containing keratin, sebum, and hair. (Stedman, 25th ed)BostonAwards and PrizesMassachusettsTranslational Medical Research: The application of discoveries generated by laboratory research and preclinical studies to the development of clinical trials and studies in humans. A second area of translational research concerns enhancing the adoption of best practices.Hospitals, General: Large hospitals with a resident medical staff which provides continuous care to maternity, surgical and medical patients.National Institutes of Health (U.S.): An operating division of the US Department of Health and Human Services. It is concerned with the overall planning, promoting, and administering of programs pertaining to health and medical research. Until 1995, it was an agency of the United States PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE.Farber Lipogranulomatosis: A sphingolipidosis subtype that is characterized by the histological appearance of granulomatous deposits in tissues. It results from the accumulation of CERAMIDES in various tissues due to an inherited deficiency of ACID CERAMIDASE.Ovarian Cysts: General term for CYSTS and cystic diseases of the OVARY.

Cystic lymph node metastases of squamous cell carcinoma of Waldeyer's ring origin. (1/35)

We analysed in a retrospective study the frequency of cystic lymph node (LN) metastases in neck dissection specimens of 123 patients with primary squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) arising in the palatine tonsils (62 M/14 F), the base of the tongue (38 M/5 F) and the nasopharynx (2 M/2 F). Eighty-two per cent of patients had metastases (64 tonsillar SCC, 33 base of tongue SCC and all four nasopharynx SCC) in 368 LN of a total 2298 sampled LN. Thirty-nine per cent of patients had exclusively solid metastases and 37% of patients had exclusively cystic metastases. A total of 62 patients had some signs of cyst formation in one or more metastatically affected LN (27 with only histological evidence of cyst formation with luminal diameters < 5 mm, 35 with clinically detectable cyst with luminal diameter > 5 mm). Cystic metastases were more common in patients with SCC of the base of the tongue (P = 0.005), while solitary clinically evident cystic metastasis with lumina > 5 mm were found exclusively in tonsillar carcinoma (P = 0.024). In comparison with solid metastases, cyst formation was associated with N-categories (N2b and N3, P = 0.005) in SCC of the base of the tongue origin. No such association was observed for tonsillar SCC (P = 0.65). The primary mechanism of cyst formation was cystic degeneration.  (+info)

Solitary nodal metastases presenting as branchial cysts: a diagnostic pitfall. (2/35)

Two patients with metastatic squamous cell carcinoma are presented. Both were initially clinically diagnosed as branchial cysts. The importance of a full examination of the upper aerodigestive tract, and fine needle aspiration cytology is emphasised to avoid the possibility of excision as a branchial cyst, which could lead to tumour dissemination.  (+info)

Second branchial cleft cysts: variability of sonographic appearances in adult cases. (3/35)

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Previous reports have suggested that second branchial cleft cysts (BCCs) appear on sonograms as well-defined, cystic masses with thin walls and posterior enhancement. Previous CT and MR imaging findings, however, have indicated heterogeneity of these masses, and, in our experience, sonography also shows a similar variable appearance. In this communication, we report the cases of 17 patients with second BCCs and document the variability of sonographic patterns. METHODS: The sonograms of 17 adults with second BCCs were reviewed. Only patients with surgical or cytologic evidence of BCCs were included in this study. The features evaluated were the location, internal echogenicity, posterior enhancement, and presence of septa and fistulous tract. RESULTS: Four patterns of second BCCs were identified: anechoic (41%), homogeneously hypoechoic with internal debris (23.5%), pseudosolid (12%), and heterogeneous (23.5%). The majority (70%) showed posterior enhancement. All were situated in their classical location, posterior to the submandibular gland, superficial to the carotid artery and internal jugular vein, and closely related to the medial and anterior margin of the sternomastoid muscle. Fourteen (82%) of the 17 BCCs had imperceptible walls, and all were well defined. For none of the patients was a fistulous tract revealed by sonography; the presence of internal septations was revealed for three patients. CONCLUSION: As previously suggested by CT and MR imaging findings, sonography reinforces that second BCCs in adults are not simple cysts but have a complex sonographic pattern ranging from a typical anechoic to a pseudosolid appearance.  (+info)

Intrathyroidal lymphoepithelial (branchial) cyst: sonographic features of a rare lesion. (4/35)

Intrathyroidal lymphoepithelial cysts are rare, and only 15 such cases have been reported. Although sonography has been performed in some cases, the findings have not been discussed previously. Despite its rarity, the sonographic appearances of this lesion are similar to those of other commonly encountered congenital cystic lesions in the head and neck, such as thyroglossal duct cysts and second branchial cleft cysts, and this may provide a clue to its diagnosis. We describe the sonographic appearances of intrathyroidal lymphoepithelial cysts.  (+info)

Parapharyngeal second branchial cyst manifesting as cranial nerve palsies: MR findings. (5/35)

SUMMARY: We report the MR findings of parapharyngeal branchial cleft cyst manifesting as multiple, lower cranial nerve palsies in a 35-year-old woman. On MR images, a well-marginated cystic mass was detected in the right parapharyngeal space, with displacement of both the right internal carotid artery and the right internal jugular vein on the posterolateral side. The cyst contained a whitish fluid that was slightly hyperintense on T1-weighted images and slightly hypointense to CSF on T2-weighted images. No enhancement on contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images was present. The right side of the tongue showed high signal intensity on T2-weighted images, suggesting denervation.  (+info)

Infected branchial cleft cyst due to Bordetella bronchiseptica in an immunocompetent patient. (6/35)

A healthy 23-year-old man with fever and a tender mass in his right anterior neck was found to have a branchial cleft cyst infected with Bordetella bronchiseptica. Initial testing suggested a Brucella species, but further laboratory testing identified the organism definitively. B. bronchiseptica infection in healthy adults is an unusual event.  (+info)

A case of second branchial cleft cyst with oropharyngeal presentation. (7/35)

Second branchial cleft cysts are the most common type of branchial abnormalities and usually found high in the neck. Oropharyngeal presence of branchial cleft cyst is very rare. We report a case of oropharyngeal branchial cleft cyst in 2-yr-old girl with about 1 x 1 cm sized cystic mass, which had not any specific symptom. It was removed completely under impression of mucocele and did not have tract-like structure. However, cyst had a squamous epithelium-lined wall with lymphoid aggregation in histopathologic study, which was characteristic finding of branchial cleft cyst. Patient discharged without any complication and there was no evidence of recurrence for 18 months follow-up. We review reported oropharyngeal or nasopharyngeal presentation of these cases in English literature and embryological explanation.  (+info)

Pathological analysis of congenital cervical cysts in children: 20 years of experience at Chang Gung Memorial Hospital. (8/35)

BACKGROUND: Congenital cervical cysts are frequently encountered in pediatric populations, and constitute one of the most intriguing areas of pediatric pathology. This report analyzes cervical cysts in Taiwanese children diagnosed at Chang Gung Memorial Hospital (CGMH) over the past 20 years. The pathologic and clinical findings are reviewed. METHODS: Files on 331 patients under the age of 18 years, with a diagnosis of congenital cervical cyst at CGMH from January 1, 1983 to June 30, 2002, were retrieved from the Department of Pathology. There were 204 boys and 127 girls. We reviewed the histology of all cases and correlated it with clinical information in the medical records. RESULTS: Thyroglossal duct cysts, the most common congenital neck cyst, accounted for 54.68% of all cases, followed by cystic hygromas (25.08%), branchial cleft cysts (16.31%), bronchogenic cysts (0.91%), and thymic cysts (0.30%). Nine cases (2.72%) remained unclassified. CONCLUSIONS: This is the largest series regarding pediatric cervical cysts in the literature to date. Thyroglossal duct cysts were the most common congenital cervical cyst encountered. Our experience indicates that each type of cyst has its unique location in the neck and is highly associated with its embryonic origin. Complete and precise clinical information is a prerequisite in order for pathologists to make accurate diagnoses of congenital cervical cysts.  (+info)

*Branchial cleft cyst

A branchial cleft cyst is a cyst in the skin of the lateral part of the neck. It can but does not necessarily have an opening to the skin surface called a fistula. The cause is usually a developmental abnormality arising in the early prenatal period, typically failure of obliteration of the second branchial cleft, i.e. failure of fusion of the second and third branchial arches. Less commonly, the cysts can develop from the first, third, or fourth clefts, and their location and the location of associated fistulas differs accordingly. Most branchial cleft cysts present as a smooth, slowly enlarging lateral neck mass that may increase in size after an upper respiratory tract infection. The fistulas, when present, are asymptomatic, but may become infected. Branchial cleft cysts are remnants of embryonic development and result from a failure of obliteration of one of the branchial clefts, which are homologous to the structures in fish that develop into gills. The cyst wall is composed of either ...

*Pharyngeal groove

A pharyngeal groove (or branchial groove, or pharyngeal cleft) is made up of ectoderm unlike its counterpart the pharyngeal pouch on the endodermal side. The first pharyngeal groove produces the external auditory meatus (ear canal). The rest (2, 3, and 4) are overlapped by the growing 2nd pharyngeal arch, and form the floor of the depression termed the cervical sinus, which opens ventrally, and is finally obliterated. Branchial cleft cyst "musom.marshall.edu". Retrieved 2009-05-28. http://isc.temple.edu/marino/embryology/parch98/ARCHI97/Img016. ...

*Rathke's cleft cyst

A Rathke's cleft cyst is a benign growth found on the pituitary gland in the brain, specifically a fluid-filled cyst in the posterior portion of the anterior pituitary gland. It occurs when the Rathke's pouch does not develop properly and ranges in size from 2 to 40mm in diameter. Asymptomatic cysts are commonly detected during autopsies in 2 to 26 percent of individuals who have died of unrelated causes. Females are twice as likely as males to develop a cyst. If a cyst adds pressure to the optic chiasm, it may cause visual disturbances, pituitary dysfunction, and headaches. The majority of pituitary patients with chronic headaches have Rathke's Cleft Cysts. This is believed to be caused by the constant change in volume and the drastic changes in vasopressure from fluctuations in gonadotrophs and ADH. The treatment of choice for symptomatic cysts is drainage and taking a biopsy. Radical excision is more dangerous because of the potential of damaging the patient's pituitary function e.g. ADH ...

*FOXO4

Forkhead box protein O4 is a protein that in humans is encoded by the FOXO4 gene. It is located on the long arm of the X chromosome from base pair 71,096,148 to 71,103,533. FOXO4 is a member of the forkhead family transcription factors O subclass, which is characterized by a winged helix domain used for DNA binding. There are 4 members of the FOXO family, including FOXO1, FOXO3, and FOXO6. Their activity is modified by many post translational activities, such as phosphorylation, ubiquitination, and acetylation. Depending on this modified state, FOXO4 binding affinity for DNA is altered, allowing for FOXO4 to regulate many cellular pathways including oxidative stress signaling, longevity, insulin signaling, cell cycle progression, and apoptosis. Two of the main upstream regulators of FOXO4 activity are phosphoinositide 3- kinase (PI3K) and serine/threonine kinase AKT/PKB. Both PI3K and AKT modify FOXO4 and prevent it from translocating to the nucleus, effectively preventing the transcription of ...

*FOXC2

Forkhead box protein C2 (FOXC2) also known as forkhead-related protein FKHL14 (FKHL14), transcription factor FKH-14, or mesenchyme fork head protein 1 (MFH1) is a protein that in humans is encoded by the FOXC2 gene. FOXC2 is a member of the fork head box (FOX) family of transcription factors. The protein is 501 amino acids in length. The gene has no introns; the single exon is approximately 1.5kb in size. FOX transcription factors are expressed during development and are associated with a number of cellular and developmental differentiation processes. FOXC2 is required during early development of the kidneys, including differentiation of podocytes and maturation of the glomerular basement membrane. It is also involved in the early development of the heart. An increased expression of FOXC2 in adipocytes can increase the amount of brown adipose tissue leading to lower weight and an increased sensitivity to insulin. Absence of FOXC2 has been shown to lead to the failure of lymphatic valves to form ...

*FOXO3

Forkhead box O3, also known as FOXO3 or FOXO3a, is a human protein encoded by the FOXO3 gene. FOXO3 belongs to the O subclass of the forkhead family of transcription factors which are characterized by a distinct fork head DNA-binding domain. There are three other FoxO family members in humans, FOXO1, FOXO4 and FOXO6. These transcription factors share the ability to be inhibited and translocated out of the nucleus on phosphorylation by proteins such as Akt/PKB in the PI3K signaling pathway (aside from FOXO6, which may be constitutively nuclear). Other post-translational modifications including acetylation and methylation are seen and can result in increased or altered FOXO3a activity. This protein likely functions as a trigger for apoptosis through upregulation of genes necessary for cell death, such as Bim and PUMA, or downregulation of anti-apoptotic proteins such as FLIP. Gopinath et al.(2014) demonstrate a functional requirement for FOXO3 as a regulator of Notch signaling pathway (an ...

*FOXK2

Forkhead box protein K2 is a protein that in humans is encoded by the FOXK2 gene. The protein encoded by this gene contains a fork head DNA binding domain. This protein can bind to the purine-rich motifs of the HIV long terminal repeat (LTR), and to the similar purine-rich motif in the interleukin 2 (IL2) promoter. It may be involved in the regulation of viral and cellular promoter elements. GRCh38: Ensembl release 89: ENSG00000141568 - Ensembl, May 2017 GRCm38: Ensembl release 89: ENSMUSG00000039275 - Ensembl, May 2017 "Human PubMed Reference:". "Mouse PubMed Reference:". Durand DB, Shaw JP, Bush MR, Replogle RE, Belagaje R, Crabtree GR (Jul 1988). "Characterization of antigen receptor response elements within the interleukin-2 enhancer". Mol Cell Biol. 8 (4): 1715-24. PMC 363332 . PMID 3260003. "Entrez Gene: FOXK2 forkhead box K2". Li C, Lusis AJ, Sparkes R, et al. (1992). "Characterization and chromosomal mapping of the gene encoding the cellular DNA binding protein ILF". Genomics. 13 (3): ...

*FOXO3

... appartiene alla sottoclasse O della famiglia dei fattori di trascrizione denominati forkhead, tali fattori di trascrizione sono caratterizzati dalla presenza di un dominio molecolare a forma di forcella, il quale consente a tali proteine di contattare il DNA. Come tutti i fattori di trascrizione regola la trascrizione del DNA. Negli esseri umani, sono state identificate tre varianti FOXO: FOXO1, FOXO4 e FOXO6. L'attività di questi fattori di trascrizione viene inibita mediante fosforilazione da parte di altre proteine quali le Akt/PKB attivate nella via di segnalazione PI3K (ad eccezione di FOXO6, che può essere costitutivamente nucleare); Il funzionamento di FOXO3a può essere modulato anche mediante modificazioni post-traduzionali come acetilazione e metilazione [3]. Questa proteina interviene nel processo di apoptosi cellulare, attraverso la sovra-regolazione dei geni necessari per la morte delle cellule, come Bim e PUMA,[4] o nella sotto-regolazione dei geni di anti-apoptotici come ...

*FOXA2

Forkhead box protein A2 is a member of the forkhead class of DNA-binding proteins. These hepatocyte nuclear factors are transcriptional activators for liver-specific genes such as albumin and transthyretin, and they also interact with chromatin. Similar family members in mice have roles in the regulation of metabolism and in the differentiation of the pancreas and liver. This gene has been linked to sporadic cases of maturity onset diabetes of the young. Transcript variants encoding different isoforms have been identified for this gene.[5] ...

*Bacilli

... refers tae a taxonomic class o bacteria. It includes twa orders, Bacillales an Lactobacillales, which contain several well-kent pathogens sucn as Bacillus anthracis (the cause o anthrax). ...

*Treg17 cells

Helper T cells are essential part of body's immune system. These cells are divided in many subsets based upon their ability to produce different cytokines. Following the discovery of interleukin-17 (IL-17) producing T helper (Th17) cells as a distinct lineage of T helper cells it became clear that these cells play an important role in the host defense and participate in the pathogenesis of many inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. The Th17 cells can alter their differentiation program ultimately giving rise to either protective or pro-inflammatory pathogenic cells. The protective and non-pathogenic Th17 cells are termed as Treg17 cells. Like conventional regulatory T cells (Treg), induction of regulatory Treg17 cells could play an important role in modulating and preventing certain autoimmune diseases. Treg17 (Regulatory Th17) cells are generated from CD4+ T cells. Treg17 cells with regulatory phenotype with in vivo immune-suppressive properties in the gut have also been identified as rTh17 ...

*Interleukin 23 subunit alpha

Interleukin-23 subunit alpha is a protein that in humans is encoded by the IL23A gene. IL-23 is produced by dendritic cells and macrophages. Interleukin-23 is a heterodimeric cytokine composed of an IL-12p40 subunit that is shared with IL-12 and the IL-23p19 subunit. A functional receptor for IL-23 (the IL-23 receptor) has been identified and is composed of IL-12R β1 and IL-23R. IL-23 is an important part of the inflammatory response against infection. It promotes upregulation of the matrix metalloprotease MMP9, increases angiogenesis and reduces CD8+ T-cell infiltration into tumours. IL-23 mediates its effects on both innate and adaptive arms of the immune system that express the IL-23 receptor. Th17 cells represent the most prominent T cell subset that responds to IL-23, although IL-23 has been implicated in inhibiting the development of regulatory T cell development in the intestine. Th17 cells produce IL-17, a proinflammatory cytokine that enhances T cell priming and stimulates the ...

*FOXP2 - 维基百科,自由的百科全书

寻找FOXP2的工作始于对"KE"(或称"K")家族的研究。该家族的一些成员患有遗传性的言语障碍,且有三代在世的家族成员受其害。进一步的研究显示,该基因为常染色体显性。通过对患病与无病的家族成员的染色体的扫描,研究人员将该基因定位在第7号染色体上。这个基因最初被称为SPCH1。接下来又通过细菌人工染色体手段对该染色体上的相关区域进行了测序。在基因测序开展期间,他们又找到了另一位患有这种先天性言语障碍,但不属于KE家族的病人。对这个新样本的染色体扫描显示,第7对染色体一处有断裂。 ...
A branchial cleft cyst is a cyst in the skin of the lateral part of the neck. It can but does not necessarily have an opening to the skin surface called a fistula. The cause is usually a developmental abnormality arising in the early prenatal period, typically failure of obliteration of the second branchial cleft, i.e. failure of fusion of the second and third branchial arches. Less commonly, the cysts can develop from the first, third, or fourth clefts, and their location and the location of associated fistulas differs accordingly. Most branchial cleft cysts present as a smooth, slowly enlarging lateral neck mass that may increase in size after an upper respiratory tract infection. The fistulas, when present, are asymptomatic, but may become infected. Branchial cleft cysts are remnants of embryonic development and result from a failure of obliteration of one of the branchial clefts, which are homologous to the structures in fish that develop into gills. The cyst wall is composed of either ...
Branchial cleft cysts are the most common congenital neck mass, they appear in early adulthood, usually as painless slow-growing neck swelling as in this patient. Complications include haemorrhage and secondary infection.
Thyroid Cancer No More Surgery 101: Ethanol Ablation for Of A large Congenital Rest Branchial Cleft Cyst Causing Choking in Patient with Papillary Thyroid Cancer PTC. Not Everything in the Neck is a Recurrence of cancer and needs more radiation or surgery.. Case History: Branchial Cleft Cyst Mascarading as a Recurrent thyroid cancer. 61 Y/O F with PTC 4 years before she saw me for choking sensation in the neck with a large mass that was firm to hard.She had prior 600 MCI RAI/131 and 2 thyroid surgeries for a 1 cm PTC and a neck dissection with 28 lymph nodes positive for cancer but the cyst was not removed!. She presented with the 4.3 cm cyst one year before she came to the USA to see me for non-invasive ethanol ablation.The cyst was only 1 cm when she first presented to with thyroid cancer 4 years prior. Her thyroid function tests including TSH were normal and she had low level TG of 2.1 and TGab of 3.9. She still had thyroid cancer persistence by marker testing. However, my evaluation found ...
Second branchial cleft remnants account for the majority of branchial cleft abnormalities. Embryologically, the second arch overgrows the second, third, and fourth branchial clefts. This process results in expansion of the second branchial cleft into an elongated common cavity, called the cervical sinus of His, which is obliterated shortly after its formation. Various degrees of incomplete closure of the sinus lead to anomalies of the second branchial cleft. Anomalies can occur anywhere along an embryologically defined tract that extends from the external opening, the anterior border of the junction of the middle and lower thirds of the sternocleidomastoid muscle, passes between the internal and external carotid arteries superficial to cranial nerves IX and XII, and enters the oropharyngeal tonsillar fossa (1, 2). The parapharyngeal space is a very rare location for a branchial cleft cyst. This rare location superior to the tonsillar fossa can best be explained by the fact that a second ...
First branchial cleft anomalies are uncommon and comprise 1%-8% of all branchial cleft anomalies.1 They often present in the first two decades of life and present a clinical challenge as they can easily be misdiagnosed and thus inappropriately treated. They are thought to arise as a result of developmental abnormalities of the branchial apparatus and may take the form of a cyst, sinus, or fistula.2. Clinically they may present with repeated episodes of infection of the lesion. This may manifest itself with a cystic swelling or discharge from a fistulous opening either pre-auricularly or post-auricularly, in the cheek, or high in the neck. A thorough otological examination should be performed in all cases and may reveal a pit visible in the external canal at the site of entrance of a sinus or fistula. Such a lesion may result in otorrhoea or otitis externa with infective exacerbations. The meatus may be found to be partially or completely obstructed by bulging of the canal wall because of a ...
Thymic cyst: a fourth branchial cleft anomaly.: We report a unique case of a fourth branchial cleft cyst found within the thymus of an adult patient. In the lit
Trans-oral endoscopic approach to exposure of a type IV branchial cleft anomaly sinus tract in the left piriform recess and closure using cauterization and tisseel application. Contributors:Yi-Chun Carol Liu
TY - JOUR. T1 - Endoscopic cauterization for treatment of fourth branchial cleft sinuses. AU - Jordan, Jennifer A.. AU - Graves, Joe E.. AU - Manning, Scott C.. AU - McClay, John E.. AU - Biavati, Michael J.. PY - 1998/9. Y1 - 1998/9. N2 - Fourth branchial cleft sinuses are rare, and the nature of their origin is controversial. Clinical presentation is varied because they may present as asymptomatic neck masses, recurrent neck abscesses, or suppurative thyroiditis. We describe herein 7 children who presented with abscesses on the left side of their necks, 3 of whom had abscesses that involved the thyroid gland. Direct laryngoscopy revealed that all 7 children had a sinus tract opening into the apex of the piriform sinus. Endoscopic obliteration of this tract was achieved using an insulated electrocautery probe either when the abscess was initially incised and drained or 4 to 6 weeks later. All 7 children recovered uneventfully. Four of the 7 children were followed up for more than 18 months ...
Branchial cyst EBV Neoplasia. LYMPHADENOPATHY. Your new best friend! LOCAL OR GENERALISED? ... BRANCHIAL CYST Embryological remnant hence in young adults ... – A free PowerPoint PPT presentation (displayed as a Flash slide show) on PowerShow.com - id: f7c3a-NzFhY
Hi jtl. Im a bit of an odd case to be honest - I did have a node involved but it was removed in the belief it was a branchial cyst. After they found MEC I have had a recent selective dissection to check if it had spread and all the other nodes were clean. So Im free of node involvement now. My difference is there is no primary to be found; Ive had PET, CT, MRI and nothing. They took a tonsil and section from my BOT with the dissection to try to find it as those are hiding places from PET because of the other activity but nothing, all clear.. Also usually PET finds cancer in the major parotid gland very easily but no sign there either. They have two theories - firstly that the original tumor might have actually been the primary as you can find salivary glands in nodes. Second my immune system may have dealt with the primary. Aside from all the surgery Ive had no treatment and am just having 4 monthly scans now for 12 months.. My onc says with the nodes now sorted, the grade and the primary if ...
A human embryo of the fourth week. I, the chorion; 3, part of the amnion; 4, umbilical vesicle with its long pedicle passing into the abdomen; 7, the heart; 8, the liver; 9, the visceral arch destined to form the lower jaw, beneath which are two other visceral arches separated by the branchial clefts; 10, rudiment of the upper extremity, 11, that of the lower extremity; 12, the umbilical cord; 15, the eye; 16, the ear; 17, cerebral hemispheres; 18, optic lobes, corpora quadrigemina.. ...
The Use of Holy Offerings - The LORD spoke to Moses, saying: Direct Aaron and his sons to deal carefully with the sacred donations of the people of
The diagnosis of a thyroglossal duct cyst is often apparent when it presents with typical findings. We report a case of a 6 year-old girl with a low-lying thyroglossal duct cyst presenting with recurrent lateral cervical discharge without palpable mass, thus mimicking a second branchial cleft fistula. CT scan differentiated the lesion from a second branchial cleft fistula, and a standard Sistrunk procedure cured the lesion. In patients who show lateral cervical discharge without definite mass, therefore mimicking a second branchial cleft fistula, a low-lying thyroglossal duct cyst should be considered.
A monomorphic population of anucleated squamous cells may suggest an epidermal inclusion cyst, trichilemmal cyst or a branchial cleft cyst. Epidermal inclusion cysts most often show well-delineated anucleated squamous cells lying singly and in clumps, as opposed to the irregular and degenerated anucleated squames of pilomatrixoma. A foreign body granulomatous reaction may be present if an epidermal cyst has ruptured. However, basaloid cells are rarely, if ever, identified in these cysts. Trichilemmal cysts usually occur on the scalp and yield groups of mature basaloid cells with more abundant and dense cytoplasm. Branchial cleft cyst typically yields cloudy fluid containing a mixture of inflammatory cells, histiocytes, nucleated and anucleated squamous cells and columnar cells ...
90% Thyroglossal cysts lie in the midline. Commonest site for thyroglossal cyst-Subhyoid.. Atypical thyroglossal cysts are usually found on left side.. Thyroglossal cyst is the commonest congenital neck swelling.. Commonest cause of recurrence is the failure to remove body of hyoid.. Treatment of papillary Ca of thyroglossal cyst-Sistrunks+Post op TSH suppression+Eltroxin. ...
A pharyngeal groove (or branchial groove, or pharyngeal cleft) is made up of ectoderm unlike its counterpart the pharyngeal pouch on the endodermal side. The first pharyngeal groove produces the external auditory meatus (ear canal). The rest (2, 3, and 4) are overlapped by the growing 2nd pharyngeal arch, and form the floor of the depression termed the cervical sinus, which opens ventrally, and is finally obliterated. Branchial cleft cyst "musom.marshall.edu". Retrieved 2009-05-28. http://isc.temple.edu/marino/embryology/parch98/ARCHI97/Img016. ...
The differential diagnosis of the imaging appearance of NTM infection includes bacterial adenitis, tuberculous adenitis, cat-scratch disease, fungal infection, tularemia, brucellosis, infected branchial cleft cyst, infected lymphatic malformation, treated lymphoma, and other necrotic neoplasms (3, 8). The treatment of choice for NTM adenitis is excision of the affected lymph nodes. Therefore, it is important to distinguish this condition from bacterial adenitis that is usually treated with incision and drainage. In contrast to NTM, common forms of bacterial adenitis and cat-scratch disease tend to produce painful unilateral or bilateral enhancing lymph nodes, which may appear as low attenuation on CT scans if necrotic (15). Extensive stranding of the adjacent subcutaneous fat is a common associated finding.. Tuberculosis usually produces painless bilateral posterior triangle and internal jugular adenitis. Unlike our patients with NTM, tuberculous adenitis typically is seen in a child who is ...
Rathke cleft cyst: Find the most comprehensive real-world symptom and treatment data on Rathke cleft cyst at PatientsLikeMe. 12 patients with Rathke cleft cyst experience fatigue, depressed mood, pain, anxious mood, and insomnia and use Escitalopram to treat their Rathke cleft cyst and its symptoms.
Often, Rathke cleft cysts do not cause symptoms and are discovered while a person is undergoing a magnetic resonance scan (MRI) being used to diagnose something else, such as after an accident, head trauma, or unexplained vision problems or headaches. Symptoms occur only when the lesion grows and compresses nearby nerves and structures.
The specialists at the Pituitary and Neuroendocrine Program at Weill Cornell Brain and Spine Center are highly skilled in the most advanced procedures for treating Rathke cleft cysts. Our relationship with NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital allows our doctors and surgeons access to the very best facilities and specialists, as well as the most leading-edge research laboratories, to ensure that you get the very best treatment available.
Suprise, suprise, liberals lie yet again. link No matter what they say-Rathkes cleft cyst are considered a kind of a pituitary tumor by many brain surgeons and she was having increasing vision problems---and was told she needed to wait several months to see a neurosurgeon in Canada. I dont care what they say, thats unacceptable and no matter that what the dems are proposing-that it is different than the Canadian system it still will involve rationing and increasing wait times
It is very common for children to have enlarged tonsils and adenoids. These are almost always from an infection or inflammation. It is very rare that children develop a cancer, lymphoma, or sarcoma of these areas. When the tonsils, adenoids, or other areas of the mouth or throat remain enlarged or are enlarged on only one side, it is important to have an evaluation by a specialist in ear, nose and throat or otolaryngology-head and neck surgery.. The lymph nodes of the neck region may become enlarged during childhood. Most of the time, this is reactive in nature and related to inflammation or infection. However, if the lymph nodes remain enlarged for a period of time without going away, it is important to have an otolaryngologist-head and neck surgeon evaluate the problem.. Other benign growths in the face and neck include cysts (fluid collection) such as branchial cleft cyst, thyroglossal duct cyst, cystic hygroma, and dermoid cysts. These often require removal due to their continued growth and ...
Final Diagnosis: Suprasellar cyst, resection: consistent with Rathkes cleft cyst.Gross Description: The specimen is received in a single container labelled with the patients demographics and SUPRASELLAR CYST. It consists of multiple fragments o...
Rathke cleft cysts (RCCs) are non-neoplastic sellar lesions derived from remnants of Rathke s pouch, and mostly asymptomatic. Symptomatic RCCs occur usually in middle-age, are ,1 cm, and cause pituitary hypofunction, diabetes insipidus, hyperprolactinemia or visual impairment. In children, RCCs are rare and usually asymptomatic. However, symptomatic cases may present with growth retardation and diabetes insipidus. We report two children with symptomatic RCC manifesting as growth retardation.. First case: A 14-year-old boy was admitted because of growth retardation (S.D.S. height −2.5) and delayed puberty. Serum levels of SmC (21 ng/ml), cortisol (4.23 μg/dl), fT4 (0.61 ng/dl) and T3 (0.8 ng/ml) were low, TSH (1.84 μIU/ml) was normal and PRL (2556 μIU/ml) elevated. Stimulation tests of growth hormone (GH) secretion showed low GH (GHmax 1.6 ng/ml). Pituitary MRI revealed an intra- and suprasellar mass 1.2×3.8×2.3 cm with solid and cystic elements. Visual fields were normal. After the start ...
This patient presented with hyperprolactinemia. MRI reveals T1/T2 hyperintense lesion in the left posterior aspect of the pituitary with convex superior margin with minimal enhancement on post contrast scans. The pituitary stalk is deviated to right. Fluid level is noted in the axial section. The optic chiasm & cavernous sinus appears normal. No parasellar abnormality. Differentials include first differential of rathkes cleft cyst versus other possibility of cystic adenoma. Rathkes cleft cysts are nonneoplastic, sellar or suprasellar epithelium-lined cysts arising from the embryologic remnants of Rathkes pouch in the pituitary gland. Hyperprolactinemia in Rathke cleft cyst is due infundibular stalk compression. ...
Surgical Spectrum and Scope. Open Surgeries:. Basic General Surgery: Wound suturing and debridement, I&D in superficial and deep abscesses, Excision of Swellings, cysts, lumps, nails, Surgical procedures for foot ulcers, leg ulcers, and diabetic foot lesions, Surgical procedures for necrotizing fasciitis, Cellulitis, synergistic and gas gangrene, fasciotomies. Head and Neck surgery: Oral cavity cysts and swellings excision, Cervical lymph node excision, Superficial/Total Parotidectomy, Submandibular salivary gland surgery, Cervico-thoracic Sympathectomy, Cervical / first rib resection, Anterior scalenotomy, Branchial cyst excision. Endocrine: Thyroglossal cyst / fistula excision, Hemi and Total Thyroidectomy, Parathyroid surgery (adenoma removal, 4 gland excision), Adrenal surgery. Breast: Simple Mastectomy (Gynaecomastia), Radical and Modified Radical Mastectomy, Excision of Fibroadenoma, Operations for Fibroadenosis, Breast Abscess. Vascular:. Venous: Varicose Vein surgery (Trendelenberg ...
Editor-The branchio-oculo-facial syndrome (BOFS) is characterised by a branchial cleft sinus or linear skin lesion behind the ear, lacrimal duct obstruction, colobomata of the iris/retina, hypertrophy of the lateral pillars of the philtrum ("pseudocleft"), an asymmetrical nose with a broad tip, and auricular and lip pits. Premature greying of the hair is also observed.1 Inheritance is autosomal dominant (OMIM 113620).2 Several anomalies common to both BOF and BOR (branchio-oto-renal) syndromes have been reported.3 McCool and Weaver4 reported three cases with BOF and unilateral renal agenesis. This anomaly is not frequent in BOFS but is characteristic for patients with BOR, and hence a contiguous gene syndrome or the presence of different mutations within a single gene have been suggested.4 Recently, the BOR gene was identified by positional cloning on chromosome 8q13.3 and mapped between markers D8S1060 and D8S1807.5 The gene was named "eyes absent-like 1" (EYA1), the human homologue of the ...
Objective: To investigate the usefulness and effectiveness of multi-slice spiral computerized tomographic fistulography (MSCTF) in the diagnosis and treatment of congenital fistula of neck. Methods: Thirty-four patients with thyroglossal fistulasor branchial cleft fistulas who were initial treated from July 2008 to August 2015 in Fujian Provincial Hospital were retrospectively analyses. Thirteen males and 21 females patients aging from 3 to 46 years old with a median age of 37 were included. There were thyroglossal fistula in 6 cases, the first branchialcleft fistula in 9 cases, the second branchialcleft fistula in 3 cases, the third branchialcleft fistula in 9 cases, and the fourth branchialcleft fistula in 7 cases ...
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Dr Gordon Sun presents common causes of neck masses in adult and pediatric patients and discusses appropriate initial imaging studies for each patient population.
Case Presentation A 34-year-old man presented with worsening neck pain and an enlarging neck mass. Physical examination demonstrated a palpable left neck mas...
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List of 43 disease causes of Neck mass in children, patient stories, diagnostic guides. Diagnostic checklist, medical tests, doctor questions, and related signs or symptoms for Neck mass in children.
Learn about neck mass pain treatments at Pediatric ENT Associates. Visit our expert neck doctors in Alabama to schedule an appointment with ENT experts.

Branchioma; Branchial Cyst; Branchial Cleft CystBranchioma; Branchial Cyst; Branchial Cleft Cyst

... On-line free medical diagnosis assistant. Ranked list of possible diseases ... Branchioma (Branchial Cyst; Branchial Cleft Cyst). A tumor derived from branchial epithelium or branchial rests. (Dorland, 27th ... Detailed information through a personalized searchRanked list of diseases related to "Branchioma"Drugs, active principles and " ...
more infohttps://lookfordiagnosis.com/mesh_info.php?term=Branchioma&lang=1

Branchial Cleft CystBranchial Cleft Cyst

Ontology: Branchioma. (C0006131) Definition (MSH) A tumor derived from branchial epithelium or branchial rests. (Dorland, 27th ... Branchial Cyst, Branchioma, Branchiomas, Cysts, Branchial, Branchial Cleft Cyst, Branchial Cleft Cysts, Cleft Cyst, Branchial, ... Branchioma [Disease/Finding], branchial cleft cyst, Cyst;branchial, cyst branchial cleft, branchial cysts, branchial cleft ... Branchioma (morphologic abnormality), branchial cleft; cyst, cyst; branchial cleft, Cyst of Branchial Cleft, Cyst of the ...
more infohttps://fpnotebook.com/ENT/HemeOnc/BrnchlClftCyst.htm

Application # 2017/0102386. Method for identifying and obtaining activated T-cells that have a
     demethylated Foxp3 TSDR...Application # 2017/0102386. Method for identifying and obtaining activated T-cells that have a demethylated Foxp3 TSDR...

... branchioma; malignant carcinoid syndrome; carcinoid heart disease; carcinoma (for example Walkers carcinoma, basal cell ...
more infohttp://patents.com/us-20170102386.html

Neck Cysts: Background, Problem, EpidemiologyNeck Cysts: Background, Problem, Epidemiology

Martin H, Morfit HM, Ehrlich H. The case for branchiogenic cancer (malignant branchioma). Ann Surg. 1950 Nov. 132(5):867-87. [ ...
more infohttps://emedicine.medscape.com/article/848730-overview

adrenal glandsadrenal glands

Branchioma. 36. + + +. 4. Mucocele. 36. + + +. 5. Bronchogenic Cyst. 35. + + +. 6. Thyroglossal Cyst. 32. + + +. ...
more infohttps://lookfordiagnosis.com/results.php?symptoms=adrenal+glands&lang=1&parent=/1015&mode=H

Department of Radiology - Research Output
     - Penn StateDepartment of Radiology - Research Output - Penn State

Aubert, B., Barate, R., Boutigny, D., Couderc, F., Del Amo Sanchez, P., Gaillard, J. M., Hicheur, A., Karyotakis, Y., Lees, J. P., Poireau, V., Prudent, X., Robbe, P., Tisserand, V., Zghiche, A., Grauges, E., Garra Tico, J., Lopez, L., Martinelli, M., Palano, A., Pappagallo, M. & 1,064 others, Pompili, A., Chen, G. P., Chen, J. C., Qi, N. D., Rong, G., Wang, P., Zhu, Y. S., Eigen, G., Stugu, B., Sun, L., Abrams, G. S., Battaglia, M., Borgland, A. W., Breon, A. B., Brown, D. N., Button-Shafer, J., Cahn, R. N., Charles, E., Clark, A. R., Day, C. T., Furman, M., Gill, M. S., Groysman, Y., Jacobsen, R. G., Kadel, R. W., Kadyk, J. A., Kerth, L. T., Kolomensky, Y. G., Kral, J. F., Kukartsev, G., Leclerc, C., Levi, M. E., Lynch, G., Merchant, A. M., Mir, L. M., Oddone, P. J., Orimoto, T. J., Osipenkov, I. L., Pripstein, M., Roe, N. A., Romosan, A., Ronan, M. T., Shelkov, V. G., Suzuki, A., Tackmann, K., Tanabe, T., Wenzel, W. A., Zisman, M., Barrett, M., Bright-Thomas, P. G., Ford, K. E., Harrison, T. ...
more infohttps://pennstate.pure.elsevier.com/en/organisations/department-of-radiology-2/publications/?type=%2Fdk%2Fatira%2Fpure%2Fresearchoutput%2Fresearchoutputtypes%2Fcontributiontojournal%2Farticle&page=10

Code System ConceptCode System Concept

Branchioma (morphologic abnormality). Code System Preferred Concept Name. Branchioma (morphologic abnormality). Concept Status ...
more infohttps://phinvads.cdc.gov/vads/ViewCodeSystemConcept.action?oid=2.16.840.1.113883.6.96&code=42362005

Rohaizak Muhammad, Prof. Dr. - Research Output
     - The National University of MalaysiaRohaizak Muhammad, Prof. Dr. - Research Output - The National University of Malaysia

Teh, L. K., Mohamed, N. I., Salleh, M. Z., Muhammad, R., Abdullah Suhaimi, S. N., Jasmin, S. J., Shia, J. K. S., Roslan, H., Sood, S., Rajoo, T. S., Muniandy, S. P., Henry, G., Ngow, H. A., Hla U, K. T. & Din, J., Mar 2012, In : AAPS Journal. 14, 1, p. 52-59 8 p.. Research output: Contribution to journal › Article ...
more infohttps://ukm.pure.elsevier.com/en/persons/rohaizak-muhammad/publications/

Efficacy of OK-432 local injection for the treatment of a neonatal branchial cleft cyst: A case report<...Efficacy of OK-432 local injection for the treatment of a neonatal branchial cleft cyst: A case report<...

TY - JOUR. T1 - Efficacy of OK-432 local injection for the treatment of a neonatal branchial cleft cyst. T2 - A case report. AU - Taguchi, Shohei. AU - Tatsuta, Kyousuke. AU - Ieiri, Satoshi. AU - Taguchi, Tomoaki. AU - Suita, Sachiyo. PY - 2005/12. Y1 - 2005/12. N2 - We herein present a case of a neonatal cervical cyst, which was diagnosed prenatally, and markedly decreased in size and disappeared after a local injection therapy of OK-432. A 0-day-old boy had an abnormal prenatal ultrasonography scan suggestive of rt. cervical cyst, measuring about 25 mm in diameter at 29 weeks gestation. At birth, an elastic soft mass, measuring about 30 mm in diameter, was found on the right side of his neck. Computed tomography (CT) scans showed a giant cyst, which extended from the upper level of epipharynx to the upper mediastinum, and the contents were air and fluid. At 20 days of age, ultrasonography (US)-guided needle aspiration was performed. The aspirated fluid contained no epithelial cells, but many ...
more infohttps://kyushu-u.pure.elsevier.com/en/publications/efficacy-of-ok-432-local-injection-for-the-treatment-of-a-neonata

TargetsTargets

Branchioma. 1 , 3 Branchiootic syndrome. 1 , 12 Cardiomegaly. 1 , 116 Cardiomyopathies. 1 , 110 ...
more infohttps://pharos.nih.gov/idg/targets?facet=GO+Process/regulation+of+skeletal+muscle+satellite+cell+proliferation

Recent questions and answers in Synovial Cyst - lookformedical.comRecent questions and answers in Synovial Cyst - lookformedical.com

Branchioma (0) * Breast Cyst (0) * Bronchogenic Cyst (0) * Chalazion (1) * Choledochal Cyst (0) ...
more infohttps://lookformedical.com/answers/en/diseases/neoplasms/cysts/synovial-cyst

Patent US6506559 - Genetic inhibition by double-stranded RNA - Google PatentsPatent US6506559 - Genetic inhibition by double-stranded RNA - Google Patents

... branchioma, malignant carcinoid syndrome, carcinoid heart disease, carcinoma (e.g., Walker, basal cell, basosquamous, Brown- ...
more infohttp://www.google.com/patents/US6506559?dq=7493558

Valium Beta Blockers - Does Valium Stop Seizures In DogsValium Beta Blockers - Does Valium Stop Seizures In Dogs

The branchioma may develop from the various elements. common valium side effects ...
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Therapy and diagnosis of conditions related to telomere length and/or telomerase activity - Board of Regents, The University of...Therapy and diagnosis of conditions related to telomere length and/or telomerase activity - Board of Regents, The University of...

... branchioma, malignant carcinoid syndrome, carcinoid heart disease, carcinoma (e.g., Walker, basal cell, basosquamous, Brown- ...
more infohttp://www.freepatentsonline.com/5707795.html

US Patent Application for METHODS AND COMPOSITIONS FOR DETECTING RARE CELLS FROM A BIOLOGICAL SAMPLE Patent Application ...US Patent Application for METHODS AND COMPOSITIONS FOR DETECTING RARE CELLS FROM A BIOLOGICAL SAMPLE Patent Application ...

Exemplary tumors include hemangioendothelioma, apudoma, choristoma, branchioma, malignant carcinoid syndrome, carcinoid heart ...
more infohttps://patents.justia.com/patent/20080057505

Branchiopadous - definition of branchiopadous by The Free DictionaryBranchiopadous - definition of branchiopadous by The Free Dictionary

Define branchiopadous. branchiopadous synonyms, branchiopadous pronunciation, branchiopadous translation, English dictionary definition of branchiopadous. n. Any of various aquatic crustaceans of the class Branchiopoda, such as the fairy shrimp and the water flea, characterized by a segmented body and...
more infohttp://www.thefreedictionary.com/branchiopadous

NANOCARRIER SYSTEM FOR MICRORNAS AND USES THEREOF - Patent applicationNANOCARRIER SYSTEM FOR MICRORNAS AND USES THEREOF - Patent application

Examples of cancers include but are not limited to solid tumors and leukemias, including: apudoma, choristoma, branchioma, ...
more infohttp://www.patentsencyclopedia.com/app/20160145628

Branchial cyst, branchiogenic cyst, branchiogenous cyst | definition of branchial cyst, branchiogenic cyst, branchiogenous cyst...Branchial cyst, branchiogenic cyst, branchiogenous cyst | definition of branchial cyst, branchiogenic cyst, branchiogenous cyst...

Looking for online definition of branchial cyst, branchiogenic cyst, branchiogenous cyst in the Medical Dictionary? branchial cyst, branchiogenic cyst, branchiogenous cyst explanation free. What is branchial cyst, branchiogenic cyst, branchiogenous cyst? Meaning of branchial cyst, branchiogenic cyst, branchiogenous cyst medical term. What does branchial cyst, branchiogenic cyst, branchiogenous cyst mean?
more infohttps://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/branchial+cyst%2C+branchiogenic+cyst%2C+branchiogenous+cyst

Branchlike | definition of branchlike by Medical dictionaryBranchlike | definition of branchlike by Medical dictionary

Looking for online definition of branchlike in the Medical Dictionary? branchlike explanation free. What is branchlike? Meaning of branchlike medical term. What does branchlike mean?
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Dermoid Cyst | Harvard Catalyst Profiles | Harvard CatalystDermoid Cyst | Harvard Catalyst Profiles | Harvard Catalyst

Funded by the NIH/NCATS Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) program, grant number UL1TR001102, and through institutional support from Harvard University, Harvard Medical School, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston Childrens Hospital, Brigham and Womens Hospital, Massachusetts General Hospital and the Dana Farber Cancer Institute ...
more infohttps://connects.catalyst.harvard.edu/Profiles/display/Concept/Dermoid%20Cyst
  • 6 Protistan Choanoflagellate Source: Freeman (2002) Sponge (Porifera) Water current out of sponge Choanoflagellate cell Sponge feeding cell Food particles Water current Water current into sponge Asymmetrical body plan: brown volcano sponge (Branchioma sp. (sciencedocbox.com)